Certified Environmental Professionals (EP)

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Certified Environmental
Professionals (EP)
Supplying Environmental Assurance to Canada’s
Environment Sector
Table of Contents
Certified Environmental Professional Demographics...............................................................................................4
The History of Environmental Professional (EP) Designation ..................................................................................4
Certification Standards and Processes .....................................................................................................................5
Environmental Professionals - EP .....................................................................................................................6
Specializations for Environmental Auditors – EP(CEA) and EP(EMSLA) ...........................................................6
Specializations for Greenhouse Gas Professionals – EP(GHG) .........................................................................7
Professional Development .......................................................................................................................................7
The Roles ECO Canada, CECAB and the Certification Committees ..........................................................................8
Professional Development Committee ............................................................................................................8
Certification Committee ...................................................................................................................................8
Auditing Certification Sub-Committee .............................................................................................................8
GHG Certification Sub-Committee ...................................................................................................................9
Ethics and Discipline Committee ......................................................................................................................9
The Environmental Professional Code of Ethics and the Disciplinary Process .........................................................9
ISO 17024 Accreditation ...........................................................................................................................................9
Insurance for Certified Environmental Professionals ............................................................................................ 10
Environmental Professional Community Building ................................................................................................. 10
Conclusions ............................................................................................................................................................ 11
Appendix A: Environmental Professional (EP) Designation................................................................................... 12
Appendix B: Breakdown of Certified Environmental Professionals ...................................................................... 13
Appendix B: Breakdown of Certified Environmental Professionals - Continued .................................................. 16
Appendix C: CECAB Board Members ..................................................................................................................... 17
Appendix D: Responsibilities of ECO Canada and CECAB in certification.............................................................. 18
Appendix E: Environmental Professional Code of Ethics....................................................................................... 19
Appendix F: Disciplinary Process Details ............................................................................................................... 21
Appendix G: Errors and Omissions Insurance – Coverage details ......................................................................... 22
Appendix H: Regional Chapter Leads .................................................................................................................... 23
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Certified Environmental Professionals (EPs)
Supplying Environmental Assurance to Canada’s Environment Sector
In the Canadian legal and regulatory framework, professionals and professional bodies play an important role
in protecting the public from danger and the government from liability. Today, we are realizing that our past
and current practices with the environment, in terms of air, land, water quality and more, have a large
potential to put the public at risk, and there is an ever growing need for specific competencies, skills, and
training among people to change this situation. The challenge for qualified people working in this area is that,
at this moment, anyone can call themselves an environmental professional and claim to be able to work
toward beneficial solutions. There is no one designation with strong regulatory support that recognizes the
multi-disciplinary nature of the environmental workforce.
For these reasons it is ECO Canada and the Canadian Environmental Certifications Approvals Board (CECAB)’s
position that people holding the Environmental Professional (EP) designation in the areas of environmental
protection , resources management , environmental compliance auditing (EP(CEA)) environmental
management systems auditing (EP(EMSLA)), and greenhouse gas reporting (EP(GHG)) should be recognized,
among others, as qualified professionals in the regulations that are relevant to their area of practice, both
federally and provincially. To support this statement this paper will outline the following:
To support this statement this paper will outline the following:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
g)
h)
i)
A statistical breakdown of certified Environmental Professionals
History of the Environmental Professional (EP) designation
The professional and industry-established Certification Standards and Process
Professional development
The role of the certification committees
The Environmental Professional Code of Ethics and disciplinary process
ISO 17024 accreditation
Errors & Omissions and General Liability insurance coverage and pre-qualification arrangement for
environmental work offered to Environmental Professionals
Current actions to build the Environmental Professionals community and organization
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Certified Environmental Professional Demographics
As of January 1, 2010 there were 1725 people holding 1928 Environmental Professional titles in Canada. As of
March 16, 2010 there were 1055 certification applications that are in progress that have already completed
enough information to confirm they are eligible for the designation they are seeking. This tremendous increase
in application numbers is a result of a large-scale national marketing effort to grow the Environmental
Professional designation that began in September 2010. As of January 1, 2010, 780 people held full titles and
the remainder held the in-training title.
In regards to educational backgrounds, 84.5% of certified members hold a university degree and the remaining
members hold a college diploma. The predominant areas of study are: environmental science, engineering,
environmental management, law, biology, geography and, environmental technology.
Currently, the top ten employers of certified environmental professional are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Stantec
AMEC Earth & Environmental
Golder Associates Ltd.
Environment Canada
EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
GENIVAR
Alberta Government
SLR Consulting (Canada) Ltd.
University of Toronto
City of Calgary
Please see appendix B for more information related to the current body of certified Environmental
Professionals.
The History of Environmental Professional (EP) Designation
In 1997 the Canadian Environmental Certification Approvals Board (CECAB, the Approvals Board) was
established by ECO Canada to oversee the development and administration of a voluntary certification
program for environmental professionals in Canada. Please see appendix C for a current list of Approvals Board
Members.
ECO Canada established this certification process as a result of the environment industry approaching Human
Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) for assistance to address Human Resources issues which
had the potential of impeding the growth of this dynamic, emerging industry. Documenting national
occupational standards for environmental work was the first step. These standards, developed in consultation
with environmental practitioners and broad environment industry representation, identified the competencies
required to perform environmental work and have become the backbone of the certification process.
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The initial guiding principles of the certification program, that still hold true today are:
• To maintain the highest standards in all of its activities.
• To serve nationally and seek recognition in all provinces.
• To ensure that its certification is consistent with relevant national and international initiatives (i.e. ISO
14000).
• To work in harmony with existing certifying bodies. By maintaining close communication with other
bodies, it would also work to avoid duplication of activities.
• To operate in an efficient, results-oriented and cost-effective manner.
• To be non-profit and self-sustaining.
In 2000, the Certified Canadian Environmental Practitioner (CCEP) designation with the Certified Environmental
Practitioner-in-Training (CEPIT) option was launched.
In 2004 ECO Canada (under the supervision of CECAB) assumed administration and management of auditor and
site assessor certification in Canada from the Auditing Association of Canada (AAC), formerly the Canadian
Environmental Auditing Association (CEAA).
In October 2009 ECO Canada launched the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) certification which is also administered
under the supervision of the Approvals Board and includes certification for GHG Verifiers and Quantifiers.
Today, the Approvals Boards represents key environmental stakeholders from across Canada, and is
responsible for overseeing the certification process, the approval of candidates and the disciplinary process for
the titles:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Environmental Professional in Training - EPt
Environmental Professional - EP
Environmental Professional specialized as an Environmental Compliance Auditor – EP(CEA)
Environmental Professional specialized as an Environmental Management Systems Lead Auditor –
EP(EMSLA)
Environmental Professional specialized as an Environmental Management System Lead Auditor with a
focus in Sustainable Forestry Management – EP(EMSLA)
Environmental Professional-Greenhouse Gas Quantifier - EP(GHG)
Environmental Professional-Greenhouse Gas Verifier - EP(GHG)
Certification Standards and Processes
From its inception the Environmental Professional certification processes have emphasized the importance of
assessing practical competency rather than specific educational pathways. This is exceptionally important in
the environment sector due to the multi-disciplinary nature of the work, and the necessity of the incorporation
of many backgrounds in environmental problem-solving. The standards, certification process and designation
awarded to Environmental Professionals are a complement to education-based credentials such as the ones
held by engineers, biologists, geologists, that highlight individuals’ competencies specifically related to
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environmental work. The designation also supports people with educational backgrounds in the sector that do
not lead directly into one of the current professional bodies; professionals in this situation include:
environmental science, geography and management graduates.
Environmental Professionals - EP
The EP certification is available to environmental professionals with 5 or more years of Canadian environmental
work experience in one of the following areas: Environmental Protection, Conservation and Preservation of
Natural Resources, and Environmental Sustainability. Practitioners with less than 5 years of experience can
receive the in-training version of this designation, the EPt.
Eligible applicants must meet or exceed the criteria identified in the National Occupational Standards (NOS) for
environmental employment. The NOS are a set of competency statements that outline the experience required
by environmental professionals in Canada; they are developed by industry and environmental professionals
and continuously maintained; this development and maintenance is overseen by ECO Canada. The NOS
maintenance, or review, occurs every 5 years in order to ensure that the standards upon which the EP
certification is based accurately reflect the work being undertaken in the Canadian environmental sector.
EP applicants display their competency in relation to the NOS by completing a self-assessment of their
competencies in the specialization of their choice; there are currently 19 possible specializations. While
completing the self-assessment applicants rate their own skills according to their years of experience, level of
experience and the last time a particular competency was performed. The self-assessment is then validated by
three or more of the applicant’s peers who have observed the applicant perform environmental skills over the
course of their career. Peers view the exact same skill statements that were answered by the applicant but only
indicate the level at which they believe the applicant is capable (learning, guidance, independent, or expert).
The results of this review are then compared to the applicant’s responses to see if it meets the required level of
validation for a successful application.
Specializations for Environmental Auditors – EP(CEA) and EP(EMSLA)
The standards for auditing were developed by the Auditing Association of Canada (AAC) and are consistent
with national and international standards for environmental auditors. Applications for auditing titles involve a
full review of an applicant’s training and experience. Once the minimum eligibility requirements have been met
the application is sent to panel review where two trained certified environmental auditors will review your
application to ensure that the competency requirements have been fulfilled. Pending a successful panel review
the applicant is eligible to write the online examination where they must achieve a passing grade of 70%. The
supplementary exam, which is monitored by an eligible proctor, covers:
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•
•
•
•
•
Environmental management systems, standards, and practices
Environmental legislation, regulations, and other requirements
Environmental aspects, impacts and technology
Environmental Professional Code of Ethics for Environmental Auditors
Environmental auditing case studies
Specializations for Greenhouse Gas Professionals – EP(GHG)
The Environmental Professional in GHG Quantification or Verification is overseen by CECAB in addition to a
GHG Certification Sub-Committee. Certifications are awarded based on the evaluation of an individual’s
competency level, in his or her area of expertise, as compared to the NOS. These standards were developed as
a definitive guide of the skills and knowledge required for practitioners to do their jobs within the areas of
Greenhouse Gas Quantification and Verification.
The NOS for Greenhouse Gas Professionals were developed through extensive consultation and validation with
industry experts in Canada and are aligned with the international standards in this field (ISO 14064 parts 1, 2,
and 3, ISO 14065, ISO 14066).
The GHG application process is a combination of that for EP and auditing titles in that it involves eligibility
review, applicant self-assessment and peer validation, GHG sub-committee review (panel review) and an online
examination of their skills and knowledge. The exam, which is monitored by an eligible proctor covers:
•
•
•
•
•
Team leadership
Boundaries
GHG program
Quantification
Data and information auditing
Professional Development
It is important to note that all certified individuals must undergo a 5-year re-certification process where they
must demonstrate ongoing professional practice and development. To successfully re-certify Environmental
Professionals are required to complete a minimum of 90 credits of professional development activities and
professional practice logs to prove they are keeping up with the changing environment industry. Professional
development activities that count towards the requirement can include:
Acceptable professional development activities include:
• Presenting at conferences
• Publishing technical articles in journals
• Instructing either a university or college continuing education course in a relevant subject area, or an
accredited environmental auditing course
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•
•
•
•
Attending, organizing, and/or instructing a company’s internal or external workshop, seminar, or
course on relevant topics
Completing an accredited course
Participating in either graduate education, or in university courses on relevant topics
Attending a conference on a relevant topic
The Roles ECO Canada, CECAB and the Certification Committees
In the process ECO Canada is the certification body for Environmental Professionals. The certification process,
the administrative processes to certify professionals are overseen by CECAB, who also is mandated to deal with
complaints against members when they arise. To see a detailed breakdown of the roles of each organization
please see appendix D.
A number of standing committees and associated sub-committees report to the Approvals Board. The
Approvals Board depends on the volunteer committee members to work to uphold the reputation of CECAB
and the certification process and to make continual improvements. The nine people on CECAB hold final
approval of all changes. Currently there are five main committees and, in total, approximately 75 certified
members serving as volunteers:
Professional Development Committee
The Professional Development Standing Committee develops and implements policies and procedures, as well
as addresses issues, pertaining to CECAB’s requirements and procedures for professional development of
certified members. It is also the role of this committee to maintain and improve processes required to ensure
that certified members are able to maintain and continuously upgrade their environmental competencies
through appropriate and relevant professional development activities.
Certification Committee
The Certification Standing Committee maintains and improves as necessary the process, policies and
procedures used for the certifications offered as well as works to address specific issues pertaining to the EP
and EPt certification programs.
The Certification Standing Committee approves and prepares the recommendations of the Auditing
Certification Sub-committee for submission to CECAB. The Certification Committee will ensure that any
proposed revisions to any of the auditing titles offered do not conflict with existing CECAB policies and
procedures.
Auditing Certification Sub-Committee
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The role of the Auditing Certification Sub-Committee is to develop and propose policies and procedures, as well
as address specific issues, pertaining to CECAB’s certification processes for each auditing specialization. They
will also work to identify market needs and propose to the Approvals Board the creation of other
environmentally-related auditing designation(s), or changes to those currently in existence.
GHG Certification Sub-Committee
The role of the GHG sub-committee is to develop, maintain, improve and propose policies and procedures
pertaining to CECAB’s certification processes for the GHG specializations and other specializations as may be
added to the GHG Certification sub-committee’s scope of operations. They will also be charged with the
application review of eligible candidates and keeping both the Certification Committee and Approvals Board
updated on all types of greenhouse gas work and recommended revisions as needed to the EP(GHG)
certification programs.
Ethics and Discipline Committee
With the approval of CECAB, the Ethics Standing Committee develops and implements policies and procedures,
as well as addresses issues, pertaining to the Environmental Professional Code of Ethics.
The Ethics Standing Committee shall establish and will maintain the value and good name of the Environmental
Professional certifications to the benefit of those who possess them and the general public.
The Environmental Professional Code of Ethics and the Disciplinary Process
All certified environmental professionals are required to abide by the Environmental Professional (EP) Code of
Ethics. The Approvals Board ensures adherence to the EP Code of Ethics in addition to monitoring the
application of disciplinary measures and oversee the professional development of certified members. Please
see appendix E for the contents of the EP Code of Ethics.
There is a strict disciplinary process with clearly detailed procedures should a complaint be filed against a
certified member. The disciplinary process also provides guidelines for disciplinary measures that may be
applied in cases where a certified member is found to have contravened the EP Code of Ethics. Please see
appendix F for more details on this disciplinary process.
ISO 17024 Accreditation
In December 2006 ECO Canada’s certification team obtained ISO 17024 accreditation, the international
standard for Personnel Certification Bodies. This third-party verification of certification policies and
procedures demonstrates that the process abides by international guidelines in the areas of quality
management, (prevention of) conflict of interest, and best practices.
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As ECO Canada continues to grow, accreditation will serve as an important recognition of our commitment to
continual improvement and our ability to meet or exceed the industry standards for certification services.
Insurance for Certified Environmental Professionals
Individuals holding a full Environmental Professional designation in good standing are pre-qualified for General
Liability (GL) and Errors and Omissions (E&O) insurance for environmental work at discounted rates. Currently
certified members do not have to show proof of insurance to receive their designation, but the plan is to make
this a mandatory requirement over time, particularly in situations where regulatory recognition is in question.
The ECO Canada Errors and Omissions (E & O) and General Liability Insurance Programs are underwritten by
ENCON Group Inc. ENCON Group Inc. has been a trusted name in professional liability – E&O insurance – for
many years. As a leading managing general agent in Canada, ENCON offers insurance programs for individuals,
professionals, organizations and businesses, which are available through brokers and plan advisors across the
country.
For more information on the details of this coverage please see appendix G.
Environmental Professional Community Building
In conjunction with the emphasis to increase awareness and certification numbers for the Environmental
Professional designation, there are also new initiatives focused on building the community of Environmental
Professionals in locations across Canada. To this end seven regional chapter leaders have been selected to
build the connections opportunities and recognition of the designation in their province. Please see appendix H
for their biographies. The first annual general meeting of the each chapter of Environmental Professionals will
happen between September 2010 and June 20111 in conjunction with a networking lunch and workshop.
Partnerships with Post-Secondary Institutions
Currently sixteen post-secondary institutions across Canada are integrating Environmental Professional
certification into the environmental programs they offer and ensuring their students are graduating with their
EPt designation. Partnerships such as these are seen as one key way to ensure the growth and recognition of
the environmental profession.
The schools partnering to ensure this growth include the University of Toronto, University of Saskatchewan,
University of Manitoba, Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC), Lakeland College, Southern Alberta Institute of
Technology (SAIT), Cambrian College and Fleming College among others.
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According to Dr. Lee Arthur, Program Head of the Applied Environmental Degree at Lakeland College,
“integrating EPt certification adds significant value to the degree program because uses environmental,
industry-specific skills and competencies as outlined in the National Occupational Standards for Environmental
Employment.” Through EPt certification, students are able to align their educational skills with industry
benchmarks, providing an easier transition into an environmental career.
Conclusions
In conclusion, all certified Environmental Professionals are held to rigorous standards and processes that have
been established by their peers and industry; this has been the case for over ten years. The ongoing
professional practice and professional development requirements for certified members as well as the code of
ethics and established disciplinary process provide a high level of assurance that these individuals can shoulder
the responsibility of being considered qualified professionals in regulation related to their area of
specialization, and the implications that come along with that recognition. It is worth noting, the certification
processes of the Environmental Professionals certified in the auditing and greenhouse gas reporting areas is
slightly different and should be considered separately in the considerations from the more general EP
designation. The ISO 17024 accreditation of the certification process that is used to administer the designation,
as well as the pre-qualification for Errors & Omissions and General Liability insurance coverage for
environmental work and the incorporation of the certification process into Masters level environmental
programs across the country indicates there is a great deal of third –party support and belief in the credibility
of this certification process.
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Appendix A: Environmental Professional (EP) Designation
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Appendix B: Breakdown of Certified Environmental Professionals
Type of Certification
Certification
EPt
EP
EP(CEA) and
EP(EMSLA)
EP(GHG)
Jan 1, 2010
54.8%
27.8%
17.4%
0
Field of Specialization – for Certified EP/EPt
Subsector(s) of Specialization
Water Quality
Restoration and Reclamation
Environmental Protection Management
Land Quality
Human and Environmental Health & Safety
Waste Management
Air Quality
Natural Resources Management
Management for Sustainable Development
Fisheries and Wildlife
Policy and Legislation
Energy
Communication and Public Awareness
Research & Development
Education
Mining
Forestry
Agriculture
Parks and Natural Reserves
Jan 1, 2010
14.7%
11.0%
10.5%
10.4%
8.5%
6.1%
6.0%
4.1%
4.1%
3.9%
3.5%
3.4%
3.4%
3.0%
2.6%
1.9%
1.2%
1.0%
0.7%
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Appendix B: Breakdown of Certified Environmental Professionals - Continued
Geographic Profile
Current Residential Location
Province
Ontario:
Alberta:
British Columbia:
Atlantic Canada:
Quebec:
Manitoba:
Saskatchewan:
Northern Canada:
International:
Unknown
Jan 1, 2010
37.4%
28.5%
15.9%
5.9%
4.9%
2.9%
2.1%
1.6%
0.5%
0.3%
City
Calgary
Toronto
Edmonton
Vancouver
Ottawa
Mississauga
Winnipeg
Victoria
Brampton
Montreal
Jan 1, 2010
296
112
64
54
43
39
38
32
26
22
Language
English
French
Both
Jan 1, 2010
97.6%
1.6%
0.8%
Top 10 Cities of Residence
Language
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Appendix B: Breakdown of Certified Environmental Professionals - Continued
Educational Profile of Certified Members
Highest Level of Education
Highest Level of
Education
University degree
College Diploma
Graduate Degree
Jan 1, 2010
80.1%
15.8%
4.1%
Previous Educational Institutions
The top 10 Canadian referring schools are:
Previous Educational institutions
University of Calgary
University of Toronto
University of Waterloo
University of Guelph
University of Alberta
Royal Roads University
Niagara College
Sir Sanford Fleming College
University of British Columbia
University of Western Ontario
Number of members who attended
January 2010
139
108
101
100
91
63
62
57
54
46
Educational Background
Program of Study
Environmental Science
Engineering
Environmental Management and Law
Biology
Geography
Environmental Technology
Environmental Studies (Arts)
Chemistry
Forestry
Ecology
Geology
Occupational Health and Safety
Land Planning and Reclamation
Agriculture
Water Quality
General Science
Other
January 2010
Number of Members
317
203
149
139
123
98
87
80
44
33
28
28
16
11
9
9
833
Percentage
14.4
9.2
6.8
6.3
5.6
4.4
3.9
3.6
2.0
1.5
1.3
1.3
0.7
0.5
0.4
0.4
37.7
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Appendix B: Breakdown of Certified Environmental Professionals - Continued
Employment Profile of Applicants
Top 10 Organizations
January 2010
Organization Name
Stantec
AMEC Earth & Environmental
Golder Associates Ltd.
Environment Canada
EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd.
GENIVAR
Alberta Government
SLR Consulting (Canada) Ltd.
University of Toronto
City of Calgary
Number of
Members
86
83
55
44
43
35
34
33
29
24
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Appendix C: CECAB Board Members
Representing key environmental stakeholders from across the country, the Canadian Environmental
Certifications Approvals Board (CECAB) is responsible for oversight of the certification process, oversight of the
approval of all candidates and the all actions related to a complaint brought against a certified member.
Victor Nowicki, M.Sc., P.Geo., EP
CECAB Chair
President
ARC Geobac Group Inc., NB
Barton Taylor, B.Sc., EP
CECAB Vice Chair
Owner
Chem Smart Resources, SK
Bob Gill, MNRM, EP
Senior Environmental Specialist
Manitoba Hydro, MB
Jim Knight, P.Eng.
President
Jebresh Environmental Consulting, NB
Lou Locatelli, CET, P. Geo., EP, EP(CEA)
Principal
Church & Trought Inc., ON
Jennifer Silverthorn, Hons. B.Sc., CRSP, EP,
EP(EMSLA)
Environmental Specialist
City of Calgary, AB
Scott Turner, Dip., R.E.T., EP
Community Response Coordinator
Keyera Energy Ltd.
Robert Volkman, Dip., RFT, CRSP, PMP, EP,
EP(EMSLA)
Manager, Audits and Investigations - Forest Practices
Board
President - JEDROC Consulting Services Ltd., BC
Paul Werbiski, M.Sc., EP
Senior Director, Health, Safety and Environment
Direct Energy, ON
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Appendix D: Responsibilities of ECO Canada and CECAB in certification
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Appendix E: Environmental Professional Code of Ethics
I accept the rights, privileges and obligations associated with being granted certification from the Canadian
Environmental Certification Approvals Board (CECAB).
As part of said obligations, and as long as I maintain the CECAB Certification that I have been granted, I agree to
abide by the following CECAB Code of Ethics, which I have read and understood.
CECAB Code of Ethics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Recognize the responsibility for environmental stewardship and protection of the public through the
use of sound scientific practices in the conduct and representation of work undertaken.
Endeavour at all times to enhance the public regard for the certification and the profession.
Conduct all affairs in a manner reflecting the highest ethical standards. Be honest and candid and
perform work with integrity and due care.
Hold in strict confidence, except as required by law, all information concerning the business and affairs
of the employer or client acquired in the course of the professional relationship, and not use this
information for personal gain.
Avoid situations that are explicitly or implicitly in conflict of interest with their employer or client,
without the knowledge and consent of their employer or client. Remain free of any influence, interest,
or relationship that impairs professional judgment, independence, impartiality or objectivity.
Strive to serve the employer and client in a conscientious, diligent and efficient manner.
Be competent, having the skills, knowledge and experience to perform the required work.
Represent qualifications and competencies, or advertise services, only through factual representation
without exaggeration.
Not be associated with any report, statement, or representation known to be false or misleading.
Commit to honest, thorough, and straightforward communication in the performance of professional
duties.
Conduct oneself toward others with fairness and good faith.
Endeavour to continuously improve his/her skills and proficiency through practice, education and
professional development.
Maintain proper regard in all work for the safety and welfare of all persons and for the physical
environment affected by the work.
I understand and accept that failure to comply with the CECAB Code of Ethics as outlined above may result in
the suspension or revocation of my certification. I understand that I must continue to comply with the relevant
provisions of my certification, and I also agree to annually submit certification renewal fees and complete any
required activities to maintain my certification status.
I understand that the certificate provided to me is and will remain the property of CECAB. In the event of
suspension or revocation of my designation for any reason, I agree to return the certificate to CECAB and cease
all claims to the certification title.
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Appendix E: Environmental Professional Code of Ethics - Continued
I agree not to use my certificate or my certification in a misleading manner, including making claims outside the
scope for which my certification has been granted.
I agree not to use my designation in such a manner as to bring CECAB into disrepute and I will not make any
unauthorized statements regarding CECAB or its certification programs.
I understand that anyone who is granted certification and who also belongs to a professional association with
official licensure or right-to-title status in Canada will also be bound by the code of ethics of that organization. I
also understand that the granting of the CECAB certification credential does not relieve me from having to
respect other professional practice requirements in Canada and abroad.
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Appendix F: Disciplinary Process Details
The process used to review a complaint against a certified Environmental Professional is extensive and welldocumented. Below is an excerpt from the “Complaint Investigation and Disciplinary Process” document that
prescribes CECAB’s actions in this situation. The entire document can be made available by request.
--Review of the complaint by the Ethics and Discipline Standing Committee
Taking into account the Secretariat’s Information Package, the Ethics and Discipline Standing Committee will review the complaint to ensure that the
matter is within CECAB’s mandate in that:
·
The complaint alleges a contravention of CECAB’s Code of Ethics; and,
·
The complaint contains sufficient particulars to require an investigation.
The Ethics and Discipline Standing Committee, after deliberation, within 15 business days, shall either
·
Dismiss the complaint, or
·
Decide to investigate the complaint further, or
·
Decide that further investigation is not needed; in such cases where the subject member has indicated that he/she is in agreement
with the complainant.
4.7 Dismissal of the complaint
If the Ethics and Discipline Standing Committee decides to dismiss the complaint, it will send to the Registrar all documentation relevant to the
complaint, along with its written decision with reasons to dismiss the complaint, with instructions to within 5 business days:
·
Inform the Chair of the Approvals Board that the complaint has been dismissed, with reasons to dismiss
·
Inform the Subject member that the complaint has been dismissed, with reasons to dismiss
·
Inform the Complainant that the complaint has been dismissed, with reasons to dismiss, indicating that the decision is final (no
recourse).
4.8 Complaint to be investigated
Within 5 business days of receiving instructions from the Ethics and Discipline Standing
Committee that the complaint should be investigated the Registrar will:
·
Inform the Chair of CECAB’s Approvals Board that the complaint will be investigated
·
Inform the Complainant that his/her complaint will be investigated further and that an Investigating Panel will be appointed. At the
same time, provide the Complainant with a copy of the CECAB’s Complaint Investigation and Discipline process along with
instructions as to what will be expected of the Complainant during future steps
·
Inform the Subject member that the complaint will be investigated further and providehim or her with:
•
Notice of the Ethics and Discipline Committee decision and an outline of the
•
reasons for the further investigation,
•
The names of the eligible persons (see section 5.1 for eligibility) on the
CECAB Roster who could be on the Investigating Panel and informing the Subject member that he/she has the right to request one or more potential
Investigators be excluded, for reasons, and will be given 10 business days to respond.
4.9 Complaint to be settled
Within 5 business days of receiving instructions from the Ethics and Discipline Standing
Committee that the subject member is in agreement with the complainant, the Registrar will:
·
Inform the Chair of the CECAB Approvals Board that a complaint has been lodged and that it will be settled based on the subject
member’s agreement with the facts contained within the original formal complaint that outlined a breach of the relevant Code of
Ethics.
·
Inform the Complainant that his/her complaint will be settled with the subject member, since the facts of the formal complaint are
not being disputed by the subject member, and that the Ethics and Discipline committee will negotiate a settlement arrangement
which will include sanctions against the subject member.
·
Inform the Subject Member that the Investigating Panel will not be formed due to the Subject Member’s agreement with the facts
of the complaint, but that the Ethics and Discipline Committee will determine appropriate sanctions, if any, which shall come into
effect.
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Appendix G: Errors and Omissions Insurance – Coverage details
Errors and Omissions Insurance – Coverage Rates for Certified Members
Coverage
Professional Liability
Limits
$1,000,000 per claim
$1,000,000 Aggregate
$2,000,000 per claim
$2,000,000 Aggregate
$4,000,000 per claim
$4,000,000 Aggregate
$5,000,000 per claim
$5,000,000 Aggregate
Deductible
$1,000
Rating without Pollution
Coverage (for Phase I and II)
$1,000 per member
Rating with Pollution Coverage
(for Phase I and II)
$1,500 per member
$1,000
$1,300 per member
$1,800 per member
$1,000
$1,800 per member
$2,300 per member
$1,000
$2,000 per member
$2,500 per member
PL Endorsements:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
I-2EO Insured Services…duties as Canadian Certified Environmental Practitioner, Greenhouse Gas Professional and an Environmental Auditing Professional and customary to
that practice
T-6EO Terrorism Exclusion
A-10EO Asbestos Liability Bodily Injury Exclusion
E-11IEO Retirement/Death/Disability and Cessation of Business 75%/50%/50%
D-4EO Disciplinary Action-Legal Expenses Coverage $50,000
Z-1EO - Extended Reporting Period: automatic 30 days in the event of non-renewal or cancellation (for other than nonpayment of premium) at no charge
Retro Date will be inception of the policy
E-4EO Engineering Services Exclusion
Pollution Exclusion included in wording
Retro fit exclusion
*****Environmental Consultants with pollution in ENCON’s Architects and Engineers department have a minimum premium of $3,200
1. ENCON will provide an application
2. ENCON will provide a certificate template
3. The broker will administer the program and issue the members certificates
4. New members added after inception will be added as follows: 100% 1st quarter; 75% second quarter and 50% for the third quarter. (MINIMUM PREMIUMS WILL APPLY)
16% Commission applies as the broker will be administering the program.
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Appendix H: Regional Chapter Leads
Darren Brown, B.Sc., MEM, EP – British Columbia Chapter Leader
A graduate of Simon Fraser University’s Bachelor of Biological Sciences and Royal
Roads University’s Masters in Environment and Management, Darren Brown has
been certified as an EP for four years. In his current position as project assessment
officer with the Environmental Assessment Office in British Columbia, Darren is
responsible for facilitating the environmental assessment process and reviewing
certificate applications pursuant to the British Columbia Environmental Assessment Act.
Darren brings a wealth of experience in environmental assessment, regulatory process, and stakeholder
engagement to the BC Chapter. Darren has diverse experience in the sector spanning government and
industry. Darren has developed and chaired environmental committees and managed key aspects of
major capital projects.
His past experience as an environmental scientist with Golder Associates, an environmental coordinator
with the City of Abbotsford and a natural resource specialist with BC Hydro will also contribute to the
chapter’s success by being able to relate to the various perspectives of environmental professionals.
Darren can be reached by email at [email protected]
Craig Robertson, M.Sc., EP, P.Geol., P.Ag. – Alberta Chapter Leader
With a baccalaureate degree from the University of Lethbridge and masters in
Hydrogeology from the University of Alberta, Craig Robertson has been a senior
manager with GENIVAR and predecessor companies for the past 8 years. In his
current role he directs technical and professional staff in the conduct of
contaminant hydrogeological investigations, development of risk management and
remediation strategies and management of facility liabilities for multiple clients in western Canada.
Craig has over 35 years experience in industry, oil & gas, mining, and agriculture. His diversified
responsibilities have included environmental impact assessments, site characterizations, remediation
design, ground water resource development, regional flow studies, irrigation and drainage, research,
education and training. Craig has managed projects involving the application of hydrogeological and
hydrochemical principles related to environmental management and remediation. He has travelled
extensively and been involved in international projects in developing countries.
Craig can be reached by email at [email protected]
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Appendix H: Regional Chapter Leads - Continued
Craig Nomeland, B.A., EPt - Saskatchewan Chapter Leader
A graduate of the University of Saskatchewan, Craig Nomeland has been involved
with ECO Canada since 2008 and is certified in the areas of Communications &
Public Awareness and also Energy. His current position is at the Saskatchewan
Research Council as an energy conservation adviser for the province. This dynamic
role allows him to work closely with cities and towns to assist in reducing the
carbon footprint for municipal buildings.
Craig’s experience in environmental leadership, marketing and planning will contribute to the growth of
the Saskatchewan Chapter. He is looking forward to working with his ECO Canada colleagues to
enhance the visibility of certification, while benefitting from the many professional development and
networking opportunities that ECO Canada provides.
Craig can be reached by email at [email protected]
Barton E. Taylor, B.Sc, EP – Manitoba Chapter Leader
Bart Taylor is a chemist and HazMat specialist with nineteen years’ experience in
the comprehensive management of hazardous materials. His experience has
specifically involved the hands-on management of over 6,500 waste
characterizations and identifications throughout Canada and the United States.
Bart has extensive experience working with provincial and federal regulatory agencies, and continues to
advance his technical and professional skills by participating in several municipal and regional
conferences and organizations. He provides training in Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency
Response, corporately and to several clients in the Canadian and international markets.
Bart’s experience across Canada and reputation within the environmental industry ensures that the
integrity and values of ECO will be maintained for all participants, and will allow for the continued
growth of ECO throughout Canada.
Bart has moved to Envirotec in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan but can still be contacted for all inquiries
regarding ECO Canada’s Manitoba chapter. He can be reached by email at [email protected]
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Appendix H: Regional Chapter Leads - Continued
Keith Clavet, Dip., C.E.T., EP, PMP - Ontario Chapter Leader
A graduate of Fanshawe College in Environmental Technology, Keith Clavet has
been certified as an EP since 2003. In his current position as President at
CarbonEdge, Keith is responsible for the overall leadership and operations of the
organization.
Keith brings a wealth of experience in business development, stewardship, and regulatory compliance to
the Ontario Chapter. He has worked with, and consulted to, a wide range of Fortune 500 companies helping them to achieve high standards of both environmental and business performance across their
operations.
His past experience with the Department of National Defense and the Better Business Bureau will also
contribute to the chapter’s success through his in-depth understanding at developing people, and
maintaining the highest level of business ethics and conduct.
Keith can be reached by email at [email protected]
Tonya Lagrasta, B.A. Hons., EPt – Ontario Chapter Leader
A graduate of York University, Tonya Lagrasta has been an EPt since 2008. In her
current position as Manager of Community Leadership at KPMG Canada, Tonya is
responsible for supporting the implementation of KPMG’s national sustainability
strategy through detailed reporting and supporting the Sustainability Office
Champions, as well as developing and implementing national policies and
guidelines related to community leadership at the national, local and individual level.
Tonya brings experience in strategic planning, corporate communications and community engagement
to the Toronto Chapter. Her programs have helped heighten awareness and participation amongst
various stakeholders, and she will utilize her strong networking abilities to build momentum and
strengthen ECO Canada membership initiatives.
Her past experience in leadership roles and continued commitment to engaging employees and
students, participating in environmental forums and communicating the value of sustainability will also
contribute to the chapter’s success.
To get involved with the Ontario Chapter please send Tonya an email at [email protected]
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Appendix H: Regional Chapter Leads - Continued
Loïc Didillon, M.Sc., EP – Quebec Chapter Leader
Loïc moved to Canada from France in 2003 with a Masters degree in
ecology, biology and environment. Prior to this time he had worked
in the environment sector in France, Switzerland, Guadeloupe, and
Corsica. Since moving to Quebec Loic has worked with the St. Charles
River Basin Council in Quebec City, in mining industry as an
environmental superintendent in Val d'Or, as a biologist at the
Biotechnology Research Institute, and as an environmental advisor in
the Bell Canada Head Office. Loïc currently works with SNC Lavalin.
With this diverse and global experience Loic brings a well-rounded perspective to certified
Environmental Professionals in Quebec, where he is eager to grow the number of people who hold our
nationally recognized designation. His strengths in developing and implementing innovative strategies
and programs will be a great asset to the Quebec Chapter.
Loïc can be reached by email at [email protected]
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