Lockout / Tagout Awareness

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Lockout / Tagout
Awareness
1
Introduction
• Lockout/Tagout (“LOTO”) is a technique used to
prevent energy from being released during the
servicing of equipment. This is accomplished by
placing locks on energy sources prior to starting work.
• People conducting maintenance/repair operations on
machinery and equipment are exposed to possible
injury from the unexpected start-up of the equipment,
or the release of stored energy in the equipment. The
purpose of a Lockout/Tagout program is to prevent
injury to individuals performing repair and
maintenance tasks.
Lockout/Tagout
• The Lockout/Tagout program at USC Upstate
requires the use of specific maintenance
safety procedures to shut down, isolate,
prevent the release of stored energy, and to
bring the equipment back on-line. In addition,
employees will receive training to ensure that
they fully understand the concepts of
lockout/tagout and the methods by which
safety procedures are implemented.
Useful Definitions
•
Authorized employee: An employee who actually locks/tags machines or equipment in order to
perform servicing or maintenance. Examples of Authorized employees are: electricians, plumbers,
energy facility operators, etc. Authorized employees must be trained in the recognition of
hazardous energy sources, the type and magnitude of energy sources in their work area, and the
procedures that are used for energy isolating and control.
•
Affected employee: An affected employee is not qualified to lock/tagout a piece of equipment, but
uses/operates a machine or piece of equipment which may need maintenance or servicing. An
affected employee can also be a person who works in/around an area where equipment may be
locked/tagged out. Examples of an Affected employee are: housekeeping staff, grounds staff,
roofers, office employees, etc.
•
Energy source: Any source of electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, thermal, or
other energy. Energy sources are what makes the piece of equipment or machinery run, move or
operate. Equipment may have a single energy source, or may have many different sources of
energy.
•
Energized: Machines and equipment are energized when they are connected to an energy source,
or they contain residual or stored energy. An example of stored energy could be a steam line. Even
though you may have isolated a section of steam line by closing valves, pressure will remain in the
line until it is properly bled-off.
Useful Definitions
•
Capable of being locked out: A energy-isolating device must be locked-out if it is available on the
piece of equipment you are performing maintenance tasks. An energy-isolating device is
considered capable of being locked out if it:
•
•
•
Is designed with a hasp or other means of attachment to which a lock can be affixed.
Has a locking mechanism built into it.
Can be locked without dismantling, rebuilding, or replacing the energy-isolating device or permanently altering its energy
control capability.
•
Lockout: The placement of a lockout device on an energy-isolating device which ensures that
equipment being controlled cannot be operated until the lockout device is removed.
•
Lockout device: examples include locks, chains, blank flanges and bolted slip blinds. Lock out
devices are used to hold an energy-isolating device in a safe position and to prevent the start-up of
machinery or equipment. Whenever possible a lockout device must be used along with a tagout
device. An example of this is when you lockout a electrical disconnect, you must attach the warning
tag to the lock shackle and then attach both the lock and tag to the disconnect. Never remove a
lockout that does not belong to you.
•
Tagout device: A tag and a nylon tie that is securely fastened to an energy-isolating device to
indicate that the machine cannot be operated until the tagout device is removed. A tag alone will
only serve as a warning device - people can easily remove tags, putting you at risk. Never remove a
tagout that does not belong to you!
Multiple Energy Sources
• Depending on the specific piece of equipment you are servicing or
maintaining, there may be one source of energy to lockout/tagout,
or there could be many sources of energy that must be isolated
before beginning maintenance activities.
• An example of a single source piece of equipment would be an
electrically driven pump motor.
• An example of a multi-source piece of equipment would be a large
boiler that has gas, electrical, and pneumatic energy sources.
• As you can see, it is generally easier to isolate the energy sources
leading to single source piece of equipment when compared to a
multi-source piece of equipment.
Lockout / Tagout Awareness
• Persons servicing
equipment that
could cause injury if
energized should
place a device or
sign like the ones on
the right to notify
others not to
power-on the
equipment.
7
Lockout / Tagout Awareness
• If equipment or
machinery is
switched on while
someone is working
on it, serious injury
could occur to that
person.
8
Overview
If there is a “DO NOT
TOUCH” sign or lockout
device attached to a
piece of equipment,
light switch, electrical
breaker, etc,
then use your head and
DON’T TOUCH IT! The
maintenance
employee’s safety
depends on it!
9
• You may now finish this safety training tutorial
by completing the OSHA Assessment Quiz.
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