Chapter 5 Recruiting and Selecting Employees

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Chapter 5
Recruiting and Selecting Employees
Copyright ©2012 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall
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Chapter 5 Overview
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Matching labor supply and labor demand
Advantages/disadvantages of internal vs.
external recruiting
Selection tools and their legal defensibility
Legal constraints of the hiring process
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HR Supply and Demand
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The Hiring Process
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Three components in hiring process:
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Recruitment
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Sources of recruiting
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Current employees (ILM)
Referrals from current employees
Former employees
Former military
Customers
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Recruitment
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Sources of recruiting (continued)
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Print and radio advertisements
Internet advertising and career sites
Employment agencies
Temporary workers
College recruiting
Social Media
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Recruitment
Evaluating recruiting sources
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 Cost per hire
 Time to fill
 Effectiveness [quality of candidate;
quality of recruiters and process (Rynes)]
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Internal vs. External Recruiting
 External—fresh perspectives
 Learning Curve
 Internal—less costly
 Signals opportunity to workforce
 Already acclimated to org. culture
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Selection Tools
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Letters of recommendation
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Application/biodata forms
Ability tests
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Poor predictors of job performance
*Cognitive [and Physical] ability tests
Work Samples [or probation period]
Honesty tests
Psychological tests
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Selection Tools
Personality tests: The Big FIVE
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Extroversion
Agreeableness
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*Conscientiousness
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Emotional stability
 Openness to experience
_____________________________
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*most highly validated empirically as
predictor of performance across wide
range of jobs [along with cognitive ability]
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HR Faculty Application [6-25-15]
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Review of top 2
predictors of job
performance
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How would you
rate this
candidate?! 
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Selection Tools
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Interviews
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Structured Interviews [legally defensible]
Malos research on same [JAP]
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Selection Tools
 Assessment centers
 Used for upper managerial positions
or other critical jobs [expensive]
 In-basket exercises, leaderless group
activities, other devices
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Drug tests
Reference checks
Background checks [CA legal req’s
Handwriting analysis
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Selection—Applicant Reactions
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Applicant reactions to selection devices
 Prefer job simulations and interviews
 Dislike personality and cognitive
ability tests [but among most valid!]
Manager reaction to selection systems
 Little research
 Prefer devices that are quick, easy to
administer and easy to interpret
 Dislike excessive HR interference
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Legal Issues in Staffing
 Discrimination Defenses:
 Legitimate, non-discriminatory
practices [Disparate treatment]
 Valid selection tools [Adverse impact]
 Affirmative Action obligations
 Negligent Hiring
 Investigate past work-related behavior
via references and background checks
[duty of due care, due diligence]
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Use of Social Media in Staffing
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Six states--California, Delaware, Illinois,
Maryland, Michigan and New Jersey-enacted legislation in 2012 that prohibits
requesting or requiring an employee,
student or applicant to disclose a user name
or password for a personal social media
account. California, Illinois, Maryland, and
Michigan laws apply to employers. California,
Delaware, Michigan and New Jersey have
laws that apply to academic institutions. In
all, fourteen states introduced legislation in
2012 that would restrict employers from
requesting access to social networking
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Use of Social Media in Staffing
[See Case 3, text at page 178]
Six states--California, Delaware,
Illinois, Maryland, Michigan and
New Jersey--enacted legislation in
2012 that prohibits requesting or
requiring an employee, student or
applicant to disclose a user name
or password for a personal social
media account.
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Use of Social Media in Staffing (cont’d)
California
A.B. 1844 [2012]
-Prohibits an employer from requiring or requesting an
employee or applicant for employment to disclose a user
name or password for the purpose of accessing personal
social media in the presence of the employer, or to divulge
any personal social media.
-Prohibits an employer from discharging, disciplining,
threatening to discharge or discipline, or otherwise retaliating
against an employee or applicant for not complying with a
request or demand by a violating employer.
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