EDRD 4408 KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF SECONDARY AND MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION

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EDRD 4408
KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF SECONDARY AND MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION
Fall 2006
I.
COURSE NUMBER/SECTION: EDRD 4408
COURSE TITLE: Understanding the Reader and the Reading Process
II.
INSTRUCTOR:
Name:
Office:
Office Phone:
E-mail:
Office Hours:
Dr. Pam B. Cole
KH 1004
770.423.6351
[email protected]
TBA
III.
CLASS MEETING:
MW XXAM-XXPM, KH XXXX
IV.
TEXT(S):
Weaver, C. (2002). Reading process and practice (3rd ed). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
The following Websites will get you started with class research:
www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dkbrown/index.htmll
www.bilingualbooks.com
http://www.ncte.org
www.readingonline.org,
www.reading.org
http://teacher.scholastic.com
http://suu.edu/faculty/lundd/readingsite/readingresources
http://www.sedl.org/reading
http://readwritethink.org
http://readingonline.org
http://reading.indiana.edu
http://teachers.henrico.k12.va.us/Specialist/fanceslively/reading.htm
http://www.sedl.org/reading/framework/assessment.htm
http://www.balancedreading.com
http://www.ops.org/reading/secondarystrat1.htm
http://www.literacy.uconn.edu/compre.htm
http://www.literacymatters.org/adlit/intro.htm
http://www.greece.k12.ny.us/instruction/ela/6-12/Reading/Reading%20strategies/inferentialreading.htm
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V.
CATALOG DESCRIPTION:
A study of the socio-psycholinguistic foundations of reading and writing for teachers of adolescents.
This course examines language development, reading acquisition, phonemic awareness, word
identification, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension and motivation. It explores historical
perspectives of reading, reading research and theory, and introduces students to a wide range of
instructional practices and curriculum materials that meet the needs of all adolescent learners.
VI.
RATIONALE/PURPOSE:
Mastery of reading skills is basic to successful learning in every school subject. Teacher
candidates can further their training by adding an endorsement in reading to their teaching
certificates. Additionally, an endorsement program in reading will facilitate teacher acquisition of
skills and competencies needed to help students read and understand content material; it will also
aid teachers in identifying reading problems, providing required interventions, and assisting all
students in improving reading skills. A reading endorsement will provide the incentive, as well as
the opportunity, for teacher candidates to become effective teachers of reading and will help them
meet state mandates for highly qualified teachers of reading.
In this course students will acquire a background in reading theory/research and terminology used
in discussing language/reading development. They will develop an understanding of the
sociological, psychological, and linguistical factors that underpin reading acquisition and begin
exploring a wide array of curricula and instructional practices and materials that meet the needs of
a diverse population of adolescent learners.
Conceptional Framework
Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching and Learning
The Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) at Kennesaw State University is committed to
developing expertise among candidates in initial and advanced programs as teachers and
leaders who possess the capability, intent and expertise to facilitate high levels of learning in all
of their students through effective, research-based practices in classroom instruction, and who
enhance the structures that support all learning. To that end, the PTEU fosters the development
of candidates as they progress through stages of growth from novice to proficient to expert and
leader. Within the PTEU conceptual framework, expertise is viewed as a process of continued
development, not an end-state. To be effective, teachers and educational leaders must embrace
the notion that teaching and learning are entwined and that only through the implementation of
validated practices can all students construct meaning and reach high levels of learning. In that
way, candidates are facilitators of the teaching and learning process. Finally, the PTEU
recognizes, values and demonstrates collaborative practices across the college and university
and extends collaboration to the community-at-large. Through this collaboration with
professionals in the university, the public and private schools, parents and other professional
partners, the PTEU meets the ultimate goal of assisting Georgia schools in bringing all students
to high levels of learning.
Knowledge Base: Teacher development is generally recognized as a continuum that includes
four phases: preservice, induction, in-service, renewal (Odell, Huling, and Sweeny, 2000).
Just as Sternberg (1996) believes that the concept of expertise is central to analyzing the
teaching-learning process, the teacher education faculty at KSU believes that the concept of
expertise is central to preparing effective classroom teachers and teacher leaders.
Researchers describe how during the continuum phases teachers progress from being Novices
learning to survive in classrooms toward becoming Experts who have achieved elegance in their
teaching. We, like Sternberg (1998), believe that expertise is not an end-state but a process of
continued development.
Use of Technology: The use of technology is a fast growing facet of education. In this course
the student will use technology as a resource/tool for researching and teaching language arts.
During the microteaching and field experience components of the TOSS program, students will
be expected to demonstrate, document, and justify their use of different types of print and nonprint media to facilitate pupil achievement of lesson objectives. Students will have an opportunity
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to develop skill in using overhead projectors and videotape recording/playback equipment. As
students complete course assignments in this course, as well as in the Team Teaching course
and their other content area, they will utilize many additional facets of instructional technology.
These facets will include electronic bulletin boards, email, the Internet, WEBCT, ERIC, the CDROM data base retrieval system in the library, the multimedia software and courseware,
electronic encyclopedias, and networked software available in the Educational Technology
Training Center. In addition, students will construct their own web pages and some lectures will
utilize PowerPoint and the Internet.
Diversity: A variety of materials and instructional strategies will be employed to meet the needs
of the different learning styles of diverse learners in class. Candidates will gain knowledge as
well as an understanding of differentiated strategies and curricula for providing effective
instruction and assessment within multicultural classrooms. One element of course work is
raising candidate awareness of critical multicultural issues. A second element is to cause
candidates to explore how multiple attributes of multicultural populations influence decisions in
employing specific methods and materials for every student. Among these attributes are age,
disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, geographic region, giftedness, language, race,
religion, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. An emphasis on cognitive style
differences provides a background for the consideration of cultural context.
Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons
defined as disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990. A number of services are available to support students with disabilities
within their academic program. In order to make arrangements for special services, students
must visit the Office of Disabled Student Support Services (ext. 6443) and develop an individual
assistance plan. In some cases, certification of disability is required.
Please be aware and seek out the other supportive and mentoring groups on the campus of
Kennesaw State University that address each of the multicultural variables outlined above.
VII.
COURSE GOALS/OBJECTIVES:
The Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) prepares learning facilitators who understand
their disciplines and principles of pedagogy, who reflect on their practice, and who apply these
understandings to making instructional decisions that foster the success of all learners. The
following grid aligns course objectives with the PTEU Proficiency (documented in the Candidate
Performance Instrument--CPI), NCATE, IRA Professional Reading Standards and NCTE
Professional Standards for the English Language Arts:
Course Objectives
Candidate
Performance
Instrument
(CPI)
NCATE
IRA
Reading
Standards
Demonstrate knowledge
of psychological,
sociological, and linguistic
foundations of reading
and writing processes
and instruction.
Proficiency 1:
Subject Matter
Experts
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 1.1
Demonstrate knowledge
of reading research and
histories of reading.
Proficiency 1:
Subject Matter
Experts
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 1.2
3
NCTE
Professional
Standards for
the ELA
Evidence
Scholar Study
Personal Reading History
WebCT Discussions
Emergent Literacy Profile
Portfolio
Exam
Dimensions Project
Standard 3.7
Scholar Study
Portfolio
Exam
WebCT Discussions
Dimensions Project
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Demonstrate knowledge
of language development
and reading acquisition
and the variations related
to cultural and linguistic
diversity.
Proficiency 1:
Subject Matter
Experts
Demonstrate knowledge
of the major components
of reading (phonemic
awareness, word
identification and phonics,
vocabulary and
background knowledge,
fluency, comprehension
strategies, and
motivation) and how they
are integrated in fluent
reading.
Use instructional
grouping options
(individual, small-group,
whole-class, and
computer-based) as
appropriate for
accomplishing given
purposes.
Use a wide range of
instructional practices,
approaches, and
methods, including
technology-based
practices, for learners at
different stages of
development and from
differing cultural and
linguistic backgrounds.
Use a wide range of
curriculum materials in
effective reading
instruction for learners at
different stages of
reading and writing
development and from
differing cultural and
linguistic backgrounds.
Display positive
dispositions related to
reading and the teaching
of reading.
Proficiency 1:
Subject Matter
Experts
VIII.
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 4:
Diversity
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 1.3
Scholar Study
Personal Reading History
Emergent Literacy Profile
Portfolio
Exam
WebCT Discussions
Dimensions Project
Exam
Emergent Literacy Profile
Portfolio
WebCT Discussions
Dimensions Project
Proficiency 2:
Facilitators of
Learning
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 2.1
Standard 3.3.2
Portfolio
Emergent Literacy Profile
Proficiency 2:
Facilitators of
Learning
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 2.2
Standard 3.3.2
Portfolio
Emergent Literacy Profile
Dimensions Project
Proficiency 2:
Facilitators of
Learning
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 2.3
Standard 3.3.2
3.6.3
Portfolio
Emergent Literacy Profile
Proficiency 3:
Collaborative
Professionals
Standard 1:
Candidate
Knowledge,
Skills &
Dispositions
Standard 5.1
Standard
WebCT Discussions
Standard 1.4
4.0
COURSE REQUIREMENTS/ASSIGNMENTS:
A) Personal Reading History Narrative and Artifacts. Reflect on your own personal reading
experiences and create a “timeline” illustrating your reading development/interests, etc.
Your reflection should include how you learned to read, factors contributing to your progress
and overall attitude toward reading as you matured. You will submit this in the form of a 3-4
page narrative, accompanied by visualsYou may include such things as school pictures,
photos of you involved in a “literacy act,” family photos, pictures of teachers, copies of “school
awards” or other literacy artifacts.
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B) Emergent Literacy Profile You will study an emergent (PK-3) reader’s literacy practices. You
will interact with the child and gather information regarding his/her language and literacy
development. You will compile a 5-section literacy profile notebook (tabbed, table of contents
but no plastic sleeves) on your student. You will share this project with the class. The format
for sharing will be determined later—size of the class and other variables will determine the
method.
Section 1:
You will write a 800-1000 word narrative supported by research that outlines the child’s
literacy experiences. Address the following in this narrative:
Briefly describe your student physically, socially, emotionally and intellectually. (No real
names).
Describe your student’s language development.
Identify the cultural, political, economic, psychologoical, and social factors contributing
to literacy development. Pay particular attention to factors that contributed to success
and/or failure.
Describe your student’s interests and attitudes, primarily those literacy-related.
Have the child read for you. What can you deduce from his/her reading?
Outline the instructional methods used with this child (phonics, basal reader, whole
language, integrated instruction, etc.)
Section 2:
Analyze and evaluate your data—your student’s comments, his/her oral
reading (miscues). You will write a 600-700 word reflection on what you learned about
your student and develop a plan for effective reading instruction for this child. Consider
these questions:
1) What does reading research/histories say about each child’s development?
2) What theories played key roles and why?
3) How did these approaches impact the child?
4) What did you learn from the miscue analysis?
Section 3:
You will compile 15 instructional strategies, (include computer-based strategies and/or
other technology resources) that are “tailored” to your student, briefly explaining
why you chose each strategy. (Include a wide array of activities that address reading,
writing, speaking, thinking, and viewing skills that meet this child’s linguistic,
developmental, and cultural needs.)
Section 4:
Based on your emergent reader’s needs, interests and attitudes, you will compile an
annotated list of 20 Children’s Books—5 for each of the following contents: ELA, MATH,
SS, and SCI.
Section 5:
All raw data, notes, group meeting reflections.
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C) Scholar Study. You will choose a reading scholar to research.The paper (1200-1500 words)
will cover the author’s works, his/her theories and the impact his/her work has on the field of
reading.(This is not a biographical study of the scholar).
D) Dimensions Project/Presentation. You will be assigned to a group to do in-depth reading
about one of the five dimensions of reading: phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency,
vocabulary, and reading comprehension. You will do a short demonstration or lesson that
showcases the dimension. Further details will be given.
E) WebCT Discussions. We will use WebCT in this class, and you will be responsible for
posting and responding to questions. This medium is a place for professional conversations
and should not be used to “vent.” You will show evidence of your performance in this area in
your portfolio. I will provide further details.
F) Portfolio. You will begin in this class developing an online portfolio in which you illustrate your
growth and expertise as a reading teacher. The portfolio will be a “tab” in your student
teaching portfolio. Within this tab, you will compile evidence that illustrates you have met the
goals and objectives of the reading endorsement program (See attached objectives, IRA
Standards and CPI). At the end of the reading endorsement you will write a narrative as a final
reflection of your experience. I will provide further details. It is crucial that you work on this
portfolio “as you move” through the program.
G) Exam. You will take a comprehensive exam during the scheduled exam time. The exam will
focus on assigned readings and class/WebCT discussions/activities. To be successful on the
exam, you should complete all reading assignments and participate in WebCT discussions.
IX.
Evaluation and Grading:
Personal Reading History Narrative and Visual(s) (20 pts.) Due Week 2
Emergent Literacy Profile (35 pts.) Due Week 10
Scholar Study (35 pts.) Due Week 7
Dimension Presentation (20 pts.) Due Week 12
WebCT Discussions (15 pts.) Ongoing
Portfolio (20 pts.) Due Week 15
Exam (55 pts.) Scheduled exam date
Late Work
I will accept late work (with the exception of any class presentations.). However, I do deduct points from
all late work. No exceptions. I consider work late if it is not handed in during the assigned class time.
Each day an assignment is late, the activity will receive a 25% grade reduction per day. (If an
assignment is due on Tuesday, and you turn it in on Thursday, the assignment is two days late.) I do
count Saturday and Sunday. Should you turn in work on the day of class but after class, the work is one
day late.
Please understand that I cannot be responsible for work placed under my door, in my mailbox, or via
email, etc., unless we have a mutual arrangement. I will consider incompletes for extenuating
circumstances. I expect all work to be turned in on time; being absent from class will not serve as an
adequate reason for failing to submit work in a timely manner or for being prepared for class.
Professional Standards for Written Work:
When submitting work, please remember the following professional standards:
secure single sheets of paper—Do not dogear or turn in loose sheets
type/word process all assignments (crisp, clear printout)
no report covers or plastic sleeves
along with your name, please include the date and course # on work
All work should be edited well and complete. Points will be deducted from all work that does not meet
professional standards. Based on my professional judgement, I will either return such work without a
grade and ask you to redo the assignment, or I will assign a low grade.
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Grading Scale:
186 pts. - 200 pts. =A
170 pts. - 185 pts. =B
154 pts. - 169 pts. =C
138 pts. - 153 pts. =D
Below 137 pts. = F
X.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
Every KSU student is responsible for upholding the provisions of the Student Code of Conduct,
as published in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. Section II of the Student Code of
Conduct addresses the University’s policy on academic honesty, including provisions regarding
plagiarism and cheating, unauthorized access to University materials, representation or
falsification of University records or academic work, malicious removal, retention, or
destruction of library materials, malicious/intentional misuse of computer facilities and/or
services, and misuse of student identification cards. Incidents of alleged academic misconduct
will be handled through the established procedures of the University Judiciary Program, which
includes either an “informal” resolution by a faculty member, resulting in a grade adjustment, or
a formal hearing procedure, which may subject a student to the Code of Conduct’s minimum
one semester suspension requirement.
XI.
ATTENDANCE POLICY:
The expectations for attending class are in accordance with the Undergraduate Catalogue. All
students are expected to attend classes in accordance with the scheduled time of the course.
Should you be absent, you are responsible for making up the work missed. In-class activities
and presentations may not be made up.
XII.
COURSE OUTLINE:
What follows is a tentative schedule (subject to change with notice). I have indicated the
dates that readings from your text are due. I may also assign other readings which are
are NOT indicated in the reading schedule. I prefer to leave a bit of reading open until we
see your needs and interests. I will announce them as need arises.
Week 1
Introduction/Syllabus
Defining Reading
Week 2
Reading Theories
Week 3
Have read “A Brief History of Reading Instruction in the United States” (Graves, pp. 1-17)
“The History of Reading Movements in the Twentieth Century” (Dornan, pp. 19-25)
Week 4
Methods of Teaching Reading:
Part-to-whole: Phonics, “Sight” reading, Basal readers
Week 5
Socio-psycholinguistics
Week 6
Development of Language and Literacy
Week 7
Development of Language and Literacy Continued
Week 8
Context, Word Identification, and Constructing Meaning
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Week 9
Word Perception/Phonics Rules, Developing Phonics Knowledge
Conducing Interviews, Analyzing Reading, Miscues
Week 10
Comprehension
Week 11
Vocabulary acquisition
Week 12
Fluency
Week 13
Instructional and grouping practices and strategies
Week 14
Instructional and grouping practices and strategies
Week 15
Special Needs Readers
Motivation—Selections from Lifers and I Won’t Read and You Can’t Make Me.
Week 16
EXAM
XIII.
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Hall.
Burke, J. (2002). Reading reminders: Tools, tips, and techniques. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook.
Burkhardt, R. (2003). Writing for real. Westerville, OH: NMSA.
Calkins, L. 2001). The art of teaching reading. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
Campbell, R. (2004). Phonics naturally, reading and writing for real purposes. Portsmouth, NH:
Heinemann.
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Routman, R. (2002). Reading essentials: The specifics you need to teach reading well. Portsmouth, NH:
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struggling readers. Newark, DE: IRA.
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