................................ English Education Proposal Package Table of Contents

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English Education Proposal Package
Table of Contents
New Course Proposal (ENGL 3310: Principles of Writing Instruction) ....................................................................... 2
Syllabus .................................................................................................................................................................. 6
Course Master Form ............................................................................................................................................. 18
Change in Existing Course (ENED 4414: Teaching English/Language Arts) ............................................................ 19
New Course Proposal (ENED 4415: Teaching of English/Language Arts (7-12) Internship) .................................... 22
Syllabus ................................................................................................................................................................ 26
Course Master Form ............................................................................................................................................. 41
Change in Degree Requirements/Major Program Requirements: ............................................................................... 42
Change in Existing Course: ENED 4475: Student Teaching in English/Language Arts (7-12) ................................ 45
Schedule of Courses in Current Program .................................................................................................................... 47
Schedule of Courses with Proposed Changes .............................................................................................................. 48
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
NEW COURSE (NOT General Education)
Course Prefix/Number/Title ENGL 3310: Principles of Writing Instruction
Department: English
Degree Title (if applicable) English Education
Proposed Effective Date: Fall 2005
Submitted by:
Aaron Levy and Carol Harrell
Faculty Member
September 28, 2004
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved _________________________________________
Department Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved_________________________________________
Professional Teacher Education Unit: Program Area*
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_______________________________________
Department Chair
Date
_______________________________________
Teacher Education Council**
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ________________________________________
College or School Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
________________________________________
College or School Dean
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved _________________________________________
Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________________
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________________
President
Date
*The PTEU Program Area Committee collaborates closely with Department Curriculum Committees.
**Signature required for Teacher Preparation proposals (omit College or School Curriculum Committee).
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[v.1-21-98]
KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
New Course (NOT General Education)
I.
Proposed Information
Course Prefix and Number____ENGL 3310_______________________
Course Title __ Principles of Writing Instruction
Credit Hours ___6-0-6_______________________________
Prerequisites _ENGL 2110 and ENGL 2270_____________________
(Prerequisites are courses or requirements that non-negotiable and must be successfully
completed by any student before enrolling in the course or program under consideration.
Co requisites are courses that can be taken before or in the same semester as the course under
consideration. Courses at the upper-division level will require lower-division competencies
or prerequisites.)
Course Description for the Catalog:
An exploration of current theories of grammar instruction and theories of composition pedagogy and assessment,
including a variety of strategies for teaching writing while dealing with institutional policies, such as standardized
testing; and acquiring grammatical competence in oral and written communication, understanding what grammar
errors reveal about writing, promoting syntactic complexity in writing, and studying grammatical structures that
promote syntactic growth and diversity of style in writing. In a writing workshop environment, students will write
for a variety of purposes and audiences.
II. Justification for Course
A. Explain assessment findings which led to course development.
The teaching of writing is a complex task that should not be broken into isolated elements; however, the current
structure of our program does just that. The teaching of grammar in the context of writing (ENGL 3260) is
completely separated from all other elements (ENGL 3309). This is an artificial separation that goes against
researched best practices (Hillocks, 1986; Nuguchi, 1991; Weaver, 1996; Schuster, 2003), and the integration of the
two courses provides a framework from which to model good writing instruction (including the integration of
teaching grammar into the context of writing), analysis of that instruction, and opportunity for students to
experience and try out best practices in writing instruction.
B. Explain for Prerequisites:
1. What is the substance of content in each prerequisite that commands its inclusion as a
prerequisite to the proposed course?
Because this is an upper-level course, students should have completed several English courses prior to
enrolling in ENGL 3310.
2. What is the desired sequence of prerequisites?
3. What is the rationale for requiring the above sequence of prerequisites?
4. How often are the required prerequisites offered?
Every term
C.
Give any other justification for the course.
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III. Additional Information
A. Where does this course fit sequentially and philosophically within the program of study.
The course is a midpoint course, which implies some level of competence.
B. What efforts have been made to ensure that this course does not duplicate the content of
other college courses with similar titles, purposes, or content?
The courses from which the content will be combined (ENGL 3260, ENGL 3309) to form the proposed
ENGL 3310 will remain in the catalog for a reasonable time allowing students already in the program to have the
option of taking ENGL 3260 and ENGL 3309 separately. As students under the current catalog graduate and we
no longer need to offer ENGL 3260 and ENGL 3309, we will submit the paperwork to delete the two courses
from the catalog.
C. Where will the course be located in the program (elective, required in Area F, required or
elective for the major)? Indicate and justify its placement in the curriculum.
It falls in the Upper-Level English Requirements.
D. How often will this course be offered?
Every term.
E. All sections of the course will be taught with the understanding that the following apply:
SEE ATTACHED SYLLABUS
1. Purpose of the Course
2. Objectives of the Course
3. Course Content
F. What instructional methodologies will be incorporated into the course to stimulate group
process, writing skills, multiculturalism, and educational outcomes?
G. Outline the plan for continuous course assessment. What are the department, school, college,
or professional standards which will be used for the assessment? How will it be determined
that the course is current, meeting the educational needs of students and responsive to
educational standards? How often will the course assessment be done by the department?
H. Enclose a course syllabus (optional format attached)
IV.
Resources and Funding required
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What resources will be redirected to accommodate this course?
None
Explain what items will cause additional cost to the department/school/college
Personnel
Computer Technology
Library resources
Equipment
Space
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I.
ENGLISH 3310: Principles of Writing Instruction. 6-0-6
English Department
Kennesaw State University
Fall 2005
II.
Instructor: Dr. Aaron Levy
Office English Building (HU) 059
Office Hours: M/W 1:45 – 3:30, T, Th 11:45 – 12:30
Office telephone: 770/423-6132
e-mail: [email protected]
III.
Class Sessions: Mon/Wed 3:30-6:15 in HU 251
IV.
Texts:
Blasingame, Jim and John H. Bushman. Teaching Writing in Middle and Secondary Schools. New Jersey:
Pearson Education , Inc., 2005.
Romano, Tom. Writing with Passion: Life Stories, Multiple Genres. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1995.
Nelson, G. Lynn. Writing and Being. 2004
Noden, Harry R. Image Grammar: Using Grammatical Structures to Teach Writing. Portsmouth, NH:
Heinemann, 1999.
*** We will be making copies of our writing for the class on a weekly basis.
**** A JOURNAL
*Supplemental readings from various English/Language Arts journals and books.
V.
Catalog Course Description: Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 and ENGL 2270. An exploration of current theories of
grammar instruction and theories of composition pedagogy and assessment, including a variety of strategies for
teaching writing while dealing with institutional policies, such as standardized testing; and acquiring grammatical
competence in oral and written communication, understanding what grammar errors reveal about writing,
promoting syntactic complexity in writing, and studying grammatical structures that promote syntactic growth and
diversity of style in writing. In a writing workshop environment, students will write for a variety of purposes and
audiences.
VI.
Purpose/Rationale:
Conceptual Framework Summary:
COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF EXPERTISE IN
TEACHING AND LEARNING
The Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) at Kennesaw State University is committed to developing
expertise among candidates in initial and advanced programs as teachers and leaders who possess the capability,
intent and expertise to facilitate high levels of learning in all of their students through effective, research-based
practices in classroom instruction, and who enhance the structures that support all learning. To that end, the PTEU
fosters the development of candidates as they progress through stages of growth from novice to proficient to expert
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and leader. Within the PTEU conceptual framework, expertise is viewed as a process of continued development,
not an end-state. To be effective, teachers and educational leaders must embrace the notion that teaching and
learning are entwined and that only through the implementation of validated practices can all students construct
meaning and reach high levels of learning. In that way, candidates are facilitators of the teaching and learning
process. Finally, the PTEU recognizes, values and demonstrates collaborative practices across the college and
university and extends collaboration to the community-at-large. Through this collaboration with professionals in
the university, the public and private schools, parents and other professional partners, the PTEU meets the ultimate
goal of assisting Georgia schools in bringing all students to high levels of learning.
Knowledge Base:
Teacher development is generally recognized as a continuum that includes four phases: preservice, induction, inservice, renewal (Odell, Huling, and Sweeny, 2000). Just as Sternberg (1996) believes that the concept of expertise
is central to analyzing the teaching-learning process, the teacher education faculty at KSU believes that the
concept of expertise is central to preparing effective classroom teachers and teacher leaders. Researchers describe
how during the continuum phases teachers progress from being Novices learning to survive in classrooms toward
becoming Experts who have achieved elegance in their teaching. We, like Sternberg (1998), believe that expertise
is not an end-state but a process of continued development.
To help prepare teacher education students to become professional teachers, the ENGL 3309 class will explore the
goals, objectives, and content of composition instruction in secondary English/Language Arts courses as they are
being constructed in both theory and practice among leading professionals today. In our own classroom, we will
observe and practice strategies for the selection of teaching materials, the design and implementation of
instructional plans, and the ongoing assessment of learning. We will review key elements in the content of
English/LA 7-12 courses in Georgia as reflected in the QCC objectives and in the national standards for
English/LA content as defined by NCTE and IRA. To create a theoretical foundation for our teaching, we will
examine current definitions of "composition" as a part of "English" instruction, and we will consider the
sometimes conflicting models for language and composition learning that result from different conceptions of our
field.
Our inquiry will be critical in that we will seek to uncover underlying assumptions about language and learning, as
well as strengths and weaknesses in current approaches to writing instruction; collaborative in that we will teach
and learn together; and practical in that we will constantly ask ourselves "what works in the 'real' world classroom"
as well as why and how it works.
Use of Technology: Students in ENGL 3309 are expected to develop a working knowledge of technology. This
will include use of simple machines like the overhead, the VCR, and some demonstration of the ability to
effectively use the chalkboard. In addition, students are expected to be adept at computer use appropriate for the
course (e.g. e-mail, word processing, website construction). In all cases, the use of any technology should be in
support of learning.
Diversity Statement: A variety of materials and instructional strategies will be employed to meet the needs of the
different learning styles of diverse learners in class. Candidates will gain knowledge as well as an understanding
of differentiated strategies and curricula for providing effective instruction and assessment within multicultural
classrooms. One element of course work is raising candidate awareness of critical multicultural issues. A second
element is to cause candidates to explore how multiple attributes of multicultural populations influence decisions
in employing specific methods and materials for every student. Among these attributes are age, disability,
ethnicity, family structure, gender, geographic region, giftedness, language, race, religion, sexual
orientation, and socioeconomic status. An emphasis on cognitive style differences provides a background for
the consideration of cultural context.
Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons defined as
disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
A number of services are available to support students with disabilities within their academic program. In
order to make arrangements for special services, students must visit the Office of Disabled Student Support
Services (ext. 6443) and develop an individual assistance plan. In some cases, certification of disability is
required.
Please be aware there are other support/mentor groups on the campus of Kennesaw State University that address
each of the multicultural variables outlined above.
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VII.
Course Goals/Objectives:
The KSU teacher preparation faculty is strongly committed to the concept of teacher preparation as a
developmental and collaborative process. Research for the past 25 years has described this process in increasingly
complex terms. Universities and schools must work together to successfully prepare teachers who are capable of
developing successful learners in today’s schools and who choose to continue their professional development.
All of the learning activities (readings, class discussions, lectures, projects, homework) are designed to help you
achieve interrelated objectives and goals drawn from the Kennesaw Secondary Education Program Committee's
objectives modeled from NCTE's Standards for the Preparations of Teachers of English/LA. These objectives and
goals also reflect the function of the course as a bridge between discipline-centered and professional education
courses that introduce concepts and practices early in the program and the student teaching experience at its close.
Students will
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
Develop as reflective teachers, and in their consideration of teaching as a collaborative effort.
Develop an informed, research-based understanding and application of current philosophies, practices, and
theories about
a. the teaching of writing, with an emphasis on the workshop model,
b. the developmental aspect of learning in English and in the concepts that guide writing instruction
Integrate multimedia/technology in the teaching of writing.
Develop the concept of “reading like a writer and writing like a reader” by using reading to guide students to think
about language structure first in others’ writing and then in their own, thus viewing reading and writing as
reciprocal, informed processes.
Design stimulating instructional curriculum that incorporates setting and evaluating teaching goals and objectives
with a focus on “super-objectives” that connect to the emerging individual, research-based pedagogical
philosophies.
Explore ways to integrate reading, writing, speaking, listening skills.
Experience models of the writing workshop in practice, and evaluate effectiveness of the pedagogical type as
training for the development of the lifelong habit of critical thinking and judgment.
Experience, design, and implement mini-lessons.
Demonstrate a concern for individual differences in the English/LA classroom, including a respect for language
and dialect varieties and the conviction that teachers can help all students grow in their ability to effectively use
language.
Understand the power structures embedded in language and how mastering conventions signals authority and
power for writers (readers [audience] respond more positively and more openly).
Develop as writers (thinking of themselves as "real" writers--not just of writing as academic exercise), improving
writing skills in the areas of content, organization, syntax, style/voice, word choice/semantics, sentence fluency,
and usage.
Develop, through actual writing experiences, as writers using all modes of discourse: description, narration,
memoir, fiction, creative, critical analysis, expository, argument/persuasion, research, multi-genre, and writing
across the curriculum.
Demonstrate mastery of grammatical structures and standard usage conventions in their writing.
Practice responding to and leading students to mastery of grammatical structures and standard usage conventions.
Develop pedagogical strategies to effectively lead students to mastery of grammatical structures and standard
usage conventions.
Write for publication!
Develop playful, innovative, metaphorical, dramatic methods for writing instruction
Apply various evaluation instruments for writing including both their uses and potential abuses—including
traditional and alternative assessments such as portfolios, asking questions to elicit a variety of responses and
inferences as well as facts, ways to respond constructively (responding rather than just evaluating) and promptly to
student work, approaches to integrate assessment with instruction, and ways to interpret student progress to parents
and to the administration.
Explore a variety of secondary composition texts to determine content usefulness in the writing curriculum.
Course Objective
1. Develop as reflective,
collaborative teachers
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CPI Outcome(s)
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
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Course Requirement
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
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2. Develop understanding
pedagogical and methodological
research in the teaching of
writing/grammar
3. Integrate multimedia technology
in the teaching of writing
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3
4. Develop the concept of “reading
like a writer and writing like a
reading”
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5,
3.1, 3.2
5. Design stimulating instructional
curriculum
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1
6. Explore ways to integrate ELA:
reading, writing, speaking,
listening, and viewing
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5,
3.1
7. Experience workshop
environment and evaluate its
pedagogical and methodological
effectiveness
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
8. Experience, design, and
implement mini-lessons
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5,
3.1
9. Demonstrate a concern for
individual differences, and help
student grow in their ability to
effectively use language
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5,
3.1, 3.3
10. Understand the power structures
embedded in language
1.1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 3.2, 3.3
11. Develop as writers: content,
organization, syntax, style, word
choice/semantics, fluency, and
usage
1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.5, 3.2
12. Develop as writers: modes of
discourse
1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.5, 3.2
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1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.4
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First-Day “Thang”
Group Mini-lesson
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCt
Multigenre Paper
Individual and Group Mini-lesson
Exam/Paper
Discussion CirclesWebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Mini-lessons
Multigenre Paper
Tutor/Reflective Practice
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Mini-lessons
First-Day “Thang”
Personal Literacy Paper
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
First-Day “Thang”
Multigenre Paper
Personal Literacy Paper
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
First-Day “Thang”
Multigenre Paper
All writing
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Mini-lessons
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/Web/CT
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Personal Literacy Paper
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Multigenre Paper
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13. Demonstrate mastery of
grammatical structures
1.1
14. Practice responding to and
leading students to mastery of
grammatical structures and
conventions
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5,
3.1, 3.2, 3.3
15. Develop pedagogical strategies
to lead students to mastery of
grammatical structures and
conventions
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5
16. Write for publication
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.3, 2.5, 3.1, 3.2,
3.3
17. Develop innovative and dramatic
methods of writing
1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.5, 3.1
18. Apply various assessment and
evaluation instruments
2.3, 2.5, 3.1, 3.3
19. Explore a variety of secondary
writing texts to determine their
effectiveness in the secondary
curriculum
1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.5, 3.1,
3.3
XIII.
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Mimi lessons
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Minilessons
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Minilessons
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Multigenre Paper
First-Day “Thang”
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Rough Draft Pages
Multigenre Paper
Exam/Paper
Discussion Circles/WebCT
Personal Literacy Paper
Mimi-lessons
Course Requirements:
1.
2.
Discussion Circles (See Appendix I) For reading assignments, you will be responsible to your group as
either the Discussion Leader, the Passage Finder, the Illustrator, or the Connector. Sometimes we will do a
more informal Discussion Circle because we’ve posted on Web CT.
Web CT Postings – Once you have read a particular reading for this class, find the section on the discussion
board and post a response about the reading. Depending on the reading, you will respond to it as a writer
looking at writing and as a future teacher considering the content introduced in the article or chapter(s). These
postings are NOT meant to test your reading, rather a way for you to take the readings, analyze them and
synthesize the content and/or style in such a way that it’s meaningful. So you can agree with the content,
disagree, both, but your postings should indicate thorough and insightful thinking and not just regurgitation.
That being said, it’s important to quote and/or paraphrase (even offer page numbers) of particular sections that
stick out to you or motivate your actual response in some fashion. You are required to make one healthy
response per reading, however, you are encouraged to read other responses and feel free to respond to one that
you can’t help responding to. This could be a response you really agree with and/or one you oppose. Remember
to be respectful at all times regardless. This reading of other responses and/or responding will build a
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community that it crucial to the success of this class and of your future as writing instructors. This will be
clearer as the course proceeds.
3. Individual Mini-lesson: This presentation will be between 5 and 10 minutes on one assigned element of
grammar or mechanics within the context of teaching writing. This will be informed and inspired by the
pedagogical and methodological research that strongly suggests not teaching this material in isolation. This
assignment will allow you to experience the creation and implementation of a lesson that incorporates both
grammar and writing instruction as one entity. Follow the direction for the group mini-lesson.
4. Group Extended Mini-lesson: The group teach should be a 15 - 30 minute lesson on one of the assigned topics
of syntax, style/voice/word choice/semantics, sentence fluency, and usage. In planning your presentation, use a
variety of sources other than the texts or handouts. I recommend that you make use of THE ENGLISH
JOURNAL, VOICES FROM THE MIDDLE, NOTES PLUS, IDEAS PLUS, or anything else you can get your
hands on. The teaching activity(ies) should build on or complement the reading in the texts.
Before beginning your presentation, please give me a detailed lesson plan for your lesson (See Appendix
IV). In the lesson plan, be sure to describe how you will or (if there’s not enough time) would evaluate your
students’ mastery of the material presented in your lesson. Also specify to the class what grade and ability level
your activity(ies) is planned for. If you use any small group activities, be sure to use written directions. Also,
if you use handouts (please do), please provide enough for everyone in the class, and be sure to document your
source on the handout(s). Your group teaching should be student-centered and reflect the good practices
discussed and illustrated in the texts. Your lesson will be graded on the following criteria:
1.
2.
Lesson Plan
Teaching
 Organization
 Evaluation
 Presentation
 Content
20%
80%
20%
20%
20%
20%
Your individual grade will consist of two parts. My overall grade for the group using the above criteria
will count for 50% of your grade. The other 50% of your grade will come from the grade that each of your
group members gives you as well as the grade you give yourself. This grade will be based on your
participation in the group's preparation as well as your part of the presentation. Each member of the group's
grade for you will count the same as your grade for yourself.
5.
Multigenre Paper: This paper is a multilayered, multivoiced literary experience. Genres of narrative thinking
require writers to make an imaginative leap melding the factual with the imaginative. Writer can’t just tell;
they must show. They must make their topics palpable; they must penetrate experience. In this paper you will
select a topic or area of research and develop a text that contains more than just a regurgitation of facts. You
will provide a factual word picture for your audience. This is a research-intensive assignment, but it provides
a forum for you to become personally invested in the process and presentation to your audience. Careful
attention to Noden’s grammatical and stylistic material is required.
6.
Final Portfolio – This needs to be a physical and electronic portfolio. Initially, it will be a writing portfolio.
You’ll need to keep everything! In other words, this portfolio will house your “final” drafts, sure, but it also
will be a place that demonstrates “process” because you will keep your drafts – from your first journal entry to
your last draft. If you are left-brained challenged like me, you will start now. You will keep everything
organized by assignment. Do this electronically as well. By the time you begin to construct your final
portfolio to hand-in, you will discover that it will also be an extremely valuable teaching portfolio. So you’ll
want to keep all assignment direction sheets, examples, and thank you notes to add to this portfolio. In other
words, keep everything! See also grading rubric in Appendix III.
7.
Final Exam/Paper: You will turn in a paper (minimum of four pages) in which you will discuss in some
detail how you will teach composition and grammar in your classroom. (See Appendix II.) The paper should
be written using the MLA style manual as a guide and will be evaluated on the following criteria:
Ideas/Content
Organization
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30%
25%
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Style/Voice
Word Choice
Sentence Fluency
Conventions
15%
10%
10%
10%
*See Appendix II for a detailed breakdown of these criteria.
8.
Tutoring/Reflective Practice: Each of you will be required to do at least 10 hours of tutoring in the Writing
Center (HU 242) over the course of the class. This will allow you to apply the methods discussed in the course
through tutoring students in Freshman English courses and KSU students in general. The first three - five hours
will be training conducted in the Writing Center. The next five - seven hours will consist of you doing one-onone tutoring of students in the Writing Center. Feel free to work more than the required ten hours if you would
like. Keep a log of your tutoring hours as a record and have Dr. Barrier sign it. To schedule your five hours of
training, contact Dr. Barrier in the Writing Center at (770) 423-6380 or e-mail him at: [email protected]
For your tutoring experience, you are required to keep a reflective practice journal about the experience. Your
journal will consist of three entries: The first due after your first three hours of tutoring, your second after the
next three hours, and the last journal after the final four hours. This means that you should break your tutoring
schedule into at least three sessions rather than one or two marathon sessions. Your journals should be a
reflection on your thoughts and feelings about being a tutor, your observations about the students who come for
tutoring and the problems they bring, and any other thoughts or reflections you have about the experience.
Each of the three entries should be at least two pages and should be e-mailed to me at: [email protected]
9.
IX.
First-Day “Thang”: Create and workshop a potential first-day presentation that feature a piece of your own
writing and the subsequent performance of the writing in the context of the first day of class. This piece should
resonate and represent and foreshadow in an entertaining, attention-getting way the class theme. You will use
the class as a mock audience and perform the piece.
Evaluation and Grading:
Class Activities
% of
Total
Grade
30%
Course Objectives
Discussion Circles, Web CT
1-19
Postings, Mics.
Writings/Readings, Mimilessons
Attendance/Participation,
10%
1, 3-6, 10-12, 16, 17
Tutoring hours, First-Day
“Thang”
Physical and Electronic
40%
1-19
Writing/Teaching portfolio,
Mulit-Genre Paper
Final Exam/Paper ,
20%
1-19
Evidence Portfolio
A = 100-90, B = 89-80, C = 79-70, D = 69 – 60, F = 59-0
XIII Academic Honesty:
Please see the current undergraduate catalog for the KSU policy on academic honesty. Students are responsible for
reviewing and understanding the policy.
IX.
Attendance Policy:
Because so much of your learning depends on the in-class activities, you must attend class on a regular basis to
receive credit for the course. You will be given attendance/participation credit for each class you attend.
Consequently, you will lose points for absences. If you miss more than 10% (3 or more) of classes, your grade will
be dropped one letter grade. If you miss more than four classes, you will fail this course. There is no distinguishing
between “excused” and “unexcused” absences, except for extreme situations, so please factor in things like travel
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plans, holiday, and other obligations. Let me be absolutely clear here: you cannot pass this course if you miss
more than four (4) class meetings, regardless of the reason for your absence.
A student is chronically late to class, leaves, early, or is not prepared to participate in the day’s work will not receive
attendance and participation credit. Because you will receive credit for class participation, more than two absences
will affect your grade.
Policy on Late or Missed Work
Late work will receive a grade of an F. Late homework, drafts, and in-class assignments will not be accepted.
However, if you are having trouble completing an assignment, make an appointment with me or stop by my office
hours and/or email me. Permission to turn in a late assignment without being penalized will be given rarely and only
as a result of a conference with me (and never on the day the assignment is due). Because you must turn all major
assignments in order to pass this course, you must turn in a paper even though it is late and may receive an F.
NOTE: If you are absent, you are still responsible to find out what you missed from a classmate and to come to the
next class prepared as if you never missed the previous class. If you are unprepared for the next class, your
assignments will not be accepted late. You will be given many opportunities to know your classmates early in the
semester (lots of group work), so make sure you get several students’ contact information.
NOTE: If you find it difficult to adhere to the absence and late work policy at this point in your life, you may be too
busy with outside commitments to take this course this semester. This is okay and better to discover now. Please
make arrangements to take the course when you are able to dedicate the proper amount of time and energy to it.
Cell Phones and other things that are rude: If you need to have your cell phone on during class to where we can
hear it and you answer it, you are probably too important to take this class at this stage in the game. If you decide to
leave your cell phone on and it rings, I have the right to answer it during class. Please, turn all things that ring and
beep off before you come to class.
X.
Course Outline:
NOTE: I will be giving you articles to read as we go along. These are newer pieces that speak to the latest in
pedagogy and methodology and other issues in writing instruction. We also will be doing the work of writers – we
will be writers. Subsequently, because writing is not an exact science, I will also adjust the schedule accordingly as I
best see fit. So, remember, this reading AND writing schedule is very much subject to change.
Week 1
Read Craig Vetter art.
Levy article – First Day/First Impressions
Writing: Who am I - epigraph
Shoes monologue and impressions
Introductions
Read Nelson YAWP art. and Warrior with Words
Blasingame Ch. 1
Romano – Prologue, Ch. 1
Logo – Feather Circle (FC)
Journal – half hour a day - Can you do it?
Read Blasingame ch.3
Romano Ch. 2,3
Wiley Art.
Introduce Workshop
Word Photos – Workshop (WS) copies for group
Thank You Notes – at least 8
Read Romano Ch. 4-6
Nelson Ch. 9 Autobiographical Poem
I Remember piece - WS
I Remember and one Word Photo – FC
Read Romano Ch. 7-8
Blasingame Ch. 4
Autobiographical Poem WS
Autobiographical Piece FC
Read Osborne article
Blasingame Ch. 5
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
Week 6
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Story article
Multi-genre piece (a) WS
Multi-Genre piece FC
Read Dissertation pages about State Standards
Levy final dr. English Journal article
Blasingame Ch. 6
Multi-Genre piece (b) WS
So Much Depends piece FC – Multi-Genre option
Read Romano Ch. 9
Blasingame Ch. 7
Emotional Task – story/essay WS
Emotional Task – story/essay (1 passage) FC
Read Sparks article
Romano Ch. 10
Noden Ch 1-2
Emotional Task Essay Final Due – copies for
practice grading for group – Six Trait
Hope and Hell (WS)
Hope and Hell - FC
Read Romano Ch. 11 & Appendix A, B, C, D
Noden Ch. 3-5
Nature WS
Nature FC
Read Nelson Introduction & Heart Scars
Blasingame Part III
Noden 6-7
Heart Scars WS
Heart Scars FC
Reach Nelson Ch. 1,2 & 4
Grammar Articles
I Am From WS
I Am From FC
Read Nelson Ch. 5, 6
Multi-Genre Packet - Romano
Revised Final Drafts due to hand in
Final Exam Rough dr. due
Metaphor WS
Read Noden Ch. 8
Multi-Genre Papers
Rehearse Workshop First Day Thang
Wrap-up
Week 7
Week 8
Week 9
Week 10
Week 11
Week 12
Week 13
Week 14
Week 15
XI.
Appendix I: Discussion Circles
1.
Discussion Director: Your job is to develop a list of questions (at least 10) that your group might want to
discuss about today’s reading. Don’t worry about the small details; your task is to help people talk over the
big ideas in the reading and share reactions. Usually the best discussion questions come from your own
thoughts, feelings, and concerns as you read. You will start the discussion and make sure the discussion stays
on track.
2.
Passage Master: Your job is to locate a few special sections of the reading the group should look back on.
The idea is to help people notice the most interesting, funny, puzzling, or important sections of the text. You
decide which passages or paragraphs are worth reviewing and then jot plans for how they should be shared
with the group. You can read passages aloud yourself, ask someone else to read them, or have people read
them silently and then discuss.
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Location
1. Page
Paragraph
Reason for Picking
Plan for Reading
2. Page
Paragraph
3. Page
Paragraph
4. Page
Paragraph
5. Page
Paragraph
**Feel free to cite more than five (5) important passages.
3.
4.
1.
Illustrator: Your job is to draw some kind of picture related to the reading. It can be a sketch, cartoon,
diagram, flow chart, or stick figure scene. You can draw pictures of things discussed specifically in the
readings, or something that conveys any idea or feeling you got from the reading. Any kind of drawing or
graphic is okay – you can even label things with words if that helps.
Presentation Plan: When the Discussion Director invites your participation, you may show your picture(s)
without comment to the others in the group. One at a time, they get to speculate what your picture(s) means,
to connect the drawing to their own ideas about the reading. After everyone has had a say, you get the last
word: tell them what your picture(s) means, where it came from, or what it represents to you.
CONNECTOR: Your job is to find connections between the material being read and the real-world
classroom. Your reflective reading journals will be graded on how well you connect the reading to 1). your
own education and 2). how you plan to teach. These connections can be positive or negative. If you believe
that the way you were taught was superior to the styles advocated in the reading, then explain what the
differences are and why your teachers' style(s) are superior. If you plan to teach very differently from the way
the texts advocate, then explain how and why you will teach this way. If you agree with the methodology
promoted in the reading, then discuss how it differed from or was similar to the ways you were taught and
why this new methodology is superior. If you plan to use the approaches outlined in the texts, explain which
ideas you will use and why you will use them. Your response may be a mixture of agreement and
disagreement with the texts concerning your education and your teaching. No matter how you respond
DISCUSS WHAT YOU LIKE AND DISLIKE ABOUT THE READINGS AND WHY YOU FEEL THIS
WAY. ALSO, BE SURE TO DISCUSS ANY QUESTIONS YOU HAVE ABOUT THE MATERIAL AND
PHILOSOPHIES PRESENTED. (Length 2- 4 pages typed).
Bibliography:
Applebee, Arthur N. WRITING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL: ENGLISH AND THE CONTENT AREAS. NCTE
Research Report No. 21. Urbana, IL: National Council Teachers of English, 1982.
Atwell, Nancie. IN THE MIDDLE: WRITING, READING, AND LEARNING WITH ADOLESCENTS. Portsmouth, NH:
Heineman, 1987.
---. In the Middle: New Understandings about Writing, Reading, and Learning. 2nd ed. Portsmouth, NH: Heineman, 1998.
Bissex, Glenda L., and Richard H. Bullock. SEEING FOR OURSELVES; CASE-STUDY RESEARCH BY TEACHERS OF
WRITING. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1987.
Britton, James. LANGUAGE AND LEARNING. Harmondsworth, England: Penguin, 1970.
---. PROSPECT AND RETROSPECT: SELECTED ESSAYS OF JAMES BRITTON. ed. Gordon M. Pradl. Upper Montclair,
NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1982.
Briton, James, Tony Burgess, Nancey Martin, Alex McLeod Harold Rosen. THE DEVELOPMENT OF WRITING ABILITIES
(11-18). London: Macmillan Education, 1975.
Butler, Sydney and Roy Bentley. LIFEWRITING: LEARNING THROUGH PERSONAL NARRATIVE. Toronto: Pippin
Publishing, 2001.
Burke, Jim. WRITING REMINDERS: TOOLS, TIPS, AND TECHNIQUES. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2003.
Caulkins, Lucy McCormick. LESSONS FROM A CHILD. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1983.
---. THE ART OF TEACHING WRITING. new edition. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1994.
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Childers, Pamela B., Hobson, Eric H., and Joan A. Mullin. ARTICULATING: TEACHING WRITING IN A VISUAL
WORLD. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1998.
Cooper, Charles R., and Lee Odell, eds. RESEARCH ON COMPOSING: POINTS OF DEPARTURE.Urbana, IL: NCTE,
1978.
Christenbury, Leila. MAKING THE JOURNEY: BEING AND BECOMING A TEACHER OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE
ARTS. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1994.
Elbow, Peter. WRITING WITHOUT TEACHERS. New York: Oxford University Press, 1973.
---. WRITING WITH POWER. New York: Oxford University Press, 1981.
---. EMBRACING CONTRARIES: EXPLORATIONS IN LEARNING AND TEACHING. New York: Oxford University
Press, 1986.
Emig, Janet. THE WEB OF MEANING: ESSAYS ON WRITING, TEACHING, LEARNING, AND THINKING. Upper
Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1983.
---. THE COMPOSING PROCESSES OF TWELFTH GRADERS. Urbana, IL: NCTE, Committee on Research no.13.
Esbensen, Barbara Juster. A CELEBRATION OF BEES: HELPING CHILDREN WRITE POETRY. Minneapolis: Winston,
1975.
Frost, Helen. WHEN I WHISPER, NOBODY LISTENS: HELPING YOUNG PEOPLE WRITE ABOUT DIFFICULT
ISSUES. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2001.
Gilmore, Barry. DRAWING THE LINE: CREATIVE WRITING THROUGH THE VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS.
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1999.
Graves, Donald, H. BALANCE THE BASICS: LET THEM WRITE. New York: Ford Foundation, 1978.
---. WRITING: TEACHERS & CHILDREN AT WORK. NH: Heinemann, 1983.
---. A RESEARCHER LEARNS TO WRITE. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1984.
Hewitt, Geof. A PORTFOLIO PRIMER: TEACHING, COLLECTING, AND ASSESSING STUDENT WRITING,
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1994.
Hillocks, George. RESEARCH ON WRITTEN COMPOSITION. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1986.
Jago, Carol. COHESIVE WRITING: WHY CONCEPT IS NOT ENOUGH. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2002.
Kirby, Dan, Tom Liner, and Ruth Vinz. INSIDE OUT: DEVELOPMENTAL STRATEGIES FOR TEACHING WRITING.
2nd ed. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Heinemann, 1988.
Koch, Kenneth. WISHES, LIES, AND DREAMS: TEACHING CHILDREN TO WRITE POETRY. New York: Vintage, 1970.
---. ROSE, WHERE DID YOU GET THAT RED? New York: Vintage, 1973.
Lott, Joyce. A TEACHER'S STORIES: REFLECTIONS ON HIGH SCHOOL WRITERS. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook,
1994.
Macrorie, Ken. UPTAUGHT. New York: Hayden, 1970.
---. A VULNERABLE TEACHER. Rochelle Park, NJ: Hayden Book Co., 1974.
---. WRITING TO BE READ. 2nd rev. ed. Rochelle Park, NJ: Hayden Book Co., 1976.
---. 20 TEACHERS. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984.
---. TELLING WRITING, 4th ed. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1985
---. THE I-SEARCH PAPER, 2nd ed. of SEARCHING WRITING. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1988.
Mahoney, Jim. POWER AND PORTFOLIOS: BEST PRACTICES FOR HIGH SCHOOL CLASSROOMS. Portsmouth, NH:
Heinemann, 2002.
Mayher, John S., Nancy Lester, and Gordon M. Pradl. LEARNING TO WRITE/ WRITING TO LEARN. Upper Montclair, NJ:
Boynton/Cook, 1983.
Moffett, James. TEACHING THE UNIVERSE OF DISCOURSE. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1968.
---. ACTIVE VOICE: A WRITING PROGRAM ACROSS THE CURRICULUM. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1981.
---. ACTIVE VOICES, vols. I-IV. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1986-87.
Moffett, James, and B. J. Wagner. STUDENT-CENTERED LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING, K-13. 2nd ed. Boston:
Houghton Mifflin, 1976.
Murray, Donald M. CRAFTING A LIFE IN ESSAY, STORY, POEM. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1994.
---. "The Listening Eye: Reflections on the Writing Conference." In LEARNING BY TEACHING: SELECTED ARTICLES
ON WRITING AND TEACHING. Upper Montclair NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1982.
---. WRITE TO LEARN. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1984.
---. A WRITER TEACHES WRITING. 2nd ed., Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. 1985.
Noden, Harry R. IMAGE GRAMMAR: USING GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURES TO TEACH WRITING. Portsmouth,
NH: Heinemann, 1999.
Noguchi, Rei R. GRAMMAR AND THE TEACHING OF WRITING. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1991.
Rief, Linda. SEEKING DIVERSITY : LANGUAGE ARTS WITH ADOLESCENTS. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1992.
Ramono, Tom. CLEARING THE WAY: WORKING WITH TEENAGE WRITERS. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1987.
---. BLENDING GENRE, ALTERING STYLE:WRITING MULTIGENRE PAPERS. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2000.
Schuster, Edgar H. BREAKING THE RULES: LIBERATING WRITERS THROUGH INNOVATIVE GRAMMAR
INSTRUCTION. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2003.
Spandel, Vicki. CREATING WRITERS: THROUGH 6 – TRAIT WRITING ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTION. 3rd ed.
New York: Addison Wesley Longman, 2001.
Stanford, Gene. ed. HOW TO HANDLE THE PAPER LOAD. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1979.
Strong, William. COACHING WRITING: THE POWER OF GUIDED PRACTICE. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2001.
Sudol, Ronald A., ed. REVISING: NEW ESSAYS FOR TEACHERS OF WRITING. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1982.
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Tremmel, Robert and William Broz. TEACHING WRITING TEACHERS OF HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH AND FIRSTYEAR COMPOSITION. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2002.
Tsujimoto, Joseph. LIGHTING FIRES: HOW THE PASSIONATE TEACHER ENGAGES ADOLESCENT WRITERS.
Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook, 2001.
Welty, Eudora. ONE WRITER'S BEGINNINGS. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press, 1984.
Willis, Meredith Sue. DEEP REVISION: A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS, STUDENTS, AND OTHER WRITERS. New York:
Teachers and Writers Collaborative, 1983.
---. PERSONAL FICTION WRITING. New York: Teachers and Writers Collaborative, 1984.
Zemelman, Steven, and Harvey Daniels. A COMMUNITY OF WRITERS: TEACHING WRITING IN THE JUNIOR AND
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1988.
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COURSE MASTER FORM
This form will be completed by the requesting department and will be sent to the Office of the Registrar once the course has
been approved by the Office of the President.
The form is required for all new courses.
DISCIPLINE
English Education (ENED)
COURSE NUMBER
3310
COURSE TITLE FOR LABEL
Principles of Writing Instruction
(Note: Limit 30 spaces)
CLASS-LAB-CREDIT HOURS 3-0-3
Approval, Effective Semester
Fall 2005
Grades Allowed (Regular or S/U) Regular
If course used to satisfy CPC, what areas?
Learning Support Programs courses which are required as prerequisites
APPROVED:
Vice President for Academic Affairs or Designee
Submitted by:
Dr. Aaron Levy and Dr. Carol Harrell
Faculty Member
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
Department Curriculum Committee
Date
Professional Teacher Education Unit: Program Area*
Date
Department Chair
Date
Teacher Education Council*
* Date
College or School Curriculum Committee
Date
College or School Dean
Date
Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee
Date
Dean of Undergraduate Studies
Date
President
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
*The PTEU Program Area Committee collaborates closely with Department Curriculum Committees.
**Signature required for Teacher Preparation proposals (omit College or School Curriculum Committee).
Form updated April 1, 2004.
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
Change in Existing Course
Existing Course Prefix/Number/Title ENED 4414: Teaching English (7-12)
Department
English
Degree Title (if applicable)
Proposed Effective Date
Submitted by:
Fall 2005
Dr. Jim Cope and Dr. Carol Harrell
Name
September 28, 2004
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_______________________________
Department Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved _________________________________
General Education Council*
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved__________________________________
Professional Teacher Education Unit Program Area*
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
Department Chair
________________________________
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ________________________________
College/School Curriculum Committee AND/OR
Date
Teacher Education Council*
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ________________________________
College/School Dean
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________
Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ___________________________________
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________
President
Date
*For curriculum proposals involving General Education courses, there should be collaboration by the Department
Curriculum Committee and the General Education Council. For Teacher Preparation proposals, there should be
collaboration by the Department Curriculum Committee, the Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) Program Area
Committee, the Teacher Education Council, and the College/School Curriculum Committee.
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
Change in Existing Course
Please indicate what changes are being proposed:
_____ Change in course number
X
Change in course description
_____ Change in course title
X
Change in prerequisite/corequisites
X
Change in credit hours
_____ Other change (please identify) ______________________________________
I.
Current Information
Page Number in Current Catalog:
ENED 4414
page 299
Current Course Information in Catalog (photocopy preferable):
ENED 4414. Teaching English/Language Arts. 7-6-9.
Prerequisite: ENGL 3260, ENGL 3309, ENGL 3391, EDUC 3308
An examination and application of curriculum issues, learning theories, teaching strategies, instructional materials,
and assessment procedures for teaching secondary school English/Language Arts in the multicultural and diverse
classroom of today. Emphasis is on developing teachers who possess the capability, intent, and expertise to facilitate
high levels of learning in all of their students through effective, research-based practices in the classroom. Includes a
secondary school field experience in English teaching and concurrent seminars. Proof of professional liability
insurance is required prior to school placement.
II.
Proposed Information (fill in completely)
Course Prefix & Number: same
Course Title: same
Credit Hours: 6-0-6
Prerequisites: ENGL 3310, ENGL 3391, Admission to Teacher Education
Course Description:
An examination and application of curriculum issues, learning theories, teaching strategies, instructional materials,
and assessment procedures for teaching secondary school English/Language Arts in the multicultural and diverse
classroom of today. Emphasis is on developing teachers who possess the capability, intent, and expertise to facilitate
high levels of learning in all of their students through effective, research-based practices in the classroom.
III.
Justification for Change
Occasionally students must retake the field component of ENED 4414, Teaching of English/Language Arts (7-12).
When the field experience is embedded in the existing ENED 4414, students must retake the entire 9-hour block.
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Dividing the coursework from the field experience will make it possible to remediate students and have them retake
the field experience only.
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
NEW COURSE (NOT General Education)
Course Prefix/Number/Title ENED 4415: Teaching of English/Language Arts (7-12) Internship
Department: English
Degree Title (if applicable) English Education
Proposed Effective Date: Fall 2005
Submitted by:
Jim Cope and Carol Harrell
Faculty Member
9-28-2004
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved _________________________________________
Department Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved_________________________________________
Professional Teacher Education Unit: Program Area*
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
Date
_______________________________________
Department Chair
Date
_______________________________________
Teacher Education Council**
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ________________________________________
College or School Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
________________________________________
College or School Dean
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved _________________________________________
Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________________
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________________
President
Date
*The PTEU Program Area Committee collaborates closely with Department Curriculum Committees.
**Signature required for Teacher Preparation proposals (omit College or School Curriculum Committee).
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[v.1-21-98]
KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
New Course (NOT General Education)
I.
Proposed Information
Course Prefix and Number ENED 4415
Course Title Teaching of English/Language Arts (7-12) Internship
Credit Hours 0-9-3 repeatable
Prerequisites admission to ENED 4414
Corequisites ENED 4415
(Prerequisites are courses or requirements that are non-negotiable and must be successfully
completed by any student before enrolling in the course or program under consideration.
Co requisites are courses that can be taken before or in the same semester as the course under
consideration. Courses at the upper-division level will require lower-division competencies
or prerequisites.)
Course Description for the Catalog:
Secondary school field experience in English/Language Arts teaching with concurrent seminars.
Proof of professional liability insurance is required prior to school placement.
II. Justification for Course
B. Explain assessment findings which led to course development.
1. To accommodate staffing demands, the field experience will be listed separately from ENED 4414.
2. Occasionally students must retake the field component of ENED 4414, Teaching of English/Language
Arts (7-12). When the field experience is embedded in the existing ENED 4414, students must retake
the entire 9-hour block. Dividing the coursework from the field experience will make it possible to
remediate students and have them retake the field experience only.
B. Explain for Prerequisites:
1. What is the substance of content in each prerequisite that commands its inclusion as a
prerequisite to the proposed course?
Admission to ENED 4414 assumes students have met all prerequisites.
2. What is the desired sequence of prerequisites?
3. What is the rationale for requiring the above sequence of prerequisites?
4. How often are the required prerequisites offered?
Fall and Spring semesters.
C.
Give any other justification for the course.
III. Additional Information
A. Where does this course fit sequentially and philosophically within the program of study.
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This course is the gateway to student teaching. Successful completion of the field experience in ENED 4415 must
occur before students can student teach.
B. What efforts have been made to ensure that this course does not duplicate the content of
other college courses with similar titles, purposes, or content?
C. Where will the course be located in the program (elective, required in Area F, required or
elective for the major)? Indicate and justify its placement in the curriculum.
It must be the final course prior to student teaching, which is the final course in the teacher education program.
E. How often will this course be offered?
Whenever ENED 4414 is offered.
E. All sections of the course will be taught with the understanding that the following apply:
SEE ATTACHED SYLLABUS
1. Purpose of the Course
2. Objectives of the Course
3. Course Content
F. What instructional methodologies will be incorporated into the course to stimulate group
process, writing skills, multiculturalism, and educational outcomes?
G. Outline the plan for continuous course assessment. What are the department, school, college,
or professional standards which will be used for the assessment? How will it be determined
that the course is current, meeting the educational needs of students and responsive to
educational standards? How often will the course assessment be done by the department?
H. Enclose a course syllabus (optional format attached)
IV.
Resources and Funding required
What resources will be redirected to accommodate this course?
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None
Explain what items will cause additional cost to the department/school/college
Personnel
Computer Technology
Library resources
Equipment
Space
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I.
ENED 4415 Teaching of English/Language Arts (7-12) Internship
KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
II.
INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION:
Instructor
OFFICE HOURS:
III.
Phone
FAX
By appointment
CLASS MEETINGS and CALENDAR:
IV.
e-mail
At assigned schools
REQUIRED TEXTS AND MATERIALS:
Burke, Jim. The English Teacher’s Companion: A Complete Guide to Classroom, Curriculum, and the Profession.
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2003.
Burke, Jim. Tools for Thought: Graphic Organizers for Your Classroom. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2002.
Collins, Paul. Community Writing: Researching Social Issues Through Composition. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence
Erlbaum Associates, 2001
Delpit, Lisa. Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom. New York: New Press, 1995.
Moore, John Noelle. Interpreting Young Adult Literature: Literary Theory in the Secondary Classroom. Portsmouth,
NH: Heinemann, 1997.
Noden, Harry. Image Grammar: Using Grammatical Structures to Teaching Writing. Portsmouth, NH:
Boynton/Cook, 1999.
Smith, Michael W. and Jeffrey D. Wilhelm. Reading Don’t Fix No Chevys: Literacy in the Lives of Young Men.
Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2002.
V.
CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION:
3 Credit hours. Admission to ENED 4414.
Secondary school field experience in English/Language Arts teaching with concurrent seminars. Proof of
professional liability insurance is required prior to school placement.
VI.
RATIONALE:
Conceptual Framework Summary: Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching and Learning
The Kennesaw State University teacher education faculty is committed to preparing teachers who demonstrate
expertise in facilitating learning in all students. Toward that end, the KSU teacher education community strongly
upholds the concept of collaborative preparation requiring guidance from professionals inside and outside the
university. In tandem with this belief is the understanding that teacher expertise develops along a continuum
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which includes the stages of preservice, induction, in-service, and renewal; further, as candidates develop a strong
research-based knowledge of content and pedagogy, they develop their professional expertise in recognizing,
facilitating, assessing, and evaluating student learning.
Knowledge Base:
Teacher development is generally recognized as a continuum that includes four phases: preservice, induction, inservice, renewal (Odell, Huling, and Sweeny, 2000). Just as Sternberg (1996) believes that the concept of expertise
is central to analyzing the teaching-learning process, the teacher education faculty at KSU believes that the
concept of expertise is central to preparing effective classroom teachers and teacher leaders. Researchers describe
how during the continuum phases teachers progress from being Novices learning to survive in classrooms toward
becoming Experts who have achieved elegance in their teaching. We, like Sternberg (1998), believe that expertise
is not an end-state but a process of continued development.
ENED 4415 is designed to support the collaborative model and develop teachers who understand and apply the
principles of collaboration learned in the classroom at KSU inside the classrooms in the field. Students plan and
present models of effective practice and apply techniques of good instruction when working with students in the
field experience. Also, they work closely with supervising teacher/mentors at the school and university levels
during their field experience.
Use of Technology: Student teachers will avail themselves of the instructional technologies available to them in
their host schools.
Multicultural Education Emphasis: A variety of material and instructional strategies will be employed to meet the
needs of different learning styles of diverse learners in student teachers’ classes. Students will gain knowledge,
skills, and understanding to provide effective instruction in multicultural classrooms.
Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons defined as disabled
under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. A number of
services are available to help disabled students with their academic work. In order to make arrangements for
special services, students must visit the Office of Disabled Student Support Services (ext. 6443) and arrange an
individual assistance plan. In some cases, certification of disability is required.
COURSE PURPOSE
The field experience provides an initial supervised opportunity to demonstrate, reflect upon, and advance candidates
in the role of collaborative professional. Field Experience Objectives include the following:
1. Demonstrate professional behavior (e.g., be on time, dress professionally, demonstrate positive attitude, behave
collegially (CPI: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, collaborative professional).
2. Organize classroom for optimum learning experience for all students (e.g., small groups, lecture, discussion,
assessment (CPI: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student learning, Working
knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and pedagogy).
3. Develop classroom management techniques (CPI: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses
student learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and
pedagogy).
4. Demonstrate content knowledge (CPI: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student
learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and
pedagogy).
Multicultural Education Emphasis: A variety of material and instructional strategies will be employed to meet the
needs of different learning styles of diverse learners in student teachers’ classes. Students will gain knowledge,
skills, and understanding to provide effective instruction in multicultural classrooms.
Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons defined as disabled
under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. A number of
services are available to help disabled students with their academic work. In order to make arrangements for
special services, students must visit the Office of Disabled Student Support Services (ext. 6443) and arrange an
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individual assistance plan. In some cases, certification of disability is required.
VII.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
All of the learning activities are designed to help you achieve interrelated objectives and goals drawn from the
Kennesaw Secondary Education Program Committee's objectives modeled from NCTE's Standards for the
Preparations of Teachers of English/LA. These objectives and goals also reflect the function of the course as a
bridge between discipline-centered and professional education courses that introduce concepts and practices early in
the program and the student teaching experience at its close.
 Each of the following objectives supports the idea that our students will facilitate learning in all students.
 Numbers in parenthesis indicate which assignment advanced knowledge stated in objective and their connection to
KSU’s Conceptual Framework for teacher education.
Specific Objectives: Designed around study that provides:
1. Inquiry-based teaching and classroom research in English Education (1,2,3, 5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in
teaching and learning, Research based content and pedagogy)
2. Curriculum design for English Education including setting and evaluating goals and objectives, planning lessons
and larger curricular units (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student
learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and
pedagogy);
3. Teaching strategies and assessment techniques for English Education (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in
teaching and learning, Assesses student learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student
learning, Research based content and pedagogy);
4. Reflective teaching emphasis (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student
learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and
pedagogy);
5. Discipline-centered theories about language use and development, about composing and analyzing language in a
range of ways for various audiences, and about reading a variety of texts for a variety of purposes (1,2,3,5) (CF:
Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student learning, Working knowledge of technology
in support of student learning, Research based content and pedagogy);
6. Understanding of developmental theories of learning in English and concepts that guide teaching (1,2,3,5) (CF:
Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student learning, Working knowledge of technology
in support of student learning, Research based content and pedagogy);
7. Understanding of various kinds of evaluation instruments in English/LA including both their uses and potential
abuses--includes traditional and alternative assessments such as portfolios, asking questions to elicit a variety of
responses and inferences as well as facts, ways to respond constructively and promptly to student work,
approaches to integrate assessment with instruction, and ways to interpret student progress to parents and to the
administration (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student learning,
Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and pedagogy);
8. Ways of employing a variety of stimulating instructional strategies that aid students in their development of
reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing abilities (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching
and learning, Assesses student learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning,
Research based content and pedagogy);
9. Concern for individual differences in the English/LA classroom, including a respect for individual language and
dialect differences, and conviction that teachers can help all students grow in their ability to use language
effectively (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student learning, Working
knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and pedagogy);
10. Willingness to seek a match between student needs and teacher goals (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in
teaching and learning, Assesses student learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student
learning, Research based content and pedagogy).
11. Demonstrate professional behavior (e.g., be on time, dress professionally, demonstrate positive attitude, behave
collegially) (4) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning,);
12. Organize classroom for optimum learning experience (e.g., small groups, lecture, discussion (1,2,3,5) (CF:
Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses student learning, Working knowledge of technology
in support of student learning, Research based content and pedagogy);
13. Develop classroom management techniques (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning,
Assesses student learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based
content and pedagogy);
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14. Demonstrate content knowledge (1,2,3,5) (CF: Collaboration, Expertise in teaching and learning, Assesses
student learning, Working knowledge of technology in support of student learning, Research based content and
pedagogy).
VI.
COURSE REQUIREMENTS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Detailed Lesson Plans: You will be expected to write detailed lesson plans for each class taught. Plans
should include the following:
a) Objectives (Based on GPS's and National Standards)
b) Procedures
c) Materials
d) Evaluation
These plans can be hand written and must be approved by your cooperating teacher one week in advance
(i.e. on Thursday or Friday you will have the next week's lesson plans ready to be approved). The
exception to this is the plans for the first preparation you will teach. Before you begin teaching your first
class(es), you must have two weeks of approved lesson plans.
Reflective Journal: At the end of good and/or bad days (minimum two journals per week), take 10-15 minutes
to e-mail me ([email protected]) a reflective entry about that day's teaching. In your journal, discuss
lessons that worked well and why they succeeded as well as lessons that did not go well and why they were
not successful. This journal is a place to celebrate, vent, complain, analyze, and reflect. You and I will be the
only people reading your journal, so feel free to not pull punches. Hopefully, keeping a reflective journal will
become a habit that stays with you for your entire career. If you want a quicker response to your journals, you
may write entries in the form of e-mail messages to me.
Participation in Seminar Meetings: Attendance for the seminar meetings is mandatory, so plan ahead. These
meetings will give you a chance to share ideas, problems, and concerns with your peers.
Professionalism: Be on time, dress professionally, establish and maintain a professional working relationships
with all school and college personnel, and in general act like a professional at all times. If you are unsure
what the appropriate action is in a situation, ask for guidance (Rules for Student Teachers in Field Center
Schools).
Effective Teaching: Your performance as an English teacher in the classroom. This includes using effective
teaching methods and classroom management strategies.
Impact on Student Learning: During student teaching you’ll be required to complete a formal assessment of
your teaching effectiveness. In preparation for that assignment, during your field placement, you’ll practice.
You are not in the field long enough to teach a unit, so the work you do this term is simply to familiarize you
with the expectation you see during your final field experience.
During student teaching, the following activity will be added to your evidence portfolio, but this trial run will
probably not provide sufficient data to act as support for your portfolio; however, while you are in the field do
the following:
1. Chose one lesson, activity, project, paper, quiz, or test and analyze its impact on every student’s learning.
The analysis can include qualitative or quantitative data collection (or both). What that means is that you can
include students’ scores (quantitative evidence) along with data that grow out of your knowledge of individual
students, the lesson, activity, project, paper, quiz, or test. Use readings from our class to help you discuss your
evidence.
2. In the analysis, reflect on the impact on every student's learning on that particular lesson, activity, project,
paper, quiz, or test. In the reflection, consider how the differences that every student brings to the classroom
setting may have influenced learning. Also reflect on your performance as a teacher and link your
performance to the student learning results. Then discuss any future actions you plan to improve your practice
and professional growth.
This means that you will need to write something about each student’s performance and why he/she
performed as he/she did. This could include information such as the following:
X comes from an affluent home where both parents have college degrees and are very involved in X’s
education. X is also highly motivated and is a disciplined student.
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7.
Y lives in an abandoned car with his mother and several siblings. This is the fifth school he/she has attended
this year.
Professionalism: It is expected that future teachers will conduct themselves with the professionalism that is
required of practicing teachers. Such professionalism includes effective and respectful collaboration and
communication with colleagues, prompt attendance of all meetings and classes, moral behavior and actions,
appropriate communication and sharing of materials and plans with the cooperating teacher and university
supervisor, appropriate professional dress (even on "casual days"), etc. Please note that "meeting
expectations" for teachers is usually what others consider to be "exceeding expectations." Education students
are entering a profession of extremely high standards that they are expected to live up to daily. If, at any time,
a student's actions or attitudes are judged to be less than professional by a university supervisor, cooperating
teacher, or school principal, appropriate remedial action will be taken. Such action may include the
development of a plan for the student to complete by the end of the semester or the removal of the student
from the student teaching experience. A student teacher may be removed from the school site immediately
upon the request of the cooperating teacher or school administrator.
Questions indicating professionalism. Answers to the following questions can be used to assess professional
behavior.
Does the student teacher:
 Model high standards and expectations for him or herself?
 Display a commitment to becoming a teacher and to the profession of helping students learn?
 Enjoy learning and indicate enthusiasm toward working with students to facilitate their learning?
 Regularly reflect on and assess his or her performance and effectiveness for self-improvement?
 Learn from experiences and show improvement over time?
 Manage interpersonal relationships effectively?
 Demonstrate courtesy, respect, and civility in interactions with others? (If appropriate, include
descriptions and/or copies of emails and conversations that may be judged unprofessional.)
 Work collaboratively with professional colleagues and faculty?
 Demonstrate punctuality and timely completion of responsibilities? (Include any tardies, absences,
and late or missing work.)
 Accept responsibility for actions and non-actions, placing the locus of control upon him or herself
rather than shifting blame or claiming inability to control outside factors.
 Maintain appropriate attire and appearance?
 Promote and model standards of academic honesty?
VII.
EVALUATION AND GRADING:
Your final grade will be either an S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory) and will be determined according to the
satisfactory completion of course requirements. Failure to turn in assignments will result in a U. Frequent evaluations
by both your mentor teacher and your university supervisor will keep you well informed as to your progress.
While participating in all field experiences, you are encouraged to be involved in a variety of school-based activities
directed at the improvement of teaching and learning. Activities may include, but are not limited to, tutoring
students, assisting teachers or other school personnel, attending school board meetings, and participating in
education-related community events. As you continue your field experiences, you are encouraged to explore every
opportunity to learn by doing.
Please note that there are three grades you can receive in the field experience:
a. Pass with no reservations (S),
b. Pass with reservations that must be addressed during student teaching (S), and
c. Fail (U).
VIII.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY:
Every KSU student is responsible for upholding the provisions of the Student Code of Conduct, as published in the
Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs. Section II of the Student Code of Conduct addresses the University’s
policy on academic honesty, including provisions regarding plagiarism and cheating, unauthorized access to
University materials, misrepresentation or falsification of University records or academic work, malicious
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removal, retention, or destruction of library materials, malicious/intentional misuse of computer facilities and/or
services, and misuse of student identification cards. Incidents of alleged academic misconduct will be handled
through the established procedures of the University Judiciary Program, which includes either an “informal”
resolution by a faculty member, resulting in a grade adjustment, or a formal hearing procedure, which may subject
a student to the Code of Conduct’s minimum one semester suspension requirement.
IX.
ATTENDANCE POLICY
Attendance during ENED 4415 is of utmost importance and should follow the policies dictated by your local
school. Inform both your university supervisor of any absence well in advance. Your students are depending on
your attendance.
X.
COURSE SCHEDULE
Week One
Observe and assist collaborating teacher, one-on-one
teaching, turn in field journal, submit lesson plans.
Observe and assist collaborating teacher, one-on-one
teaching, turn in field journal, submit lesson plans.
Teach at least two of the three classes. Turn in field
journal, submit lesson plans.
Teach at least two of the three classes. Turn in field
journal, submit lesson plans.
Teach at least two of the three classes. Turn in field
journal, submit lesson plans.
Teach at least two of the three classes and/or assist
collaborating teacher. Submit Impact on Student
Learning assignment.
Week Two
Week Three
Week Four
Week Five
Week Six
XI.
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---. WRITING TO BE READ. 2nd rev. ed. Rochelle Park, NJ: Hayden Book Co., 1976.
---. 20 TEACHERS. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984.
---. TELLING WRITING, 4th ed. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1985
---. THE I-SEARCH PAPER, 2nd ed. of SEARCHING WRITING. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/ Cook, 1988.
Martin, Nancy, Pat D'Arcy, Bryan Newton, and Robert Parker. WRITING & LEARNING ACROSS THE
CURRICULUM, 11-16. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1976.
Mayher, John S., Nancy Lester, and Gordon M. Pradl. LEARNING TO
WRITE/WRITING TO LEARN.
Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1983.
Miller, Bruce E. TEACHING THE ART OF LITERATURE. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1980.
Miller, James E., Jr., and Stephen N. Judy. WRITING IN REALITY. New York: Harper & Row, 1978.
Milner, Joseph O., Lucy Floyd Morcock Milner. PASSAGES TO LITERATURE. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1989.
Milner, Joseph O., and Carol A. Pope, eds. GLOBAL VOICES: CULTURE AND IDENTITY IN THE
TEACHING OF ENGLISH. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1994.
Moffett, James. TEACHING THE UNIVERSE OF DISCOURSE. Boston: Houghton Mifflin,1968.
---. "On Essaying." In FFORUM: ESSAY ON THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE TEACHING OF WRITING
edited by Patricia L. Stock. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/ Cook, 1983.
---. ACTIVE VOICE: A WRITING PROGRAM ACROSS THE CURRICULUM. Upper Montclair, NJ:
Boynton/Cook, 1981.
---. . ACTIVE VOICES. vols. I-IV. Upper Montclair, NH: Boynton/Cook, 1987.
Moffett, James, and B. J. Wagner. STUDENT-CENTERED LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING, K-13. 2nd ed.
Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1976.
Monseau, Virginia R. RESPONDING TO YOUNG ADULT LITERATURE. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook
Heinemann, 1996.
Monseau, Virginia R., and Gary M. Salvner. READING THEIR WORLD: THE YOUNG ADULT NOVEL IN
THE CLASSROOM. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook Heinnemann, 1992.
Murray, Donald M. "Teaching the Motivating Force of Revision." ENGLISH JOURNAL 67 Oct. 1978: 56-60.
---. "Questions to Produce Writing Topics." ENGLISH JOURNAL 69, 1980: 69.
---. "The Listening Eye: Reflections on the Writing Conference." In LEARNING BY TEACHING: SELECTED
ARTICLES ON WRITING AND TEACHING. Upper Montclair NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1982.
---. "First Silence, then Paper." In FFORUM: ESSAYS ON THEORY AND PRACTICE IN THE TEACHING
OF WRITING. Edited by P. Stock. Upper Montclair, NJ: Boynton/Cook, 1983.
---. WRITE TO LEARN. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1984.
---. "Writing Badly to Write Well: Searching for the Instructive Line." In SENTENCE COMBINING: A
RHETORICAL PERSPECTIVE, edited by Donald A.
Daiker, Andrew Kerek, and Max Morenberg.
Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1985.
---. A WRITER TEACHES WRITING. 2nd ed., Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. 1985.
Myers, Miles. THE TEACHER-RESEARCHER: HOW TO STUDY WRITING IN THE CLASSROOM.
Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1985.
Nagy, William E. TEACHING VOCABULARY TO IMPROVE READING COMPREHENSION. Urbana, IL:
NCTE, 1988.
Nelms, Ben F. LITERATURE IN THE CLASSROOM: READERS, TEXTS, AND CONTENTS. Urbana, IL:
NCTE, 1988.
Newkirk, T. and Nancie Atwell. UNDERSTANDING WRITING: OBSERVING, LEARNING, AND
TEACHING. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann., 1982.
Nilsen, Alleen Pace, and Kenneth L. Donelson. LITERATURE FOR TODAY’S YOUNG ADULTS. 4th ed.
New York: Harper Collins, 1993.
Oliver, Eileen Iscoff. CROSSING THE MAINSTREAM: MULTICULTURAL PERSPECTIVES IN
TEACHING LITERATURE. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1994.
Peck, David. NOVELS OF INITIATION: A GUIDEBOOK FOR TEACHING LITERATURE TO
ADOLESCENTS. New York: Teachers College Press, 1989.
Petty, W. THE WRITING PROCESSES OF STUDENTS. Buffalo: State University of New York, 1975.
Phelan, Patricia (ed.). LITERATURE AND LIFE: MAKING CONNECTIONS IN THE CLASSROOM. Urbana,
IL: NCTE, 1990.
Probst, Robert E. RESPONSE AND ANALYSIS: TEACHING LITERATURE IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR
HIGH SCHOOL. NH: Boynton/Cook, Heinemann, 1988.
Purves, Alan C. READING AND LITERATURE: AMERICAN ACHIEVEMENT IN INTERNATIONAL
PERSPECTIVE. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1981.
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Purves, Alan C., Richard Beach. LITERATURE AND THE READER: RESEARCH IN RESPONSE TO
LITERATURE, READING INTERESTS, AND THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE. Urbana, IL: NCTE,
1972.
Purves, Alan C., Theresa Rogers, and Anna O. Soter. HOW PORCUPINES MAKE LOVE III: READERS,
TEXTS, CULTURES IN THE RESPONSE-BASED LITERATURE CLASSROOM. New York: Longman,
1995.
Ramono, Tom. CLEARING THE WAY: WORKING WITH TEENAGE WRITERS. Portsmouth, NH:
Boynton/Cook, 1987.
READERS, TEXTS, CULTURES IN THE RESPONSE-BASED LITERATURE CLASSROOM. New York:
Longman, 1994.
Reed, Arthea J. S. REACHING ADOLESCENTS: THE YOUNG ADULT BOOK AND THE SCHOOL. New
York: MacMillan, 1994.
---. COMICS TO CLASSICS: A GUIDE TO BOOKS FOR TEENS AND PRETEENS. New York: Penguin
Books, 1988.
Reichman, Henry. CENSORSHIP AND SELECTION: ISSUES AND ANSWERS FOR SCHOOLS. USA:
AASA/ALA, 1988.
Rief, Linda. SEEKING DIVERSITY : LANGUAGE ARTS WITH ADOLESCENTS. Portsmouth, NH:
Boynton/Cook, 1992.
Rosenblatt, Louise M. THE READER THE TEXT THE POEM: THE TRANSACTIONAL THEORY OF THE
LITERARY WORK. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 1978
Rothlein, Liz, and Anita Meyer Meinbach. LEGACIES: USING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE IN THE
CLASSROOM. New York: Harper Collins, 1996.
Schullstrom, Faith Z. EXPANDING THE CANON: BRIDGES TO UNDERSTANDING--ARTICLES FROM
ENGLISH JOURNAL, 1987-89. Urbana, IL: NCTE, 1990.
ENED Proposal Package
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ENED Proposal Package
CANDIDATE PERFORMANCE - Exit BAGWELL
KSU Candidate_________________________________________________
KSU Supervisor_______________________________________________
Collaborating Teacher ____________________________________
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
Semester ____________________________________________________
Candidate Degree Program ___________________________________
School______________________________________________________
Grade
Level/Subject_____________________________________________
School System ________________________________________________
Candidate_____ Collaborating Teacher_____ KSU Supervisor____
(Check One)
Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching and Learning: The Kennesaw State University teacher education faculty is committed to preparing
teachers who demonstrate expertise in facilitating learning in all students. Toward that end, the KSU teacher education community strongly upholds
the concept of collaborative preparation requiring guidance from professionals inside and outside the university. In tandem with this belief is the
understanding that teacher expertise develops along a continuum which includes the stages of preservice, induction, in-service, and renewal; further, as
candidates develop a strong research-based knowledge of content and pedagogy, they develop their professional expertise in recognizing, facilitating,
assessing, and evaluating student learning.
This evaluation instrument contains expected performance outcomes for teaching readiness. It is used for midterm and final evaluations. KSU expects candidates to continually
assess their own performance and professional growth as part of their professional development. Therefore, whenever an evaluator completes this form, the candidate should also
complete the form.
To track the candidate’s developmental progress consider all indicators together when determining the level of performance for each outcome statement. Please record the date of
evaluation (e.g. 11/8) in the appropriate outcome box. Identify future growth or sustained performance by recording new dates. Use the following levels of performance (L1, L2,
L3, L4) in the evaluation of each candidate for each outcome.
Rating Description
Level 1 The candidate’s performance offers little or no evidence of achieving the performance expectation. Although there may be occasional points that vaguely suggest
L1
the candidate has achieved the expected outcome, viewed as a whole the candidate’s performance provides little or no evidence of performance expectations.
Level 2 The candidate’s performance provides limited evidence that the performance expectation has been met. Performance may occasionally hint at a higher level of
L2
practice but viewed as a whole the candidate’s performance provides limited evidence of performance expectations.
Level 3 The candidate’s performance provides clear evidence that the performance expectation has been met. Performance may not be as detailed or rich as Level 4, but
L3
overall, there is clear evidence that the candidate has achieved the performance expectations.
Level 4 The candidate’s performance provides clear, consistent, and convincing evidence that the performance expectation has been met.
L4
Signatures:
Candidate___________________ Collaborating Teacher__________________
KSU Supervisor ___________________
Date ________________
Candidate___________________ Collaborating Teacher__________________
KSU Supervisor ___________________
Date ________________
ENED Proposal Package
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ENED Proposal Package
Domain 1: Learners
L1
Outcome: 1.1 Understand the characteristics of human growth, development, learning, and motivation.

Use developmentally appropriate teaching strategies to meet student needs

Use multiple motivational strategies to engage learners

Apply learning theory to instructional decisions
L1
Outcome: 1.2 Understand the influences of society, culture, community, and family on schools and learning.
 Value and respect students’ language and ways of knowing and learning
 Use information about home and community to connect instruction to students’ interests and experiences
 Develop assignments to encourage multiple perspectives in student responses
 Treat students fairly and equitably
L1
Outcome: 1.3 Hold high learning expectations for all students.
 Communicate high expectations for student learning
 Encourage students to be responsible for own learning
 Develop lessons that challenge all learners to apply higher order thinking
Notable Strengths:
Areas for Improvement:
Please add any additional comments on the back of the page.
Domain 2: Content
L
Outcome: 2.1 Possess strong knowledge of discipline content, methods of inquiry, connections to other disciplines, and applications
in life situations.
 Teach content accurately
 Connect concepts within and across disciplines
 Make connections to real life situations
 Incorporate learning theories and methods of inquiry
L
Outcome: 2.2 Possess in depth content understanding that allows use of multiple explanations to help learners understand the
discipline content.
 Organize and teach concepts building on prerequisites and students’ prior knowledge
 Use more than one approach to help students understand key concepts
 Anticipate basic student difficulties, misconceptions, or misunderstandings and plan appropriately
 Provide additional examples or explanations when needed
Notable Strengths:
ENED Proposal Package
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Areas for Improvement:
Please add any additional comments on the back of the page.
D Domain 3: Pedagogy
L1
Outcome: 3.1 Create effective well-managed learning environments that engage students in active learning.
 Organize, allocate, and manage the resources of time and space to positively influence student learning
 Create safe physical and emotional environment of respect and rapport
 Provide engaging, relevant learning experiences
L1
Outcome: 3.2 Design and implement instructional plans that use a variety of effective methods, materials, and technologies to meet
the needs of all students.
 Plan comprehensive and coherent units that connect objectives, activities, assessments, and prior knowledge
 Teach lessons that engage all students in successful learning
 Use technology as an effective element in instruction
L1
Outcome: 3.3 Assess and evaluate student learning appropriately and adjust instruction based on the results.
 Reflect on instruction, assessment method(s), student work and products
 Change instructional approaches based upon formal/informal assessment results
 Use appropriate assessments to guide instruction and inform students of progress
L1
Outcome: 3.4 Demonstrate a positive impact on student learning.
 Ensure students show progress on learning objectives
 Take responsibility when students fail
Notable Strengths:
Areas for Improvement:
Please add any additional comments on the back of the page.
ENED Proposal Package
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DoDomain 4: Professionalism
Outcome: 4.1 Assess, reflect upon, and improve professional performance.
 Revisit and refine philosophy of teaching
 Reflect on the impact of teaching performance on classroom activity and learning
 Use professional standards to improve practice
 Participate in one or more professional organizations and/or staff development workshops
Outcome: 4.2 Work collaboratively with colleagues, supervisors, students, parents, and community members.
 Exchange teaching ideas and activities with colleagues and supervisors
 Communicate effectively with parents /guardians
 Use community resources and services to help students and families
 Participate in faculty and PTSA meetings, parent/teacher conferences, IEP meetings, staffings, etc.
Outcome: 4.3 Show regard for human dignity in all relationships.
 Respect all students and their families
 Value the enrichment of learning that comes from diverse backgrounds, values, skills, talents, and interests
 Build professional relationships with all students and colleagues
Outcome: 4.4 Assume responsibility for professional and ethical behavior.
 Follow generally recognized professional standards
 Abide by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission Code of Ethics for Educators
 Maintain privacy and confidentiality of information
Outcome: 4.5 Use effective communication skills.
 Construct written documents free of errors in standard English
 Apply appropriate grammar and language in a variety of academic and professional contexts
 Avoid vernacular and colloquial expressions during the course of professional practice
Notable Strengths:
Areas for Improvement:
Please add any additional comments on the back of the page.
ENED Proposal Package
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ENED Proposal Package
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COURSE MASTER FORM
This form will be completed by the requesting department and will be sent to the Office of the Registrar once the course has been
approved by the Office of the President.
The form is required for all new courses.
DISCIPLINE
English Education (ENED)
COURSE NUMBER
4415
COURSE TITLE FOR LABEL
Teaching of English/Language Arts (6 – 12) Internship
(Note: Limit 30 spaces)
CLASS-LAB-CREDIT HOURS 0-9-3
Approval, Effective Semester
Fall 2005
Grades Allowed (Regular or S/U) S/U
If course used to satisfy CPC, what areas?
Learning Support Programs courses which are required as prerequisites
APPROVED:
Vice President for Academic Affairs or Designee
Submitted by:
Dr. Jim Cope and Dr. Carol Harrell
Faculty Member
10/04/04
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
Department Curriculum Committee
Date
Professional Teacher Education Unit: Program Area*
Date
Department Chair
Date
Teacher Education Council*
* Date
College or School Curriculum Committee
Date
College or School Dean
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
Dean of Undergraduate Studies
Date
President
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
*The PTEU Program Area Committee collaborates closely with Department Curriculum Committees.
**Signature required for Teacher Preparation proposals (omit College or School Curriculum Committee).
Form updated April 1, 2004.
ENED Proposal Package
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
Change in Degree Requirements/Major Program Requirements
Degree or Major Affected Secondary English Education
Responsible Department English
Proposed Effective Date
Fall 2005
Submitted by:
Jim Cope and Carol Harrell
Name
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
___Approved
September 28, 2004
Date
_____________________________________________
Department Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Not Approved _____________________________________________
General Education Council*
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_____________________________________________
Professional Teacher Education Unit Program Area* Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_____________________________________________
Department Chair
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_____________________________________________
College/School Curriculum Committee AND/OR
Date
Teacher Education Council*
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_____________________________________________
College/School Dean
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_____________________________________________
Undergraduate Policies & Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_____________________________________________
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_____________________________________________
President
Date
* For curriculum proposals involving General Education courses, there should be collaboration by the Department Curriculum
Committee and the General Education Council. For Teacher Preparation proposals, there should be collaboration by the Department
Curriculum Committee, the Professional Teacher Education Unit [PTEU] Program Area Committee, the Teacher Education Council,
and the College/School Curriculum Committee.
ENED Proposal Package
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM PROPOSAL
Change in Degree Requirements/Major Program Requirements
Major or Degree Affected Secondary English Education
Please provide a brief summary of the changes proposed.
(E.g., increase in the number of hours of major field requirements, elimination of a track.)
ENED 4414-Hours decreased from 9 hours to 6 hours—moving 3-hour field experience to a new course (ENED 4415).
ENED 4415-New 3-hour stand-alone course for field component previously housed in ENED 4414.
ENGL 3310-New 6-hour course that subsumes ENGL 3260 (currently 3 hours) and ENGL 3309 (currently 3 hours).
ENGL 3400: Survey of African Literatures, ENGL 3500: Topics in African American Literature, ENGL 3600: Topics in
African Diaspora Literatures, and ENGL 4401: Topics in African Literatures are now offered as choices under the section
“Upper Level Core Requirements,Cultural Study of Literature.”
I. Current Information
Page Number in Current Catalog:
ENED 4414
page 299
ENED 3260
page 295
ENED 3309
page 296
Upper Level Core Requirements,Cultural Study of Literature- page 111
Current Degree/Major Program Requirements (photocopy preferable):
See attached.
II. Proposed Information
Include an outline of the entire program. (Please underline or otherwise indicate changes.)
See attached.
III. Justification for Change
1.
2.
ENED 4414/4415
To accommodate staffing demands, the field experience will be listed separately from ENED 4414.
Occasionally students must retake the field component of ENED 4414, Teaching of English/Language Arts (7-12). When the
field experience is embedded in the existing ENED 4414, students must retake the entire 9-hour block. Dividing the
coursework from the field experience will make it possible to remediate students and have them retake the field experience
only.
ENGL 3310
The teaching of writing is a complex task that should not be broken into isolated elements; however, the current structure of
our program does just that. The teaching of grammar in the context of writing (ENGL 3260) is completely separated from all
other elements (ENGL 3309). This is an artificial separation that goes against researched best practices (Hillocks, 1986;
Nuguchi, 1991; Weaver, 1996; Schuster, 2003), and the integration of the two courses provides a framework from which to
model good writing instruction (including the integration of teaching grammar into the context of writing), analysis of that
instruction, and opportunity for students to experience and try out best practices in writing instruction.
Upper Level Core Requirements,Cultural Study of Literature
ENGL 3400: Survey of African Literatures, ENGL 3500: Topics in African American Literature, ENGL 3600: Topics in
African Diaspora Literatures, and ENGL 4401: Topics in African Literatures are all new courses that fit under the “Cultural
Study of Literature” category, and we would like our students to have the option of taking them.
Supporting Analyses of the Program –
ENED Proposal Package
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When degree and/or major program requirements are being revised, it is an opportunity to reconsider the relevance,
effectiveness and efficiency of the entire structure of the program. Following are some questions designed to provoke
thoughtful evaluation of a program.
If a program is being substantially revised, written responses to each of these items should be included as part of the proposal
for the UPCC. If a minor change is being made to a program, writing out responses to all items is not necessary. However,
UPCC members may ask about these issues during their evaluation of any proposal.
1.
What are the primary learning outcomes of the program?
See attached syllabus.
2. What assessment findings have led to the proposed change(s)?
ENED4414/4415: Ongoing faculty program evaluation.
ENGL 3310: Student feedback on program and faculty evaluations.
Upper Level Core Requirements,Cultural Study of Literature: Ongoing faculty program evaluation.
3. Evaluate the prerequisites.
Why are the specified courses needed as prerequisites?
Why are there no prerequisites for some courses?
What is the desired sequence of prerequisites?
How often are the prerequisites offered?
4. Where within the program is an introductory overview of the major?
5. What are the capstone experiences of the program?
6. Where within the program are there application activities and what are the activities?
(E.g., field experiences, practicum opportunities, applied projects, undergraduate research, service learning,
co-ops, internships, studio work, practical problem solving.)
7. Where and how do the following occur in the program?
Writing, reading, critical thinking, presenting
Participative and collaborative learning
Use of information technology
Global and multicultural perspectives
8. What are the required courses that contribute to the interdisciplinary nature of the program?
ENED Proposal Package
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
Change in Existing Course
Existing Course Prefix/Number/Title ENED 4475: Student Teaching English (7-12)
Department
English
Degree Title (if applicable)
Proposed Effective Date
Submitted by:
Fall 2005
Dr. Jim Cope and Dr. Carol Harrell
Name
September 28, 2004
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
_______________________________
Department Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved _________________________________
General Education Council*
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved__________________________________
Professional Teacher Education Unit Program Area*
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved
Department Chair
Date
________________________________
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ________________________________
College/School Curriculum Committee AND/OR
Teacher Education Council*
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ________________________________
College/School Dean
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________
Undergraduate Policies and Curriculum Committee
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved ___________________________________
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Date
___ Approved ___ Not Approved __________________________________
President
Date
*For curriculum proposals involving General Education courses, there should be collaboration by the Department Curriculum
Committee and the General Education Council. For Teacher Preparation proposals, there should be collaboration by the Department
Curriculum Committee, the Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) Program Area Committee, the Teacher Education Council,
and the College/School Curriculum Committee.
ENED Proposal Package
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KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY
UNDERGRADUATE PROPOSAL
Change in Existing Course
Please indicate what changes are being proposed:
_____ Change in course number
Change in course description
_____ Change in course title
X
Change in prerequisite/corequisites
Change in credit hours
_____ Other change (please identify) ______________________________________
I.
Current Information
Page Number in Current Catalog:
ENED 4475
page 299
Current Course Information in Catalog (photocopy preferable):
ENED 4414. Student Teaching: English (7-12). 12 credit hours
Prerequisite: ENED 4414 and Approval of Field Experience Application
Full-time teaching experience in English under the supervision of a secondary school cooperating teacher and a college English
education supervisor. Includes regularly scheduled seminars. Proof of professional liability insurance is required for school
placement.
II.
Proposed Information (fill in completely)
Course Prefix & Number: same
Course Title: same
Credit Hours: same
Prerequisites: ENED 4414, ENED 4415 and Approval of Field Experience Application
Course Description: same
IV.
Justification for Change
We are proposing a new course, ENED 4415: Teaching of English/Language Arts (7-12) Internship, that will place the 3-hour
field component of ENED 4414: Teaching of English/Language Arts into a stand-alone course. Students will need to have
successfully completed ENED 4414 and ENED 4415 to be prepared to take ENED 4475: Student Teaching: English.
ENED Proposal Package
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English Education Major—Course Requirements (Current)
Area F for English Education Majors
Course
Hours
Prerequisite
EDUC 2201Teaching and Schools in a Changing Society
3
ENGL 1102 & core social science course
EDUC 2202 Life Span Dev.: Ado/YA Emphasis
3
ENGL 1102 & core social science course
ENGL 2145 Intro. To English Studies
3
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2160 Am. Lit. Survey, Beginnings to Present
3
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2172 Brit. Lit. Beginnings to 1660
3
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2174 Brit. Lit. 1660 to Present
3
ENGL 2110
Total hours this section:
18
After taking EDUC 2201 and EDUC 2202 (both with teacher recommendation), passing Praxis I, & acquiring a 2.75 GPA, apply for
admission to the Teacher Education Program (KH 3024).
Upper-Level English Requirements (3 hours each section)
Requirement Category
IX.
Specific Upper-Level Courses
Language
ENGL 2270 Language and Usage
[Note: or pass Dept. Language Exam]
Writing
ENGL 3309 Principles of Teaching Writing
Prerequisite
ENGL 1102
ENGL 1102 ENGL 2270 or
Dept. Language Exam
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2110
Genres
ENGL 3220 Studies in Film
Cultural Studies of Literature ENGL 3320 Scriptural Literature
[Choose one]
ENGL 3330 Gender Studies
ENGL 3340 Ethnic Literatures
ENGL 3350 Regional Literature
ENGL 3360 African-American Literature
Theory
ENGL 3391 Teaching Lit. to Adolescents
ENGL 2110
Studies in Lit. Before 1800
ENGL 4340 Shakespeare
ENGL 2110
Studies in 19th-Century
ENGL 4460 19th-Century American Lit.
ENGL 2110
Literature
ENGL 4470 19th-Century British Literature
[Choose one]
ENGL 4480 19th-Century World Literature
Studies in 20th-Century
ENGL 4560 20th-Century American Lit.
ENGL 2110
Literature
ENGL 4570 20th-Century British Literature
[Choose one]
ENGL 4580 20th-Century World Literature
Applied/Professional
ENGL 3260 Grammar in the Context
ENGL 2270 or Dept.
Sequence
of Writing
Language Exam
Applied/Professional
ENGL 3035 Introduction to Language and
ENGL 2110
Sequence
Linguistics
Total hours this section:
30
After completing subject-area courses, STUDY and take Praxis II (KH 3018).
Pedagogy Courses
Course
Hours
X.
Prerequisite
EXC 3304 Education of Exceptional Students
3
Admission to Teacher Ed.
EDUC 3308 Learning, Motivation, and
3
Admission to Teacher Ed.
Classroom Management
EDSM 4409 Instructional Strategies in Reading
3
Admission to Teacher Ed.
and Adolescent Literature
ENED 4414 Tchg. of Engl/LA 7-12 (TOSS)
9
ENGL 3260, 3309, and EDUC 3308/Admission
[Fall M-F 9-12; Spring M/T 5-8 class.
to Teacher Ed.
Fall/Spring in schools 8-12 five weeks]
ENED 4475 Student Teaching or
12 ENED 4414, ENED 4415, and Approval of Field
Experience Application
ENED 4498 Student Teaching Internship (for
12 Provisional teaching license issued by state of Georgia;
provisional teachers only) [M-F 8-4]
full-time employment teaching English
Total hours this section:
30
ENED Proposal Package
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English Education Major—Course Requirements (Proposed)
Area F for English Education Majors
Course
Hours
Prerequisite
EDUC 2201Teaching and Schools in a Changing Society
3
ENGL 1102 & core social science course
EDUC 2202 Life Span Dev.: Ado/YA Emphasis
3
ENGL 1102 & core social science course
ENGL 2145 Intro. To English Studies
3
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2160 Am. Lit. Survey, Beginnings to Present
3
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2172 Brit. Lit. Beginnings to 1660
3
ENGL 2110
ENGL 2174 Brit. Lit. 1660 to Present
3
ENGL 2110
Total hours this section:
18
After taking EDUC 2201 and EDUC 2202 (both with teacher recommendation), passing Praxis I, & acquiring a 2.75 GPA, apply for
admission to the Teacher Education Program (KH 3024).
Upper-Level English Requirements (3 hours each section)
Requirement Category
XI.
Specific Upper-Level Courses
Prerequisite
Language
ENGL 2270 Language and Usage
ENGL 1102
[Note: or pass Dept. Language Exam]
Writing
ENGL 3310 Principles of Writing Instruction
ENGL 1102 ENGL 2270 or
Dept. Language Exam
Genres
ENGL 3220 Studies in Film
ENGL 2110
Cultural Studies of Literature ENGL 3320 Scriptural Literature
ENGL 2110
[Choose one]
ENGL 3330 Gender Studies
ENGL 3340 Ethnic Literatures
ENGL 3350 Regional Literature
ENGL 3360 African-American Literature
ENGL 3400 Survey of African Literatures*
ENGL 3500 Topics in African American Literature*
ENGL 3600 Topics in African Diaspora Literatures*
ENGL 4401 Topics in African Literatures*
Theory
ENGL 3391 Teaching Lit. to Adolescents
ENGL 2110
Studies in Lit. Before 1800
ENGL 4340 Shakespeare
ENGL 2110
Studies in 19th-Century
ENGL 4460 19th-Century American Lit.
ENGL 2110
Literature
ENGL 4470 19th-Century British Literature
[Choose one]
ENGL 4480 19th-Century World Literature
Studies in 20th-Century
ENGL 4560 20th-Century American Lit.
ENGL 2110
Literature
ENGL 4570 20th-Century British Literature
[Choose one]
ENGL 4580 20th-Century World Literature
Applied/Professional
ENGL 3035 Introduction to Language and
ENGL 2110
Sequence
Linguistics
Total hours this section:
30
After completing subject-area courses, STUDY and take Praxis II (KH 3018).
Pedagogy Courses
Course
Hours
XII.
Prerequisite
EXC 3304 Education of Exceptional Students
3
Admission to Teacher Ed.
EDUC 3308 Learning, Motivation, and
3
Admission to Teacher Ed.
Classroom Management
EDSM 4409 Instructional Strategies in Reading
3
Admission to Teacher Ed.
and Adolescent Literature
ENED 4414 Tchg. of Engl/LA 7-12 (TOSS)
6
ENGL 3310, 3391, and Admission to Teacher
[Fall M-F 9-12; Spring M/T 5-8 class.
Ed.
Fall/Spring in schools 8-12 five weeks]
ENED 4415
3
Admission to ENED 4414
ENED 4475 Student Teaching or
12
ENED 4414, ENED 4415, and Approval of Field
Experience Application
ENED 4498 Student Teaching Internship (for
12
Provisional teaching license issued by state of Georgia;
provisional teachers only) [M-F 8-4]
full-time employment teaching English
Total hours this section:
30
ENED Proposal Package
- 48 -
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