Assistive Technology: Using Switch-activated Toys and Devices for An Instructional Module for

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Assistive Technology:
Using Switch-activated Toys and Devices for
Preschool Children With Motor Impairments
An Instructional Module for
Special Educators and School Support Staff
Jayne Omori
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
Spring 2009
Background
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My first student with motor impairment
Professional Development 12-week course
Interest in learning and sharing
Create Web-based resource
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Specific to student needs
Free and on-demand
Eventually expand to parents
Relevant Research
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Special educators are left in a position to
make AT decisions in relative isolation
(Marino, Marino, & Shaw, 2006).
Training and support influences
confidence, and confidence can affect
the level of ability in delivering
instructional strategies that affect
student learning (Moore & Wilcox, 2006).
What is switch-activated AT?
What is switch-activated AT?
Why switch-activated AT?
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Gain motor control at young age for
future independence (Besio, 2002).
Vary toys, devices, and switches, and
“exploit” activities often (Ashton &
Johnston, 2003).
Project
Purpose
1.
Design and evaluate the effectiveness
of a Web-based instructional module
for special educators, which focuses on
switch-activated toys and devices for
preschool students with motor
impairments.
Project
Purpose
2.
Evaluate the effect the Web-based
instructional module had in increasing
special educators’ confidence to
implement switch-activated toys and
devices with their preschool students
who have motor impairments.
Web-based Instructional Module
Data Collection: Survey Monkey
URL http://www.surveymonkey.com
Contents, Features, Links
Prototype Module Testing
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Test Audience
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8 participants from 3 elementary schools
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13 students from UHM COE SpEd class
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17 participants after elimination process
Pre- and Posttest Data
100
17
80
17
17
13
60
14
14
17
16
14
10
40
15
15
17
9
20
0
Learn & Play
Cause & Effect
Switches
Pre-test
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Toys & Devices Switch-Activation
Positioning
AT Preschool
Post-test
100% Learn and Play for both pre/posttests
100% Switches, Toys & Devices, AT Preschool
Large gains in Switch Activation & Positioning
Small gains – insufficient, unclear information
More Quantitative Data
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Attitudinal Survey (12 Likert Questions)
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Design, Understanding Content,
Confidence
No strongly disagree
3 disagree in positioning question
2 disagree in graphics, cause/effect,
benefits of switch-activated AT
Qualitative Data
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Attitudinal Survey - positives
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format and pictures were excellent
“reflections helped bring it home”
it didn’t require too much time to complete
clear and concise
very informative and helpful
“Great introductory unit… but I was already
familiar with the concepts…”
Qualitative Data
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Attitudinal Survey – considerations
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not enough visuals
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create a direct link back to module
Informal Conversations
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Free access of the information they needed.
Access the site in privacy of their own homes
and at their own time, place, and pace.
Prefers this method of receiving information
as a busy teacher and mother of youngsters.
Liked the interactivity and immediate
feedback the embedded tests provided.
Enjoyed reading about my personal
experiences.
Summary
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Design of this instructional module
was effective and most participants
gained information from its use.
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Increased teachers’ confidence using
switch-adapted toys and devices.
Future Implications
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Refine module and surveys
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Share module
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Parents, Island, State DOE
Create similar modules
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Based on data and feedback
AT in other areas of disabilities
Subject Matter Experts
Final Comments
URL http://www2.hawaii.edu/~jhomori/SAT&D_index.html
Questions?
Contact Info
[email protected]
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