2014 Notes

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2014 Notes

5-6 scenarios

Inquiry (Field Study and Controlled Investigation)

Application

Systems

45 total questions (5 are pilot items)

35 Mult. Choice or Completion

5 Short Answer Questions

Types of Scenarios

Systems

Diagram of a system and some text about a specific system.

May include systematic observations, models, or openended explorations of a system.

Inquiry

Documentation of the steps of a controlled experiment or field study.

Data table with the results.

Application

Documentation of the use of the technological design process to solve a problem.

Table with test results.

50% - Cross-cutting standards

Inqiury (8 questions)

Systems (6 questions)

Application (6 questions)

50% - Content Standards

LS1 Structure and Function (9 questions)

LS2 Ecology and Populations (6 questions)

LS3 Biological Evolution (5 questions)

Biology EOC Test Map

EALR

1: Systems (crossed with Life Science and alone)

2: Inquiry (crossed with Life Science and alone)

3: Application (crossed with Life Science and alone)

4: Life science domain of EALR 4 (alone)

Percent of EOC

At least 15

20 – 25

15

45 – 50

Biology EOC Test Map

Life Science Domain of EALR 4

Percent of EALR 4

Items

Percent of EOC

Points

40-45 20-23 Processes in cells (LS1)

Maintenance and stability of populations (LS2)

Mechanisms of Evolution (LS3)

30-35

25-30

15-18

14-16

Biology EOC Number and Types of Items

Item Type

Multiple Choice

Completion

Short Answer

Total Items

Total Points

Pilot Items

Biology EOC

30-34

1-5

5

40

45

5

The Birds and the Beaks

Completion Item

1 point item

Can rank higher on the DOK scale than MC

Rubrics include lists of accepted responses

8

Foaming Spuds

Conclusion

5 attributes

New attribute- Scientific Explanation

9

Foaming Spuds

New Procedure

7 attributes

Extra Validity measure

Experimental Control Condition (when appropriate)

10

Field Study Template 7 Attributes

Similar to controlled investigations but…

Need to have 3 “conditions” instead of one controlled variable

Example: Which surface on the school campus will get hotter?

Compare asphalt, bare soil, and grass

11

Application scenarios describe a technological design process students use to solve a problem.

The problem must be one that involves a

Life Science System*

Blueberry Plant

List the steps of a technological design process to help farmers with improve yield of blueberry plants.

The Steps

Define the Problem

Gather Information

Generate Ideas

Test Ideas

Redesign as needed

Communicate results

Test Questions that kids will be asked?

Research the Problem

Criteria and

Constraints

Test a solution

Redesign

Jose and Tasha want to improve the soil in the garden by increasing the population of worms in the soil. Describe how to begin solving this problem.

Science Standards

Glossary

Systems.

An assemblage of interrelated parts or conditions through which matter, energy and information flow

.

Subsystems in this System

Producers

Herbivore

Omnivore

Carnivore

Decomposers

Self Regulating (Negative)

Generally over time

Self Reinforcing (Positive)

During short time periods

Systems it is connected to.

Biome

Seasons

Food Web

Carnivore population

Predict the results of a change in the system.

Migration of new carnivores into the area will change the balance of a carnivore population

Inputs that regulate the system.

Matterprey population

Energychemical

Equilibrium:

Static Dynamic input = output?

Terrariums with limited biodiversity may be used to model real food webs.

These models are limited because they rarely include all the species in an actual environment.

Output of the system

MatterCarnivore Population

EnergyChemical

Reliability: An attribute of any investigation that promotes consistency of results during repeated trials.

Validity: An attribute of an investigation that describes the degree of confidence that data collected and logical inferences are accurate representations of the phenomena being investigated.

SHORT ANSWER

Answer both bullets when there are two. Example:

Describe two ways to solve the problem. In your description be sure to:

Identify two solutions to the problem

Describe how each solution will solve the problem

Students very often identify two solutions to the problem, but do not attempt the second bullet.

They generally must at least attempt to address the second bullet to earn any points.

19

CONCLUSIONS

Write a complete comparison – don’t write, “ the amount of water does have an effect on the plant height.”

Instead, say:

Plant A grew the tallest;

Plant A grew taller than plant B and plant C;

The more water the plant had, the taller the plant grew

.

Include supporting data and/or descriptive text from the data table.

Quote from the data table.

Be specific – cite data exactly as given in tables.

20

NEW PROCEDURES

Be sure to write the steps for a procedure when asked, not a conclusion or prediction.

The manipulated (independent) and responding

(dependent) variables don’t need to be specifically named or listed (e.g.,

Manipulated variable is water temperature

) to receive credit for them; the variables just need to be used correctly in the procedure to be credited.

Sometimes students switch the identities of the manipulated and responding variables and contradict their procedure.

21

NEW PROCEDURES

Be very clear about what you are measuring.

Many students write “ record the data,” “measure the data,” or “watch what happens and record the measurements” without actually stating the

“ responding variable. They should write things like record the number of organisms in the sample area,” “measure the height of the plant,” or

“measure the time for seeds to germinate” to earn credit for the responding variable.

22

NEW PROCEDURES

Write procedures that use the manipulated

(independent) and responding (dependent) variables given in the new experimental or field study question.

Don’t use the same responding variable as was used in the original scenario. A procedure that does not use the correct manipulated variable cannot answer the investigative question and no points can be earned on the item.

23

GENERAL ISSUES

When given a model of a complex system lacking sufficient detail to make reliable predictions about that system, students are unable to describe the inadequacies of the model

.

Students have difficulty identifying positive and/or negative feedback systems.

Students have difficulty distinguishing between steps in an investigation that increased reliability and steps that increased validity.

Many students are unable to identify roles and relationships among DNA, chromosomes, genes, ribosomes and proteins.

24

GENERAL ISSUES

Students demonstrate misconceptions about cellular respiration, especially in the context of plants.

Students often are unable to identify the number of chromosomes in sex cells versus body cells or after the processes of mitosis, meiosis or fertilization.

Students struggle to identify the processes that regulate the flow of substances into and out of the cell (e.g., active transport, osmosis).

Students struggle with identifying the path of a carbon atom during photosynthesis and/or cellular respiration.

25

GENERAL ISSUES

Students showed little understanding of the nitrogen cycle.

Students demonstrate misconceptions about the mechanisms of evolution (e.g., genetic variability due to sexual reproduction, effect of natural selection on populations).

26

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