A Beginner’s Guide to (Cyber) Online Teaching: Pleasures and Pitfalls

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A Beginner’s Guide to (Cyber)
Online Teaching: Pleasures and
Pitfalls
American Psychological Association Annual Meeting
Toronto Canada
August 6-10, 2003
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Dr. Diane Finley
Prince George’s Community College

Dr. Ken Weaver
Emporia State University
Distance Education
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First appeared in 1892
catalogue of U.Wisconsin
First used by ERIC as a
descriptor in 1983
Any formal (or informal) delivery
of learning in which the majority
of the instruction takes place at
a physical (and temporal)
distance
Types of D.E.
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Mail correspondence
Print Materials
Telephone
Radio broadcasting
Television broadcasting
videotapes; ITV
CD/Videotape/audiotape
Email
Online
Philosophical Issues
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Learner centered
“Guide on the side”
Learner autonomy
Collaborative nature
Facilitator v. instructor
Jargon
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Cyberteaching
ISP – internet service provider
Asynchronous
Virtual classroom/ chat room
Face to face (f2f)
CMS – Course management system
(discussion board, bulletin board, forum)
Faculty Training Issues
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New paradigm for teaching
Technological competencies
Course design issues
Teaching as a skill
Time management issues
Support service issues
Misconceptions and Myths
About Online Learning
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Web classes are easy.
Work for web classes can be
done at my own pace – they are
self-paced.
Web classes don’t take much
time.
This is basically an independent
study, I don’t have to interact
with other students.
Learning Myths, cont.
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The instructor will “teach” me
everything I need, including all
technology related issues
The teacher will be available
24/7.
I don’t have to have a computer
or internet connection at home.
All materials I need will be
online (i.e. no more books).
Misconceptions and Myths
About Online Teaching
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I don’t need to know anything about
technology.
I have to know everything about
technology.
Technology makes things easy – it
won’t be a problem.
Teaching online is just like teaching
face-to-face.
Teaching online will take less time.
Teaching Myths, cont.
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Teaching online will be easy – I
can just post my lecture notes.
I can just post all required
information and instructions and
the students will read it all, no
more answering questions about
something already stated.
I’m good in the classroom, I’ll be
good online.
Online courses are teacher
centered.
Teaching Myths, cont.
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The class dynamics will be different
online; there won’t be any
interaction.
I’ll never get to know my students.
I can’t do active learning online.
I didn’t have any special training to
teach in the college classroom. I
don’t need any to teach online.
To Begin:
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Know your own learning style
Know your own teaching and
learning philosophy
Recognize your tolerance for the
unexpected
Acknowledge your own
technology literacy levels
Assess honestly your motives
and beliefs about online learning
Issues To Consider
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Faculty selection
Time demands
Equipment needs – both faculty and
student
Technology literacy requirements
Student expectations
Enrollment limits
Intellectual property rights
Contact Information
Dr. Diane Finley
Department of Psychology
Prince George’s Community College
301 Largo Road
Largo MD 20774
301-322-0869
[email protected]
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