FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Jayne Harvie 314 Signers' Hall

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:
Jayne Harvie
314 Signers' Hall
474-7964 [email protected]
For Audioconferencing:
Toll-free #: 1-800-893-8850
Participant PIN: 1109306
Chair PIN: 1109371
AGENDA
UAF FACULTY SENATE MEETING #156
Monday, February 2, 2009
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Wood Center Carol Brown Ballroom
1:00
I
Call to Order – Marsha Sousa
A.
Roll Call
B.
Approval of Minutes to Meeting #155
C.
Adoption of Agenda
1:05
II
Status of Chancellor's Office Actions
5 Min.
A.
Motions Approved:
1. Motion to Approve a Master’s of Education in Special Education
2. Motion to Approve a Graduate Certificate in K-12 Special Education
B.
Motions under Consideration:
1. Motion to Amend the Mandatory Placement Policy (writing sample
requirement) Review of the motion by ad hoc committee extended to
April 2009.
C.
Motions Disapproved: none
1:10
III
Public Comments/Questions
1:15
IV
A.
B.
President's Comments – Marsha Sousa
President-Elect's Report – Jonathan Dehn
1:25
V
A.
B.
Remarks by Interim Chancellor Brian Rogers
Remarks by Provost Susan Henrichs
1:45
VI
Governance Reports
A.
Staff Council – Juella Sparks
B.
ASUAF – Brandon Meston
C.
UAFT/UNAC
1:50
PHOTO SHOOT AND BREAK: Senate Representatives and Alternates
please meet at the lower multi-level lounge for a group photograph session
with Todd Paris before taking the break.
5 Min.
5 Min.
5 Min.
5 Min.
10 Min.
10 Min.
5 Min.
2:00
VII
Guest Speaker
A.
Robert Holden, Associate Director, Auxiliary and
Business Services
15 Min.
2:15
VIII
New Business
10 Min.
A.
Motion to Approve a Ph.D. in Indigenous Studies,
submitted by the Graduate Academic & Advisory Committee
(Attachment 156/1)
B.
Motion to Approve a Certificate in Pre-Nursing, submitted
by the Curricular Affairs Committee (Attachment 156/2)
2:25
IX
Discussion Items
A.
Proposed B.A., B.S., B.T. Program Option in General
Studies -- Dana Thomas (Attachment 156/3)
B.
Faculty Peer Observation Worksheet (Attachment 156/4)
2:45
X
Committee Reports
10 Min.
A.
Curricular Affairs – Amber Thomas / Falk Huettmann
B.
Faculty Affairs – Cathy Cahill
C.
Unit Criteria - Brenda Konar (Attachment 156/5)
D.
Committee on the Status of Women – Alex Fitts / Jane Weber
(Attachment 156/6)
E.
Core Review - Michael Harris / Latrice Bowman
F.
Curriculum Review - Rainer Newberry
G.
Faculty Appeals & Oversight – James Bicigo
H
Faculty Development, Assessment & Improvement – Dana Greci /
Julie Lurman Joly (Attachment 156/7)
I.
Graduate Academic & Advisory Committee – Ron Barry
J.
Student Academic Development & Achievement – Marjorie Illingworth /
Jane Allen (Attachment 156/8)
2:55
XI
Members' Comments/Questions
3:00
XII
Adjournment
20 Min.
5 Min.
ATTACHMENT 156/1
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
MOTION:
=======
The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a Ph.D. in Indigenous Studies.
EFFECTIVE:
Fall 2009 and/or
Upon Board of Regents approval.
RATIONALE:
See the full program proposal #20-GNP from the Fall 2008 review
cycle on file in the Governance Office, 314 Signers' Hall.
*************************
Brief Statement of Program:
Alaska Native people constitute 18% of the Alaska population and are the fastest growing ethnic
group within the state, making up nearly 25% of the K-12 student population. At UAF, Alaska
Natives make up 16% of the student enrollment, but only 3% of the faculty. In May, 2007 UAF
awarded a Ph.D. to the fourth Alaska Native to receive such a degree in the University's history.
To begin to address these disparities, the UAF 2010 Strategic Plan includes the following goals:
• Increase Alaska Native enrollment in graduate programs by 50%
• Increase the representation and retention of women and minorities in staff and faculty
positions
• Increase research programs that address the Arctic and its indigenous people
• Document and disseminate indigenous knowledge
• Generate innovative and useful applications of research that benefit the state of Alaska
The Ph.D. program in Indigenous Studies is intended to directly address these and most other
goals of the UAF 2010 Strategic Plan by offering an advanced program of graduate study
focusing on issues that are deeply rooted in Alaska's past and are destined to be an integral part of
Alaska's future.
The proposed Ph.D. program in Indigenous Studies will draw and build upon longstanding
academic and research capabilities at UAF. The program will offer an integrated course of
advanced graduate study consisting of a common core curriculum that all students will complete,
coupled with five thematic areas of emphasis from which students will choose a concentration:
• Indigenous Studies/Research
• Indigenous Knowledge Systems
• Indigenous Education/Pedagogy
• Indigenous Languages
• Indigenous Leadership
Ph.D. candidates will participate in research activities across a variety of academic disciplines
and applied fields at UAF. They will be encouraged to engage in comparative studies with other
indigenous peoples around the world and to focus their dissertation research on issues of
relevance to Alaska and the Arctic. Using the IGERT and Interdisciplinary Ph.D. model of
academic assignment, students' home base will be in the School or College of their major
advisor, who will also serve as an affiliate faculty for the program. The program itself will be
administered through the UAF Graduate School.
Program Objectives:
1. To provide the programmatic infrastructure for advanced, in-depth, interdisciplinary
graduate studies and research in academic fields related to the role of indigenous
knowledge and ways of knowing in the contemporary world.
2. To prepare graduates who are capable of conducting basic and applied research on social,
political, educational, economic and cultural issues of concern to people and communities
in the circumpolar north, with a particular emphasis on Alaska.
3. To expand the pool of knowledgeable and highly skilled Alaskans who can assume
leadership and technical positions with public and private sector organizations, including
universities, school districts, social service agencies, Native corporations, tribal
governments, and state and federal agencies in Alaska and beyond.
4. To provide a venue to sponsor state, national and international seminars, conferences,
exchanges and comparative research programs that bring people together around issues of
concern to Alaska, the circumpolar north, and indigenous people throughout the world.
5. To contribute to and tap into newly emerging bodies of academic scholarship that address
the role of indigenous knowledge systems in fields such as ecological studies, natural
resources management, health care. education, language revitalization, community
development, social services, justice, and Native studies.
6. To achieve economies-of-scale that put existing university resources and capabilities to
more effective and efficient use in addressing issues of concern to all Alaskans.
Preliminary General Catalog layout copy
Ph.D. Program in Indigenous Studies
UAF Graduate School, College of Liberal Arts, School of Education, and College of Rural and
Community Development
Ph.D. Degree
Minimum requirement for Degree: 18 thesis credits
The joint Ph.D. program in Indigenous Studies draws and builds upon long-standing academic
and research capabilities at UAF to offer an integrated course of advanced graduate study
consisting of a common core curriculum that all students complete, coupled with five thematic
areas of emphasis from which students choose a concentration:
• Indigenous Studies/Research
• Indigenous Knowledge Systems
• Indigenous Education/Pedagogy
• Indigenous Languages
• Indigenous Leadership
Ph.D. candidates will participate in research activities across a variety of academic disciplines
and applied fields at UAF. They are encouraged to engage in comparative studies with other
indigenous peoples around the world and to focus their dissertation research on issues of
relevance to Alaska and the Arctic. Using the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. model of academic
assignment, student's home base will be in the School or College of their major advisor, who also
serves as an affiliate faculty for the program.
In collaboration with the graduate committee, each student develops a program of coursework
and research that produces a unique intellectual contribution to the applied fields associated with
Indigenous Studies. Students elect to focus on one of the five thematic areas or they may choose
in collaboration with their graduate committee to draw on multiple themes to develop their areas
of knowledge and dissertation research.
Graduate Program--Ph.D.
Complete the admissions process and fulfill the following program requirements:
1. Complete the general university requirements listed in the UAF catalog
2. Complete the Ph.D. degree requirements listed in the UAF catalog
3. Complete coursework as determined by the student's graduate advisory committee
(completion of 18 UAF semester credits by distance or on-campus will constitute
residency)
4. Required and Elective Elements of the Plan of Study
a. Coursework: All Indigenous Studies Ph.D. students will be required to complete a
minimum of two research methods courses and select, in collaboration with their
graduate committee, 12 credits from the core courses in Table I (including CCS 608
and CCS 690), plus a minimum of 12 credits in an area of concentration.
b. Advancement to Candidacy will occur when the student demonstrates mastery in
understanding of the problems and theories of indigenous studies and in-depth
knowledge of the student's dissertation research topic area. Requirements for
Advancement to Candidacy are determined by the graduate committee of the student,
and shall be consistent with the candidacy requirements for Ph.D. studies at UAF. The
basis of the evaluation will be comprehensive written and oral exams.
c. Dissertation Defense Seminar and Oral Examination
d. Doctoral Dissertation (18 credits minimum)
5. Recommended additional academic experience
a. Students will be encouraged to enroll in a minimum of one semester of coursework at a
partner institution with program offerings related to their area of specialization.
b. Students will be expected to make at least one formal academic presentation at a
national or international meeting, as well as a community-level presentation in
Alaska.
c. Students will be encouraged to study a language other than English, as appropriate for
the thematic area in which they arc enrolled. Students who select the Indigenous
Languages specialty will be expected to acquire a minimum of nine credits in an
appropriate indigenous language.
University of Alaska Board of Regents
Program Approval Summary Form
MAU: University of Alaska Fairbanks
Title: Ph.D., Indigenous Studies
Target admission date: Fall 2009
1. How does the program relate to the Education mission of the University of Alaska and
UAF?
The Ph.D. program in Indigenous Studies will directly address the following goals of the UAF
2010 Strategic Plan by offering an advanced program of graduate study focusing on issues that
are deeply rooted in Alaska's past and are destined to be a vital part of Alaska's future.
• Increase Alaska Native enrollment in graduate programs by 50%
• Increase the representation and retention of women and minorities in staff and faculty
• Increase research programs that address the Arctic and its indigenous people
• Document and disseminate indigenous knowledge
• Generate innovative and useful applications of research that benefit the state of Alaska
The proposed program was developed by faculty in the UAF College of Liberal Arts, School of
Education and College of Rural and Community Development in response to a growing need for
"advanced graduate opportunities for Alaska Native scholars and leaders," as expressed in a 2004
resolution of the Alaska Federation of Natives. Details of the program grew out of a two-day
"Indigenous Ph.D. Planning Workshop" hosted by UAF in conjunction with the 2007 Alaska
Federation of Natives Convention and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. We invited
55 Alaska Natives (out of a list of over 100) with a Master's degree who had expressed an
interest in pursuing a PhD to provide input into the planning of the proposed Ph.D. in Indigenous
Studies. Following the workshop a survey form was sent to all the participants to obtain a more
systematic picture of the level of interest and the conditions under which students would enroll in
a Ph.D. program. The survey responses have served as the basis for many of the elements and
structure of this proposal. The level of interest in the program is high from both Native and nonNative potential doctoral candidates, provided there is a strong Indigenous core emphasis,
multiple avenues for access to the program (on-campus, distance education, intensive seminars,
etc.) and sufficient fellowship funding for financial support.
2. What State Needs will be met by this program?
In 2002, the Alaska Federation of Natives conducted a statewide survey to identify all the Alaska
Natives who had earned a Ph.D. (30), J.D. (32) or M.D. (12). Of the 30 Alaska Native Ph.D.'s at
the time, three had earned their degree from the University of Alaska, with one more graduating
in 2007. The dearth of Alaska Natives with advanced degrees has meant a paucity of indigenous
perspective in upper level leadership and professional roles, including as university faculty
members, where at UAF they currently constitute 3% of the faculty but 16% of the students.
Most often, upper-level expertise has to be imported from outside Alaska to fill advanced
professional and technical positions in the state. Businesses, government agencies,
nongovernmental organizations, policy institutes, Native organizations, academic institutions,
and other groups in Alaska today need professionals who have competencies in a wide set of
Indigenous issues, while also having the in-depth expertise in a specific problem area. The
Indigenous Studies program strives to meet these needs by training professionals with analytical
skills for understanding human resource problems and cultural sustainability issues.
3. What are the Student opportunities, outcomes and enrollment projections?
The proposed Ph.D. program will draw and build upon long-standing academic and research
capabilities at UAF to offer an integrated course of advanced graduate study consisting of a
common core curriculum that all students will complete, coupled with five thematic areas of
emphasis from which students will choose a concentration: indigenous research; indigenous
knowledge systems; indigenous education; indigenous languages; and indigenous leadership.
The specific skill set of the graduates will include quantitative analysis, scientific applications,
qualitative research methods, research design and program management, along with broad
conceptual frameworks for understanding the dynamics of social-cultural-ecological systems.
Based on current staffing levels and resource commitments, the program will accommodate six
new students each year for an average total enrollment of approximately 20 students spread over
three to four years.
4. Describe the Research opportunities:
Ph.D. candidates will participate in research activities across a variety of academic disciplines
and applied fields at UAF and with an international network of partner institutions. They will be
encouraged to engage in comparative studies with other indigenous peoples around the world and
to focus their dissertation research on issues of relevance to Alaska and the Arctic.
5. Describe the Fiscal Plan for development and implementation:
The faculty resources for implementation of the program will be drawn from reallocation of
existing workload in cooperating departments across the campus, with the only additional
funding being to support program operations during the summer. Facilities and equipment of the
Center for Cross-Cultural Studies will be utilized to house the administration of the program.
These existing institutional resources will be augmented by funding from the Andrew W. Mellon
Foundation to provide doctoral fellowships and student support services.
ATTACHMENT 156/2
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
MOTION:
=======
The UAF Faculty Senate moves to approve a Certificate in Pre-Nursing Qualifications.
EFFECTIVE:
Fall 2009 and/or
Upon Board of Regents approval.
RATIONALE:
See the full program proposal #77-UNP from the Fall 2008 review
cycle on file in the Governance Office, 314 Signers' Hall.
*************************
Brief Statement of Program:
This Certificate program consists of the courses that prepare a student to apply to the University
of Alaska Anchorage Associate of Applied Science in Nursing. UAA distributes the AAS in
nursing to each MAU and to specific campuses at each MAU on a rotating schedule. There is
need to provide a clearly identified pathway for students and advisors alike, so that each student
may proceed efficiently through the pre-requisite courses and be highly qualified for the
competitive admission to the AAS in nursing. Further, since only UAA holds the nursing degree,
it is not possible to admit UAF students into a pre-nursing degree status at UAF. Virtually all
financial aid grantors require that students be enrolled in a degree with a specific sequence of
courses. This certificate will provide that degree-seeking status to students, and will result in a
transcripted Certificate. Having pre-nursing students identified specifically within the UAF
system will also allow UAF faculty and administration to better track the demand for and success
of the UAA nursing program as it is distributed to UAF.
Preliminary General Catalog layout copy
Allied Health: Pre-nursing qualifications
College of Rural and Community Development
Tanana Valley Campus
(907) 455-2823
www.tvc.uaf.edu/programs/health/
Minimum credits for the Certificate: 37-42
The Certificate in Allied Health: Pre-Nursing Qualifications is designed to guide the student who
is preparing to apply to the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) Associate of Applied Science
(AAS) in nursing. The certificate includes all of the prerequisite and co-requisite courses for the
UAA AAS in nursing. In addition, it includes a clinical course. Students are strongly encouraged
to work in a clinical practice prior to applying to the UAA nursing program. Admission to the
UAA nursing program is competitive; while this certificate prepares the student to be highly
qualified, it does not guarantee admission to the UAA nursing program. Students who have not
completed high school chemistry will need to complete either CHEM 100X or CHEM 103X.
Students who have not completed high school algebra must take DEVM 105 or MATH at the
100-level or higher. Students who have completed high school algebra may take HLTH 116 to
review computation skills used in the medical field. Students must complete the Nurse Entrance
Test prior to application to the UAA AAS in nursing. Students should work closely with an
advisor while completing this certificate and preparing an application for admission to the
nursing program.
1. Complete the general university requirements
2. Complete the following certificate requirements (9 credits)
Communications
ENGL 111X – Introduction to Academic Writing
3
Computation
DEVM 105 – Intermediate Algebra
or HLTH 116 – Mathematics in Healthcare
or MATH at the 100 level or higher
3
Human Relations
PSY 101 – Introduction to Psychology
3
3. Complete the following major requirements (24 credits)
ENGL 211X – Academic writing about literature
or ENGL 213X (preferred) – Academic writing
about social and natural sciences
COMM 131X - Fundamentals of communication: group context
or COMM 141X – Fundamentals of communication :
public context
PSY 240 – Lifespan developmental psychology
HTLH 203 – Science of nutrition
3
3
3
3
BIOL 111X – Human anatomy and physiology
BIOL 112X – Human anatomy and physiology II
BIOL 240 – Beginnings in microbiology
4. Select one of the following clinical courses (4 – 9 credits)
HLTH 107 – Nurse Aide training
HLTH 111 – Personal care attendant
HLTH 113 – PCA to CNA bridge
EMS 170 – Emergency Medical Technician I
or other approved clinical course
5. Required credits
4
4
4
9
4
5
6
37-42
RESOURCE COMMITMENT TO THE
Certificate in Allied Health: Pre-nursing Qualifications
Resources
Regular faculty
(FTEs & dollars)
Adjunct Faculty
(FTE’s &
dollars)
Teaching
Assistants
(Headcount)
Instructional
Facilities
(in dollars and/or
sq. footage)
Office Space
(Sq. footage)
Lab Space
(Sq. Footage)
Computer &
Networking
(in dollars)
Research/
Instructional/
office Equipment
(in dollars)
Support Staff
(FTE’s &
dollars)
Supplies
(in dollars)
Travel
(in dollars)
Existing
New
Total
UAF/TVC
4 FTE
$364,000
4 FTE
$28,000
UAF/TVC
0
Others (Specify)
0
$364,000
0
0
$28,000
none
0
0
numerous
classroom
0
0
4 offices, each
0
about 140 sq ft
576 sq ft nurse
0
aide teaching lab
1800 sq ft biology
lab, 400 sq ft
biology lab
24 chair computer 0
lab
0
$200,000
0
0
$200,000
20% of 1 FTE
$20,000
0
0
20% of 1 FTE
$20,000
none
0
0
none
0
0
0
0
4 offices, each
about 140 sq ft
576 sq ft nurse aide
teaching lab
1800 sq ft biology
lab, 400 sq ft
biology lab
24 chair computer
lab
University of Alaska Board of Regents
Program Approval Summary Form
MAU: University of Alaska Fairbanks
Title: Certificate in
Allied Health:Pre-Nursing Qualifications
Target admission date: Fall, 2009
How does the program relate to the Education mission of the University of Alaska and the
MAU?
This program is proposed by the Division of Allied Health in the College of Rural and
Community Development. It is supported by the University of Alaska Anchorage and by the
Allied Health Alliance as a mechanism for identifying and advising students who are preparing
for admission to the UAA AAS program in nursing. The Certificate is similar to one at UAS.
Data at UAF was used to determine the number of students seeking admission to the UAA AAS
in nursing. That data includes admission to the Allied Health No Major status, the number of
applicants to the program and advising information from nursing advisors and others. UAA
school of nursing representatives reviewed the proposed certificate and suggested slight
modifications to it. The Certificate was modeled after the UAS Certificate in Pre-Nursing
Qualifications.
No impact is expected at programs across UAA since this is primarily a mechanism for
identifying and advising a group of students who intend to apply to the UAA school of nursing
for the AAS degree.
What State Needs met by this program.
The need for nurses within the state is well-documented. According to the Alaska Department of
Labor Statistics, there will be a 31.2% increase in the number of registered nurses employed
between 2004 and 2014. That statistic means that an additional 1530 nurses will be needed.
In response to that need, Statewide UA and UAA collaborated to develop the distance delivered
AAS in nursing. The success of that program has resulted in doubling the number of nurses
trained in Alaska within the past 5 years. However, for students attending UAF while
completing their general education and prerequisite courses, the career pathway has not been very
clear. Problems with financial aid and advising remain frustrating for students. To date, students
have selected several options: self-advisement, enrollment in degrees they do not intend to
pursue, or enrolling as AHNM majors. Many obtain excellent advising through the nursing
advisors at TVC; others flounder. Some enroll as UAA students, and then find that they are
unable to enroll at UAF to complete their prerequisites or that their financial aid has been sent to
Anchorage. We believe that the creation of the pre-nursing certificate will help direct students
more seamlessly into the nursing career path and ensure that they receive excellent advising. The
certificate will make it easier for students to apply for and receive financial aid. Lastly, the
certificate will allow UAF to clearly identify and track the students who are pursuing nursing,
and document the significant role UAF plays in their education.
What are the Student opportunities and outcomes? Enrollment projections?
The ultimate goal of this certificate is not actually the certificate in pre-nursing qualifications: no
market for a pre-nursing certificate exists. However, there is substantial need for nurses in our
state and in the nation. According to the Alaska Department of Labor (DOL) Statistics, there will
be a 31.2% increase in the number of registered nurses employed between 2004 and 2014. That
statistic means that an additional 1530 nurses will be needed. Students who complete the prenursing qualifications certificate and are not admitted to the UAA AAS nursing program will be
able to work immediately as nurse aides (or other clinical practitioners, depending on course
selection). The Alaska DOL estimates that between 2002 and 2012 there will be a 26% increase
in the number of CNAs needed to accommodate aging of the current staff and growth of new
staff. In addition, DOL projects a 42% increase in the number of Personal Care Attendants
needed in the workplace. Locally, Denali Center and Pioneer Home are the largest employers of
CNAs. Denali Center hires approximately 50 CNAs annually.
Describe Research opportunities:
Not applicable to this certificate program.
Describe Fiscal Plan for development and implementation:
We do not seek any additional funding in order to develop, implement or maintain this program.
All courses currently exist and are taught on a routine basis. Those faculty are supported by
general fund revenue. An administrative assistant provides support to the nursing program and to
the nurse aide program. The technology, classroom, labs, and offices are available.
ATTACHMENT 156/3
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
Proposed B.A., B.S., B.T. General Studies Degree Option
Brief Statement of Change in Degree Requirements:
This proposal creates two tracks for interdisciplinary baccalaureate programs; one for students who establish a welldefined interdisciplinary program of study early in their academic career and one for the purpose of degree
completion in General Studies.
The Academic Advising Center provides faculty and staff advisors for general studies (undeclared) students. Faculty
members serving in the Academic Advising Center will serve as the advisors for General Studies Degree Completion
students.
Justification for Action Requested:
The proposal establishes a degree completion pathway for students who have accumulated sufficient credits and
completed general baccalaureate requirements to graduate but do not have the collection of courses needed to meet
specific major requirements. The requirements for specific majors are not being changed so the quality of existing
programs is not being lowered.
Historically, the interdisciplinary program has been used to provide a path for those students who have in excess of
120 credit hours, have satisfied Core requirements and residency and 39 upper division credit requirements but do
not have a collection of courses that fit any established program. While it has often been cumbersome to piece
together an interdisciplinary program and establish a committee late in the students career this has been done.
However, this path has only been used for those students who learned about it or guided to it by the few advisors
who knew this could be done. We expect additional students could benefit from a degree completion program like
the one proposed. With one of the lowest graduation rates in the nation, UAF should seriously consider a degree
completion program.
Students who have used the interdisciplinary degree as a pathway for degree completion in the past have been of the
three following types in order of prevalence:
1) Students have transferred from other institutions with a substantial number of credits in a major not offered by
UAF. By completing our Core, residency, and upper division requirements this proposal would allow an efficient
degree completion path for these students.
2) Some students encounter gateway courses in their major. They make multiple attempts to complete the
requirement but continue to fail. For example, in the mathematics program students commonly struggle with
Abstract Algebra (MATH 405) and/or Advanced Calculus (MATH 401) in their senior year. These students
typically have completed all the other university requirements for a baccalaureate degree but will not earn a degree in
mathematics. This proposal provides a path for degree completion for such students. The proposed program
requires 130 credits, in part, so that students are encouraged to complete any degree they initially declared.
3) Occasionally, a student has a personality conflict with the sole faculty member teaching a major requirement
course that prohibits completion of the student’s original educational goal. This proposal provides such students a
path for degree completion.
Proposed Requirements:
The UAF interdisciplinary program provides flexibility to students who have well-defined goals that do not fit into
one of the established majors offered by the university. Two tracks for students; first, programs with well-defined
interdisciplinary goals that do not fit into established majors and second, a general studies degree completion option.
The program for well-defined goals is available to undergraduate and graduate students (see page 203 for graduate
information). Interdisciplinary studies, for both graduate and undergraduate programs, are administered by located
in the Graduate School office. Help with the application process, contact information for faculty advisors and
assistance for interdisciplinary students is available at 907-474-7716 or see
www.uaf.edu/gradsch/general/degrees/INDS/.
Interdisciplinary Goals Option
Students may submit a proposal for an interdisciplinary program after completing 15 credits at UAF as long as they
have at least 30 credits remaining in the proposed degree program. The proposed curriculum must differ significantly
from established degree programs at UAF and will require evidence that the necessary facilities and faculty are
available to ensure an approximation of a normal undergraduate degree. All general requirements for the B.A., B.S.
or B.T. degree must be met.
In developing an interdisciplinary proposal, the student should specify the degree (B.A., B.S. or B.T.), include an
explanation of how the proposed program differs substantially from established UAF programs, and include a
discussion showing that current UAF resources are adequate to meet the requirements of the proposed program. (A
minimum of two disciplines is required for the interdisciplinary degree.) The student then obtains an advisory
committee of at least three faculty members from the appropriate disciplines and holds at least one formal meeting
with the full committee to review the proposal. The committee will appoint a chair, review the proposed program,
select a degree title in concert with the student and make its recommendation. Applicants then submit to the vice
provost Dean of the Graduate School their proposal for the program they wish to pursue, specifying the degree,
proposed curriculum work sheet and rationale. The degree is awarded through the school or college of the chair of
the committee, subject to approval by the vice provostDean of the Graduate School.
Students interested in pursuing an undergraduate interdisciplinary degree can contact the Office of the Graduate
School and Interdisciplinary Programs for help in finding faculty advisors and developing their curriculum proposal.
B.A., B.S. or B.T. degree
1.
Contact the UAF Office of the Graduate School and Interdisciplinary Programs for materials and
procedures.
2.
Contact three faculty members to serve as the interdisciplinary studies committee.
3.
Prepare rationale/justification letter.
4.
Conduct committee meeting to finalize degree proposal, title of degree and assessment plan.
5.
Submit proposal to appropriate dean for approval.
6.
Submit to the vice provost Dean of the Graduate School approval.
Minimum credits required—130 credits
General Studies Degree Completion Option (may not be used as a double major)
Students may not declare this major until they have accumulated at least 100 credits.
B.A., B.S. or B.T. degree
1.
Contact the UAF Office of the Graduate School and Interdisciplinary Programs for materials and
procedures. Prepare and submit a rationale/justification letter
2.
Three faculty members serving in the Academic Advising Center or at Rural Campuses will serve as the
degree completion interdisciplinary studies committee.
3.
Prepare rationale/justification letter explaining the need for the degree completion program.
4.
Conduct committee meeting to finalize degree proposal.
5.
Submit to the Dean of the Graduate School for final approval.
6.
Complete all the requirements for the baccalaureate program including
a.
b.
c.
Completing the Core curriculum
Completing the residency requirement
Completing 39 upper division credits
d.
Completing the PRAXIS I pre-professional skills test. This test should be completed when Core
requirements are satisfied but may be taken the last semester in the program.
Minimum credits required—130 credits
ATTACHMENT 156/4
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
Peer Teaching Observation Worksheet
Pre-observation
Observer and faculty member should meet ahead of the course to be evaluated to discuss the
goals of the course and the specific class period. Observer and faculty member should both be
familiar with the observation worksheet before the observation takes place. Faculty member may
request that the observer pay particular attention to certain aspects of his/her teaching. This
process is meant to be a partnership and a positive experience providing useful information to the
faculty member. The observation is to remain confidential between the observer and the faculty
member unless the faculty member chooses to disclose the observer’s comments. The list below
is comprehensive; not every observation will include all of the specific areas.
Observation
1. CONTENT
Suggested considerations:
Main ideas are clear and specific
Sufficient variety in supporting information
Higher order thinking was required
Instructor related ideas to prior knowledge
Definitions were given for vocabulary
Comments:
2. ORGANIZATION
Suggested considerations:
Introduction captured attention
Clear organizational plan
Effective transitions (clear w/summaries)
Concluded by summarizing main ideas
Reviewed by connecting to previous classes
Previewed by connecting to future classes
Comments:
3. INTERACTION
Suggested considerations:
Instructor questions at different level
Sufficient wait time
Students asked questions; summary/review provided as necessary
Instructor feedback was informative and supportive
Instructor incorporated student responses
Opportunity for student-student or student-instructor interaction where appropriate
Good rapport with students
Comments:
4. VERBAL/NON-VERBAL
Suggested considerations:
Language was understandable
Articulation and pronunciation clear
Absence of verbalized pauses (er, ah, like, etc.)
Instructor spoke extemporaneously where appropriate, as opposed to reading from notes
Effective voice quality
Volume sufficient to be heard
Rate of delivery was appropriate
Effective body movement and gestures
Eye contact with students
Confident & enthusiastic
Comments:
5. USE OF MEDIA
Suggested considerations:
Overheads/Chalkboard content clear & well-organized
Visual aids can be easily read
Instructor provided outline/handouts where appropriate
Computerized instruction effective and appropriate
Comments:
6. OVERALL
a. STRENGTHS: (e.g. most effective teaching strategies, meta-curriculum, use of comparisons &
contrasts, positive feedback, opportunity provided for student questions)
b. Suggestions for Improvement: (e.g. work on answering student questions, use of time, class
structure, etc.)
Observation Notes
Time
Observations
Impressions/Questions
Post-observation
Observer provides the faculty member with specific, constructive suggestions and answers all
questions. Misunderstandings between the observations made by the observer and the
recollections of the faculty member should be discussed and resolved before the observer
provides the faculty member with the final report. Confidentiality is paramount throughout the
entire process.
ATTACHMENT 156/5
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
Unit Criteria Meeting Minutes
16 January 2009
1-2pm 214 ONL
Attending:
Brenda Konar, chair
John Heaton
Ray RaLonde
Mark Herrmann
Jing Zhang
John Gimbel (Math and Stats representative)
Criteria reviewed:
Math and Stats Criteria:
Question from J Gimbel: Did we get tracked copy?
Answer: Maybe not. We got one with CAPS but no color.
One problem may be that some of the ALL CAPS was in blue. Everything in blue was meant as
an explanation and will not be included in the overall criteria.
General comments: Evaluation for each rank
CBU does not allow for time measurements. J Gimbel will compromise by prefacing all time
statement with a qualifier. The committee will accept this but warns that this may not go past the
Faculty Senate because of the CBU.
The use of “normal” and “under normal conditions”. How is this defined? The committee is
concerned that junior faculty and the campus wide tenure and promotion committee won’t
understand what is “normal” for that department.
Compromise: will delete the second “normal” under Chapter 3, 1 Tenure. For 3. Associated
Professor, will delete “under normal conditions”
For all evaluations, it will be stated that they are only being judged based on current evaluations,
not (cumulative) annual evaluations.
Question from J Gimbel: What parts need to go elsewhere and what needs to be deleted.
John H: explanation remarks are not part of evaluation
Part of the problem here may be that we did not receive a tracked change version
Teaching:
Effectiveness of Teaching:
H. The committee wants this deleted. How do you measure high pedagogic standards? It also
needs to be re-worded so that it fits.
Compromise: delete “awareness of students’ needs”
The committee feels that I is redundant to B (Capital B: Criteria for Instruction). Compromise:
combine I with B
The committee feels that J needs to be clarified. It will be re-worded so that it can be used to
measure effectiveness in teaching
-Components of Evaluation:
The use of the word “normal”. After an explanation from J Gimbel, the committee thinks that
this is okay to leave.
The paragraph that starts “The department expects faculty with a 30%….” And the following
paragraphs are more descriptive than anything else. It is confusing and vague (and yet very
specific). The committee feels that this entire section should be removed or clarified. The
committee would like to see the bottom line with all the thought process taken out.
Compromise: delete the white paper
Move the 30%, 50% etc… to the end of 2.
J Gimbel needed to leave (2pm) so the plan is for him to re-write the criteria with our suggestions
and give us a new draft (minus the explanations)
SNRAS Criteria:
The committee felt SNRAS did a good job making the document more concise. The new draft
and explanation was easy to follow.
Some of the committee is now concerned about the use of “high impact”. Can SNRAS please
define and give examples of what they consider “high impact”.
The committee would like to see the one revision on “high impact” before approving.
Next Meeting: Feb 13 from 1-2 in 245 ONL (SFOS Dean’s conference room)
ATTACHMENT 156/6
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
Committee on the Status of Women (final version of minutes dated: 12 December 2008)
Tuesday Dec 9, 2008
1-2PM 718 Gruening - School of Ed Conference Room
Present: Diane Wagner, Cindy Hardy, Carol Gold, Jane Weber, Alex Fitts, Uma Bhatt, Kayt
Sunwood
1) Brown Bags
- February, March, and April
Suggested topics for the next brown bag
- Topics: 1) What can we as faculty ask for? And how to do it? (what courses you can teach?
Load? Time?)
2) Family Friendly Task Force Diane Wagner gave update
Met November 18th, participated in national webinar for the first part of meeting. 6 committee
members were present. Next meeting is tentatively scheduled for January 9.
- The Task Force feels it needs more quantitative information on campus child care needs.
- UA Child Care Needs Assessment survey report has come out, but more information specific
to UAF may be needed.
- Heather Leavengood, a staff member, is now on this committee.
Diane was tasked with looking into the Tenure Clock issue with Regents
- to stop tenure clock you must take FML, this is general practice. The regents policy does not
quite read like this interpretation. This needs to be cleared up because the regents policy sounds
like if you get paid then it will count. This is inconsistent with FML, which can be paid.
- See what Martha West has to say on this.
Have a longer meeting next semester (try for February) to discuss this.
3) AWHE/AAUW, Alex looked into this and has been corresponding with Joy. Identify
leadership and is mainly for administrators.
Steffi could not attend the meeting because she was out of town, but she has had a very different
experience with AAUW. I am pasting her comments below and in light of her experience, I
suggest we give this issue a second look:
Paraphrasing Steffi Ickert-Bond:
"I am not sure, but AAUW is not for administrators, I am a member. They support graduate
student and postgraduate student research. I received $20,000 during my dissertation from them.
... I think this is a good group. They do a lot of things nationally and the Fairbanks chapter does
some local outreach and has local funding for female students as well."
4) Skip agenda item until January meeting (how to pick new members).
(Minutes from January 27, 2009 meeting on next page.)
Committee on the Status of Women
Meeting Minutes for January 27 2009
Present:
Joseph Thompson, Carol Gold, Jane Weber, Renate Wackerbauer, Kayt Sunwood, Diane
Wagner, Steffi Ikert-Bond, Elizabeth Allman, & Alex Fitts
1) P&T workshop, Board of Regents conference room 109 Butro, April 24th 10-12 noon
Panel: Roxie Dinstel, Carol Gold, Alex Fitts, Renate Wackerbauer and Paul Layer
Action items
Food need to order in early April.
Ask Sine to make the flier and Kayt will ask her to send it to Jayne.
Ask Jayne to send emails out, mail 1 in March and mail 2 the week, put on UAF calendar (ask
Jayne).
Make sure there is a live connection for this workshop.
2) How to determine new members each year
So far we have asked for nominations and people were voted upon.
We discussed the committee choosing members as an option.
Arguments for why we should elect people to our committee were presented.
Electronic ballot without showing your names
Concerns about CRCD, lobby for CRCD folks to return the ballots.
Make sure continuing members are listed there.
Do voting electronically again.
The decision was made to continue the voting process, but revisit the voting again a year from
now.
3) Alaska Women in Higher Education
Uma, Sine, & Elizabeth were asked to serve.
Elizabeth will draft a letter suggesting that CSW can serve as a resource for nominating people.
Who should the letters be written for? Address it to Lauren, and cc Joan Braddock, Carol Lewis
and Chancellor. It may not change anything for this year but maybe for next time.
4) Fall Luncheon Speaker
Who should we invite? Lisa Murkowski’s name came up, Beth Kertulla or Anna Kertulla may
be good people speak. She has UAF connections.
5) Next meeting
February 19th 2009, 12-2PM
CRAFTING NEW FAMILY FRIENDLY POLICIES TO REPLACE THE CURRENT BOARD
OF REGENTS POLICY.
ATTACHMENT 156/7
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
UAF Faculty Development, Assessment & Improvement Committee
Meeting Minutes for December 2, 2008
Meeting called to order at 8:15 am.
Attending: Eric Madsen, Link Olson, Josef Glowa, Layne Smith, Joy Morrison, Channon Price,
Michael Daku, Julie Joly, Marji Illingworth, Dana Greci.
Upcoming Meetings
The FDAI Committee will meet from 8:15-9:15 a.m. on January 27, 2009.
Joy Morrison’s Report
 Joy pointed out that Professor Tara Gray’s workshop on publishing is part of the
DVD/video collection of the Office of Faculty Development: "Publish, Don't Perish: 12
steps to help scholars flourish."

The workshop on how to use Facebook as a classroom management tool was cancelled
but Joy bought a CD-ROM that contains a slide show with audio. A separate presentation
on Facebook will be rescheduled for spring.

Joy stressed the pedagogical potential of immersive environments by using the virtual
world of Second Life. There were presentations on this topic at the EDUCAUSE Annual
Conference in Orlando this past October. A presentation on Second Life is scheduled for
spring.

There will be the second in a 3-part series on Student Learning Assessment,
"Choosing a Published Instrument to Assess Student Learning" on Thursday,
December 4 from 9:00 am to 10:30 am in RASM 340.
Old / Ongoing Business
Status of sub-committees

Larry was not able to attend this meeting but he will be reporting on the Lilly Institute on
Innovations & Teaching, which will take place March 4-6, 2009 at the Princess Hotel.

Michael reported that sub-committee on Faculty Forums met once so far (Michael, Josef,
Thomas) to discuss possible topics for the forums.
Marjorie had a question about the format of faculty forum at TVC. Those who attended
that workshop agreed that it had been quite successful: three experienced teachers had
been invited to talk about how to manage and engage students at the beginning, the
middle and the end of the semester. The workshop consisted of short presentations, small
groups, and hands-on experience. The question of location arose once more. Most agreed
that the Honors House on
Copper Lane would be the better location because of its coziness and informal nature.
The committee members decided that two faculty forums should be scheduled for the
spring, i.e. at the beginning and middle of April. The committee will choose topics later.
The present members of the Faculty Forum Sub- Committee agreed that they would try to
find a convenient time to meet again before January 27.
Roy’s classroom observations
A major discussion focused on Roy’s visits to classrooms in order to help new faculty
fine-tune their teaching skills. At the last faculty senate meeting, concerns were raised
about having Roy evaluate new faculty’s teaching skills. It should be made clear to the
observed colleagues that Roy’s visits are only mandatory for new faculty without teaching
experience. Channon voiced a major concern regarding the reports on those classroom
visitations. Everybody present agreed that these reports should stay between observer and
those being observed. The committee members stressed that the terms “evaluation” and
“evaluator” should be dropped in favor of less threatening and more appropriate terms
such as “observations” and “observer.” The committee thought that both the
documents prepared by Roy and Julie will be very helpful for future classroom
observations. Whereas Roy’s short one page document is supposed to help the observed
faculty, Julie’s three-page document will serve as guidance to both, the observer and
observed faculty. Eric added an important comment by pointing out that interacting with
peers also means that we should try to avoid the impression that these observations could
be used for tenure evaluations. The observed faculty should no be required to sign the
document. Instead, it should state that observations have been done. It was also agreed
that Joy should only receive a list of names of people observed and not copies of Roy’s
notes.
New Business
 There will be Teaching Training Workshops on pedagogy and theory in the spring,
organized with the help of education faculty.

Every committee member was asked to check his/ her schedule, so that we might be able
to come up with a more convenient meeting time for the spring semester.
Next Meeting
 The next FDAI meeting will be January 27, 2009, from 8:15-9:15 a.m. Dana reported that
Karl Kowalski will be joining us at that meeting.
The meeting was adjourned at 9: 20.
Respectfully Submitted on December 9, 2008
Josef Glowa, Recorder
ATTACHMENT 156/8
UAF Faculty Senate #156, February 2, 2009
SADA Committee Meeting Minutes
January 16, 2009
Marji Illingworth and Jane Allen, chairs
Notes taken by Amy Keith (This meeting was recorded)
Meeting began at 2:20 pm in Chancellors Conference Room
Members Present: Carrie Aldrich, Dana Greci, Marjorie Illingworth ( co-chair), Jane Allen (cochair), Ron Illingworth, Joe Dupras., Colleen Angaiak, Joe Mason, Amy Kieth
December Minutes were amended and approved.
Meeting schedule was distributed. Jane or Marjorie will attend the Admin Committee meetings.
Old Business:
DEVE 109, DEVS 111, DEVS 112 were approved by the Faculty Senate and signed off by the
Chancellor.
The Motion for Writing Sample for Mandatory placement in English was approved by the
Faculty Senate and is in at the Chancellors office for discussion concerning budgetary impacts in.
Once budget affects are discussed it will be signed off on. A committee is meeting next week to
begin the discussion around implementation. Dana Greci and Ron Illingworth will attend that
meeting. Jane Allen and representatives of her campus will also attend. There are concerns that
some non-traditional students’ keyboard skills will affect WritePlacer scores.
Reading mandatory placement: Dev Ed Department through their curriculum committee is
working on this with English composition director and other CORE representatives. The
Department of Dev Ed will keep the committee updated.
Joe Dupras: comment on open enrollment does not mean that everybody is ready for college level
work therefore mandatory placement. Students require more support should receive it.
Ron Illingworth encouraged the committee to keep engaged in the mandatory placement
implementation process as there will be problems. Carrie concurs. Ron wants to know who we
need to talk to when there are implementation problems. Linda Hapsmith? Dana Thomas?
Marjorie will check on this and add to the minutes. Colleen gave another example, she fixes
with override.
Joe Dupras expressed a concern over High School students into English 111. Carrie talked
about early college classes at Effie Kokrine High School, and the strict compliance with
placement requirements and additional steps taken to assure student the opportunity for success.
Core Revitalization: Ron Illingworth summarized the charged or the Core Revitalization
Committee - reviewing the concept of the core. The goal is to look at this from the perspective
of a philosophical discussion of what is it that a person in the 21st century needs to know.
Secondly, how do we measure this? What do we as a university believe is needed and how do
we assess that? The SADA Committee members had several suggestions such as:
 what do students need to succeed - Learning how to learn
 computer skills. Valid vs trivial information from internet, scholarly vs popular.
 Beyond the classes type classes be technology intensive, similar to written and oral
intensive.. One course in a major field class and maybe one in a minor field. Generic tech
classes seem less successful. Jane suggests earlier than 300 or 400 level classes.
Specifically, non traditional students need help earlier. Joe Mason in Nome: CIOS 146
being revised. Hopefully done by the fall.
New Business:
What can this committee and faculty senate do to improve student success?
Jan introduced areas for future discussion
 Student learning centers and labs. Encouraging students to schedule tutor hours.
 Advising centers and use of best practices. Maximizing assessment tool such as
Accuplacer. Assuring effective cut scores.
 Course modification and academic program implementation such as Emerging Scholars
Program and Early College
 Student recognition – how can we use recognition to keep up student moral instead of
only terminal recognition (at graduation) - Not to downplay students that already get
good grades, but also recognize students at risk when they have success.
There were many examples and suggestions. The summary of the discussion - What will we do
next? What can we do to foster student success? Rural committees do some things that could be
used as model for Fairbanks, and vice versa. This semester committee will choose a few ideas
from further discussion and recommendations for implementation.
Another task for the semester is to look at the composition of the committee to We need to make
sure membership reflects committee goals. Also what can we do to assure broader attendance
from that membership?
Adjourned at 3:30 pm
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