5th Grade 2nd 9 Weeks IPG

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Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide
Social Studies
5th Grade
Second Nine Weeks
Teachers will find the following components provided in this document useful in their professional planning:
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Student Expectations
Recommended Pacing Schedule
Suggested Student Work Products
Suggested Assessments
Compendium of Recommended Resources
Suggested Accommodations for Students with Special Needs
Questions about the information found within the Instructional Planning Guides
can be directed to the Austin ISD Bureau of Curriculum’s Social Studies Department.
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
Colonial America
103
History-Periods, eras, and points of reference in history
Identify the major eras in U.S. history and apply absolute and relative chronology through
the sequencing of significant time periods such as . . . colonization. . . (L) B <Gr.8,11>
T1
108
History-Sequence events in history
Apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals,
events, and time periods. (L) B
T1
119
History-Figures promote the settlement of different areas
Describe the accomplishments of significant colonial leaders such as Anne Hutchinson,
William Penn, John Smith, and Roger Williams. (1B) B
T3*
History-Groups from selected societies and their contributions
Identify the challenges, opportunities, and contributions of peoples from selected NativeAmerican and immigrant groups. (4G) B
T3*
169
History-Origins of colonization and settlement
Explain when, where, and why groups of people colonized and settled in the United States.
(1A) B
T1
214
Geography-Translate and analyze geographic data
Translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as raw data to graphs and maps.
(6B) B
T2
219
Geography-One area is similar to, and different from another area
Compare places and regions of the U.S. in terms of physical and human characteristics.
(L) B
T2
220
Geography-Physical environment affects and interacts with the human environment
Explain the geographic factors such as climate, land use, vegetation, and water sources that
influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in the U.S., past and
present. (8D) B
T2
224
Geography-Humans have adapted to, and modified the physical environment
Describe ways people have adapted to/ modified their environment in the U.S., past /
present. (9A) B <WG8G>
T5*
225
Geography-Humans have adapted to, and modified the physical environment
Identify reasons people have adapted to and modified their environment in the U.S., past
and present, such as the use of human resources to meet basic needs. (9B) B <WG8G>
T5
227
Geography-Location and patterns of settlement in different areas of the world
Identify and describe the types of settlement and patterns of land use in the U.S.
T2
228
Geography-Location and patterns of settlement in different areas of the world
Describe clusters of settlement in the U.S. and explain their distribution. (8B)
126
(8A)
B
Weeks 1-3
(See AISD
website/matrix/resources:
http://www.austinschools.or
g/matrix/SocStudweb.htm
(Group project/
presentations)
[About 2/3 of each Social
Studies period]
B
Colonial Fair
Each student researches a
specific aspect of colonial
life, prepares a display
board including photos
and/or drawings with related
information, presents to
class then appropriate
grades and parents are
invited to a Colonial Fair to
showcase projects.
Criteria Chart and Rubric
With the class, develop a
criteria chart to indicate the
specific quality standards for
grading. From their criteria
chart, create a rubric, which
gives specific weight to each
required element.
For a grade, combine the
following:
1) Teacher assessment of
group work and
presentation
(according to rubric)
2) Group self-assessment
(according to rubric)
3) Class assessment of their
presentation
4) Content grade (according to
attached grading scale)
Because students will be
working in groups, you
need to supervise closely
to be sure all students are
participating and
contributing to the work.
Differentiation of
Assessment:
When assessing the students,
you should consider each
students ability level. The
higher the student, the more
depth you should expect in
their explanations and
analyses. Struggling learners
might not be expected to
include as much detail in their
explanations and descriptions.
T2
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
The American
Colonies
2
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
Colonial America
229
234
325
Geography-How population is distributed
Analyze how physical characteristics of the environment, such as climate, mountain
ranges, and river valleys influenced population distribution. . . in the U.S. during the
18th and 19th centuries. (L) B
T2
Geography-Geographic factors influence economic development
Analyze how physical characteristics of the environment such as climate, land and
water influenced. . . economic activities in the U.S. during the 18th and 19th centuries.
(L) B
T2
Economics-Economic patterns of different societies
Explain the economic patterns of early European colonists.
T3
(10B)
Weeks 1-3
Cont.
(Group project/
presentations)
Comparing the Colonies
B
327
Economics-Historic factors that influence a society’s economy
Identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in the U.S.
(11A) B
304
Economics-Concept of how people earn a living
Analyze how people in different parts of the U.S. earn a living, past and present.
T3
(14A)
319
Economics-Types of industry found in different societies
Identify major industries of colonial America, such as fishing, grain production, indigo,
lumber, tobacco, and whaling. (11B)
415
Government-Comparisons between different types of governments
Compare the systems of government of early European colonists. (15A)
603
Culture-How people and cultures are similar and different
Identify the similarities and differences within and among selected racial, ethnic, and religious
groups in the U.S.
(23A)
621
Culture-Relationship between art and literature and the societies
Identify significant examples of art, music, and literature from various periods in U.S. history.
(22A)
The American
Colonies
History Alive! Lesson 7
Students Learn about the
similarities and differences
among the New England,
Middle, and Southern
Colonies. This is a
problem-solving group
activity
Students work in groups to
create a billboard
advertising one of six
American colonies. Groups
will prepare short
presentations to convince
other settlers to settle in
their colony. Afterwards,
students read about the six
colonies and evaluate the
claims made on the
billboards and in the
presentations. Students
then apply their learning in
the processing assignment.
For a grade, combine the
following:
1) Teacher assessment of
group work and
presentation
(according to rubric)
2) Group self-assessment
(according to rubric)
3) Class assessment of their
presentation
4) Content grade (according to
attached grading scale)
Because students will be
working in groups, you need to
supervise closely to be sure all
students are participating and
contributing to the work.
Process Assignment
Imagine you are moving from
England to one of the 13
American colonies in the
1740s. Write a farewell letter
to your family. Your letter
should include:
--a date and salutation
--a paragraph that identifies
the colony in which you plan to
settle and your reasons for
moving there
--a second paragraph that
compares the colony you have
chosen with the two other
regions of colonial America.
--writing that is free from
spelling and grammatical
errors
Assessment 7 in History Alive!
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
3
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
Colonial America
622
See
next
column
→
Culture-Relationship between art and literature and the societies
Explain how examples of art, music, and literature reflect the times during which they were
created. (22B)
Weeks 1-3
Cont.
The American
Colonies
(Group project/
presentations)
Social Studies Skills
See attached page on Social Studies Skills for descriptions of these TEKS.
801-806, 809, 814, 815, 823, 824, 828, and 829.
History Alive! Life in
Colonial Williamsburg
Lesson 9.
Students take a “walking
tour” of Williamsburg to
learn about daily life in
colonial Virginia. Students
visit six stations that have
written and visual
information about an aspect
of colonial life and record
notes and complete a
“colonial” task.
Resources
Harcourt Horizons, Unit 3, The English Colonies, Chapters 3-7
Geoskills CD-ROM
History Alive! Lessons 7-9: Comparing the Colonies, Facing Slavery, and Life in Colonial Williamsburg
Austin Past and Present
Processing Assignment from
History Alive! In a writing for
understanding activity,
students write a letter
describing life in Colonial
Williamsburg and Compare it
to life in Austin.
GT Differentiation
Students may use the
multi-media tool
Austin Past and
Present for research
on our community.
(available on the
district server and in
all campus libraries)
Teacher Notes
Continue to work on the American Colonies group project or Colonial Fair projects
Vocabulary:
Puritan, charter, town meeting, specialize, expel, consent, fundamental, exports, imports,
triangular trade routes, militia, indigo, debtor, public service
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
Because students will be
working in groups, you need to
supervise closely to be sure all
students are participating and
contributing to the work.
4
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
Colonial America--Slavery
108
History-Sequence events
Apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals,
events, and time periods. (L) B
169
History-Origins of colonization and settlement
Explain when, where, and why groups of people colonized and settled in the U.S.
T1
T2
219
Geography-One area is similar to and different from another area
Compare places and regions of the U.S. in terms of physical and human characteristics.
(L) B
T2
314
Economics-Free enterprise system
Describe the development of the free enterprise system in colonial America and the U.S.
(12A) B
T3
326
Economics-Economic patterns of different societies
Explain the economic patterns of early European colonists.
T3
B
327
Economics-Historic factors that influence a society’s economy:
Identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in the U.S.
(11A) B
332
Economics-Historic factors that influence a society’s economy:
Identify and explain how geographic factors, such as harbors, mountain ranges and rivers
have influenced the location of economic activities in the U.S.
(14B) B
205
Geography-Construct and interpret maps and other graphics
Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to
construct and interpret maps.
(6A)
304
Economics-Concept of how people earn a living
Analyze how people in different parts of the U.S. earn a living, past and present.
Grade journals/ slide shows
according to the degree with
which they met the criteria
identified on the assignment.
B
Geography-Translate and analyze geographic data
Translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as raw data to graphs and maps.
(6B) B
T2*
History Alive! Lesson 8
“Facing Slavery”
Preview Activity for
Students:
Write a description of a
dilemma (situation that
requires you to choose
between evenly balanced
and usually unattractive
choices) that you have
faced. Explain how you
responded and why.
Lesson 8 is a response
group activity that examines
three dilemmas faced by
Africans during
enslavement—the European
slave trade in West Africa,
the Middle Passage, and
arrival in North America.
Students view images,
information, record notes,
and respond to critical
thinking questions.
Process Activity:
Pretend you are a West
African living in the early
1700s. Write a journal entry
describing one day in your life,
either in West Africa, during
the Middle Passage, or in
North America,
Your entry should include:
--an accurate description of
what happened to you on that
day.
--an explanation of the
dilemma you faced.
--an explanation of how you
dealt with the dilemma and
why you reacted that way.
(14A)
319
Economics-Types of industry found in different societies:
Identify major industries of colonial America, such as fishing, grain production, indigo, lumber,
tobacco, and whaling. (11B)
509
Citizenship-Rights and responsibilities of good citizenship:
Explain the importance of personal responsibilities such as accepting responsibility for one’s
behavior and supporting one’s family.
(L)
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
Student Presentations of
Colonial Research
T1
(1A)
214
(10B)
Weeks 4-8
5
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
The Revolutionary War
102
103
History-Concept of time
Create and interpret timelines.
T5*
(L)
B
History-Periods, eras, and points of reference
Identify the major eras in U.S. history and apply absolute and relative chronology through
the sequencing of significant time periods such as exploration, colonization, revolution and
independence…
(L) B <Gr. 8.11>
T1
108
History-Sequence events
Apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals,
events, and time periods. (L) B
T1
115
History-Notable individuals
Identify the accomplishments of notable individuals such as Carrie Chapman Catt, …[Jane
Addams]… who have made contributions to society in the areas of civil rights, women’s
rights, military actions and politics. (5B) B
T3*
119
History-Figures promote the settlement of different areas
Describe the accomplishments of significant colonial leaders such as Anne Hutchinson,
William Penn, John Smith, and Roger Williams. (1B) B
T3*
120
History-Contributions of political revolutionary leaders
Identify the contributions of significant individuals during the Revolutionary period,
including Thomas Jefferson, and George Washington.
(2A) B
T1
125
History-Figures shape the state and nation
Identify the contributions of individuals including James Madison and Roger Sherman who
helped create the U.S. Constitution. (3A) B
T1
139
History-Causes and effects of political revolutions
Analyze the causes and effects of events prior to and during the American Revolution such
as the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party,
Lexington and Concord, declaring independence, Saratoga, Yorktown, and Treaty of Paris of
1783. (2B) B
T1
History-Issues related to the founding documents of the U.S.
Identify and explain the significance of the Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of
Burgesses. (L) B
T4*
172
Weeks 4-8
Continued
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
Revolution Newspapers
Students create newspapers
reflecting both the Patriot’s
perspective and Loyalists’
perspective.
Other than standard form
articles, students might
include the following within
the newspaper:
1. Create, draw, and
explain a cartoon
incorporating a person,
political perspective, event,
etc… important to the
American Revolution.
2. Write an obituary for a
person involved in the
Revolution. Be sure to
include aspects of the
person’s life typically
included in an obituary.
Class-developed criteria charts
and rubric (include evidence of
understandings ad identified by
the TEKS).
Enrichment: Students might
write their articles from a
specific perspective (Loyalist
or Patriot)
History Alive! Lessons 1012
“Growing Tensions Between
the Colonies and Britain”
“To Declare Independence
or Not”
“The Declaration of
Independence”
History Alive! Lesson 13
The Revolutionary War
Experiential Activity This tug
of war simulation helps
students understand the
factors that ultimately
helped the American
colonies to win the
Revolutionary War.
Debrief/questioning after tug of
war.
Students complete graphically
organized notes showing
similarities between the tug of
war simulation and the struggle
between the Continental Army
and the British Army.
6
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
U.S. Constitution—Forming Our Government
174
History-Issues related to the U.S. Constitution
Summarize the events that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution, such as the
failure of the Articles of Confederation and the Philadelphia Convention of 1787.
(3B) B
T4
418
Government-Origins and developments in government
Identify examples of representative government in the American colonies, including
the Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses. (15B) B
T4
419
Government-Principles of government found in individuals
Analyze the arguments of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, including those of
Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry, and James Madison. (18A) B
T3*
424
Government-Principles of government in historic documents
Identify the purposes and explain the importance of the Declaration of Independence.
(16A) B
T4
616
Culture-Individuals and groups shape a society’s culture
Identify the political, social, and economic contributions of women to American
society. (L) B
T3*
133
History-Origins of customs and tradition
Identify anthems and mottoes of the United States and Texas.
Weeks 4-8
Continued
(L)
517
Citizenship-Effective leadership in a democratic society
Identify and compare leadership qualities, such as honesty, fairness, loyalty, and
determination, of national leaders, past and present. (20B)
621
Culture-Relationship between art and literature and the societies
Identify significant examples of art, music, and literature from various periods in U.S. history.
(22A)
622
Culture-Relationship between art and literature and the societies
Explain how examples of art, music, and literature reflect the times during which they were
created. (22B)
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
We the People
Lessons 1-5 in the We the
People book. Teachers
guide suggests many lesson
ideas that include individual,
small group, and large
group activities.
We the People (contact Jan
Miller, Director of LawRelated Education to get
class set of We the People
([email protected])
History Alive! Lessons 1415
“The Constitution”-Social
Studies Skill Builder
Students first read about
events leading to the
creation of a stronger
central government and
make the comparison
between the Constitution
and a three-legged stool.
Then students play a game
in which they are presented
with a series of situations
with which the government
might be faced. Students
determine which branch(es)
of government will resolve
each situation.
“The Bill of Rights”
Experiential Exercise In
this lesson, students will
work in mixed-ability groups
of four to create “living
pictures” that represent the
ideas in the amendments in
the Bill of Rights.
Processing Activity for
students:
Find a newspaper article that
describes an action carried out
by one branch of the federal
government. Write a summary
of the article that includes:
--a sentence that states
whether the action was carried
out by the legislative,
executive, or judicial branch.
--a description of the power(s)
that the branch exercised.
--writing that is free of spelling
and grammatical errors.
7
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Fifth Grade
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
Suggested Student Work
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
Suggested Assessment
#
Obj.
Products
Student Expectation
Resources:
Teacher Notes:
Harcourt Horizons Unit 4, Chapters 8-10
During this unit, divide the language arts class into 3 groups and have them complete book
Gazeteer, Index, and Bibliographical Dictionary
studies on the following Time for Kids readers: John and Abigail Adams, Victory at Yorktown,
School library materials
and Travels of the Declaration of Independence. As they present their book shares, they
Computer-based encyclopedias
should lead discussions about their books.
Internet
History Alive! Lessons 10-15
Vocabulary: Constitutional Convention, executive branch, legislative branch, judicial branch,
We the People (contact Jan Miller, Director of Law-Related Education to get class set of We
amendments, liberties/freedoms, rights of the accused
the People ([email protected])
Technology
www.harcourtschool.com Resources / activities and links related to American history.
www.americaslibrary.gov Library of Congress site – Information on the states in the U.S.
www.nara.gov
National Archives – Links to all presidential libraries
http://www.kids.house.state.tx.us/
www.tutorials.historyalive.com
Differentiation:
For enrichment, students can develop a Revolutionary War Game, focusing on geography,
dates and map skills.
Principles of Learning,
Academic Rigor: Students will write information learned and
synthesize it through art (cartoons), writing and oratory.
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
8
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
U.S. Constitution—Forming Our Government
125
155
174
History-Historical figures shape the state and nation
Identify the contributions of individuals including James Madison and Roger Sherman
who helped create the U.S. Constitution. (3A) B
T1
Weeks 4-8
Continued
History-Historical development of social issues
Analyze the impact of slavery on different sections of the United States. (L)
T1
2 days: Students read from
text (pg. 338-357) and
complete chapter lessons
T1
2 days: Groups write
constitutions for their school
T4
1 day: Compromise among
groups and finalize one
class constitution for their
school.
B
History-Historical Issues related to the U.S. Constitution
Summarize events that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution, such as the failure
of the Articles of Confederation, in addition to republicanism and federalism.
(17B)
B
410
Government-Powers of governments
Identify the reasons for and describe the systems of checks and balances outlined in
the U.S. Constitution, in addition to republicanism and federalism. (17B) B
418
Create a Constituion
Observation of student
participation.
Final student products and
presentation at the end of the
week.
T4
Government-Origins and developments in government
Identify examples of representative government in the American colonies, including
the Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses. (15B) B
419
T4
Government-Principles of government found in individuals
Analyze the arguments of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, including those of
Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry, and James Madison. (18A) B
420
T4
Government-Purpose and functions of the U.S. Constitution
Explain the purposes of the U.S. Constitution as identified in the Preamble to the
Constitution. (16B) B
421
T4
Government-Purpose and functions of the U.S. Constitution
Define the term amend and explain how and why the Constitution can be amended.
(L) B
428
T4
Government-Relationship between national and state governments
Distinguish between national and state governments and compare their
responsibilities in the U.S. federal system. (17C) B
518
T4*
Citizenship-Fundamental rights in a constitutional government
Summarize the reasons for the creation of the Bill of Rights. (21A)
Social Studies MOY
Benchmark
Students in Grades 4-11
will take the Middle of the
Year Benchmark in Social
Studies. Testing will be
from November 6 to
December 21, 2007. The
deadline for scanning all
data will be December 21,
2007
B
520
T4*
Citizenship-Fundamental rights in a constitutional government
Summarize selected amendments to the U.S. Constitution such as those that extended
voting rights of U.S. citizens. (21B) B
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
9
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
The Election Process
807
Social Studies Skills-Organize and interpret information
Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals
including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.
(25C) B
T5
Social Studies Skills-Create visual and written materials
Interpret and create databases, research outlines, biographies, and visuals including
graphs, charts, timelines, and maps. (L) B
T5
Student poster or campaign
button will be judged by the
class. Did the poster or button
serve as good advertising for
the candidate? Why or why
not?
Social Studies Skills- Locate, differentiate, and use primary and secondary sources
Differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as
computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and
artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas.
(25A) B
T5
Teacher asks, has everyone
registered to vote on Election
Day?
818
Social Studies Skills- Identify and support different historic points of view
Identify different points of view about an issue or topic.
(25D) B
T5
823
Social Studies Skills-Apply critical thinking skills to gather and analyze social studies
information
Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying, cause and effect
relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making
generalization and predictions, and drawing interference and conclusions. (25B) B
404
Government-Role, selection, and responsibilities of authority figures.
Analyze and evaluate the process of electing the President of the United States and other
local, state and national officials. (L)
402
Government-Purpose of rules and laws
Give examples of rules or laws that establish order, provide security, and manage conflict in
the U.S. (L)
415
Government-Comparisons between different types of governments
Compare the systems of government of early European colonists. (15A)
517
Citizenship-Effective leadership in a democratic society
Identify and compare leadership qualities, such as honesty, fairness, loyalty and
determination of national leaders, past and present. (20B)
812
815
Weeks 4-8
Continued
Election
Process
Students begin planning for
the mock election by voter
registration and political
debates.
Class conducts a debate on an
issue of concern and votes to
see which candidate was most
convincing.
T5
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
Political Campaigns
Students design a political
campaign poster or button
about an issue or candidate
that they would vote for.
“The care of human life
and happiness and not
their destruction is the
first and only legitimate
object of good
government.”
Thomas Jefferson to
Maryland Republicans,
1809
10
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Fifth Grade
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
Suggested Student Work
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
Suggested Assessment
#
Obj.
Products
Student Expectation
Resources
Teacher Notes
Vocabulary: U.S. Constitution, Articles of Confederation, republicanism, federalism, checks
Harcourt Horizons: U.S. History Unit 5; Chapter 10 (pgs. 347-379) Constitution pages [Lessons 1-5]
and balances, Mayflower Compact, Virginia House of Burgesses, political campaign,
Harcourt Horizons: U.S. History Unit 8; The United States and the World: Lesson 4 (government and
Federalists, Anti-Federalists, preamble, amend, federal, unalienable, democratic society,
people, pgs. 638-647)
political parties, Bill of Rights, constitutional government, due process
History Alive! Lessons 14-15
Differentiation: Because the products described are a group product and an individual
“Time for Kids” reader “Election 2000”
We the People Level 1 (contact Jan Miller, Direction of Law-Related Education to get class set)
product that is rather concrete in nature, students with limited writing skills have an opportunity
[email protected]
to excel or at least to equal their peers. Students with dyslexia, learning disabilities and limited
English proficiency often have much stronger verbal skills than written. These activities
www.kidsvotingusa.org (you must register for this site)
require much group discussion and class discussion. The verbal nature of this sharing can
www.nationalgeographic.com/mapmachine
encourage struggling learners to participate more fully (especially when given positive
[email protected] (Invite a local election official to talk to the class through the Secretary
encouragement and adequate wait time.)
of State.)
Extension: Each class selects two students to meet as a joint committee to iron out
www.house.gov/Constitution/Constitution (has text of Constitution, as well as notes describing which
articles were affected by later amendments.)
differences between class constitutions.
http://memory.loc.gov/const/fed/fedpapers.html (learn about the 85 separate papers in support of
ratification of the new Constitution, published between 1787 and 1788. Includes other important
documents.)
http://odur.let.rug.nl/~usa/D/1776-1800/constitution/confart.htm (includes links to each of the separate
articles from a Hypertext on American History)
Principles of Learning,
http://www.worldalmanacforkids.com/explore/presidents/madison_james.html (learn about James
Clear Expectations teaching tip: It is important that criteria charts are
Madison and the important events that occurred during his presidency.)
aligned with the standards (student expectations). After the chart is created,
http://bensguide.gpo.gov/ Ben’s guide to U.S. Government for Kids.
students should take responsibility for judging their own work according to
the expectations.
Television: Students can watch political ads or collect political ads from newspapers/magazines to help
Academic Rigor, Accountable Talk, and Socializing Intelligence are all
them in designing a political poster or button choosing a topic or person to campaign for or against. It
vital to the success of this learning experience.
could be a local of school issue such as adopting a dress code or placing special equipment on the
playground. Students can also monitor local news stations for use of propaganda or misleading
information in political advertising.
Project V.O.T.E CD, Mock Election
http://www.cityofaustin.org/carver/ George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center
www.tutorial.historyalive.com
http://www.texaslre.org/ Law Related Education with lessons pertaining to the Constitution
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
11
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
Framing the Constitution
103
History-Periods, eras, and points of reference in history
Identify the major eras in U.S. history and apply absolute and relative chronology
through the sequencing of significant time periods. (L) B
T1
Weeks 4-8
continued
Governing a
New Nation
(See attached
“Governing a
New Nation”)
This project will
extend for four
weeks.
Commemorative Plaque
Students read p. 65-67 in
We the People (see
resource section) and
gather information to design
a commemorative plaque to
honor one of the three
“Framers” of the
Constitution.
125
History- Figures shape the state and nation
Identify the contributions of individuals including James Madison and Roger Sherman
who helped create the U.S. Constitution. (3A) B
T1
174
History-Issues related to the U.S. Constitution
Summarize the events that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution, such as the
failure of the Articles of Confederation and the Philadelphia Convention of 1787.
(3B) B
T1
Government-Structure of governments
Identify and explain the basic functions of the 3 branches of government. (17A) B
<Gr.8,16D>
T1
410
Government-Powers of government
Identify the reasons for and describe the system of checks and balances outlined in
the U.S. Constitution in addition to republicanism and federalism. (17B) B
T4
419
Government-Principles of government found in individuals
Analyze the arguments of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, including those of
Alexander Hamilton, Patrick Henry, and James Madison. (18A) B
T4
Student Research
Activity: Students use
online resources to answer
the following questions:
1) Who are the people who
represent Texas in the
United States Senate?
2) How many
representatives does Texas
have in the United States
House of Representatives?
Who is your representative?
421
Government-Purpose and functions of the U.S. Constitution
Define the term “amend” and explain how and why the Constitution can be amended.
(L) B
T4
Students conduct a mock
election.
428
Government-Relationship between national and state governments
Distinguish between national and state governments and compare their
responsibilities in the U.S. federal system. (17C) B
T4
518
Citizenship-Fundamental rights in a constitutional government
Summarize the reasons for the creation of the Bill of Rights. (21A) B
T4*
520
Citizenship-Fundamental rights in a constitutional government
Summarize selected amendments to the U.S. Constitution such as those that extended
voting rights of U.S. Citizens. (21D) B
T4
807
Social Studies Skills-Organize and interpret information
Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals
including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps. (25C) B
T4
406
1.Create a class-developed
criteria chart for the
commemorative plaque
(variations as needed)
2. Develop rubrics from criteria
chart. (Include TEKS content
and skills in the rubric.)
.
Teacher observes the fairness
of the election process:
1. Were the ballots readable?
2. Did the students vote
privately?
3. Were the votes counted
correctly?
.
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
Project Guidelines:
12
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
Governing a New Nation
815
Social Studies Skills-Locate, differentiate, and use primary and secondary sources
Differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as
computer software; interviews; biographies, oral, print, and visual materials; and
artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas. (25A) B
T5
818
Social Studies Skills-Identify and support different historic points of view
Identify different points of view about an issue or topic. (25D) B
T5
823
Social Studies Skills-Apply critical thinking skills to gather and analyze social studies
information
Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying, cause-and-effect
relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making
generalization and predictions, and drawing and inferences and conclusions.
(25B)
B
T5
824
402
Weeks 4 – 8
(continued)
Social Studies Skills-Identify and interpret main ideas
Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication. (26B)
Government-Purpose of rules and laws
Give examples of rules or laws that establish order, provide security, and manage conflict in
the U.S. (L)
502
Citizenship-Customs, symbols, and celebrations
Recite and explain the meaning of The Pledge of Allegiance to the U.S. and Texas Flags.
(18C)
517
Citizenship-Effective leadership in a democratic societyIdentify and compare leadership qualities, as honesty, fairness, loyalty, and determination of
national leaders, past and present. (20B)
801
Social Studies Skills-Use social studies terminology
Use social studies terminology correctly. (26A)
803
Social Studies Skills-Use standard grammar
Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation. (26E)
804
Social Studies Skills-Express ideas orally
Express ideas orally based on research and experiences. (26C)
805
Social Studies Skills-Interpret and use sources of evidence
Use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index, as well as
keyword computer searches, to locate information. (L)
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
Students create in their
Interactive Notebooks a
timeline for The Confederate
Period and The Constitutional
Convention.
Students write in their
Interactive Notebooks
Teacher does an assessment
of the Bill of Rights, asking
students to independently write
the five discussed in class and
explain why each is important
to our America way of life.
Teacher checks student
notebooks for accuracy.
1. The difference and
similarities of state and
national governments.
2. State the 3 branches of
government with the reasons
for each branch.
3. Describe the terms
Republicanism and
Federalism.
4. Create poster: Students
draw/construct tree with three
branches and label each
branch (of government); add
leaves which are labeled with
the duties/responsibilities of
each branch of government
and the members of each
branch. Frame is drawn
around the whole, mentioning
the “framers of the
Constitution.
Teacher asks each student to
find a partner and discuss the
three items requested to put
into their Interactive Notebook
this week.
The teacher develops a rubric
(with the correct answers) for
the student listening to answer.
The scores for the correct
answer are:
1
= 20 points
2
= 60 points
3
= 20 points
13
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
#
Obj.
Student Expectation
Fifth Grade
Suggested Student Work
Products
Suggested Assessment
Governing a New Nation
806
Social Studies Skills-Interpret and use sources of evidence
Use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple sources of
evidence. (L)
808
Social Studies Skills-Obtain information using a variety of oral resources
Obtain information about a topic using a variety of oral sources such as conversations,
interviews, and music. (L)
809
Social Studies Skills-Obtain information using a variety of visual resources
Obtain information, including historical and geographic data about using a variety or print,
oral, visual, and computer sources. (L)
811
Social Studies Skills-Create visual and written materials
Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers,
outlines, and bibliographies. (26D)
819
Social Studies Skills-Identify and support different historic points of view
Identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced the participants in an event. (25E)
829
Social Studies Skills-How to evaluate social studies data
Use historical, geographic, and statistical information from a variety of sources to answer
questions and make inferences about relationships in social studies. (L)
Week 9
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
Student read about the
history of The Star Spangled
Banner and sing it together
as a class.
Students recite the national
anthem individually to the
teacher.
Completion of the
“Governing a New Nation”
project.
Teacher will assess each
student project individually as
the choices were numerous.
However, students must have
all of the information requested
in the handout, which will equal
one-half of their grades.
14
Austin ISD Instructional Planning Guide – Social Studies
©2009-2010 Austin Independent School District
Second Nine Weeks
Fifth Grade
Matrix Strand
Matrix
TAKS
Suggested Student Work
TEKS Knowledge and Skills
Time/Pace
Suggested Assessment
#
Obj.
Products
Student Expectation
Resources
Teacher Notes
Vocabulary: political revolution, American Revolution, military institution, Articles of
Harcourt Horizons: U.S. History Unit 5, Chapter 10 (pgs. 344-381)
Encyclopedias
Confederation, Philadelphia Convention of 1787, 3 branches of government, legislative,
executive, judicial, Federalists, Anti-Federalists, U.S. Constitution, amend, federal system,
“Time for Kids” reader: “The Star Spangled Banner”
unalienable rights, citizenship, democratic process, protective tariffs, taxation, liberty, equality,
union, founding fathers
We the People (contact Jan Miller, Director of Law-Related Education to get class set
([email protected])
Internet Resources:
http://bensguide.gpo.gov (Outstanding kid-friendly site! Let Ben Franklin explain the branches of the
U.S. Government and how they started. You can learn about citizenship, elections, how laws are made,
national vs. state government and lots more.)
http://ushistory.org/franklin/ (Detailed guide to Ben Franklin and his life. Includes games, a timeline, and
his biography and quotes.)
http://www.cityofaustin.org/carver/ George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center
http://bensguide.gpo.gov/ Ben’s guide to U.S. Government for Kids.
http://www.lrl.state.tx.us/citizenResources/ContactLeg.html Legislative Reference Library of Texas
Principles of Learning
It is important to be clear on the expectations for each project on the list.
Because many of the projects require analysis and explanations, this is a
good time to help the students develop their social work skills. Socializing
Intelligence should be directly discussed, modeled, and even role-played,
in order for the students to adopt it as part of their own thinking and
learning style. Along with the opportunity to do their research and learning
together, the students should be reminded and encouraged to hold one
another accountable through Accountable Talk. The flexibility of choice
allows students to choose projects that fit their own learning style, but any
combination, as long as teachers expect each individual student’s best will
guarantee an environment of Academic Rigor.
Note: Many of the matrix items can be covered simultaneously
(TEKS);T=TAKS; B=Benchmark; [ ]=not tested on TAKS
L=Local Expectations; Italics = Local Specificity
< > TAKS support for specific grade(s) and not all three grades
* TEKS Strand matches different TAKS Objective
15
Possible Accommodations for Students with Special Needs
Reading













Emphasis on major points
Pre-teach vocabulary to
ensure understanding
Provide page numbers to
specific answers
Use brief conferences to
ensure comprehension
Tape text
Read orally
Use organizers, visual aids
Teach comprehension
strategies
Highlight materials
Peer reading
Ask leading questions to
help focus reading on
important points
Have students list
important people, facts,
after reading
Provide a reading guide
(leading questions to
answer)
Writing









Allow student to select
method of writing (cursive,
manuscript, assistive
technology)
Oral response (taperecord)
Provide student with hard
copy of notes or fill in the
blank
Reduce amount of copying
from board
Check for understanding of
content
Don’t penalize for spelling
or grammatical errors
Provide graphic organizer
(i.e. Inspiration® software,
chart, map, graph, picture)
Provide outline
Accentuate positive
aspects of student writing
Assignment Completion











Reduce assignments
Reduced number of
problems
Provide hard copy of teacher
expected work
Extra time for response, in
class work, homework
Alternate projects
Provide multiple
opportunities to learn
content: cooperative
learning, choral responses,
hands-on participation
Assignment contracts
Provide opportunities for
extra credit
Repeat directions or have
student repeat
Provide directions orally, in
writing, and show model
Task analyze – break down
the steps and teach one at a
time, gradually adding
additional steps
Student Assessment












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
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Alternate form of exam
(multiple choice vs. short
answer, oral vs. written essay)
Open book test
Open note test
Oral tests
Oral responses
Extended time
Provide a study guide
Opportunity to retake an exam
Allow test corrections
Provide extra credit
opportunities
Provide a concrete example of
how students are to respond
Provide an alternative test sight
Give practice test prior to
actual test
Avoid unnecessary words that
do not help student select the
correct answer
Avoid choices such as “ A and
B”, “all of the above”, or “none
of the above” on multiple
choice test
Provide a word bank for fill in
the blank items
NOTE: Each campus should consult with their department chair or student’s case manager when question arise on what is an allowable accommodation.
Teachers should also refer to each student’s IEP/Accommodation and Modification page.
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