Introduction ECEN 2060 Lecture 1 Fall 2013

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Introduction
ECEN 2060
Lecture 1
Fall 2013
Instructor

Instructor: Prof. Frank Barnes

ECOT 250, 303-492-8225, [email protected]

Office hours: TBD

Web Manager: Kimberly Newman Assistant Professor Adj.

Grader: Michelle Lim <[email protected]>
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Text: “Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems” Second
Edition by Gilbert Masters
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The overall objective of this class is to provide an
introduction to electrical generation and power
distributions systems including renewable energy.
1. Discussion of the electrical power industry and
drivers for change.
2. Review of electrical circuits and electrical power
distribution systems
3. Review of Solar Power Generation
4. Wind Power Systems
5. Other Renewable Energy Systems
6. Smart Grids, Energy Storage, Demand Side
Management
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Additional Objectives
Some understanding of the complexity of the
problems.
A. The size and scope of the electrical energy system.
• The complexity of the Grid and problems of reliability.
B. The coupling to the standard of living and population
growth.
C. The complexity of the climate change forecasting
D. Economic Issues
E. The importance of the Political And Regulatory
Structures.
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Course Operations
• There will be reading of about 10 to 15 pages a day
required on the average if we are to cover the
material in the book.
• There will be a short quiz every Monday morning.
This will be graded at either zero or ten, with 10
given for right answers only on numerical problems.
• There will be 2 or 3 1-hour tests worth 100 points
each. The third test will be given if we have time
and if it looks likely to be helpful .
• The final exam will be worth 200 points.
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Course Operations
• There will be a term paper required of about 10
pages to allow you to go beyond the text into the
literature on a topic of interest to you. This paper
will be worth 50 points
• The final grade is not taken from a straight sum of
all the grades above but will be at least partly a
subjective evaluation of your overall performance in
the class. For example: a very strong final may
compensate for a weak hour test or few bad
quizzes. A really strong term paper will also lift a
grade etc.
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Course Operations
I will add some papers to read to the text on topics to try to
increase your depth of understanding.
• Homework 1:


Read through Chapter 1 by Sept 4 and some questions presented
later.
Problems 1.2, 1.3,1.6,1.9,1.10,1.13 will be due after we finish the
chapter
Some References
1. “Storms of My Grandchildren”, James Hansen
2. Science August 2,2013
3. IEEE Power and Energy Vol.11 No 3 May/June 2013
4. Bernstein “The Grand Success” IEEE Spectrum 1973 Vol
10, No 2.
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Course WEB site
ecee.colorado.edu/~ecen2060
Check the course web site frequently!

Fall 2013 Announcements

Course syllabus and vitals

Course calendar
• Lecture topics and links to supplementary course materials
• Due dates, exam schedule

Assignments and solutions

Reference library
HW and exam scores will be posted
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Growing Interest in Energy Engineering
Environmental and climate change concerns
 Energy independence goals, Costs
 A new frontier in Engineering: challenging problems,
opportunities for innovation, entrepreneurship, and
rewarding careers

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Power Industry Baseline – Some Detail
• Momentum - lots of $ moving in a rational direction
3200+ traditional utility companies
1738 non utility companies 1
 1,153 GWatts of Capacity 1
 4.2M GWhrs of generation
output annually 1
 144M end customers 1
 3.3M GWhrs supplied to customers 1
 $370.4B in revenue 1
 >12% net income

1 EIA report 2013
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6/27/2016
Power Industry Baseline – More Detail
Mature Infrastructure
125 years worth development and learning
 401,000 Employees as of July 2013 (BLS report)
 6600 Generation Plants (18530 sets) (EIA report)
 150,710 miles of networked transmission line >230kv
 Millions of miles of distribution line
 Hundreds of thousands of sub stations
 Hundreds of millions of transformers, protection devices,
switching devices, meters, etc.
 Large investments in grid management & protection
 Policies / organizations for governance, management,
decision making
 Procedures for installation, billing, buying, controlling
 Relationships with suppliers, regulators, one another

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6/27/2016
Energy Consumption in the US since 1780
This Model is Typical for all of the world
Principal Uses of Energy
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Transportation – Air, Sea, Land – People & Goods
Lighting – Home, Industrial, Outdoor
Heating / Cooling – Home, Industrial, Civil
Food Production / Preparation / Preservation
Mechanical Work – Factories, Mining, Construction
Communications – Voice, Video, Data
Entertainment
Practically everything else we do!!!
Most Involve the Generation and Use of Electric Power
WHY?
A New Set of Drivers Has Emerged
• Population growth – 10 B people by 2050 (7B now)
• Economic development in undeveloped /
underdeveloped parts of the world –
2B without electric power today
 Linkage between cheap power and standard of living
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• Need for environmental responsibility

CO2 33%, SO2 75% , NOx 33%, 25% particulates (heavy
metals, Hg etc.) from US Electric Power alone
• Finite & diminishing fossil fuel assets over the long
term - a long term strategic issue for US
• Integration issues with other utility segments (water,
sewage, telecom, etc.)
Energy and Population Growth
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GDP and Population
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CO2 and Temperature :
Global Variation 1000-2000
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CO2 Concentrations over Time
1. This is a report worth reading if you are interested in the effects of CO2 on
Climate change.
2. CO2 levels hit new peak at key observatory - CNN.com
www.cnn.com/2013/05/10/us/climate-change
May 14, 2013 - Scientists for the first time measured an average concentration of
carbon dioxide of 400 parts per million in Mauna Loa, Hawaii.
Carbon dioxide levels can be seen climbing steadily in Scripps data from the last 55 years.
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego
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CO2 Production
,
BRIC, (Brazil, Russia, India, China )
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Global Land-Ocean Temperature
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Global Temperature
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2001
Franz Josef Glacier New Zealand
2011
Arctic Ice Cap 1984 vs. 2012
1973
Whitechuck Glacier, Washington State
2006
Atmospheric Absorption
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Temperature Forcing Functions In
Watts/meter squared
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Green House Gasses, Ice Sheets and
Temperature
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Temperature, CO2 Sea Level
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Homework
1. Find data that might explain why the temperature
is approximately constant from 2000 to 2010.
2. How long would it take to bring the CO2 back to
the level of 1960 if we had no emission starting
tomorrow?
A. Some partial but insufficient information
In 1780 CO2 ≈ 280ppm
In 2009 CO2≈ 387ppm
3. What are some of the implications of the global
temperature rise that might affect you?
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