2013- 2014 BUSINESS STUDIES

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20132014
Truckee Meadows
Community College
Division of Business
BUSINESS STUDIES
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEW SELF
STUDY
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
TRUCKEE MEADOWS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEW SELF-STUDY SUMMARY
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEWED: Business Studies
School: Division of Business
Year of Review: 2013-2014
Date Submitted to Dean:
Self Study Committee Members:
Name
Title
Signature
Dan Bouweraerts
Graphic Arts Professor
Andy Delaney
Marketing/Business
Professor
Kathy Berry
Marketing Manager
Lisa Buehler
Accounting Instructor
Steve Streeper
Economics Professor
Nancy O’Neal
Entrepreneur/Management
Instructor
Diana McCoy
Economics Professor
Self Study Committee Chair:
Name
Title
Ben Scheible
Signature
Date
Date
Real Estate/Business
Professor
Truckee Meadows Community College | Committee Members
1
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Executive Summary:
Students are prepared for meaningful careers and jobs in the business world by the Business Studies
Department in the Division of Business. Classes that can stand alone to acquire marketable knowledge and
enhanced skills are provided along with transfer classes, degree programs, and certificate programs. A
business advisory board helps ensure that programs are relevant to the modern business world.
All classes, disciplines, and programs are assessed on an ongoing basis and formal rigorous assessments are
conducted on a scheduled basis. Improvements are made based on the continuous assessments. The
indicators show that success initiatives are working with increased retention, graduation/transfer rates and
SFR. Areas of concern are a lack of a Chair and succession planning with the majority of faculty nearing
retirement age.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Executive Summary
2
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Business Studies
INTRODUCTION
TMCC Business Studies provides students with the skills and knowledge to compete and succeed in today's
marketplace. Each of our courses gives students up-to-date, practical business fundamentals. We are proud
of our high-quality instruction that leads to student success. The department provides education which can
result in transfer and terminal degrees, certificates or provide individual professional development,
strengthening the region’s workforce.
Mission Statement
TMCC Business Studies focuses on academic achievement and excellence through unwavering
commitments to diversity, integrity and student success. Education is the wise choice for everyone.
Degrees, Certificates, and/or Non-Credit Courses offered
Bookkeeping – Certificate of Achievement
Business – Certificate of Achievement
Business – AAS
Business – AA
Entrepreneurship – Certificate of Achievement*
Entrepreneurship – AA*
Logistics Management – Certificate of Achievement*
Logistics Management – AA*
Logistics Management – AAS*
*These degrees and certificates are listed for information purposes only. These programs have separate PURs
scheduled. The data presented includes the disciplines as they relate to the Business Studies Department and BUS
degrees and certificates.
Assessment Reports
Curriculum is tied to assessment driven improvements. Each course in the business/management area
includes pre- and post-assessments to measure the effectiveness of each course. Each period, assessments
are forwarded to the proper reporting authorities and instructors review the results to update the curriculums
as needed. This insures the quality of each course is up to standard and is relevant to the current needs of the
community, increasing this education’s value for each student. Additionally, articulation with other
institutions within the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) insures many of the business,
management and marketing courses are transferable.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Introduction
3
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Evaluating Relevancy of Curriculum
Course Content
Course content is updated as needed. This includes input from the Business Division Advisory Board,
students and other community stakeholders. Furthermore, business studies classes are compared with those
at other institutions with similar designations. In this instance, business course outlines, content and
coverage are evaluated against other institutions of higher education. A TMCC Business Studies
Department Graduate Attributes and Professional Skills document was created in conjunction with our
Advisory Board and is used to drive Learning Outcomes and to ensure our assessments support the desired
attributes and skills. The 2013/14 Advisory Board is currently reviewing the document for current and
projected workforce relevance over the next 3 years (Appendix C).
Methods of Instruction
Business Studies has two primary methods of course instruction: web delivery using the Canvas Learning
Management System and in-person traditional lecture classes. Moreover, each semester business instructors
have the opportunity to explore novel and innovative methods of conducting lecture and delivering content
to students through both the Internet and in-person classroom delivery.
Faculty Qualifications
All faculty possess a master’s degree or higher in their field from an accredited institution. Additionally,
most instructors have many years of personal experience in the discipline they are teaching. Faculty is
required to attend professional development training each semester during the weeks before each semester
starts. In addition, many professional development opportunities are offered by the college during the
semester.
Post Completion Objectives (transfer, job placement, etc.)
In the “2011-12 Graduate Outcomes Survey, students rated the following statements as “Yes.”
I was satisfied with the quality of instruction.
93%
TMCC has helped me meet the goals I expected to achieve.
93%
After graduation, I am continuing my education.
70%
I have had a job promotion since starting TMCC.
28%
I have the same job as when I started at TMCC.
31%
I expect my income to increase as a result of my TMCC education. 64%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Introduction
4
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
The chart above shows a general increase in the number of business transfer degrees.
Secondary Student Preparation Efforts
The Division of Business takes part in the Information Night hosted by the TMCC High School, and
participates in college outreach events at area high schools. TMCC HS is also welcome to participate in the
annual Business Plan Competition, and is invited to attend O-Day. High School level classes are offered
through Tech-prep.
External Review
Business Studies maintains an active advisory board made up of community members, which includes
business owners, managers, and executives. The advisory board meets each semester
(http://www.tmcc.edu/cte/).
Non-credit Training Offered
Business Studies does not offer non-credit courses.
Assessment Findings and Strategies
As evidenced by the 2011-12 TMCC Graduate Outcome Survey Results, page 1, the student themselves
have assessed the college as providing value, see the chart below.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Introduction
5
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
External Resource Recommendations and Implementation Plans
Business studies will continue to use the advisory board to help develop resource strategies,
recommendations and implementation plans. TMCC’s professional development office will continue to
develop faculty training programs and expose instructors to new and cutting edge pedagogical methods and
delivery systems. Student input is highly valued and all instructors are required to conduct student
evaluations of course delivery and instruction. This vital information is used by instructors to improve,
adjust and modify existing courses and sheds light on other possibilities for offering new courses.
Anticipated Factors Affecting Curriculum and Strategies
Current economic uncertainty and fluctuation are preventing the college from establishing certainty in what
should be offered and not offered. Anything to do with medical care and computer technologies is on the
upswing. Business and organizations engaging in these activities need managers, office workers,
information processors, interviewers, and general service workers. The business division should constantly
survey the environment and perform a SWOT analysis on an annual basis.
Primary Goals and Objectives
The focus of business studies is based upon TMCC’s core themes outlined in the TMCC Strategic Master
Plan 2012.
Core Theme I ~ Support lifelong learning through strengthening institutional infrastructure and
partnerships within our diverse community.
Business studies provide a pathway to lifelong learning through providing professional development courses
and multiple degree/certificate opportunities. In addition, business studies consults the business community
to structure curriculum and program to better meet the region’s workforce needs.
Core Theme II ~ Academic Excellence
• Assists students with mathematical aspects of courses
• Writes across the curriculum by integrating written assignments, exams and papers
• Helps students strengthen their analytical thinking and problem-solving skills
Truckee Meadows Community College | Introduction
6
BUSINESS STUDIES
•
•
2013-2014
Uses the best technology available in smart classrooms
Incorporates the flexibility of online class technologies
Core Theme III ~ Student Success
Professors and the dean establish productive relationships with their students through several avenues.
• O Day provides incoming and new business students with relevant information on what to expect
from college courses, the resources available to help them succeed and presentations from business
leaders on the opportunities in their career fields.
• The Entrepreneurship Club provides support and advice to interested TMCC students, regardless
their majors.
• The business plan competition builds a base in sound business practices, thereby elevating students’
success in the workforce.
• Personal mentoring and advisement is also made a priority.
Factors Expected to Affect Future
Business studies will be affected by the phase-in retirement of one of the economic professors (as well as
the probability that other faculty nearing retirement age may do the same) and the legislature’s new formula
funding. The current executive administrative assistant is also expected to begin retirement, and this poses
additional problems as business studies does not have a chair or coordinator and the current executive admin
assumes many of those duties in addition to her normal assignments.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Introduction
7
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
DEMOGRAPHICS AND ENROLLMENT
General Student Demographics
Age
5 -year Average Headcount
Business
59%
TMCC
54%
25% 25%
12% 13%
0%
4%
2%
Under
18 yrs.
18-24 yrs.
25-34 yrs.
Unde r
1 8 y rs.
Fall 08
Spr 09
Fall 09
Spr 10
Fall 10
Spr 11
Fall 11
Spr 12
Fall 12
Spr 13
Business Avg
TMCC Avg
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
%
%
7
1%
8
1%
7
1%
3
0%
1
0%
3
0%
3
0%
2
0%
6
1%
2
0%
0%
2%
35-49 yrs.
50+ yrs.
1 8 - 2 4 y rs. 2 5 - 3 4 y rs. 3 5 - 4 9 y rs. 5 0 + y rs.
756
68%
709
65%
750
64%
693
61%
601
58%
531
53%
521
52%
558
52%
618
56%
582
54%
59%
54%
229
21%
237
22%
267
23%
275
24%
265
26%
283
28%
302
30%
314
29%
285
26%
294
27%
25%
25%
95
9%
109
10%
119
10%
124
11%
126
12%
150
15%
138
14%
155
14%
144
13%
147
14%
12%
13%
6%
22
2%
20
2%
32
3%
36
3%
38
4%
39
4%
45
4%
46
4%
47
4%
53
5%
4%
6%
T o t al
1,109
100%
1,083
100%
1,175
100%
1,131
100%
1,031
100%
1,006
100%
1,009
100%
1,075
100%
1,100
100%
1,078
100%
100%
100%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
8
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Business studies attracted more 18- to 24-year-olds than the overall college population. Fifty-nine
percent of TMCC’s business emphasis students were 18- to 24-years-old, five percentage points more than
the college as a whole. Those under 18, as well as those 35 to 49 and over 50 were somewhat less likely to
declare business as their area of emphasis. However, a positive trend is emerging of growing age diversity.
Over the last half of this five-year period, business studies saw increasing numbers of students aged 25 to
34, 35 to 49 and Baby Boomers over 50.
Gender
5-year Average Headcount
Business
TMCC
56%
50%
50%
44%
15
17
Female
Female
Fall 08
Spr 09
Fall 09
Spr 10
Fall 10
Spr 11
Fall 11
Spr 12
Fall 12
Spr 13
Business Avg
TMCC Avg
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
%
%
Male
Male
571
51%
556
51%
586
50%
557
49%
503
49%
512
51%
512
51%
555
52%
559
51%
533
49%
50%
56%
Unrepo rted
538
49%
527
49%
589
50%
574
51%
528
51%
494
49%
497
49%
520
48%
541
49%
545
51%
50%
44%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0%
0%
To tal
1,109
100%
1,083
100%
1,175
100%
1,131
100%
1,031
100%
1,006
100%
1,009
100%
1,075
100%
1,100
100%
1,078
100%
100%
100%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
9
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
This student population was evenly divided between males and females.
Ethnicity
5-year Average Headcount
Business
TMCC
63% 66%
20% 19%
4% 3%
6% 5%
African
American
Asian
Hawaiian or
Pacific
Islander
African
American
Fall
N
08
%
Spr
N
09
%
Fall
N
09
%
Spr
N
10
%
Fall
N
10
%
Spr
N
11
%
Fall
N
%
11
Spr
N
12
%
Fall
N
12
%
Spr
N
%
13
Business Avg
TMCC Avg
Note: Ethnicity categories
1% 2%
1% 1%
Asian
Hispanic
Hawaiian
or Pacific
Islander
Native
American
Hispanic
Native
American
White
White
3% 2%
0% 1%
2% 2%
Two or more
races
International
Students
Unreported
Two or
more
races
International
Students
Unreported
33
74
165
17
750
6
64
3%
7%
15%
2%
68%
1%
6%
43
66
158
16
729
3
68
4%
6%
15%
1%
67%
0%
6%
46
60
23
213
15
767
35
8
8
4%
5%
2%
18%
1%
65%
3%
1%
1%
46
61
20
209
21
717
40
8
9
4%
5%
2%
18%
2%
63%
4%
1%
1%
36
51
9
205
16
659
42
4
9
3%
5%
1%
20%
2%
64%
4%
0%
1%
41
59
9
202
19
619
37
4
16
4%
6%
1%
20%
2%
62%
4%
0%
2%
46
62
9
197
13
626
38
3
15
5%
6%
1%
20%
1%
62%
4%
0%
1%
40
68
10
226
22
647
43
4
15
4%
6%
1%
21%
2%
60%
4%
0%
1%
35
72
6
283
11
637
38
5
13
3%
7%
1%
26%
1%
58%
3%
0%
1%
37
61
4
273
11
638
40
4
10
3%
6%
0%
25%
1%
59%
4%
0%
1%
4%
6%
1%
20%
1%
63%
3%
0%
2%
3%
5%
0.7%
19%
2%
66%
2%
1%
2%
were changed in Fall 2009 to align with new IPEDS and NSHE reporting requirements.
Total
1,109
100%
1,083
100%
1,175
100%
1,131
100%
1,031
100%
1,006
100%
1,009
100%
1,075
100%
1,100
100%
1,078
100%
100%
100%
TMCC Business Studies successfully attracted a diverse student base. The business student pool represented
more African American, Asian and Hawaiian/Pacific Islander than both the county’s population and the
college’s overall student demographic. While Caucasians (non-Hispanic) made up the largest percentage of
business’ student body, there were fewer whites than both the college’s student and Washoe County’s
general population. There were slightly more Hispanics enrolled in business classes than the college as a
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
10
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
whole and the number of Hispanic business students has steadily grown over the five-year period, increasing
10 percentage points.
Student Status
Educational Goals
5-year Average Headcount
Business
83%
TMCC
79%
5%
Earn a Degree
4%
Earn a Certificate Improve Job Skills
Earn a
Degree
Fall 08
Spr 09
Fall 09
Spr 10
Fall 10
Spr 11
Fall 11
Spr 12
Fall 12
Spr 13
Business Avg
TMCC Avg
6%
2%
1%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
%
%
1,281
81%
1,209
80%
1,328
81%
1,326
79%
1,264
87%
1,418
87%
1,110
88%
1,158
85%
936
84%
898
81%
83%
79%
Earn a
Certificate
75
5%
76
5%
72
4%
86
5%
85
6%
94
6%
74
6%
87
6%
59
5%
67
6%
5%
4%
9%
3%
Personal
Enrichment
Improve
Job Skills
10
1%
9
1%
9
1%
14
1%
17
1%
26
2%
11
1%
16
1%
18
2%
20
2%
1%
2%
4%
Transfer
Personal
Enrichment
145
9%
152
10%
146
9%
152
9%
51
4%
47
3%
30
2%
46
3%
27
2%
38
3%
6%
9%
Transfer
28
2%
29
2%
40
2%
48
3%
33
2%
50
3%
39
3%
61
4%
68
6%
57
5%
3%
4%
1%
2%
Undecided
Undecided
49
3%
43
3%
42
3%
47
3%
1
0%
1
0%
0
0%
0
0%
0
0%
23
2%
1%
2%
Total
1,588
100%
1,518
100%
1,637
100%
1,673
100%
1,451
100%
1,636
100%
1,264
100%
1,368
100%
1,108
100%
1,103
100%
100%
100%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
11
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
More TMCC business students enrolled in courses were degree seeking than TMCC students as a
whole (83 percent vs. 79 percent for general TMCC students). Over the past five-years, the second most
common motivation was personal enrichment—an area now significantly trending downward. In addition,
more students are transferring to TMCC for their business degree than they did five years ago most likely
due to the articulation of the BUS AA with UNR’s College of Business.
Educational Status
5-year Average Headcount
81%
Business
TMCC
7%
9%
79%
Continuing Students
New Transfers
Co nt inuing
St ude nt s
Fall 08
Spr 09
Fall 09
Spr 10
Fall 10
Spr 11
Fall 11
Spr 12
Fall 12
Spr 13
Business Avg
TMCC Avg
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
%
%
12%
805
73%
924
85%
865
74%
966
85%
768
74%
888
88%
759
75%
903
84%
900
82%
982
91%
81%
79%
12%
New Students
Ne w T ransf e rs
90
8%
69
6%
89
8%
68
6%
86
8%
57
6%
77
8%
56
5%
69
6%
51
5%
7%
9%
Ne w St ude nt s
214
19%
90
8%
221
19%
97
9%
177
17%
61
6%
173
17%
116
11%
131
12%
45
4%
12%
12%
T o t al
1,109
100%
1,083
100%
1,175
100%
1,131
100%
1,031
100%
1,006
100%
1,009
100%
1,075
100%
1,100
100%
1,078
100%
100%
100%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
12
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
The overwhelming majority (81 percent) of business students were continuing students, edging out the
general college student population by two percentage points. This department mirrored the college’s
statistics with the same percentage of new students. Seven percent were transfer students.
It is concerning that the new student percentage was so low college-wide (12% for both TMCC and
business studies). With little population growth predicted by the Nevada State Demographer (growth rates
are projected to range from .8 percent to 1.1 percent each year for the next five years), TMCC as a whole
needs to increase its general awareness and recruitment efforts.
Enrollment Status
5-year Average Headcount
Business
TMCC
35%
29%
27%
28%
26%
20%
18%
12+
18%
9-11.9
6-8.9
Less than 6 credits
Credits Attempted
12+
Fall 08
Spr 09
Fall 09
Spr 10
Fall 10
Spr 11
Fall 11
Spr 12
Fall 12
Spr 13
Business Avg
TMCC Avg
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
%
%
9-11.9
461
42%
418
39%
473
40%
462
41%
362
35%
319
32%
305
30%
314
29%
315
29%
303
28%
35%
29%
181
16%
210
19%
202
17%
189
17%
225
22%
218
22%
236
23%
234
22%
264
24%
252
23%
20%
18%
6-8.9
264
24%
252
23%
282
24%
289
26%
265
26%
295
29%
315
31%
335
31%
334
30%
317
29%
27%
26%
Le ss t han 6
c re dit s
203
18%
203
19%
218
19%
191
17%
179
17%
174
17%
153
15%
192
18%
187
17%
206
19%
18%
28%
To tal
1,109
100%
1,083
100%
1,175
100%
1,131
100%
1,031
100%
1,006
100%
1,009
100%
1,075
100%
1,100
100%
1,078
100%
100%
100%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
13
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Over the past five years, business students were motivated to earn their degree/certificate programs:
35 percent enrolled as full-time students—six points higher than the general student body. Eightythree percent of students taking business courses are degree-seeking with most working toward earning their
business degrees. The second most popular credit load of this group was 6 to 8.9 credits. Interestingly,
TMCC business students were the least likely to take under six credits (18 percent vs. 28 percent for the
college). When examining the latest semesters of this period, the number of students who attempted 12+
credits was about equal to the number of those who enrolled in 6 to 8.9 credits.
A trend is emerging of fewer business students attempting full-time credit loads (29 percent Fall 2012 vs. 42
percent Fall 2008). As hard data is not available on why this is happening, we speculate based on some
anecdotal experience. O Day, an annual recruitment/retention event conducted by business studies, stresses
the time commitment needed to complete a full-time credit load, thus educating students on realistic
completion goals. This may be due to Nevada’s prolonged economic downturn: professors have had more
students tell them they are dropping classes because they had to take another job or work more hours to
make ends meet.
Campus wide the following list is understood to be at least partially responsible for these data trends:
•
HS diploma required for admission
•
Financial Aid limits imposed
•
1st 30 credits remedial policy
•
9 credit limit for new degree-seekers with insufficient test scores
•
New application deadline
•
Dead week
•
Institution of pre-requisites
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
14
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
5-year Average Headcount Credits Earned
Business
TMCC
46%
41%
24%
18%
17%
16%
12+
23%
15%
9-11.9
6-8.9
Less than 6 credits
Credits Earned
12+
Fall 08
Spr 09
Fall 09
Spr 10
Fall 10
Spr 11
Fall 11
Spr 12
Fall 12
Spr 13
Business Avg
TMCC Avg
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
%
%
194
17%
198
18%
226
19%
249
22%
198
19%
198
20%
175
17%
183
17%
187
17%
182
17%
18%
16%
9-11.9
190
17%
186
17%
183
16%
194
17%
171
17%
152
15%
187
19%
185
17%
176
16%
189
18%
17%
15%
6-8.9
244
22%
252
23%
271
23%
256
23%
262
25%
227
23%
237
23%
268
25%
279
25%
269
25%
24%
23%
Less than
6 credits
481
43%
447
41%
495
42%
432
38%
400
39%
429
43%
410
41%
439
41%
458
42%
438
41%
41%
46%
Total
1,109
100%
1,083
100%
1,175
100%
1,131
100%
1,031
100%
1,006
100%
1,009
100%
1,075
100%
1,100
100%
1,078
100%
100%
100%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
15
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Declared Business Majors Success at Completing Fulltime Credit Load
Attempted 12+
Semester Credits
Completed 12+
Credits
% Completed
12+
Fall 08
461
194
42%
Spring
09
418
198
47%
Fall 09
473
226
48%
Spring
10
462
249
54%
Fall 10
362
198
55%
Spring
11
319
198
62%
Fall 11
305
175
57%
Spring
12
314
183
58%
Fall 12
315
187
59%
Spring
13
303
182
60%
During this five-year period, the number of full-time students who completed a full credit load has
increased. During Fall 2008, only 42 percent completed the semester with their credit loads intact. Since
Fall 2011, this aspect has been steadily improving. By Spring 2013, 60 percent of full-time students
declared as business majors who were enrolled in 12+ credits completed at least 12 credits.
Student Recruitment Activities
TMCC’s Business Studies actively recruits students among the college’s undeclared students.
•
O Day, which began in August 2008 with 20 attendees, attracted about 130 students in 2012.
Undeclared students with fewer than 15 credits were invited to this full-day workshop that combined
information on business degrees/certificates and career opportunities, tips on how to succeed in
college, as well as fun activities.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
16
BUSINESS STUDIES
•
•
2013-2014
The E Club (Entrepreneurial Club) is open to all TMCC academic students and provides an inviting
gateway to various business programs.
Dean Murgolo-Poore meets on a regular basis with advisement staff to update them on business
degrees and certificates and the strong articulation with UNR and initiating articulation with SNC.
Underserved Student Populations
TMCC Business Studies does an outstanding job attracting a diverse student body and no group
stands out as being underserved. A potential growth market could be the 35 to 49 age group, which may
be looking to reskill for a second career. This should be more of a priority than the 50+ market as many of
these Baby Boomers are seeking retirement and/or volunteer opportunities rather than reskilling for new
careers.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
17
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Enrollment Patterns
Number of Sections
Number of Sections: Fall Semesters
100.0
90.0
80.0
80.0
70.0
60.0
68.0
68.0
50.0
60.0
58.0
Fall 11
Fall 12
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
Fall 08
Fall 09
Fall 10
Number of Sections: Spring Semesters
100.0
90.0
80.0
81.0
70.0
60.0
74.0
72.0
70.0
50.0
59.0
40.0
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
Spr 09
A cademic Years
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
Business (5 yr Avg)
Div of Business (5 yr Avg)
TMCC (5 yr Avg)
Spr 10
Fall
68.0
80.0
68.0
60.0
58.0
66.5
126
1554
Spr 11
Number of Sections
% Chang e
-18%
-15%
-12%
-3%
-3%
-9%
-2%
Spr 12
Spring
74.0
81.0
72.0
70.0
59.0
70.5
132
1568
Spr 13
% Chang e
-9%
-11%
-3%
-16%
-5%
-10%
-3%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
18
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Just like the college as a whole, business studies offered fewer sections over this five-year span. About
27 percent fewer business sections were offered in FY 2012 compared to FY 2009, while TMCC’s overall
number of sections declined by 9 percent during the same period.
In addition to being influenced by the general college atmosphere, there are two reasons fewer business
sections have been offered:
•
•
A decision was made to tighten the fill rate to force students into open classes.
Business studies lost full-time faculty positions due to budget cuts. In addition, it has been difficult
to find qualified part-time instructors to fill the need. With two full-time professors hired in FY 13
and a full-time accounting professor to be hired Fall 2014, the number of class sections should
increase.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
19
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Full Time Equivalent Enrollment
FTE: Fall Semesters
500.0
450.0
400.0
419.8
439.2
386.3
350.0
* The data presented on pages 3 - 5 represent data for GRC sections.
300.0
336.0
312.4
250.0
200.0
Fall 08
Fall 09
Fall 10
Fall 11
Fall 12
FTE: Spring Semesters
500.0
450.0
445.6
400.0
437.7
403.8
350.0
370.1
300.0
312.8
250.0
200.0
Spr 09
A cademic Years
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
Business (5 yr Avg)
Div of Business (5 yr Avg)
TMCC (5 yr Avg)
Spr 10
Fall
419.8
439.2
386.3
336.0
312.4
378.7
483
6810
Spr 11
FTE
% Chang e
-5%
-12%
-13%
-7%
-7%
-8%
-1%
Spr 12
Spring
403.8
445.6
437.7
370.1
312.8
394.0
502
6724
Spr 13
% Chang e
-10%
-2%
-15%
-15%
-6%
-7%
-2%
According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, the recession hit two-year colleges the hardest. In 2010,
average enrollments dropped five percent nationwide. With Nevada being one of the hardest hit states
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
20
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
during the Great Recession, it is no surprise that TMCC enrollments took a bigger hit. Business studies saw
a 12 percent decline during the 2010-2011 year.
Business studies posted a sharper decline than the college when it came to FTE loss: -7 percent for fall and 6 percent for spring terms over the five-year average. During that same period, the college lost 1 percent
FTE in the fall and 2 percent FTE.
Besides the economy, business studies FTEs have declined in part due to the implementation of
prerequisites for most business courses which were put in place between 2009 and 2013. These
prerequisites, now established in all disciplines with the exception of management, will further ensure
student success. It is believed that FTE will now increase since students may plan for these prerequisites.
Retention Rates
5 year Average Retention Rates
Business
Div of Business
TMCC
79.3%
74.2%
72.3%
Retention Rate
Term
Fall 08
Spr 09
Fall 09
Spr 10
Fall 10
Spr 11
Fall 11
Spr 12
Fall 12
Spr 13
Business (5 year Avg)
Div of Business (5 year Avg)
TMCC (5 year Avg)
Retention by Semester - Fall 08 to Spring 13
To tal Enro llments
Number Retained
388
303
365
303
449
345
448
370
400
322
413
310
361
286
363
277
353
275
343
290
388
308
29,503
21,334
339,560
251,979
Retentio n Rate
78%
83%
77%
83%
81%
75%
79%
76%
78%
85%
79.3%
72.3%
74.2%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
21
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
TMCC business students were dedicated to pursuing their degrees, showing a strong 79 percent
retention rate, which is five percentage points higher than the college as a whole. In addition, the
strongest retention rate (85 percent) occurred Spring 2013.
Student to Faculty Ratios
Student to Faculty Ratio: Fall Semesters
40.0
35.0
30.0
30.9
25.0
27.5
28.4
28.0
26.9
Fall 09
Fall 10
Fall 11
Fall 12
20.0
15.0
10.0
5.0
0.0
Fall 08
Student to Faculty Ratio: Spring Semesters
40.0
35.0
30.0
25.0
27.3
27.5
Spr 09
Spr 10
30.4
20.0
26.5
26.5
Spr 12
Spr 13
15.0
10.0
5.0
0.0
A cademic Years
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
Business (5 yr Avg)
Div of Business (5 yr Avg)
TMCC (5 yr Avg)
Fall
30.9
27.5
28.4
28.0
26.9
28.3
23
22
Spr 11
Student to Faculty Ratio
% Chang e
--11%
3%
-1%
-4%
-3%
0%
1%
Spring
27.3
27.5
30.4
26.5
26.5
27.6
23
21
% Chang e
-1%
11%
-13%
0%
0%
1%
1%
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
22
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Business studies attracted six more students per course than the average TMCC class. Over the
previous five-year period, business sections had a student to faculty ratio of 28.3 (fall) and 27.6 (spring).
Classroom availability has restricted some business class student/faculty ratios, as some sections filled to
capacity and larger classroom space was not available.
The Division of Business has worked to become efficient at using teaching space, and since most
classes do not require specialized equipment, they end up being very low-cost programs for the college
to operate.
Number of Declared Degree/Emphasis Seekers
More business studies students worked toward their bachelor’s degree, as the business AA attracts 75% of
business degree seekers and was designed to efficiently articulate with UNR’s bachelor’s in business
degree. After a low number of graduates (60) in 2009, the number of business graduates has held steady at
80-plus graduates each year.
The number of business graduates should start trending upward as all business’ associate degrees and
certificates have been reworked to be perfectly stackable and were approved by the CAP committee
on Dec. 6, 2013. This allows students to efficiently earn multiple degrees or certificates, as program
requirements are now prescribed.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
23
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Student Success Rates
Number of Students Earning a Degree
2008-2012
88
80
81
2010-11
2011-12
60
2008-09
2009-10
Number of Graduates by Academic Year
2008 - 2012
Year
# o f Graduates
2008-09
60
2009-10
88
2010-11
80
2011-12
81
To tal
309
Deg ree
BOOKKPG-CT
BUS-AA
BUS-AAS
BUS-CT
To tal
Number of Declared Degree/Emphasis Seekers
Fall 2008 - Spring 2012
Number o f Students
# o f Grads
120
8
3433
251
850
44
157
6
4560
309
While more business students were enrolled during the 2008-2009 school year than in 2012-2013,
more students earned their degrees in 2012 (60 in 2009 vs. 81 in 2012). In the past five years, 309
students have graduated from business studies—95 percent of those received their AA or AAS in business
degrees and the remainder earned either the bookkeeping or business certificates.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
24
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Transfer Status
(Students attending another institution following their last term at TMCC)
Transfer Students from the Business Program
Fall 08 thru Fall12**
Transfers
27%
Non Transfers
73%
#
Declared
Majors*
4152
#
%
Transfers
Transfers Transferred to UNR
1131
27%
695
To Other To Other
4 yr
2 yr
Institution Institution
273
163
*Declared BUS-AA, BUS-AAS, BUS-CT and BOOKKPG-CT Students enrolled
between fall 08 to fall 12 (unduplicated)
** Transfer database (National Student Clearinghouse) goes through Spring 13 so
transfer records can only be presented through Fall 12 students.
When the total number of students who earned a TMCC business degree or transferred to another
institution were combined, 31 percent of business students attained their educational goals. This
compares to the TMCC Fall 2010 cohort graduation/transfer rate of 34% (TMCC Factbook, page OM-24).
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
25
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Enrollment Strategic Plan
The following section summarizes the findings above and outlines the self-study committee’s recommended
targets for enrollment improvement to be implemented over the next five year period.
Demographic Findings and Strategies
Business studies demographic strengths:
• Gender of students was equitable.
• Ethnic diversity was more varied and better representative of the county population than the
college as a whole.
• The age demographic is trending to greater diversity as well when the most recent years in
this period were compared to the earlier years.
Business studies areas of demographic opportunities/enrollment growth:
• Further develop the 35 to 49 market (business is one percentage point below general college,
but trending upward) with certificates that result in national certification and allow older
students to more quickly reskill and segue into a new career. An example of this strategy is
how Professor Smilanick is working on redesigning the bookkeeping certificate to align with
national certification.
Student Status Findings and Strategies
Business studies’ student status strengths
• Business students were more motivated to earn their degree (83 percent enrolled in courses to
earn a degree, more than five percentage points greater than the general TMCC student
population.) This shift to a more serious student meant fewer enrolled for personal
enrichment reasons.
• The number of full-time students completing at least 12+ credits in a semester increased by
18 percent points over the five-year period.
Business studies’ student status opportunities
•
•
•
•
As the low number of new students coming to TMCC is a college-wide issue, it is
recommended the college’s recruitment office boost the number of new students enrolling in
TMCC.
Cultivate certificate programs to help those seeking to improve job skills by offering shorterterm educational solutions.
Invite TMCC noncredit Workforce Development and Continuing Education students to
participate in the E Club, which will provide a friendly gateway into business studies
certificate and degree programs.
Business studies should look for opportunities to develop an awareness among high school
seniors; perhaps a partnership between the E Club and high school groups.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
26
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Enrollment Patterns and Strategies
Pro g ram
Bus ines s
Data
Sections
Student FTE
Retention
Fall 2008
68
419.8
63%
Fall 2009
80
439.2
65%
Fall 2010
68
386.3
69%
Fall 2011
60
336.0
71%
Fall 2012
58
312.4
73%
Faculty and Staff FTE
Spring 2009
Spring 2010
Spring 2011
Spring 2012
Spring 2013
Full-time Part-Time Full-time Part-Time Full-time Part-Time Full-time Part-Time Full-time Part-Time
9.0
3.5
9.0
5.1
8.0
5.1
6.0
4.7
8.0
2.0
Business studies’ enrollment pattern strengths
• Retention rates were stronger than the average college area, posting a robust 85 percent during
Spring 2013.
• Business studies courses, on average, had six more students per class than the average section.
Business studies’ student status opportunities:
• Once the new accounting faculty member is hired, business studies can offer additional accounting
sections.
• Since business studies courses are low-cost to the college and many fill their seat capacity, efforts
need to be made to secure larger classrooms so more students can be accommodated.
• With the economy recovering and business studies course prerequisites in place, FTE should start
increasing.
• The “stack ability” of business studies certificates and degrees should be promoted to potential and
current students. The cost and time efficiency of these stackable programs are not only an incentive,
but the additional credentials make graduates even more hire-able in the eyes of employers.
Student Success Rates and Strategies
Business studies’ student success strengths:
• The Department needs to further initiatives that have begun with UNR COB to facilitate reverse
transfer.
Business studies’ student success opportunities:
• With the high transfer rate to universities (968 out of 1,131 transferred students), business studies
could better convey the value of attaining an associate’s degree prior to students transferring to fouryear institutions.
• The stack ability of programs will naturally lead to an increased number of degrees and certificates
conferred.
Truckee Meadows Community College | Demographics and Enrollment
27
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
CURRICULUM
2016-17
2015-16
X
2014-15
APR
2013-14
SS
2012-13
APR
2011-12
SS
2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
X
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
Program/Unit Review Assessment Reports
Title(s) of past Program/Unit
Reviews; include programs
(degrees, emphases, and
certificates) and disciplines.
Degree/Emphasis/Certificate:
Associate of Applied Science:
Business Degree
Degree/Emphasis:
Associate of Arts: Business
Emphasis
Certificate of Achievement:
Bookkeeping
Certificate of Achievement:
Business
Discipline: Accounting
Discipline/Program: Business
Discipline: Economics
Discipline: International Business
Discipline: Management
Discipline: Marketing
Discipline: Real Estate
X
X
Dean’s Recommendation
Truckee Meadows Community College | Curriculum
28
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Course Assessment Report Summaries
SLO
Review
Course
Modifications
Prefix Number
ACC
ACC
ACC
105
135
136
ACC
ACC
180
201
ACC
202
ACC
ACC
220
295
BUS
098
BUS
BUS
101
106
BUS
107
BUS
BUS
108
112
BUS
BUS
117
150
BUS
BUS
198
272
Title
Taxation for
Individuals
Bookkeeping I
Bookkeeping II
Payroll and
Employee Benefit
Accounting
Financial Accounting
Managerial
Accounting
Microcomputer
Accounting Systems
Work Experience
Fundamentals for
Business
Introduction to
Business
Business English
Business Speech
Communications
Business Letters and
Reports
Customer Service
Applied Business
Math
Personal Finance
Special Topics in
Business
Legal Environment
Most
Established
Recent
CAR
Date of
Assessment
Approved
Cycle
CAR
Date(s)
(if course was
revised as a
result of
assessment,
provide a brief
summary of the
results and the
modifications)
(The date
listed is the
last recorded
update to
learning
outcomes and
measures.
Please review
the ones in
bold and
submit update
to CAP)
S'12
S'13
S'14
2012
(2011/12
CAR)
1/9/2009
1/9/2009
2009-10
S'15
S'16
11/13/2012
1/9/2009
2011-12
S'12
1/9/2009
S'15
As taught
1/9/2009
6/30/2010
S'12
5/5/2009
S'16
S'13
12/6/2010
1/5/2011
S'14
1/5/2011
S'15
S'15
1/5/2011
12/9/2009
S'16
1/9/2009
6/8/2009
2011-12
2009-10
S'12
As taught
S'16
10/16/2012
9/24/2010
Dean’s Recommendation
Truckee Meadows Community College | Curriculum
29
BUSINESS STUDIES
BUS
275
BUS
290
IBUS
280
IBUS
281
IBUS
282
ECON 102
ECON 103
ECON 104
ECON 198
ECON 261
ECON 262
ECON 290
MGT 171
MGT
201
MGT
212
MGT
235
MGT
283
MGT
MKT
MKT
MKT
290
131
210
295
RE
101
Fundamentals of
International
Business
Internship In
Business
International
Business Cultures
International
Business Practices
Field Study
Field Study
International
Business Emphasis
Exploration
Principles of
Microeconomics
Principles of
Macroeconomics
Current Economic
Issues
Special Topics in
Economics
Principles of
Statistics I
Principles of
Statistics II
Internship in
Economics
Supervision
Principles of
Management
Leadership and
Human Relations
Organizational
Behavior
Introduction to
Human Resources
Management
Internship in
Management
Advertising
Marketing Principles
Internship
Real Estate
Principles
2013-2014
S'16
9/17/2008
As taught
1/5/2011
S'14
9/17/2008
S'14
9/17/2008
S'14
9/17/2008
2008-09
S'15
3/30/2011
2009-10
S'16
3/30/2011
As taught
6/8/2009
As taught
2011-12
S'12
6/30/2010
8/23/20110
(2011 CAR)
S'13
S'13
11/13/2012
As taught
S'12
6/30/2010
11/13/2012
2011-12
S'13
S'13
1/5/2011
S'14
11/13/2012
S'15
1/5/2011
S'16
1/5/2011
2009-10
As taught
As taught
S'16
As taught
2010-11
S'14
10/16/2012
7/1/2010
12/6/2010
11/7/2001
1/5/2011
Dean’s Recommendation
Truckee Meadows Community College | Curriculum
30
BUSINESS STUDIES
RE
103
RE
198
Real Estate Law and
Practice
Special Topics in
Real Estate
2009-10
S'16
2013-2014
1/5/2011
7/1/2010
ACAR was completed for ACC 135 during this reporting period.
Dean’s Recommendation
Truckee Meadows Community College | Curriculum
31
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
ACCOUNTING
Accounting Course Assessments
The program is assessed using unique course objectives and course measures. The objectives and measures
are listed below.
ACC 105 Taxation For Individuals
Summarization: Average initial student scores related to LO1 and LO3 were 42.7% and 37.01%
respectively. Students were given the opportunity to complete similar problems with different
numeric values. Scores increased to 76.75% and 72.24% respectively.
Subsequent Course Modifications: Instructor intends to encourage all students to take advantage
of the second attempt opportunity (LO1 and LO3). In addition, the course is moving from an
outdated manual tax preparation approach to a text that is integrated with commonly used tax
software (LO2).
ACC 135 Bookkeeping I
Summarization: Average initial student scores related to LO1, LO2, and LO3 were 67.41%,
64.31%, and 54.73% respectively. Students were given the opportunity to complete similar
problems with different numeric values. Scores increased to 94.18%, 91.59%, and 78.40%
respectively.
Subsequent Course Modifications: Instructor intends to include assignments that better challenge
students in the area of critical thinking (LO1, LO2, and LO3).
ACC 201 Financial Accounting
Summarization: For all learning outcomes (LO1, LO2, and LO3), student scores improved, on
average, by 35% on read/answer assignments and 32% on tests. Increased scores were attributed the
opportunity for students to attempt an assignment a second time with “new numbers” generated by
the computer.
Subsequent Course Modifications: Instructor intends to increase the level of rigor in assignments
to encourage critical thinking (LO1, LO2, and LO3).
ACC 202 Managerial Accounting
Summarization: Average initial student scores related to LO1 and LO2 were 39.67% and 40.01%
respectively. Students were given the opportunity to complete similar problems with different
numeric values. Scores increased to 67.03% and 67.18% respectively. Students demonstrated the
ability to prepare and present reports in Excel (LO3).
Subsequent Course Modifications: Instructor intends to modify lectures and assignments to better
address learning outcomes with low average scores (LO1 and L02).
Truckee Meadows Community College | Accounting
33
BUSINESS STUDIES
2013-2014
Assessment Driven Improvements
ACC 105 Taxation For Individuals
Over the last decade, Professor Smilanick has been the sole instructor for this course. It is taught
online during the Spring semester. Students are encouraged to take advantage of a “second attempt
opportunity.” (LO1 and LO3). The department has adopted a text that moved the course from an
outdated manual tax preparation system to one that is integrated with commonly used tax software
(LO2).
ACC 135 Bookkeeping I
Improved outcomes in the course were attributed the inclusion of Lecture Capture and a text that
allows the integration of online assignments into the course (LO1, LO2, and LO3). This course has
been offered since the last CAR cycle in Spring 2013; however, TMCC’s full-time accounting
professor has been on sabbatical during that time. Upon his return in Spring 2014, he intends to
restructure assignments so that they better challenge students in the area of critical thinking.
ACC 201 Financial Accounting
Publisher online contents allow an instructor to select among easy, medium and hard assignments.
The instructor has reviewed assignments and has selected more difficult assignments that encourage
critical thinking (LO1, LO2, and LO3).
ACC 202 Managerial Accounting
Assignments and lectures have been modified to better address LOs with lower than average scores
(LO1 and LO2).
Other Accounting and Taxation Course Modifications
In addition to CAR-related modifications, interim informal SLO assessments have resulted in course
modifications that have been implemented within the past seven years or are in the process of being
implemented. These include:
Textbooks: New textbooks have been adopted for substantially all accounting courses. The texts
offer greater online resources including the ability to:
• assign work based on learning outcomes,
• track student progress by learning outcome,
• allow students to attempt a problem multiple times with different numbers,
• allow students to receive immediate feedback as to their success on a learning outcome,
• provides students with links to the text and other resources that cover learning outcomes,
• allow instructors to record and post lectures, and
• include LearnSmart (in ACC 105, 201, and 202), an adaptive learning program that students
can use to practice outside regular graded assignments.
Quality Matters: Professor Smilanick recently obtained certification as a peer reviewer for Quality
Matters (QM). He completed peer reviews for ACC 201 and is currently working toward QM
certification for ACC 135, 136, 201, and 202.
Lecture Capture: As part of his sabbatical proposal, Professor Smilanick is working with Lecture
Capture software that will enhance his online courses and supplement traditional classroom courses.
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He is also working with other cutting edge technology features including: close captioning,
monitored online test taking, and live classroom streaming.
Ongoing Assessment: Accounting instructors continually use assessment results to identify areas of
difficulty for students and modify instruction and assignments as needed.
Evaluating Relevancy of Curriculum
Course Content
Accounting and Taxation Course Content: Accounting and taxation are highly regulated fields.
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) are promulgated by the Financial Standards Board
(FASB) and the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC). The American Institute of Certified Public
Accountants (AICPA) develops and grades the Uniform CPA exam. All states require CPA candidates
pass this exam prior to being licensed. Tax regulations are set forth by the IRS, federal, state and local
governments. As a result of extensive regulation, curriculum for accounting and taxation courses is
relatively standardized across the nation.
TMCC’s curriculum for these subjects accurately reflects national regulations, laws and standards.
Accounting and taxation textbooks are regularly reviewed to insure that they reflect current regulations.
In addition, software is reviewed annually to insure that it reflects software commonly used in the
industry. For example, students enrolling in the Spring 2014 sections of ACC 105 Taxation for
Individuals and ACC 220 Microcomputer Accounting Systems class will use the most recently released
edition of both the text and software applicable to those courses. Other texts will be updated as needed to
reflect changing accounting standards and regulations.
Certificate of Achievement: Bookkeeping: COA: Bookkeeping is scheduled for review during 20132014. Professor Smilanick is in the process of aligning TMCC’s bookkeeping certificate with a national
bookkeeping certification program. To this end, in addition to the current core classes offered for the
TMCC’s COA, Professor Smilanick intends to propose a capstone course that would use the American
Institute of Professional Bookkeepers’ review materials. This course is currently being offered at both
Great Basin College and Western Nevada College.
Tentative Courses: Anecdotal comments by students indicate that TMCC students, transferring into
UNR’s accounting program, have been placed on long wait lists for core accounting classes at UNR.
These wait-listed courses are pre-requisites to other core accounting classes. The classes were previously
taught at TMCC. In sum, student inability to enroll in these courses prevents graduating within a timely
manner. Professor Smilanick is in the process of investigating the feasibility of reinstating these courses
at TMCC.
Catalog Descriptions:
ACC 105 Taxation for Individuals (3 credits) Prerequisite: None. Income, expenses, exclusions,
deductions and credits. Emphasis on the preparation of individual income tax returns. This course is
transferable as an elective to UNR.
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ACC 135 Bookkeeping I (3 credits) Prerequisite: None. An introductory course for those without
previous study in bookkeeping or accounting. Includes the purpose and nature of accounting, measuring
business income, basic accounting principles covering the accounting cycle from source documents
through preparation of financial statements for a service business and a retail firm, banking procedures
and payroll procedures. Some assignments will be solved using a computerized general ledger program.
This course may not transfer to a baccalaureate degree of art or science within the universities in the
Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE).
ACC 136 Bookkeeping II (3 credits) Prerequisite: ACC 135. Continuation of ACC 135. Includes
accounting principles, assets and equity accounting for external financial reporting. Topics covered
include notes receivable and payable, uncollectible accounts, inventory, accounting for plant and
equipment, partnerships, corporations, bonds, financial statement analysis and statement of cash flows.
Use of computer software for setup of an actual accounting system and for simulated case studies. This
course may not transfer to a baccalaureate degree of art or science within the universities in the Nevada
System of Higher Education (NSHE).
ACC 180 Payroll and Employee Benefit Accounting (3 credits) Prerequisite: None. An introductory
course covering the concepts and principles of payroll accounting with practical manual and computer
applications. Legal responsibilities of employers and rights of employees are included. This course may
not transfer to a baccalaureate degree of art or science within the universities in the Nevada System of
Higher Education (NSHE).
ACC 201 Financial Accounting (3 credits) Prerequisite: MATH 96 and ENG 98R, or qualifying
Accuplacer, ACT, SAT scores, or permission of the instructor. Purpose and nature of accounting,
measuring business income, accounting principles, assets and equity accounting for external financial
reporting.
ACC 202 Managerial Accounting (3 credits) Prerequisite: ACC 201. Forms of business organization;
cost concepts and decision making; break-even analysis, fixed and variable costs and budgeting for
internal reporting.
ACC 220 Microcomputer Accounting Systems (3 credits) Prerequisite: ACC 136 or 201. This course is
transferable as an elective to UNR. Develop skills in the use of computerized accounting. Interact with
on-line real-time computerized accounting systems. Primary objective will be to focus on an applications
approach using actual business case studies.
ACC 295 Work Experience (1-8 credits) Prerequisite: None. A course designed wherein students will
apply knowledge to real on-the-job situations in a program designed by a company official and a faculty
advisor to maximize learning experiences. Available to students who have completed all core and major
requirements and have a 2.5 GPA. Contact the appropriate chairperson for the application, screening and
required skills evaluation. Up to eight semester hour credits may be earned on the basis of 75 hours of
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internship for one credit. The course may be repeated for up to eight credits. This course may not transfer
to a baccalaureate degree of art or science within the universities in the Nevada System of Higher
Education (NSHE).
Degree/Certificate Requirements
Accounting Courses: Degree and certificate worksheets appear in Appendix B.
With the exception of ACC 105 Taxation for Individuals, all accounting courses currently offered by TMCC
are core requirements for one or more TMCC degrees. ACC 105 may be used as an emphasis requirement
for the COA: Business. High community interest and enrollment in the course warrants its continuance.
ACC 201 Financial Accounting and ACC 202 Managerial Accounting transfer seamlessly to other NSHE
institutions. ACC 105 and ACC 220 transfer as electives. ACC 135 Bookkeeping I, ACC 136 Bookkeeping
II, and ACC 180 Payroll and Employee Benefit Accounting do not transfer. (See: Post Completion
Objectives – Transfer Agreements below).
Methods of Instruction
Accounting and Taxation Instruction:
The majority of accounting courses are offered in two formats: a traditional classroom with online resources
or purely online course. ACC 105 Taxation for Individuals, ACC 180 Payroll Accounting, and ACC 220
Microcomputer Accounting Systems are offered exclusively in an online format.
Traditional classes meet either twice a week for one hour and fifteen minutes or, for some evening courses,
once a week for two and one-half hours. Methods of instruction vary by instructor but generally include
lecture, discussion, cooperative problem solving, projects and individual in-class or online exercises as
appropriate to the unit being covered.
All accounting courses are offered in an online format. Professor Smilanick is in the process of using
Tegrity and other software to record his lectures and integrate them into his online courses. Tegrity allows
the capture of lectures for students to watch and review on-demand. It also allows students to search the
lecture for keywords. Professor Smilanick is working toward obtaining Quality Matters (QM) certification
for his online sections of ACC 135, 136, 201, and 202.
The majority of TMCC’s accounting courses are supplemented with extensive publisher resources, e.g.
Connect. Publisher’s online content allows students to: complete homework online, receive instantaneous
feedback including a second chance to try a problem, view solutions, and link to the area in the textbook in
which the learning objective is covered. Publisher’s resources also include opportunities for students to
view mini-lectures, PowerPoints, link to additional resources, and engage in non-graded practice.
Importantly, publisher’s online content allows instructors to choose assignments by objective, level of
difficulty, and to track student progress.
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Accounting Faculty Qualifications: TMCC has one full-time accounting faculty member. In prior years,
TMCC had three full-time instructors. However, when these instructors retired, the economic downturn
prevented the hiring of full-time replacements and the school has filled the void with part-time instructors.
Most instructors for transfer courses have a master’s degree in a related field, are licensed CPAs, and have
extensive “real-world” experience. Instructors for non-transfer courses have, at minimum, a Master’s degree
or a Bachelor’s degree plus a CPA in a related field and extensive “real-world” experience.
For information on individual faculty, see Resources section.
Post Completion Objectives (transfer, job placement, etc.)
Transferability of Accounting Courses:
ACC 201 Financial Accounting and ACC 202 Managerial Accounting are university transfer courses and
transfer seamlessly to UNR, UNLV and Nevada State College. These two courses are core requirements for
all bachelor level business degrees including: accounting, economics, finance, general business, information
systems, international business, management, marketing, etc. (See:
http://www.tmcc.edu/advisement/transfer-students/transfer-agreements/).
ACC 105 Individual Income Tax and ACC 220 Microcomputer Accounting Systems transfer as electives.
ACC 220 also fulfills an elective requirement for CPA exam candidates. (See: Nevada State Board of
Accountancy: Exam 150 Hour Education Requirement: http://www.nvaccountancy.com/new_education.fx ).
ACC 135, 136, and 180 are non-transferrable for a NSHE baccalaureate degree.
Accounting Job Placement:
COA: Bookkeeping: Students completing a COA: Bookkeeping are qualified for a variety of jobs in the
financial clerk sector (BLS SOC 43-3000). Students completing ACC 201 Financial Accounting and ACC
202 Managerial also gain a competitive edge in applying for similar positions.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ “Employment by Detailed Occupation” indicates a growth rate of
11% for this sector over a ten year period. (Table available at:
http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_102.htm). Bookkeeping, Accounting, & Auditing Clerks (SOC 433031), a detailed occupation under the financial clerks category, is listed by the BLS as one of the
occupations with the most job growth (ranking #34 of 840 job classifications). Table available at:
http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_104.htm. The short-term (two-year) outlook in Nevada is 2.9% annual
increase while long-term outlook is 1.1% annual increase. Tables available at:
http://www.nevadaworkforce.com/?PAGEID=67&SUBID=197.
Transfer Student Job Prospects:
Students transferring to UNR and completing an accounting or related degree would be qualified to seek a
variety of jobs in the financial specialists sector (BLS SOC 13-2000).
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The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ “Employment by Detailed Occupation” indicates a growth rate of
11.7% for this sector. Table available at: http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_102.htm. Accountants and
Auditors (SOC 12-2011)—a detailed occupation included in the financial specialist category—is listed by
the BLS as one of the occupations with the most job growth (ranking #17 of 840 job classifications). Table
available at: http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_table_104.htm. Short-term (two-year) outlook in Nevada is 2.4%
annual increase while long-term outlook is a .6% annual increase. Tables available at:
http://www.nevadaworkforce.com/?PAGEID=67&SUBID=197.
Secondary Student Preparation Efforts
Accounting: None
External Review
Accounting: Advisory Board
Non-credit Training Offered
Accounting students are encouraged to engage in a variety of campus activities including the
Entrepreneurship Club and the Business Plan Competition. In addition, students are encouraged to join
professional organizations. Student memberships are available with the American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants (AICPA) and Institute of Management Accountants (IMA). Students are also provided
with an array of online resources including links to Nevada State Board of Accountancy, professional
education and conferences.
Curriculum Strategic Plan
The following section summarizes the findings above related to curriculum and outlines the self-study committee’s
recommended targets for improvement to be implemented over the next five year period.
Assessment Findings and Strategies
Accounting course CARs completed during the reporting period indicate that no change in Student
Learning Outcomes are planned at this time. As discussed in “Assessment Driven Improvements” section
above, course-level improvements suggested by the CARs approved during the reporting period have
been implemented for ACC 105, ACC 201, and ACC 202. Course level improvements suggested for
ACC 135 will be implemented in Spring 2014. All other courses will be assessed over the next five years,
unless offered only intermittently, in which case they will be assessed when taught. See: Department
Assessment Cycles available at:
http://www.tmcc.edu/media/tmcc/departments/assessment/documents/ASMTDeptAssessCycles.pdf
Additional strategies in progress or under consideration that apply to the accounting curriculum and
assessment include:
• Integration of Lecture Capture, close captioning and monitoring test taking into online courses.
• Development of live classroom streaming.
• Quality Matters certification for ACC 135, 136, 201, and 202.
• Development of course-wide pre- and post-tests.
• Integration of part-time instructor assessment data into CARs.
• Evaluation of enrollment to insure that program and students needs area being met, i.e. day, night,
and online enrollment, summer-session, winter-session.
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•
•
2013-2014
Evaluation of the reinstatement of deleted accounting courses.
Tracking students to ascertain whether they are successful as transfer students or in the job
market.
Strategies listed above have a time-line of Spring 2015.
Certificate of Achievement: Bookkeeping is scheduled to be assessed during the academic year 20132014. Course level improvements and strategies discussed above are applicable to this program See:
Course Assessment Reports Summaries: Course Modifications for Accounting; and Assessment Driven
Improvements.
Tentative program-level improvements include:
• Evaluation of the addition of a capstone course for bookkeeping.
• Alignment of COA: Bookkeeping with American Institute of Professional Bookkeeper’s
certification.
Outcome Review Plan
Courses to
Review
Evaluation of Existing Outcomes
Timeline
CAR Assessment
Cycle
ACC 105
Existing outcomes are relevant
S’17
ACC 135
Existing outcomes are relevant
S’18
ACC 136
Existing outcomes are relevant
S’14
ACC 180
Existing outcomes are relevant
S’15
ACC 201
Existing outcomes are relevant
S’16
ACC 202
Existing outcomes are relevant
S’17
ACC 220
Existing outcomes are relevant
S’15
ACC 295
Existing outcomes are relevant
As offered
External Resource Recommendations and Implementation Plans
Accounting:
These activities are in place and ongoing.
• Encourage students to join professional organizations as student members.
• Encourage students to take on volunteer work that employs accounting skills.
Anticipated Factors Affecting Curriculum and Strategies
Ongoing changes in tax regulations and accounting standards. GAAP and tax law changes often impact
curriculum across all accounting courses. Faculty keeps abreast of pertinent changes through a variety of
activities, for example:
o Continuing Professional Education: Instructors holding a CPA license engage in
mandatory continuing professional education (CPE). In Nevada, CPA licensing requires the
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licensee take 80 hours of continuing professional education over a two-year period to
maintain licensure See: Nevada State Board of Accountancy: Continuing Education
Requirements: http://www.nvaccountancy.com/ education.fx). CPE typically includes
updates on ethics, changing tax regulations, and changes in generally accepted accounting
principles (GAAP).
o Membership in Professional Organizations: Instructors holding a CPA license maintain
memberships in varying accounting organizations. For example, membership in the
American Institute of Public Accountants (AICPA) includes a subscription to the Journal of
Accountancy. This journal keeps accountants apprised of current and potential changes in
accounting and taxation. Membership in the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA)
includes subscriptions to journals that are directed toward pertinent managerial accounting
strategies, including: Strategic Finance; Management Accounting Quarterly; and an online
journal for academic members: IMA Educational Case Journal.
o Frequent Textbook Review: The department actively reviews accounting texts and adopts
new ones as necessary to keep abreast with accounting and taxation changes. For example,
ACC 105 Individual Taxation is updated annually to reflect current tax law.
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Job market: Educators are well aware of the positive impact of a college education on the ability to find
employment. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics household data (http://www.bls.gov/webapps/
legacy/cpsatab4.htm) on the Employment Status of Civilian Population 25 Years and Over by
educational attainment indicates unemployment levels from 2003 to 2013 were:
 College
2% to 4.7%
 Some college
3.6% to 8.4%
 High School
4.3% to 10.3%
 Less than high school 6.8% to 14.9%
As noted in the Post Completion Objectives, Job Placement section above, students completing a COA:
Bookkeeping are qualified for a variety of jobs in the financial clerk sector (BLS SOC 43-3000) while
students transferring to UNR and completing an accounting or related degree would be qualified to seek
a variety of jobs in the financial specialists sector (BLS SOC 13-2000). Both sectors contain
occupations that are deemed to have significant job growth over the next ten years. Although some
companies provide on-the-job training for bookkeeping and/or clerical work, a background in
accounting provides students a competitive edge in finding employment.
Technology: Over the last three decades, accounting and taxation have moved from a primarily manual
system to a computerized one. Within the last decade, textbook publishers have moved from a workbook
approach to an online approach for homework. Along with that change, publishers currently offer a
wealth of innovative teaching and assessment tools. Professor Smilanick is investigating the feasibility
of employing an array of cutting edge technology to improve curriculum in both the online and
traditional classroom See: Assessment Driven Improvements: Additional Accounting and Taxation
Course Modifications above.
Funding for Accounting Instructors: See: Resources sections.
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ECONOMICS
Economic Course Assessments
The program is assessed using unique course objectives and course measures. The objectives and measures
are listed below.
Econ 102 – Microeconomics
Learning Outcomes: (LO) and Learning Measures: (LM)
LO1: Students will apply graphic analysis in order to determine the effect of changes in prices, wages and
interest rates on output, employment and investment for a typical firm in a market oriented economy.
LM1: Students will be given hypothetical examples to be solved with a given framework of analysis. The
analysis will be measured with a pre-assigned grading rubric.
LO2: Students will apply economic indicators to assess the state of a product market and analyze changes in
the market in order to forecast the amount of the goods to be produced and prices to be charged.
LM2: Ability will be measured using quizzes and tests to be graded with an established pre-assigned
grading rubric.
LO3: Students will be able to understand the basic differences among the major industrial organizations in a
market-oriented economy including competitive, monopoly and monopolistic firms.
LM3: Students will be given a comprehensive examination to demonstrate their knowledge of these
organizations and their important differences using a pre-assigned grading rubric.
Econ 103 – Macroeconomics
Learning Outcomes: (LO) and Learning Measures: (LM)
LO1: Students will apply graphic analysis in order to determine the effect of changes in prices, wages and
interest rates on GDP, employment and investment for a market oriented economy. They can then
understand the basic economic problems of inflation, unemployment, recession and poverty and the policies
to resolve them.
LM1: Student will be given pre- and post-tests that will be administered each semester in all sections.
These tests require the use of a given framework of analysis and assessed with rubric known to the student.
LO2: Students shall demonstrate basic data analysis including collection, interpreting and presenting data
for economic and business decision making. This includes applying economic indicators to assess the state
of a financial market and analyze changes in investment levels.
LM2: Students prepare a portfolio of case study problems and reason from collected data to draw general
economic conclusions. Portfolio is graded on a known and pre-assigned rubric.
LO3: Students will understand the value and risks associated with fiscal, monetary and free market
economic policies.
LM3: Students will complete a project under guidelines that require collection of data and use of a
framework of analysis presented in class to forecast economic conditions under current economic policy.
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Econ 261 – Principles of Statistics I
Learning Outcomes: (LO) Learning Measures: (LM)
LO1: Students will define statistical concepts, use sampling techniques, calculate and interpret point
estimates and other inferential measures then present results in tables, functions, graphs and words.
LM1: Pre-tests and Post-tests are administered. Students work together in the computer lab to prepare a
statistical report showing completion of the pre-test and mastery of these skill sets. Their ability will be
post-tested and measured against a pre-assigned rubric.
LO2: Students will understand, explain and utilize basic rules of probability in calculation of random events
in real world applications with the appropriate probability functions against a known and pre-assigned
rubric.
LM2: Student work in groups and/or the computer lab to complete the pre-test and then are post-tested in
an in class examination using a known and pre-assigned rubric.
LO3: Students will analyze grouped and ungrouped data, graph distributions, and compute statistical
measures in order summarize the results of sample designs. They shall understand and explain variability in
repeated sampling including concepts such as Chebychev’s theorem and Central Limit Theorem.
LM3: Students work in groups and/or the computer lab to complete the pre-test and then are post-tested in a
class examination using a known and pre-assigned rubric.
Econ 262 – Principles of Statistics II
Learning Outcomes: (LO) and Learning Measures: (LM)
LO1: Students will analyze sample data that is subject to random variation, using it to make decisions and
inferences about any given population of elements. Specifically, they will perform, interpret and explain
point estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing with one or more samples.
LM1: Successful students will be given a pre- and post-test demonstrating their knowledge. Students work
together in the computer lab to complete pre-test component and then are post-tested in an examination
which is graded with a pre-assigned and known rubric.
LO2: Students will demonstrate analytical skills that enable them to to grasp complexities, see
relationships, similarities and differences between ideas. Specifically, they will determine the appropriate
hypothesis test and /or confidence interval to solve word problems dealing with practical issues such quality
control, random experiments and business or governmental policies.
LM2: Successful students will complete assignments in study groups to complete the pre-test component
and then are post-tested in an in-class examination using a known and pre-assigned rubric.
LO3: Student will demonstrate the use of information literacy and research skills by finding, analyzing and
using information from observations, experiments and surveys.
LM3: Students are given a task list and a structured research project/plan. Students are monitored during
the development of the project including individual sessions to review progress.
The Economics discipline provides undergraduate level course work to both satisfy the general education
requirements in social science and prepare the student for transfer to University at the junior level through
the Associate of Arts with a Business Emphasis Degree. The Program offers Macroeconomics,
Microeconomics, Principles of Statistics I, Principles of Statistics II as well as independent study and
internship credits.
These courses prepare the student for an associate of arts degree with a business emphasis and are fully
transferable to any accredited University. The successful graduate will understand the performance or our
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economy and the role of business in providing for our current standard of living. In addition, they will have
the skills to collect and analyze economic and demographic information to make informed decisions to
promote individual wealth and national economic progress.
Economic Course Descriptions
Econ 102 Microeconomics
This is the study of the allocation of resources to alternative uses in producing the nation's output and the
role of relative prices in distributing these goods and services. Topics include: demand and supply,
consumer behavior, business decision-making and market structures. This course is offered online and in
traditional classroom settings every semester. Sections are distributed over all sites mornings, afternoons
and evenings. See class schedule for details. It satisfies the Social Science General Education requirement
and the Associate Arts w/ Business Emphasis core curriculum.
Econ 103 Macroeconomics
This is the study of the determination of output, employment and investment levels and strategies to
promote growth, efficiency, equity and stability in the economy. Topics include: demand and supply,
measurement of GDP, Inflation, Unemployment and the fiscal and monetary policies to promote growth and
stability. This course is offered online and in traditional classroom settings every semester. Sections are
distributed over all sites mornings, afternoons and evenings. See class schedule for details. It satisfies the
Social Science General Education requirement and the Associate Arts w/ Business Emphasis core
curriculum.
Econ 261 Principles of Statistics I
This course is the study of the collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data in order to make
sound business decisions. Topics include: descriptive statistics, exploratory data analysis, probability and
sampling distributions, indices and decision theory. This course is offered online and in traditional
classroom settings every semester. Sections are distributed over all sites mornings, afternoons and evenings.
See class schedule for details. It satisfies the quantitative General Education requirement and the Associate
Arts w/ Business Emphasis core curriculum.
Econ 262 Principles of Statistics II
This course is the study of statistical methods, induction and the design of experiments which allow the
estimation and testing of claims based on sample information. Topics include estimation and hypothesis
testing, analysis of variance, correlation and regression, times series analysis, nonparametric and statistical
process control. Some sections include a computer lab component. This course is offered online and in
traditional classroom settings every semester. Sections are distributed over all sites mornings, afternoons
and evenings. See class schedule for details. It satisfies the quantitative General Education requirement and
the Associate Arts w/ Business Emphasis core curriculum.
Faculty Qualifications
See Resources section.
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Assessment Driven Improvements
The assessment process has concentrated on degree completion, course retention and persistence. This effort
has led to innovation in the classroom, changes in the types of sections offered and additional
supplementary instruction/resources. We have added or changed the content of the courses, experimented
with the way the courses are presented and provided additional materials, as well as methods of instruction.
All courses employ pre-test and post-test procedures. In reviewing these results, we began to rely more
heavily on the graphing calculator. We now recommend a specific calculator for the statistics courses. To
facilitate the use of the graphic calculator we have purchased these items and provide them to the currently
enrolled students upon request.
Histogram of PreTest
9
8
7
Frequency
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
72
76
80
84
PreTest
88
92
96
A comparison of the pre- versus post-test score distribution after the implementation of the calculator
program shows the effectiveness of processing data and completing empirical analysis with the appropriate
tool.
Histogram of Post2
16
14
Frequency
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
60
70
80
Post2
90
100
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A second change in our assessment tools has been the introduction of increased variety of courses. The
economics curriculum provides both the traditional classroom as well as online sections for all the current
courses. In addition, the traditional classroom instruction is supplemented with a computer lab for the two
statistics courses. Students work in groups to complete a series of computer based projects in the lab. The
student is graded on a pre-assigned rubric and then is tested again during the final exam on the content of
the project.
Finally, the Economics faculty worked closely with the division to promote degree declaration by assisting
in marketing the core degree in the program, The Associate of Arts with a Business Emphasis degree by
promoting the O Day activities and the Entrepreneurial Club by offering extra credit for attendance. In
addition, opening remarks during the beginning of each section stress the need to declare a major. The
number of declared majors as well as graduates has increased dramatically over the study period.
Post Completion Objectives
Most of the students completing economics courses are either UNR transfer students or those working to
satisfy the Associates of Arts w/ Business Emphasis core requirements and then transfer to UNR. The
degree requirements have been especially modified to transfer seamlessly to UNR and provide for
immediate junior status at the College of Business.
Degrees and Certificates
Program: AA w/ Business Emphasis
DEGREE EMPHASIS
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
BUSINESS
ALL TRANSFER
5
227
5
225
13
211
29
261
28
266
29
252
60
393
88
353
80
515
81
366
ALL DEGREES
487
530
553
611
641
671
847
895
1145
986
Business AA W/ BUS
General
ALL DEGREES
227
3418
225
3424
250
3624
395
3736
289
3819
392
3277
408
3848
527
4530
431
4418
386
3947
TMCC TOTALS
5513
5523
5845
6026
6160
6479
6796
7307
7125
6351
AA
AA
AREA
FTE
Economics FTE almost doubled from 2003 to 2010 during the period when the assessment process was
implemented. It has declined due to budget restrictions and the loss of the third position in economics and
necessary reduction in sections. The number of graduates has increased dramatically during the study
period. It followed an exponential growth path from 2003 to 2010 when the annual percentage increase was
near 41%.
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Assessment Findings and Strategies
The assessment process has convinced faculty of the need for increased supplemental instruction. These
supplementary procedures include not only increased utilization and control of tutoring in economics but
better and more innovative ways of employing our part-time faculty. Currently, part-time faculty are
assigned a section and given relatively little guidance or assistance. Most of the part-time instructors deal
with the part-time office and not their tenured colleagues.
We recommend that part-time faculty be more active in discipline activities including tutoring, teaching
assistance and co-instruction opportunities. The college appears poised to increase class size. If this
happens, then a supplemental instructor would guarantee that instruction quality does not diminish as class
size increases beyond the current 40 students per section.
The economics discipline has adopted smart classroom technology and computer labs which has supported
our initial growth in FTE and graduation rates. In addition, it has helped lessen the decline in college
enrollment. In order to continue to provide this important feature of the program, we recommend dedicated
classrooms with smart room technology and appropriate board space for all economic classes. In addition, a
dedicated computer lab for both classroom instruction and walk-in or open availability would assist students
in maintaining successful completion ratios. Hybrid online courses should be investigated as a third option
for students Most of our students attend part time because of work or family obligations. In fact, 41% of
students in business take six hours or less. However, many of these students need a hands-on classroom
environment to succeed. Courses that combine online work with classroom instruction would improve
retention and persistence.
5-year Average Headcount
Business
TMCC
46%
41%
24% 23%
18% 16%
17% 15%
12+
9-11.9
6-8.9
Less than 6 credits
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ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Entrepreneurship courses are included as they may be used to complete the certificates and Associate
of Applied Science degrees.
Entrepreneurship Course Descriptions
ENT 200 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship
This course explores the basics of entrepreneurship. This is a survey course that briefly introduces students
to the various aspects and activities involved in entrepreneurship. Students then complete the focused
courses on each aspect and complete the degree with the capstone ENT 280. The course will look at the
characteristics of entrepreneurs, the cycle of entrepreneurship, idea generation and validation of an idea’s
ability to be successful, how to present your business idea to potential investors and how to take the plunge.
ENT 201 Entrepreneurship: Science & Engineering
This course looks specifically at the required skills for the scientist, engineer or applied technologies student
that is seeking to start their own business. The course will look at the aspects for entrepreneurship including
an introduction to the business plan, the financial aspects and the marketing components. Students will
explore the process of going from technology idea to market including the management of labs and
intellectual property process.
ENT 210 The Art, Science & Discipline of Creativity
This course explores the basics of entrepreneurship. This is a survey course that briefly introduces students
to the various aspects and activities involved in entrepreneurship. Students then complete the focused
courses on each aspect and complete the degree with the capstone ENT 280. The course will look at the
characteristics of entrepreneurs, the cycle of entrepreneurship, idea generation and validation of an idea’s
ability to be successful, how to present your business idea to potential investors and how to take the plunge.
ENT 220 International Women’s Entrepreneurship
This course looks at the effects of women entrepreneurs on the world economy and at the paths that women
take to business ownership. The course will look at each region and analyze the effects of micro financing,
environmental concern and development status on the role of women within the economy. The course will
also look at the role of women in creating change within their respective region and internationally.
ENT 230 Financing your Small Business Venture
This course explores the options that are available for financing your small business venture. Exploring:
ownership structures, venture capital, angel finance and the Small Business Administration. Students will
complete the course with multiple avenues for financing new and expanding existing business ventures.
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ENT 240 Marketing for Small Business
This course explores the marketing principles for the small business. Topics include integrated marketing
approaches, ROI analysis, and how to effectively build relationships that build the small business venture.
ENT 260 Intellectual Property
This course explores and defines the laws surrounding intellectual property. In particular students will
become acquainted with the patent process, culminating in the draft of a provisional patent application.
ENT 280 Entrepreneurship & Business Plan Development
This course provides an understanding of the principles of entrepreneurship and the knowledge and tools
required to develop a quality business plan. Reflective of the body of entrepreneurship literature, student
teams will use creativity and innovation techniques to generate new business ideas for which they will
develop original, realistic and effective business plans. This is intended as a “hands-on” experience that
explores the steps taken in the process of developing and presenting a proper business plan. This will
provide the opportunity for student teams to participate in a variety of local business plan competitions.
E-Club
TMCC participates in a number of entrepreneurship activities such as the Shark Tank, Nevada Center for
Entrepreneurship & Technology (NCET) exposition throughout the school year and other community
events. The club is open to membership to any part-time or full-time TMCC student. The e-club is one of
the premier student organizations at the college. The primary mission of the E-Club is to inspire and
encourage entrepreneurship among TMCC students, while offering an open environment to exchange ideas
and create networks with the support of faculty. We provided the resources that make the track to success
for entrepreneurs a smooth ride. The E-Club offers:
•
Leadership opportunities
•
Campus and community involvement
•
Business and communication skills
•
Networking opportunities
Shark Tank Competition
One event that the e-club offers is the “Shark Tank Competition”. The Shark Tank Competition aims to
bring exciting and innovative business ideas out of the woodwork. Existing business plan competitions can
be daunting: their requirements for detailed plans and executive strategies can discourage participants, and
may be preventing some bright students from bringing good ideas forward. With that in mind, the Shark
Tank does not require a complete business plan, financial statements, or any supporting documents. It is
literally "pure pitch", with nothing but the value of the idea and the speaker's presenting skill to support it.
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There is a qualifying round and a final round. The shark tank competition awards cash prizes of first ($300)
second ($150) and third ($75) place based on the following judging criteria:
Judging Guidelines
Both the preliminary and final pitches are judged on three criteria:
1. Innovative Idea: Because Shark Tank focuses on drawing out new business ideas; the core idea itself is of
elevated importance. In this category, a completely new idea with compelling potential will do well, even if
the proposed details of its execution seem doubtful.
2. Proof of a Market: Even the best products or services fail as businesses if nobody in particular wants to
buy them. Therefore, each pitch should identify a profitable group of people with a unique need that the
business would address.
3. Demonstration of Competitive Advantage: Once the market is identified, if it is truly viable, it will
probably already have businesses competing directly or indirectly for it. Each pitch should acknowledge
these competitors and explain what would set its own company apart. If there are no competitors, the pitch
should explain why the market is empty and how they can viably enter it.
Business Plan Competition
Truckee Meadows Community College encourages the development of curricula and programs in the fields
of innovation and entrepreneurship. One way we do this is through holding an annual Business Plan
Competition. To encourage students from different academic disciplines to work together to develop new
business ideas and good business plans for those ideas, and to promote greater participation and
performance in the upcoming statewide Donald W. Reynolds Governor's Cup Business Plan Competition
held each spring, TMCC has established the Business Plan Competition for students of Truckee Meadows
Community College and TMCC High School. This year the Donald W. Reynolds Governor's Cup finalists
will also have the opportunity to compete in the Tri-State Donald W. Reynolds Cup (Nevada, Arkansas, and
Oklahoma) competition following the Governor's Cup.
The TMCC Business Plan Competition seeks to teach students at all high school, college and university
levels the importance of developing high quality business ideas and plans. The competition also seeks to
provide them with the resources, not only to write comprehensive, complete and concise business strategies,
but to also see those plans come to be realized. Participants of TMCC Business Plan Competition are
strongly encouraged to participate in the spring Donald W. Reynolds’s Governor's Cup Business Plan
Competition and the subsequent Tri-State Competition to compete for a share of the more than $250,000 in
cash prizes offered.
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Eligibility
The competition is open to all full-time and part-time undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at
TMCC and TMCC High School. Faculty sponsorship is required for this competition as well as for the
Governor's Cup Competition. Individual participation is permitted, but teams of up to six students are
preferred, and are given points for interdisciplinary teams. The business plan must be for a seed, start-up or
early stage venture and must address the entire business concept (including implementation). At least one
team member must have a key role in the company's management team. Proposals for the buy-out or
expansion of an existing company, tax-shelter opportunities, franchise, real estate syndications, or a nonprofit, and other consulting projects and analyses are not eligible.
Students who have competed in a previous year are eligible to compete again, however if they placed (first,
second or third), they must present a new idea and may not present the same and/or a revised version of the
business plan or idea presented the previous year. If they did not place in the top three, they may submit the
same or revised version of the business plan or idea presented the previous year.
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LOGISTICS
Logistics courses are included as they may be used to complete the certificates and Associate of
Applied Science degrees.
Logistics Course Descriptions
LGM 201 - Essentials of Logistics Management
This course introduces students to supply chain management from both analytical and perspectives.
Stressing a unified approach, the course allows students to develop a framework for making intelligent
decisions within the supply chain. Key logistics functions are covered to include demand planning,
procurement, inventory theory and control, transportation planning and execution, reverse logistics, and
flexible contracting. Concepts covered include postponement, portfolio management, dual sourcing, and
others. Emphasis is placed on ability to recognize and manage risk, analyze various tradeoffs, and model
logistics systems.
LGM 202 - International Logistics Management
This course analyzes and defines the functions of the supply chain that are involved in international supply
chain management. Themes include supply chain activities in international business with special emphasis
on management of transportation, global sourcing, customs issues and facility location in a global
environment.
LGM 205 - Logistics Planning and Control
This course provides theoretical and hands on training in the use of production planning, demand
management, master scheduling, materials requirements, and capacity planning tools and techniques.
Themes include: Master scheduling, ERP, MRP and inventory management.
LGM 206 - Logistics Planning and Control Laboratory
This course complements the Logistics Planning and Control lecture course. In this course, students will
work on problems using Microsoft Excel and other appropriate technology for conducting analysis required
in LGM 205. Highly recommended for all students, required for students who have no prior or little
knowledge of Excel.
LGM 207 - Service Logistics
This course explores the role of logistics and logistics principles in service organizations. Students will look
at applications of TQM and master planning, along with other logistics principles, in increasing the
effectiveness and increasing output of the service organization.
LGM 208 - Logistics and Quality Management Tools
This course will introduce students to the concepts and tools that are utilized in improving and managing
quality within logistics disciplines. The first part of the course will look at Theory of Constraints, Lean and
Total Quality Management.
LGM 209 - Logistics and Quality Management Tools II
This is the second course in the Logistics and Quality Management Tools sequence. This course will focus
upon Six Sigma and synthesis of the tools for maximum impact in creating continuous improvements.
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LGM 210 Studies in Procurement & Logistics
This course analyzes both the theory and applications of strategic issues in procurement and supply chain
management process. Themes include the procurement cycle, purchasing research, relationships with
suppliers, negotiation and commodity planning. Emphasis is placed on cost, price and value analysis.
LGM 212 Transportation Management
This course analyzes carrier economics, regulation and rate making practices as well as evaluating the
public policy issues related to carrier transportation; includes course work in the planning and design of
logistically oriented urban service systems. Themes include customer service, distribution operations,
purchasing and negotiation.
LGM 280 Current Topics in Logistics
This course will explore current topics in the logistics industry. Topics will change each semester. The
course will be run as an exploratory course with students, instructors and guest lecturers each bringing their
own concept of what's new and hot to the classroom.
LGM 285 CPIM Prep
This course allows students to spend time focusing on the preparation for the APICS Certified Production
Inventory Manager certification exams.
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MANAGEMENT
Management Course Assessments
MGT 171 Supervision
Summarization:
Outcome 1: Reflective paper on personal activity in team situation based learning project.
Papers were reviewed to determine at which loop of learning students progressed; based on Argyris’
“triple-loop learning model”. Two sections taught by a single instructor was used to evaluate this year
as the official MCO was not filed and thus learning objectives were not consistent across all sections.
This is being resolved as part of this course assessment process.
Subsequent Course Modifications 1:
After reviewing the fifteen papers, twenty-seven specific
instances were found where the student in their reflection mentioned a particular rule of working in
teams (communication, leadership, accountability, delegation). All papers had a minimum of one clear
rule that they illustrated in their paper. Three of the papers were from a fast track course. These students
had a minimum of two rules per paper. This shows differences between the requirements for fast track
and traditional program. Students in the traditional program tended to focus on a single specific area of
teamwork, whereas fast track students tended to explore multiple aspects of teamwork.
Context in which they resided. All of the fast track students mentioned adapting to the utilization of
technology in lieu of face to face meetings. Their discussions included comments on the amount of time
that it took to adjust, to why the adjustment worked and were able to relate the adaptation to the
changing constraints of the way business is changing today. The primary adaptation within the
traditional course was to not having weekly meetings and having their group change constantly. While
fast track students were comfortable with the level of ambiguity with the assignment, the majority of
traditional course papers mentioned a discomfort with the level of knowledge provided regarding the
assignment.
Outcome 2: Students participated in a single course workshop on reflexivity. After completing the
exercise, students were asked to write a paper reflecting on their experience. These papers were
reviewed against the Argyrols triple loop learning model.
Subsequent Course Modifications 2: A total of thirty-three on time papers were reviewed from two
traditional sections. After reviewing the following results were discovered. There were twenty-five
specific instances where students provided a definition of reflexivity, the practice of reflection or a
specific area of the workshop exercise.
It appears to have been easier for students to achieve double loop learning without displaying single loop
learning as they were building from a physical activity that everyone in the class had participated in. As
far as a writing exercise, the inability to provide context for the reader could be improved. It appears that
it is significantly easier to achieve second loop, application level learning using a workshop format. To
insure that this second loop learning is built upon a strong foundation definition and cognition activities
should precede any workshop like this one. There were fourteen specific instances where students were
able to illustrate how their actions were responsible for the outcome of the situation and how based on
this experience they would now more carefully review the assumptions that they hold prior to interacting
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with others. The development of this skill is critical to the development of strong supervisors,
particularly in dealing with a diverse workforce. The development of triple loop learning within this
learning outcome is of more importance than the other learning outcomes.
Outcome 3 at the conclusion of the course, students were asked to complete a portfolio of their
assignments during the course.
Subsequent Course Modifications 3: These results are indicative of the need for a clear grading
rubric. It does appear that the clarified assignment instructions led to positive results in the spring term.
Again, referring to learning outcome 1 and 2, the lower level student is in need of either very clear
instructions with very specific directions or an ability to participate in classroom exercises that enhance
their learning. The use of a portfolio across all sections, even with varied assignments and rubrics will
provide a unique way to evaluate across sections in the future for this course while maintaining
academic freedom.
MGT 201 Principles of Management
Summarization:
Outcome 1: The students were given two rubrics. One required them to create a Gantt chart and the
other a PERT chart. The average for the Gantt chart (including those students who didn’t hand in the
assignment) was 78% and for the PERT chart was 74% (including those students who didn’t hand in the
assignment). If you average the results and exclude the assignments not handed it, the results are 87%
(Gantt)/83% (PERT).
Outcome 1: Subsequent Course Modifications: Instructor created an in-class exercise where students
complete a “practice” Gantt and PERT chart. Lecture on the topic is given with assigned reading due
prior to class. During the class students create an example PERT and Gantt chart. So students are
participating in a class workshop where students first create charts individually, then move into small
groups then discuss as a class. The students are practicing “creating” in class.
Outcome 2: The students were given a motivation rubric. From the rubric they were asked to choose
two motivational theories. One need based and one processed based. Then they were asked to analyze
either Steve Jobs, Carly Fiorina or the author of the book How Starbucks Saved by Life. Results were
61% average which included students that didn’t turn in the assignment. If you average the results and
exclude the assignments not handed it, the average was 80%.
Outcome 2: Subsequent Course Modifications: In order to achieve more participation from the class,
the instructor will ask for “drafts” of their report and make it worth points. Another instructor tool
would be to have students visit the “writing center” for points. Another step would be for the instructor
to brainstorm with TMCC’s writing center personnel for ways to improve participation on this
assignment.
Outcome 3: The students were given a closed book and note quiz. Results were an average of 90%.
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Outcome 3: Subsequent Course Modifications: One way to improve results would be to do an in
class practice exercise prior to students taking the quiz to test student knowledge.
MGT 212 Leadership and Human Resources
Summarization: No data has been collected to date via the CAR process. Planned for spring of 2015.
MGT 235 Organizational Behavior
Summarization: No data has been collected to date via the CAR process. Planned for spring of 2015.
MGT 283 Introduction to Human Resources Management:
Summarization: No data has been collected to date via the CAR process. Planned for spring of 2016.
MGT 290 Internship in Management
Summarization: This is an internship in management class no CAR cycles apply.
Assessment Driven Improvements
MGT 171 Supervision
The teamwork element is relatively straightforward for lecture students in the aspects of team formation
and work management. Online students face team formation inertia as well as logistical challenges in
completing work. In both cases, alternatives to team formation and responsibility have been practiced
by one instructor. Alternative approaches to motivating team selection have been experimented with,
albeit in, thus far, a non-structured manner. For the online students, the instructor has taken a two-phase
approach to support the students in team formation. In the initial step students are at liberty to form
teams as they desire. Failure on the part of any student to associated with a team results in the second
phase modal change, wherein the instructor tries to identify the “blocking factor” that is keeping the
student from associating. The instructor then coaches in a manner appropriate for the blocking behavior.
In order to improve the team production in the lecture sessions, the allocation of course time spent prior
to the group assignment was increased. The trade-off has been that students are better prepared for the
group production phase, but now have a little less time for completion. A side benefit of delaying team
formation is that, later in the semester, course attendance has stabilized somewhat. So teams are in turn
more stable, with fewer people leaving the course, and therefore their team.
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MGT 201 Principles of Management
Improved outcomes in the course will be attributed to the changes in the course syllabus for additional
class time to learn and practice the concepts. Also, Instructor O’Neal is collecting data on class
retention through experimenting with twice a semester meet and greets. The experiment is simple. The
idea is that if the instructor has “individual touches” with the student twice during the semester a
personal relationship with the student develops aiding the student in completing the course and not
failing. It involves requiring the student to do a “meet & greet” twice during the semester for ten
minutes. The student receives 25 points credit for each “meet and greet”. The “meet and greet” is held in
the instructors office and occurs during the beginning of the semester and then again towards the end. In
the initial “meet and greet” the student introduces themselves and provides an overview of their goals,
work history and course load. The later “meet and greet” involves wrapping up the semester, reviewing
their grade and doing a short Q & A. The true intent is to “open the instructors door” to the students in a
one on one setting to encourage the student to seek help when needed and keep the instructor in the loop
if forces outside of the student’s control occurs like illness, work or an accident occurs. All of these
events can impinge upon the progress of a student.
Below are 2012-2013 withdrawals and failures for MGT 201 in the fall and spring. Please note no “meet
and greets” were completed in this calendar year. Note that “meet and greets” began in the fall of 2013
and then data is listed below as a comparison. Instructor O’Neal will continue to do “meet and greets”
for the next 2 – 4 semesters.
Semester
# Students
Withdrawals
% Withdrawals
Failures
% Failures
Fall 2012
32
1
.03 %
5
.16%
Spring 2013
31
2
.06%
4
.13%
Fall 2013
18
1
.05
2
.11%
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MGT 212 Leadership and Human Resources
No data at this time.
MGT 235 Organizational Behavior
No data at this time.
MGT 283 Introduction to Human Resources Management:
No data at this time.
Other Management Course Modifications
In addition to CAR related modifications, interim informal SLO assessments have resulted in course
modifications that have been implemented within the past few years or are in the process of being
implemented. These include:
Textbooks: New textbooks have been adopted for substantially MGT 212 and MGT 201. There has
been effort put into the selection of books that provide students with minimum purchase expenses while
meeting course objective. Also, the instructors provide students with the option of on-line and hardcopy
textbooks. Many of the texts offer greater online resources including the ability to
•
•
•
assign work based on learning outcomes
track student progress by learning outcome
provides students with links to the text and other resources that cover learning outcomes
Quality Matters: Andy Delany who is full-time marketing faculty teaches some of the management
courses. Andy has over 40 years of management and small business ownership experience. He has a
strong education background in psychology and a master of business administration. Andy has been on
the TMCC faculty since 1989. Professor Andy Delaney who teaches MGT 212, has completed the
Quality Matters training and certification
Ongoing Assessment: Management instructors continually use assessment results to identify areas of
difficulty for students and modify instruction and assignments as needed.
Evaluating Relevancy of Curriculum
Course Content
MGT 171 Supervision (3 credits) Prerequisite: None; Supervision provides a skill building approach to
develop people and the conceptual skills necessary to successfully supervise employees. In addition, the
functional supervisory skills of planning, organizing, staffing, leading and controlling will be developed.
MGT 201 Principles of Management (3 credits) Prerequisite: None; Fundamentals and principles of
management; administrative policies, objectives and procedures and problems of organization control and
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leadership. Students must bring their placement reports to the first class meeting. Attendance beyond the first
class is subject to instructor approval.
MGT 212 Leadership and Human Relations (3 credits) Prerequisite: None; The focus of the course is on
understanding and managing human behavior in organizations. Central to the course is better understanding
oneself as a leader and exploring some of the more effective ways of leading others. All MGT 212 students
must take the English assessment test before enrolling. Students must bring their placement reports to the first
class meeting. Attendance beyond the first class is subject to instructor approval.
MGT 235 Organizational Behavior (3 credits) prerequisite: MGT 201 or permission of the instructor.
Concepts, theories and case studies concerning the behavior of people in modern business organizations.
MGT 283 Introduction to Human Resources Management (3 credits) prerequisite: None; Designed to
develop an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of personnel at the mid-management level. Areas
covered include: employee needs, human relations, orienting and training employees, benefit programs and
economics of supervision. All MGT 283students must take the English assessment test before enrolling.
Students must bring their assessment report to the first class meeting. Attendance beyond the first class is
subject to instructor approval.
MGT 290 Internship in Management (1 – 8 credits) Prerequisite: None; A course designed wherein
students will apply knowledge and skills to real on- the-job situations in a program designed by a company
official and a faculty advisor to maximize learning experiences. Available to students who have completed
most Core and Major requirements and have A 2.5 G.P.A. Contact the instructor for the application,
screening, and required skills evaluation. Up to eight semester hour credits may be earned on the basis of 75
hours of internship for one credit. May be repeated for up to eight credits. This course may not transfer to a
baccalaureate degree of art or science within the universities in the Nevada System of Higher Education
Methods of Instruction
Management Instruction:
Management courses have two primary methods of course instruction, web delivery using the Canvas
Learning Management System and in-person traditional lecture classes. Moreover, each semester Business
Division instructors have the opportunity to explore novel and innovative methods of conducting lecture and
delivering content to students through both the Internet and in-person classroom delivery.
The majority of management courses are offered in two formats: (1) a traditional classroom with online
resources (CANVAS Learning Management System) and (2) purely online (CANVAS only). MGT 201 and
MGT 212 are offered online through TMCC’s fast track program.
Traditional classes meet either twice a week for one hour and fifteen minutes or, for some evening courses,
once a week for two and one-half hours. Methods of instruction vary by instructor but generally include
lecture, discussion, cooperative problem solving, projects, and individual in-class or online exercises as
appropriate to the unit being covered.
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The majority of TMCC’s management courses are supplemented with extensive publisher resources.
Publisher’s resources include opportunities for students to view mini-lectures, PowerPoints, link to additional
resources, and engage in non-graded practice. Importantly, publisher’s online content allows instructors to
choose assignments by objective, level of difficulty, and to track student progress.
Faculty Qualifications
Management Faculty Qualifications:
All faculty have a master degree or higher in their field from an accredited institution. Additionally, most of
the instructors have many years of personal experience in the discipline they are teaching. Faculty are
required to attend professional development training each semester during the weeks before each semester
starts. During the semester many professional development opportunities are offered by the college.
TMCC has two full-time management faculty members. Depending upon the student demand for the
courses, if additional courses are taught beyond the full-time faculty, the courses are taught by part-time
employees. These employees are required to have a Master in Business or related Masters work.
Robert Kirchman (full time faculty) Robert Kirchman currently holds the position of Management
Instructor in the Division of Business at Truckee Meadows Community College, where he teaches classes in
Management, Economics, Business, and Marketing. In addition to teaching, Robert is a member of the
TMCC Faculty Senate, representing the Division of Business; and is a member of the Food Service
Committee. Robert’s professional experience includes management and officer-level positions at numerous
firms such as McGraw-Hill and Sybase. In addition, he has been involved in multiple start-up companies,
and has formed and run partnerships and proprietorships. Robert earned the A.B. in Economics from
Occidental College in Los Angeles, and the M.B.A. from Golden Gate University in San Francisco. He is
currently engaged in course work in graduate Economics at the University of Nevada Reno.
Nancy O’Neal (full time faculty) Nancy has over 13 years of teaching experience at the University and
college level. Prior to coming to TMCC three years ago she taught at University of Reno, Nevada for 11
years. Fourteen years prior to this she held various management positions in large corporations such as
Hewlett-Packard, General Dynamics and Arthur Anderson. She also worked in various entrepreneurial
position working for a Reno startup and for a local Reno entrepreneur. She has a Master’s in Business form
California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo and a Bachelor’s of Science degree from Purdue
University in West Lafayette, Indiana. Nancy teaches MGT 201, MGT 212 (when needed) and various other
courses in the Business Division.
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Post Completion Objectives (transfer, job placement, etc.)
Transferability of Management Courses:
The following courses are generally transferable to NSHE institutions:
•MGT 171 Supervision
•MGT 201 Principles of Management
•MGT 212 Leadership and Human Relations
•MGT 235 Organizational Behavior
•MGT 283 Introduction to Human Resources Management
The only Management course that will not transfer is MGT 290: Internship in Management. The courses above
again will typically transfer over, but they may not be a direct transfer. For instance (this is a hypothetical
example), MGT 171 may transfer to NSC, but it may not transfer as MGT 171, it may only transfer as a
management elective course.
Secondary Student Preparation Efforts
Management: None
External Review
Management: None
Non-credit Training Offered
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Curriculum Strategic Plan
The following section summarizes the findings above related to curriculum and outlines the self-study
committee’s recommended targets for improvement to be implemented over the next five year period.
Assessment Findings and Strategies
Management course CARs completed during the reporting period indicate that no change in Student Learning
Outcomes are planned at this time. As discussed in “Assessment Driven Improvements” section above,
course-level improvements suggested by the CARs approved during the reporting period have been
implemented for Management 201. MGT 171 we have had an instructor change and textbook change, so we
are re-examine outcomes for this course. All other courses will be assessed over the next five years, unless
offered only intermittently, in which case they will be assessed when taught. Additional strategies in progress
or under consideration that apply to the management curriculum and assessment include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review and revise Learning Objectives and Measures for MGT 212 to tie to new textbook(s)
MGT 171, MGT 201 and MGT 212 – course descriptions will be examined to eliminate overlap
between course and prerequisites created if applicable
Examine MGT 235 for appropriate leadership topics and develop revised course outline and MCO if
applicable
Examine MGT 283 for student applicability or eliminate from catalog
Quality Matters certification for online classes
Development of course-wide pre- and post-tests.
Integration of part-time instructor assessment data into CARs.
Evaluation of enrollment to insure that program and students needs area being met, i.e. day, night, and
online enrollment, summer-session, winter-session.
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External Resource Recommendations and Implementation Plans
Management: These activities are in place and ongoing.
•
•
•
•
•
Encourage students to join the Entrepreneurship Club “E-Club”.
Encourage students to participate in the Shark Tank Competition.
Encourage students to participate in the Business Plan Competition.
Encourage students to participate in the Division’s orientation event “O-Day”
Encourage students to avail themselves of all other TMCC student support services, in particular the
Tutoring Center.
Anticipated Factors Affecting Curriculum and Strategies
Management Curriculum and Instruction may be impacted by
National Job market: Educators are well aware of the positive impact of a college education on the ability
to find employment. BLS: Household Data: Table A-4 Employment status of civilian population 25 years
and over by educational attainment indicates unemployment levels from 2003 to 2013 were (See:
http://www.bls.gov/webapps/ legacy/cpsatab4.htm):




College
Some college
High School
Less than high school
2% to 4.7%
3.6% to 8.4%
4.3% to 10.3%
6.8% to 14.9%
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Northern Nevada Job Market: The composition of the Northern Nevada job market continues to change,
and efforts to effect that change are ongoing. The focus of economic development is on economic diversity,
with an emphasis on bringing export-based manufacturing and secondary jobs to the region. As this effort
creates successes such as the location of firms like Tesla and Zloop, the need for middle managers will
increase, but so too may the specific needs that arise from particular industries.
Growing & Declining Occupations
Occupation Change in Jobs (2004-2014)
Personal Financial Advisors
Real Estate Sales Agents
Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food
First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers
Construction Laborers
Carpenters
13,961
13,929
10,186
-3,514
-5,237
-7,256
Growing & Declining Industries
Industry Change in Jobs (2004-2014)
Full-Service Restaurants
Janitorial Services
Corporate, Subsidiary, and Regional Managing Offices
Framing Contractors
Drywall and Insulation Contractors
Casino Hotels
17,903
13,983
12,317
-9,165
-9,810
-15,612
Source: Nevada Governor's Office of Economic Development
http://www.diversifynevada.com/images/uploads//Nevada.pdf
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MARKETING
Assessment Driven Improvements
Curriculum is tied to assessment driven improvements. Each course in the business/management area has before and
after assessments to measure the effectiveness of each course. Each period assessments are forwarded to the proper
reporting authorities and instructors review and results making changes in curriculum as needed. This insures the
quality of each course is up to standard and has relevance to the current needs of the community and creates value for
each student. Additionally, articulation with other institutions within the Nevada System of Higher Education
(NSHE) insures Marketing Principles, MKT 210 is transferable to all state institutions.
Marketing Curriculum, Methods, Quality and Assessment
Course Content and Relevancy of Marketing Course
Course content is updated on a continuing basis as needed. This includes input for the Business Division Advisory
Board, students and other community stakeholders as needed. Furthermore, marketing courses are compared with
courses that have similar designations in other colleges and universities through the United States. In this instance
TMCC marketing course outlines, content and coverage are evaluated against other institutions of higher education.
Methods of Instruction
Marketing courses have two primary methods of course instruction, web delivery using the Canvas Learning
Management System and in-person traditional lecture classes. Moreover, each semester Business Division
instructors have the opportunity to explore novel and innovative methods of conducting lecture and delivering
content to students through both the Internet and in-person classroom delivery.
Case Studies and Marketing Simulation Exercises
The current textbook used is Marketing: An Introduction, 12 edition, Armstrong & Kotler, Pearson
Publishing, 2014, ISBN 9780133792591. Pearson Publishing has created a companion web site for the
textbook named My Marketing Lab. This web site is of great value to the marketing students. Students
can take practice tests and use flash cards. Additionally, the site gives access to case studies, examples
and real world marketing simulation exercises. These exercises have been used as assignments.
Quality Matters
The lead instructor, Professor Andy Delaney, has completed the Quality Matters training and
certification. All the marketing offerings follow the Quality Matters format.
Course Objectives
Students will demonstrate the ability to:
 Understand and use marketing vocabulary
 Effectively resolve or identify marketing problems and/or opportunities
Course Learning Outcomes, MKT 210
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1. Learning outcome statement 1: Students will articulate their understanding of a marketing system,
including sensing, serving, and satisfying consumer wants/needs, using marketing vocabulary.
Measure: Ability will be measured orally and/or in writing. Instructors give feedback to students by using a
written grading rubric. Instructors will answer questions orally or in writing.
2. Learning outcome statement 2: Students will demonstrate their ability to articulate their understanding
of concepts in designing advertising, pricing products, and using new technologies, analyze, evaluate, and
create advertising, product, pricing, and distribution strategies.
Measure: Ability will be measured through written assignments and case studies. Instructors give feedback
to students by using a written grading rubric. Instructors will answer questions orally or in writing.
3. Learning outcome statement 3: Students will demonstrate their ability to segment and target a market,
including horizontal and vertical distribution systems; market segmentation/positioning; target marketing in
a diverse global market; and describe a supply chain management and conduct global marketing.
Measure: Ability will be measured by written assignments, quizzes, case studies, and student presentations.
Instructors give feedback to students by using a written grading rubric. Instructors will answer questions
orally or in writing.
Ongoing Assessment
Marketing instructors continually use assessment results to identify areas of difficulty for students and
modify instruction and assignments as needed. Look on page 7 of this document for the results during Fall
2013 and Spring 2014. The results clearly demonstrate a statistically significant difference in student
understanding of the learning objectives for Marketing Principles.
Faculty Qualifications
All faculty have a master degree or higher in their field from an accredited institution. Additionally, most of
the instructors have many years of personal experience in the discipline they are teaching. Faculty are
required to attend professional development training each semester during the weeks before each semester
starts. During the semester many professional development opportunities are offered by the college.
Secondary Student Preparation Efforts
Marketing Principle courses have perquisites and students are encouraged to complete English and Math
general education requirements before taking their business/management core requirements and electives.
Degree/Certificate Requirements
Marketing Principles is a requirement or choice in all the Business Division Degrees and Certificates.
External Review
The Business Division maintains an active advisory board made up of community members which includes
business owners, managers, and executives. The advisory board meets each semester.
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Non-credit Training Offered
The Workforce Development area of the college offers several marketing oriented workshops, such as small
business marketing and person selling. The Business Division does not offer non-credit courses.
Assessment Results Fall 2013 and Spring 2014
Fall 2013 Assessment Results
At Start of Semester vs End of Semester Scores on
Assessment Test
20.0
15.0
17.0
13.0
17.5
17.0
12.8
12.0
10.0
Note: Only students completing the initial
assessment and the final assessment are
compared. Questions are directly related to the
course learning outcomes and are unique
questions not from a publisher’s test bank.
Test questions cover the course learning
objectives:
5.0
0.0
Median:
Mode:
Starting Score
Mean:
Course Learning Outcomes
N = 43
Ending Score
1. Learning outcome statement 1: Students
articulate their understanding of a
marketing system, including sensing, serving,
and satisfying consumer wants/needs, using
marketing vocabulary.
The results of a T Test for Fall 2013 shows statistical significance at < 0.001 will
Range: Start of Fall Semester: 6 to 21. End of Fall Semester: 8 to 27.
Spring 2014 Assessment Results
At Start of Semester vs End of Semester Scores on
Assessment Test
18.0
20.0
15.0
14.0
18.5
18.0
14.0
13.7
10.0
5.0
Measure: Ability will be measured orally
and/or in writing. Instructors give feedback to
students by using a written grading rubric.
Instructors will answer questions orally or in
writing.
0.0
2. Learning outcome statement 2: Students
will demonstrate their ability to articulate
N = 36
Starting Score
Ending Score
their understanding of concepts in designing
advertising, pricing products, and using new
The results of a T Test for Spring 2014 shows statistical significance at <0.001
Range: Start of Spring Semester: 0 to 25. End of Spring Semester: 0 to 30.technologies, analyze, evaluate, and create
advertising, product, pricing, and distribution
strategies.
Median:
Mode:
Mean:
Measure: Ability will be measured through
written assignments and case studies.
Instructors give feedback to students by using
a written grading rubric. Instructors will
answer questions orally or in writing.
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Courses
MKT 131 Advertising 3.00
Prerequisite: ENG 101 or BUS 098 or qualifying Accuplacer score.
This courses focus upon the development of a strategy for communicating the offerings of an organization. Emphasis will be
placed upon understanding consumer behavior and understanding the social and ethical implications of marketing
communication. Students will work in groups to create their own IMC plans for a brand of their choice.
MKT 210 Marketing Principles 3.00
Prerequisite: MATH 96 or 'C' or better in BUS 117; ENG 101/113 or BUS 108; or equivalent ACCUPLACER, SAT/ACT test
results.
Intense study of marketing philosophy including: segmenting and developing target markets, pricing, distribution and location
analysis, promotion and product development. Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the marketing concept
and be able to explain how an organization can develop an effective marketing strategy. Attendance beyond the first class is
subject to instructor approval.
MKT 295 Internship 1.00 - 3.00
Prerequisite: None
A course designed wherein students will apply knowledge of real on-the-job situations in a program designed by a company
official and faculty adviser to maximize learning experiences. Available to students who have completes most core and major
requirements and have a 2.5 GPA. Contact the appropriate chairperson for the application, screening, and required skills
evaluation. Up to eight semester hour credits may be earned on the basis of 75 hours of internship for one credit. May be repeated
for up to eight credits. This course may not transfer to a baccalaureate degree of art or science within the universities in the
Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE).
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Curriculum Strategic Plan and Recommendation
This section discusses changes in the macro-environment related to the curriculum of marketing courses
offered by the TMCC Business Division. It is critical the TMCC Business Division responds and cultivates
updated curriculum as enhancements in retailing, wholesaling and distribution take shape.
B to B Environment
Developments in the business to business economic activity is changing the way businesses conduct
transactions and search for resources. Most companies are still using the Internet as a supplemental system
for conducting transactions and reordering. However, companies would like to explore and test the online
possibilities. This is an opportunity for TMCC to service the community by offering some type of offerings
that fill this need for further information and testing the limits of the emerging technology for conducting
business activities.
B to C Environment
Retailing is experiencing significant changes brought on by the emergence of mobile devices and the
Internet. As with B to B activities, most retailers are still using brick and mortar retail establishments to
conduct business. Except for a few companies like Amazon, YouTube and Facebook, most business
organizations use the mobile devices and Internet as supplemental to their main ways for conducting
transactions. TMCC has an opportunity here. In the next five years the TMCC Business Division should
develop several courses that prepare small business owners, executives, and potential employees for the
changes in B to C being spun out by the technological environment. Internet based direct marketing is
getting more attention from businesses. “According to the Direct Marketing Association, U.S. companies
spent almost 168.5 billion on direct and digital marketing.” 1
Social Media
How many people use Facebook each month? Answer 1.35 billion. 2 Social media has become a significant
force in advertising and has some major advantages in identifying target markets. Consumer behavior can
be analyzed in new and potentially valuable ways. These developments are changing the way companies do
marketing research and develop marketing plans. Some type of marketing course needs to be developed
that helps our community constituents connect with these new developments. Over the next year a
committee should be developed to examine the changes and additions needed to update the marketing
curriculum.
1
Marketing: An Introduction, 12 edition, Armstrong & Kotler, Pearson Publishing, 2014, pg 437.
Digital Marketing Ramblings, accessed 11/7/14, http://expandedramblings.com/index.php/by-the-numbers-17-amazingfacebook-stats/
2
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Major Threat to the Integrity of College and University Courses
 Here is an example of a mini case study with multiple choice questions immediately following,
directly out of a publisher’s test bank.
http://www.chegg.com/homework-help/questions-and-answers/world-tennis-ball-co-wtb-makes-tennisballs-sells-us-raul-fernandez-firm-s-marketing-manag-q4557168
In this case the student purchases answers to the multiple choice questions by joining for a monthly fee of
$14.95. If this company does not have the publisher’s permission to sell this information it may be a
violation of copyright law. It is most certainly unethical.
 Here is a professor that is posting publisher test banks to the Internet:
http://faculty.ksu.edu.sa/alshum/Pages/English_CV.aspx
This is what he is presently posting on his university web site: faculty.ksu.edu.sa/alshum/DocLib5/Question
CH 9 kOTLER.doc
Sent an email to this professor and asked what thoughts he had on posting publisher test banks to the
Internet. He never answered.
 The next web site has publisher test banks which include all the multiple choice, true false and essay
questions and answers.
http://wenku.baidu.com/view/0d86ce88e53a580216fcfea0
It is unclear what this web site is doing but they have posted the test bank for Marketing: An Introduction,
11e, Armstrong.
Recommendation for TMCC and other University Faculty
Many faculty members may not be aware of the thousands of web sites that are giving students answers to
publisher test banks or instructor manuals. The student can cut and paste a part of a question into any search
engine which results in instant and exact results. Students seem to be outsourcing their brains to Google,
Bing and Yahoo. Every semester in my classes two or three students get caught cutting and pasting answers
into essay questions. It is surprising because they are clearly warned that all their writing assignments are
reviewed for plagiarism using the Turn It In.Com Web Site.
What can be done? First, faculty become aware! An astute faculty member can slightly change a few
words from publisher test bank essay questions. When the student goes to search the question, it will be
much harder to get matches. Next, publishers need to be alerted and pushed to enforce copyright law and
warn professors that publish test banks to the Internet.
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This topic is certainly worthy of discussion by professors and administration. A dialog should be developed
and include teachers, publishers and university and college administration. A first step for TMCC might be
a professional development workshop on this issue. Otherwise, colleges and universities may be
graduating people that know very little but are great at using search engines.
Demand for Marketing Expertise
According to the web site, Pay Scale Human Capital 3, the early career salary of someone in the Marketing
& Management field is $44,000. At mid-career a person might average $82,900. TMCC does not offer an
associate degree with an emphasis in marketing. When the college did offer an associate with an emphasis
in marketing, it was of little value in obtaining a marketing job. Companies hire people with associate
degrees and no experience into entry level marketing jobs. Students typically obtained employment as sales
representatives, retail clerks, marketing trainees, etc.
Here the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has calculated the median pay for a wide range of marketing
jobs with
bachelor’s
Quick Facts: Advertising, Promotions, and Marketing Managers 4
degrees.
2012 Median Pay
$115,750 per year, $55.65 per hour
Entry-Level Education
Bachelor’s degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation
See How to Become One
On-the-job Training
None
Number of Jobs, 2012
216,000
Job Outlook, 2012-22
12% (As fast as average)
Employment Change, 2012-22
25,400
3
Pay Scale Human Capital, accessed 11/7/14, http://www.payscale.com/college-salary-report/majors-that-pay-youback/bachelors
4
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, accessed 11/8/14, http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/advertisingpromotions-and-marketing-managers.htm
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There is a job market for people with bachelor’s degrees. The current trends, as discussed on page 10
of this document, would favor training and expertise in Internet Marketing, Social Media, and direct
marketing. This is where the TMCC Business Division can get students on a good start toward their
goals.
TMCC Business Division marketing offerings create value for students by introducing them to the often
misunderstood marketing concepts. Most people think, incorrectly, marketing is just selling and advertising
and often these thoughts include some negative images of sleazy sales representatives or crass commercial
messages. The marketing courses get students on the right track and prepare them to either transfer to a four
year university or enter the workforce with correct perceptions about marketing and its functions.
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REAL ESTATE
Program/Unit Review Assessment Report Summaries
The real estate discipline completed a Program and Discipline Review (PDR) in June 2010. The real estate
discipline does not undergo a Program/Unit Review. The president’s four recommendations arising from the
PDR and the actions taken are described below.
Recommendation 1: Determine how to access state license exam information that is current and accurate to
provide this information as needed to students and keep the data/information as a component of the real
estate course annual assessment report documentation.
Action: Beginning April 2013, TMCC has received results from the national and state portions of the real
estate license examination.
Recommendation 2 Prepare a plan to stabilize the offering of courses, recruitment of students and
relationships with local and regional real estate agencies and organizations.
Action: We consistently offer RE 101 and RE 103 online and as live, evening classes. Lack of enrollment
has resulted in a suspension of the weekend real estate classes. For other reasons, the real estate and other
courses are no longer taught on television. An effective way to target potential real estate students has not
been discovered. Relationships with local real estate organizations, particularly the Reno Sparks Association
of REALTORS® continue to be strong. For example, the real estate instructor serves on two association
committees and usually two subcommittees.
Recommendation 3 Submit student learning outcomes for all active real estate courses taught by September
1, 2010.
Action: All real estate courses now have student learning outcomes as part of their master course outlines.
Course Assessment
The real estate discipline consists of two courses: RE 101 Real Estate Principles and RE 103 Real Estate
Law and Practice. RE 103 submitted a course assessment report (CAR) in October 2009 and RE 101
submitted a CAR completed in November 2010. Both CARs identified above addressed the same two
concerns. First, the online class did not do as well as the live class. Second, statistics from the state license
exam could be a very useful tool for assessment and for improving the discipline. To improve the online
class, the instructor has been creating and posting short videos that outline each chapter and provide
important updates. We have been receiving results from the state license exam since April 2013, but we do
not have enough data to make a meaningful analysis.
Assessment Driven Improvements
Assessment driven improvements are described immediately above.
Evaluating Relevancy of Curriculum
The real estate discipline prepares students to pass the real estate license exam and obtain a real estate
salesperson’s license. Jobs are always immediately available.
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Course Content
Both courses focus on information necessary to pass the license exam and practical application for a
successful real estate career. The content of each course is described briefly below.
RE 101 Real Estate Principles: The emphasis of this course is on national real estate principles. Key topics
include, but are not limited to real estate agency, real estate contracts including brokerage agreements, forms
of ownership, and transfer of title.
RE 103 Real Estate Law and Practice: This course has a heavy emphasis on law and real estate principles
as specifically applied in Nevada.
Degree/Certificate Requirements
The recently created Skills Certificate in Real Estate requires a student to successfully complete RE 101 Real Estate
Principles and RE 103 Real Estate Law and Practice. Significantly, students must pass each with at least 75% of the
total points available.
Methods of Instruction
Both classes are taught live and online. We emphasize excellent, effective and entertaining education.
Faculty Qualifications
See Resources section.
Post Completion Objective
The primary objective is for students to obtain a real estate salesperson’s license, which can lead
immediately to employment.
Secondary Student Preparation Efforts
The real estate discipline is not a degree/emphasis program.
External Review
The real estate discipline is not a degree/emphasis program.
Non-credit Training Offered
The real estate discipline does not offer any non-credit training.
Curriculum Developments Strategies
The real estate market, including laws and regulations, frequently change. The primary strategy is to ensure
that the curriculum stays up-to-date.
Assessment Findings and Strategies
A meaningful assessment cannot be made until there is sufficient data from the results of the state license
examination. The results are reported on how well applicants do on various topics and subtopics. When
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sufficient results are available, adjustments may be made to specific areas of the curriculum. For example,
if the results show a weakness in the area of contracts changes can be made to the curriculum.
External Resource Recommendation and Implementation Plans
There is no existing mechanism for an external review.
Anticipated Factors Affecting Curriculum and Strategies
The real estate discipline takes pride in preparing students for a career in real estate. We go a step beyond
license examination preparation. The status of the real estate market and real estate financing are the key
factors that affect the curriculum. As a result of the “Homeowner’s Bill of Rights,” the discipline’s
instructor anticipates another increase in short sales, but probably will not change the curriculum unless his
prediction proves true.
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RESOURCES
Faculty and Staff
Required Faculty Credentials
Faculty who teach classes that transfer to UNR must have an MBA
Name
DELANEY, ANDREW
Degree(s), Certificates
FTE List conferring institutions
100 A.A. - Nassau Community
College
Professional Certification
List agency/organization
Years at
TMCC
Total
Years
1989
24
B.A. - Adelphi University
M.B.A.- City University
KIRCHMAN, ROBERT
MCCOY, DIANA
100 B.A. - Occidental College
M.B.A. - Golden Gate
University
2012
100 B.A. - University of
California, Santa Barbara
1982
1
31
M.A. - University of
California, Berkeley
O’NEAL, NANCY
SCHEIBLE, BEN
100 B.S. - Purdue University,
M.B.A. - California
Polytechnic State
University
2012
100 A.B. - Stanford University
1998
J.D. - University of the
Pacific, McGeorge School
of Law
SMILANICK, PHILLIP
100 B.S., M.B.A. - University
of Nevada, Reno
1
15
1991
22
STREEPER, STEVEN
80
B.A., M.S., M.A. University of Wyoming
1990
23
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Full-Time to Part-Time Faculty Ratio
Full-time vs. Part-time Faculty FTE
Fall Semesters
100%
Full-time
90%
Part-time
80%
70%
76%
76%
72%
60%
67%
62%
50%
40%
30%
20%
24%
38%
33%
28%
24%
10%
0%
Fall 08
Fall 09
Fall 10
Fall 11
Fall 12
Full-time vs. Part-time Faculty FTE
Spring Semesters
100%
Full-time
90%
Part-time
80%
70%
60%
80%
72%
64%
50%
61%
56%
40%
30%
39%
36%
44%
28%
20%
20%
10%
0%
Spr 09
Spr 10
Spr 11
Spr 12
Spr 13
Part-time
24%
28%
33%
38%
24%
30%
Spring
Full-time
72%
64%
61%
56%
80%
67%
Part-time
28%
36%
39%
44%
20%
33%
Fall
A cademic Years
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-01
2011-12
Business (5 yr Avg)
Full-time
76%
72%
67%
62%
76%
70%
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The division relies on part-time faculty to instruct many classes offered. The LGM program relies
exclusively on part-time instructors. This area is in dire need of a dedicated full-time instructor to lead
and build this important area. Logistics management is vital as Nevada is a major logistical hub. All
other areas utilize part-time instructors, except for Real Estate. The part-time pool for all areas is very
shallow, and is especially difficult in regards to the ACC classes, as the class that transfer to university
should be taught by an MBA, who is also a CPA. Marketing is also a difficult area as it is a very
dynamic area that needs someone who is able to keep up with a rapidly changing environment and
inspire students to actively learn. Economics is also a very specific skill set and needs an MBA in
Economics in order to teach.
Part-Time Business Studies Instructors
Accounting:
• Lisa Buehler – CPA, M.Ed. Curriculum and Instruction, M.B.A. Finance, and J.D.
• Anthony Cardinalli – CPA, BS Accounting, MBA (in progress)
• David Stuart – MBA, BS Managerial Science& Accounting/Finance
Business:
• Samuel Chung – BS Math, Zoology, MBA Management of Financial Intuitions
• Jessica Contreras – MBA, BS Accounting & International Business
• Katharine Peake – M.A. English Composition & Rhetoric, BA English
Economics:
• Shawn Blume – MBA, BS Managerial Economics
• John Gwaltney – Ph.D. Economics
• Michael Lampert – Ph.D. Economics
Logistics:
• Helm Lehman – MBA Finance & Business Strategy, MA Public Policy, BA Government
Management:
• Helm Lehmann – MBA Finance & Business Strategy, MA Public Policy, BA Government
• Lori Wegner – Ph.D Organizational management, MS Administration, BS Administration &
Management
Required Classified Credentials
None
Classified FTE
2.00
Advisory Board Meeting Minutes:
http://www.tmcc.edu/cte/
Facilities
The Department has two main facilities issues, classroom and office space. The main concern with classroom space
is that Accounting and Economics have specific needs. The department works with room scheduling to ensure that the
rooms we funded to have additional white boards and specific software are available for Accounting and Economics.
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The main concern with office space is that two of the faculty (and they are the two tenure track faculty members) are
located at Meadowood. It would be best if all faculty were in one location, especially so for new faculty members so
they may have greater opportunity for mentoring from senior faculty members. It is therefore necessary for Business
to have two (three once the tenure track Accounting instructor is hired – Fall ’14) additional offices on Dandini. In a
perfect world, it would be optimal for Business Studies to be housed together in one office building.
Technology
SIER 116 has specific accounting software and RDMT 204 has specific economics software.
Funding Sources
State
Resource Strategic Plan
The following section summarizes the findings above and outlines the self-study committee’s recommended
targets for resource allocations to be implemented over the next five year period.
Staffing Issues and Strategies
The Business Studies Department does not have a chair or dedicated administrative assistant and this is a
disadvantage for the department. In addition to the need to add a chair, the department’s faculty are all
nearing retirement age and with few or none tenure track faulty in each discipline ( ½ BUS, ½ MKT, 1
ACC, 1 1/2 (Tenure Track) MGT, 2 ECON, 0 LGM, ½ ENT, 1 RE ), succession planning is a major issue.
A strategy for this issue is a challenge because budget reduction is a focus for the college at this time. The
Department needs to develop a strong pool of part-time faculty who can help pass on historical knowledge
in specific disciplines as we slowly and strategically hire as budget permits.
Facilities and Desired Capital Improvements
The current situation of faculty offices on different campuses is not optimum. It would be desirable to have
Business Studies faculty offices in one building, or at least on one campus. In most instances classrooms
are not an issue except for Accounting and Economics as these disciplines require specific software and
whiteboards. It is a goal to have a dedicated Accounting classroom that does not have to be shared with
TMCC High School. At this point, Sierra 216 is shared.
Funding Allocations and Development Strategies
Funding is state supported. It would behoove the department to actively seek grant funding and to work
with industries to fund workforce related activities. This has been attempted in the past, but business has
been slow (really, non-existent) when it comes to providing funding. The fact that the Business Studies
Department contributes such a high marginal contribution with its low-cost high yield programs, which help
fund other programs, makes it valuable to the institution. This value should somehow be reflected in
program funding.
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External Resource Recommendations and Implementation Plans
The following table shows the marginal contribution of the FTE load since 2003. Each FTE figure is the
average per semester over the fiscal year. The Support$/FTE is calculated from the State Appropriation for
that fiscal year. The contributions for the fiscal year show the value of all disciplines in the business
division. For example, in fiscal year 2012, the FTE was 386 and accounted for $2,534,862 of the state
appropriation about 8.25% of the $30 million the college received from Nevada’s general fund. Interestingly
enough, the cost in terms of salaries for full-time instructors is always less than the revenue generated. The
difference or marginal contribution for business in 2012 is over $1.5 million.
Associate of Arts Business Emphasis
Marginal Contribution
Analysis
Fiscal Year
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Core
FTE
216
223
235
261
286
392
408
527
431
386
Support$/FTE
$4,792.49
$5,239.62
$5,264.78
$6,523.00
$7,218.00
$7,494.00
$7,533.00
$7,299.00
$6,566.00
$6,567.00
Contribution
Cost
$1,035,178.66 $1,003,359.00
$1,168,435.56
$978,047.50
$1,237,222.63
$942,320.50
$1,702,503.00
$948,760.50
$2,064,348.00 $1,031,947.50
$2,937,648.00
$912,827.00
$3,073,464.00 $1,203,620.00
$3,846,573.00
$960,689.00
$2,829,946.00
$960,689.00
$2,534,862.00
$844,801.00
Difference
$31,819.66
$190,388.06
$294,902.13
$753,742.50
$1,032,400.50
$2,024,821.00
$1,869,844.00
$2,885,884.00
$1,869,257.00
$1,690,061.00
Notes: Difference column shows additional revenues generated
The Support$/FTE figures in the above table were developed with the assistance of the TMCC’s Controller
and represent the ratio of the state appropriation for the fiscal year divided by the estimated FTE in the
operating budget which is submitted by NSHE every biennium. In the table, the value of a full-time
equivalent student has increased by about five percent on average every fiscal year since FY2000 until
FY2010. Severe budget cuts including reduced part-time funding and several unfilled positions reduced the
core FTE and the average state support funding from a high of $7,299 to $6,567 last year. However, the
marginal contribution is still positive in large part because of the large class size in the division as a whole.
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State General Fund Support Per FTE
TMCC
Fiscal Year
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Appropriation
$20,677,168.00
$22,067,781.00
$23,116,103.00
$24,321,906.00
$28,933,189.00
$30,525,178.00
$36,207,556.00
$38,421,773.00
$39,049,596.00
$37,330,225.00
$30,482,995.00
$35,748,021.00
$30,603,292.00
FTE
4674
5001
4918
5075
5522
5798
6213
6588
6840
7296
7152
6267
6495
Source: TMCC Fact Book
The state had almost doubled the appropriations over the study period from 2000 to a high of about $40
million in 2008. Budget reduction began in 2009 and continued through 2012 decreasing state support by
about 25%. However FTE has increased steadily by about 5 per cent per year until 2010. Since 2010 FTE
has decreased but not at the same rate as state appropriations so that the division contribution has remained
positive and the program economically viable.
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APPENDIX A
Dean’s Analysis of Funding Resources
The Business Studies area is funded through state support. Due to a sharp funding cut, the department is
lacking in tenure track faculty, although the recent hire of two tenure track faculty has made a significant
difference in the Department’s ability to provide service to the College, there is a concern that with the
majority of the department’s faculty being close to retirement age and the State’s continued budget woes,
that succession planning is in jeopardy. Class room availability is sometimes a challenge but the
department works closely with room scheduling to optimize enrollment in all classes. The department is
also challenged because it has no Chair. The Dean must undertake all of the Chair’s responsibility along
with the Dean’s responsibility for an academic division, Summer School, the Internship Scholarship
Program, and WDCE, which includes Customized Training, ABE/ESL, strategic alliance with WCSD, and
LTAP. It appears that academic departments with a dedicated Chair would have a great advantage in
management and representation. The addition of a Chair would also provide dedicated administrative
assistance to the department. The department is doing the best it can within the current budget restrictions.
State-Supported Operating Budgets
Since TMCC is part of Nevada System of Higher Education, monies for teachers’ salaries, full and adjunct,
are state supported.
Lab Fees
Lab fees are collected for technology education courses. Lab fees pay for special equipment, such as
calculators, case studies, and software. Below is a list of the courses that have lab fees and the amount of
that fee as of Spring 2012.
ACC
ACC
135
136
ACC
180
ACC
BUS
220
106
BUS
107
BUS
198
ECON
ECON
198
261
ECON
MGT
262
171
MGT
198
Bookkeeping I
Bookkeeping II
Payroll & Employee
Benefit Accounting
Microcomputer
Accounting Systems
Business English
Business Speech
Communications
Special Topics in
Business
Special Topics in
Economics
Principles of Statistics I
Principles of Statistics
II
Supervision
Special Topics in
Management
$10.00
$10.00
$10.00
$15.00
$5.00
$5.00
$0-50
$0-5/cr
$10.00
$10.00
$5.00
$0-50
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MGT
212
Leadership & Human
Relations
2013-2014
$5.00
Special Fees
There are no special fees for education courses at this time.
Grants
None
Non-Credit Training Income
None
Donations
None
Other
None
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APPENDIX B
Degree and Certificate Worksheets
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http://www.tmcc.edu/media/tmcc/departments/assessment/documents/purs/business/1213/ASMTBusi
nessAPR1213.pdf
Degree/Emphasis/Certificate Title: Certificate of Achievement - Bookkeeping
Degree/Emphasis
Outcomes
In the boxes below,
summarize the outcomes
assessed in your
degree/emphasis/certificate
during the year.
Outcome #1
Possess knowledge of and be
ready to perform basic
functions of
bookkeeping/accounting
procedures and duties as
required in entry level
bookkeeping/accounting
positions, such as assistant
bookkeeper/accountant,
accounting trainee, or
business owner.
Outcome # 2
Demonstrate proficiency in
using accounting computer
software (e.g. Peachtree and
QuickBooks) to do basic
bookkeeping/accounting and
prepare basic accounting
reports.
Outcome #3
Be prepared to pursue
opportunities for
professional development,
career change, and
pursuance of Associate and
higher degrees in accounting
or related disciplines.
Assessment Measures
Assessment
Results
In the boxes below,
summarize the methods used
to assess
degree/emphasis/certificate
outcomes during the last
year.
In the boxes
below, summarize
the results of your
assessment
activities during
the last year.
Use of Results
In the boxes
below,
summarize how
you are or how
you plan to use
the results to
improve student
learning.
Effect on
Degree/Emphasis
Based on the results of
this assessment, will
you revise your
outcomes? If so, please
summarize how and
why in the boxes
below:
Individual course assessment
applicable to this certificate
is based upon nationwide
standards developed by the
accounting profession and
incorporated into the testing
and course assessment
modules utilized with
textbooks in each course.
The resulting data from such
assessments will be
consolidated and analyzed to
form the basis for
improvement in the
certificate requirements.
Individual course assessment
in courses where accounting
software is utilized will be
consolidated and analyzed to
determine results for the
certificate. The resulting data
from such assessments will
be consolidated and analyzed
to form the basis for
improvement in the
certificate requirements.
Individual course assessment
applicable to this certificate
is based upon nationwide
standards developed by the
accounting profession and
incorporated into the testing
and course assessment
modules utilized with
textbooks in each course.
The resulting data from such
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Degree/Emphasis
Outcomes
Assessment Measures
Assessment
Results
2013-2014
Use of Results
Effect on
Degree/Emphasis
Use of Results
Effect on
Degree/Emphasis
assessments will be
consolidated and analyzed to
form the basis for
improvement in the
certificate requirements.
Degree/Emphasis/Certificate Title: AA Business[Status]
Degree/Emphasis
Outcomes
In the boxes below,
summarize the outcomes
assessed in your
degree/emphasis/certificate
during the year.
Outcome #1
Demonstrate understanding
of and competency in
applied skills, including
information technology
literacy, information literacy,
research, writing, and
presentations at the entry
level of a business career.
Outcome # 2
Demonstrate understanding
of and competency in
interpersonal/group skills,
including interpersonal and
teamwork, international
perspective, cultural
awareness, and ethics and
personal responsibility at the
entry level of a business
career.
Outcome #3
Demonstrate understanding of
and competency in analytical
skills, including problemsolving and decision-making in
a business environment at the
entry level of a business career.
Assessment Measures
Assessment
Results
In the boxes below,
summarize the methods used
to assess
degree/emphasis/certificate
outcomes during the last
year.
In the boxes
below, summarize
the results of your
assessment
activities during
the last year.
In the boxes
below,
summarize how
you are or how
you plan to use
the results to
improve student
learning.
Based on the results of
this assessment, will
you revise your
outcomes? If so, please
summarize how and
why in the boxes
below:
Applied skills will be
measured by an aggregate of
course learning outcomes.
Interpersonal/group skills
will be measured by an
aggregate of course learning
outcomes.
Analytical skills will be
measured by an aggregate of
course learning outcomes.
Degree/Emphasis Title: AAS Business
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Degree/Emphasis
Outcomes
Assessment Measures
Assessment Results
Use of Results
Effect on
Degree/Emphasis
In the boxes below,
summarize the outcomes
assessed in your
degree/emphasis during
the year.
In the boxes below,
summarize the methods
used to assess
degree/emphasis
outcomes during the last
year.
In the boxes below,
summarize the
results of your
assessment activities
during the last year.
In the boxes below,
summarize how you
are or how you plan
to use the results to
improve student
learning.
Based on the results of
this assessment, will you
revise your outcomes? If
so, please summarize
how and why in the
boxes below:
Outcome #1
Demonstrate
understanding of and
competency in applied
professional skills,
including information
technology literacy,
information literacy,
research, writing, and
presentations.
Outcome # 2
Demonstrate
understanding of and
competency in
interpersonal/group
skills, including
interpersonal and,
teamwork, international
perspective, cultural
awareness, and ethics and
personal responsibility.
Outcome #3
Demonstrate
understanding of and
competency in analytical
skills, including problemsolving and decisionmaking in a business
environment.
Applied professional
skills will be measured
by an aggregate of course
learning outcomes.
Interpersonal/group skills
will be measured by an
aggregate of course
learning outcomes.
Analytical skills will be
measured by an
aggregate of course
learning outcomes.
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APPENDIX C
TMCC BUSINESS STUDIES DEPARTMENT
GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES AND PROFESSIONAL SKILLS
What are graduate* attributes and professional skills?
Graduate attributes and professional skills are the skills required to gain employment and progress your
career. By being competent in all of TMCC Business Graduate Attributes and Professional Skills, you will
improve your employment prospects when you graduate. Professional skills are sometimes referred to as
attributes, qualities or characteristics. TMCC Division of Business uses the term 'skill' because it implies
something that is measurable, learnable and assessable.
Graduate Attributes and Professional Skills Program focuses on:

writing

presentation

interaction

problem solving

decision making

teamwork

information technology literacy

information literacy

lifelong learning

international perspectives

cultural awareness and understanding

ethics and personal responsibility

knowledge through research.
Note: not all outcomes or all skills will be covered in each course.
*Graduate refers to students who successfully complete a certificate or degree the business.
Construct Groupings
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Interpersonal/Group Relations Skills
•
Interaction
•
Teamwork
•
International Perspective
•
Cultural Awareness
•
Ethics and Personal Responsibility
Analytical Skills
•
Problem
•
Decision Making
Applied Skills
•
Information Technology Literacy
•
Information Literacy
•
Lifelong Learning
•
Knowledge Through Research
•
Writing
•
Presentations
Professional skills outcomes checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, reflect on whether you have demonstrated the targeted skill(s).
Be aware that your instructor may have provided alternative outcomes for these listed skills and you will
need to reflect on whether you have reached those outcomes. Run through the checklist prior to submission
of assessments.
Skills employers want
Employers worldwide as well as our local advisory board have identified the following key
skills graduates need to succeed in life and in their chosen career.
Skills employers want*
Corresponding assessed skills
Academic achievement
Sound foundation of applied business knowledge
Literacy and numeracy
Communication
Computer
Information technology ability
Time management
- Teamwork
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- Critical and creative thinking
Planning and organizing
- Teamwork
- Critical and creative thinking
Oral and written communication
Communication
- Written
- Presentation
- Interaction
Teamwork
Teamwork
Problem solving
Critical and creative thinking
- Problem solving
- Decision making
Initiative and enterprise
Critical and creative thinking
Lifelong learning
Lifelong learning
- Independent learning
- Sustained intellectual curiosity
Overall comprehension of business processes Sound foundation of applied business knowledge
Globalization
Applied cultural awareness
Applied international perspectives
* AC Nielsen Research Services 2000, Employer Satisfaction with Graduate Skills-research report
(Evaluations and Investigations Report 99/7) and ACCI 2002, Employability Skills-an employer
perspective.
Writing
All graduates should be able to write competently in various forms, including business letters,
reports and scholarly essays and dissertations.
Writing assessment checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

used the appropriate formats for different types of texts
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BUSINESS STUDIES

ensured accuracy of expression and content

ensured logical development of ideas in a written text

referenced sources accurately.
2013-2014
Presentation
All graduates should be able to deliver a presentation on a familiar topic or one they have
researched. Effective presentation requires a sound understanding of purpose and
audience; and the use of supporting materials/aids and technology.
Presentation assessment checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes. In this assessment task I have:

prepared a talk, clearly outlining its purpose and theme

structured the talk to suit the purpose and audience

ensured a logical sequence of ideas

practiced speaking clearly

considered sensitivity to culturally diverse audiences

planned the use of a variety of aids/media appropriately to enhance the presentation

planned to establish and maintain audience contact and interest.
Interaction
Interaction refers to effective oral communication in one-to-one situations, in groups and in a
range of contexts.
You will need to consider your interaction behaviors prior to starting your participation in
classes and reflect on the following outcome statements.
Interaction checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
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In this assessment task I have:

adapted my language to suit purpose and audience

expressed ideas and opinions clearly and confidently

indicated and discriminated between expressions of opinion and fact

listened actively

sought clarification

displayed sound interpersonal skills by:
•
adapting the amount said, tone and manner to suit different situations
•
recognizing and interpreting non-verbal signals, i.e., body language
•
timing comments appropriately, i.e., judging when to speak and when to keep silent

moved a discussion forward, i.e., summarizing, developing points, focusing on purpose

applied sensitivity to issues in intercultural communication

displayed understanding of formal and informal discussion conventions.
Problem solving
Problem solving involves formulating new answers, going beyond the simple application of
previously learned rules to create a solution (Woolfolk, 2001).
Problem solving checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

identified problems and analyzed the main features

applied appropriate problem solving processes, arguments, critical and creative thinking
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
identified, implemented and evaluated strategies for the resolution of problems

created innovative solutions.
Decision making
Decision making is the ability to apply critical reasoning to issues through independent
thought and accessing information and opinions from a range of sources in order to make an
informed judgment. Note: Decision making does not necessarily represent a solution to the
issue; rather it indicates the decision has been formulated as a result of an evaluation of
evidence in relation to appropriate criteria. That is, the decision is the 'best fit' under the circumstances it
does not necessarily mean a problem has been solved.
Decision making checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

undertaken a situation analysis

focused on primary causes rather than symptoms

addressed issues encountered

recognized, where appropriate, the ethical dimensions of issues encountered

made use of appropriate techniques for analyzing data

accepted and/or remained receptive to new ideas

put forward and evaluated possible solutions

made a decision where required

justified the decision using logical argument.
Critical and creative thinking
The purpose of critical thinking is to achieve understanding, evaluate view points and solve problems. Since
all three areas involve the asking of questions, critical thinking is the questioning or inquiry we engage in
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when we see seek to understand, evaluate or resolve. Creative thinking includes the innovative ability of the
individual to think laterally or to perceive problems and solutions in alternative ways (Maiorana, 1992).
Teamwork
Teamwork is the ability to interact effectively with others in a range of contexts towards a
common outcome and take a leadership role when required. You will need to consider your
cooperative behaviors before you begin your participation in team based activities and reflect
on the following outcome statements.
Teamwork checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

participated actively, including taking part and sharing

managed time effectively and met requirements set by others

managed projects effectively, including the organization and co-ordination of group work

negotiated successfully with others by getting people to move from a position they prefer to a
position that suits all parties

networked and made connections with people through social exchange of information.
Information technology literacy
Information technology literacy is the ability to engage effectively and appropriately with
information and communication technologies and recognize their advantages and limitations.
Information technology literacy checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

demonstrated the ability to select appropriate technology and create, store, exchange and use
information in its various forms; and recognized their advantages and limitations
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
used computer-based communication networks

used one or more of the following application software: word processors, electronic spreadsheets,
presentation systems and database systems; this implies an understanding of the principles and an
ability to use at least the basic facilities provided by the software.
Information literacy
Information literacy is the effective and ethical use of information through the ability to
recognize when and what information is needed. To be able to locate, obtain and manage
information using appropriate technologies and make judgments about its reliability and
validity.
Information literacy checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

recognized the need for information for a particular task, identified a question or topic and placed it in
context

understood how information is organized and the different forms of production and publication of
information

identified potential sources of information in a variety of formats and decided on the most appropriate
sources of information from the range that are available

developed appropriate search strategies, the ability to think conceptually about the given topic and
designed and implemented strategies for the location and selection of on-line, audio-visual and print
information resources

accessed the needed information, developed the ability to save and/or print electronic information,
understood library catalogue records and gained familiarity with the arrangement of print resources in
a library collection

selected from the available information, critically evaluated information for relevance, accuracy and
suitability for the intended purpose
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
2013-2014
organized the information for use, including careful recording of the bibliographic details to ensure
correct referencing

developed a working understanding of intellectual property (referencing), copyright and
confidentiality.
Lifelong learning
Lifelong learning is the ability to understand and apply a range of learning strategies
(reflection) and to take responsibility for one's own learning. To be able to sustain intellectual
curiosity.
Lifelong learning checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

demonstrated effective management of time

critically reflected on how I learned and considered other ways of learning

used feedback to evaluate and improve performance of myself or others

undertaken self directed learning on a task

set personal learning goals

asked questions that lead to deeper learning.
International perspectives
Recognizing and applying international perspectives refers to the ability to think globally and
to consider issues from a variety of perspectives. To be able to apply international standards
and practices within a discipline or professional area.
International perspectives checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
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In this assessment task I have:

sourced relevant literature or information from international sources

compared systems, practices, policies, law in different countries

evaluated the impact of cross-national programs, research, business, resource mining
or development.
Cultural awareness and understanding
To demonstrate cultural awareness and understanding and an appreciation of the importance of
cultural and language diversity. To recognize human rights.
Cultural awareness and understanding checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

explored elements of culture and what it means to be 'different'

given sensitive and effective feedback to people from various cultural backgrounds

explored and evaluated the effects of racism on a variety of situations from personal
interactions to international dealings

interpreted situations or phenomena from the perspective of minority cultures

identified and analyzed the situations where cultural issues underpin inappropriate
behaviors.
Ethics and personal responsibility
To demonstrate behavior and decision-making that is ethically sound and to assume
personal responsibility in all one undertakes.
Ethics and personal responsibility
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have demonstrated the
following outcomes.
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In this assessment task I have:

identified ethical dimensions of decision making

identified and evaluated the impact of ethics, equity and social justice guidelines on the
operation of a business

understood that personal responsibility and ethics go far beyond the legal correctness

evaluated the impact of decisions on all stakeholder.
Knowledge through research
Knowledge through research refers to applying discipline knowledge, principles and concepts.
Knowledge through research checklist
When you are undertaking your assessments, use the checklist to ensure that you have
demonstrated the following outcomes.
In this assessment task I have:

understood a discipline, its theoretical underpinnings, and ways of thinking

understood what constitutes discipline knowledge and how it can be applied

extended the boundaries of knowledge through research.
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PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEW
DEAN’S RECOMMENDATION
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEWED: Business Studies
Self Study Committee Chair(s):
Ben Scheible
School: Division of Business
Year of Review: 2013-2014
Date Submitted to PURC: January 30, 2014
Dean’s findings of strengths and weaknesses of the program/unit:
Summary action recommended for program/unit: 1) Continue the success initiatives that are contributing to increased
student success. 2) Gain approval for a course release to have a Chair. 3) Obtain funding for a Department
Administrative Assistant to support the Chair 4) Create “succession planning” plan to determine a timeline for hiring
needs in each discipline (within the context of budget constraints). 5) Get a classroom that is not shared with TMCC High
School as a tier 2 Accounting classroom. 6) Expedite reverse transfer with UNR COB.
Recommendations for development strategies and anticipated time lines:
1)
2)
4)
5)
6)
Ongoing
& 3) Academic Year 2014-15 – RAP Process
Academic Year 2014 -15 – The Dean will draft with input from the faculty
2015 -16 – Work with other Deans and Scheduling
Spring 2014 – Continue work started Fall ‘13 with UNR COB
Identify resources necessary for implementation of recommended development strategies:
1) None
2) Course release
3) Admin I Salary and Benefits
4) None for plan development, but cost associated with implementation.
5) Facilities usage, no direct cost as it will be a tier 2 classroom
6) None
Describe impact of recommended development strategies on School planning:
1) No impact as it is ongoing.
2) & 3) Provide the same level of representation and support as other academic departments. Enhance assessment
and the management needed to focus on College strategic initiatives.
4) This will enhance planning in staff development and succession planning.
5) This is enable more effective scheduling of Accounting classes and facilitate the department outfitting the room
with the equipment necessary for lecture capture.
6) This would effectively raise the department’s graduation rate to 31%.
Dean’s Recommendation
Describe impact of recommended development strategies on program/unit faculty:
1) They would continue with their involvement with the success initiatives as they have done in the past.
2) & 3) They would have access to a dedicated Chair and Admin Assistant do (or coordinator/director, etc.) as all
other academic departments.
4) Will help focus them on future plans for their careers as well as part-time and new hires.
5) No impact other than a positive one for Accounting faculty.
6) I’m assuming this would make them happy.
Dean of the Division of Business:
Name
Signature
Date
Marie Murgolo-Poore, Ph.D.
Marie Murgolo-Poore
1-30-14
Dean’s Recommendation
TRUCKEE MEADOWS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEW
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEW COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEWED: Business Studies
Self Study Committee Chair: Ben Scheible
School: Division of Business
Year of Review: 2013-2014
Date Submitted to VPAA/SS: Select the Date
Committee findings of self-study strengths:
Committee findings of self-study weaknesses:
Modification, if any, of development strategies:
Summary action recommended for program/unit:
Is this recommendation in agreement with the self-study committee’s recommendation?:
PURC Co-Chairs:
Name
Title
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PURC Members:
Name
Title
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Program/Unit Review Committee Recommendation
Signature
Date
Signature
Date
TRUCKEE MEADOWS COMMUNITY COLLEGE
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEW
VICE PRESIDENT’S RECOMMENDATION
PROGRAM/UNIT REVIEWED: Business Studies
Self Study Committee Chair: Ben Scheible
School: Division of Business
Year of Review: 2013-2014
Date Submitted to the President: Select the Date
Vice president’s findings of strengths and weaknesses of the program/unit:
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Summary action recommended for program/unit: Choose an item.
Recommendations for development strategies and anticipated time lines:
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Identify additional resources and/or actions necessary from each administrative unit for implementation of
recommended development strategies:
Academic Affairs: Click here to enter text.
Student Services: Click here to enter text.
Finance: Click here to enter text.
Human Resources: Click here to enter text.
Faculty Senate: Click here to enter text.
Other: Click here to enter text.
Conclusion:
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Vice President of Academic Affairs and Student Services:
Name
Signature
Vice President’s Recommendation
Date
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