This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The... copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

advertisement
This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached
copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research
and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution
and sharing with colleagues.
Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or
licensing copies, or posting to personal, institutional or third party
websites are prohibited.
In most cases authors are permitted to post their version of the
article (e.g. in Word or Tex form) to their personal website or
institutional repository. Authors requiring further information
regarding Elsevier’s archiving and manuscript policies are
encouraged to visit:
http://www.elsevier.com/copyright
Author's personal copy
Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
Contents lists available at ScienceDirect
Omega
journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/omega
Knowledge dissemination in operations management: Published perceptions
versus academic reality
Jack R. Meredith, Michelle D. Steward n, Bruce R. Lewis
Wake Forest University, Schools of Business, P.O. Box 7285, Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA
a r t i c l e in f o
abstract
Article history:
Received 17 January 2010
Accepted 11 October 2010
Processed by Associate Editor Teo
Available online 16 October 2010
The channels for knowledge generation and dissemination in the business disciplines are many:
presenting research at conferences, writing books, distributing working papers, offering insights in
society newsletters, giving invited talks, publishing studies in academic journals, and many other venues,
including even blogs and perhaps Facebooks. But the most important venue is probably published
research in ‘‘top-level’’ academic journals. In the discipline of Operations Management, many studies and
lists have been published that attempt to determine which of these journals are supposedly the ‘‘top’’
according to either citation analyses, the opinion of recognized experts, author affiliations, bibliometric
studies, and other approaches. These lists may then, in turn, be used in different degrees to evaluate
research. However, what really counts is what the academic institutions actually use for guidance in
evaluating faculty research. Based on a new source of ranking data from AACSB-accredited schools, we
compare published journal-ranking studies against that of academe to determine the degree to which the
studies reflect academic ‘‘reality’’. We present rankings of OM journals based on this new source of data
and on an aggregate of the stream of published studies, and evaluate their consistency.
& 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords:
Operations management
Journal ranking
Journal perception
OM discipline
1. Introduction
The channels available for disseminating academic knowledge
are extensive, ranging from informal ‘‘blogs’’ these days to formal
presentations to published books, monographs, and articles in
journals. In the field of business, the most important, arguably, are
published articles in ‘‘top’’ journals (rather than grants, as might be
the case in medicine or engineering) since these are frequently the
most important basis for promotion and tenure (P&T) decisions.
But beyond P&T and annual evaluations, such top publications are
also often the basis for:
research awards by universities, scholarly societies, governmental academies, and journal publishers;
grants from federal, state, and private agencies such as the
National Science Foundation;
nominations for high-profile chairs, professorships, research
grants, and fellowships;
offers for joining, or perhaps taking joint professorships at
n
prestigious universities such as Yale, Harvard, MIT, and such
others;
candidacy for high-visibility governmental positions such as
advisory positions to the President or Governor, secretarial
Corresponding author. Tel.: + 1 336 758 4426.
E-mail address: [email protected] (M.D. Steward).
0305-0483/$ - see front matter & 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
doi:10.1016/j.omega.2010.10.003
positions with the state or federal organizations such as the
Treasury, membership on the Federal Reserve or Council of
Economic Advisors, etc. and
and even, at least partially, the requisite, ubiquitous business
school/program rankings.
Clearly, the role of top publications in each of these sets of
decisions will be different, but their influence is often substantial.
For example, annual evaluations may include aspects of teaching,
service to the department (and school, university, discipline, and
perhaps even local community), research in-progress, and publications, while P&T may be based much more heavily on publications. Yet, universities are aware of the legal complications that can
arise when a faculty member receives outstanding annual evaluations only to be turned down for P&T some years later. Hence, for
schools that wish to place an emphasis on top journal publications
for P&T, the role of such publications must be heavily included in
the annual evaluations as well [1,2].
It is also clear that there are more stakeholders in top journal
publications than just the university. Attaining a reputation as the
‘‘national expert’’ in a particular field or topic can lead to such
accolades as being appointed Assistant Secretary of the Treasury,
Economic Czar of the State, or Chair of the Federal Bankruptcy
Committee for the XYZ Corporation. Such eminent appointments
are a great boon to a university, enhancing its reputation, bringing
in donations and endowments, increasing its student applications,
Author's personal copy
436
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
and many other benefits. Hence, the university also has an interest
in their faculty publishing in highly recognized journals, and may
thus emphasize particular journals or fields over others. Understandably then, everyone from University Presidents to Deans to
Assistant Professors are interested in knowing which journals the
university considers to be the ‘‘top’’ journals, and especially the top
journals in each Professor’s own field or discipline.
To determine these top journals, and the rankings of other
journals in a field, numerous authors have used various approaches
such as citation impact scores, surveys of recognized scholars,
bibliometric analyses, author affiliation indexes, and other techniques. These studies commonly identify the same general set of
journals, but their ranking may differ considerably. In the discipline
of interest here – operations management –Holsapple and Lee-Post
[3] detail many of these approaches and identify examples of their
use in operations management.
However, with such a range of rankings derived by a variety of
methods, it is not clear whose ranking to use, or even which method
to rely upon. All of the methods have some justification, but
also some weaknesses and limitations, again well described in
Holsapple and Lee-Post [3] and Lewis [4]. For that matter, it is not
only the methods that confound the studies but a range of other
factors as well such as the geographic region (e.g., US versus
Europe), the time period considered (e.g., 4 years versus 25 years),
the date of publication, the selection of scholars, and the set of
journals under consideration.
In this study, we analyze all the ranking studies of operations
management journals since 1990, and then compare them to a new
source of data—official in-house journal lists of AACSB-accredited
business schools used for helping evaluate faculty publications.
This is a source of data that has not been used previously in OM
journal ranking studies. (Although we asked schools for journal
lists ‘‘that are used for evaluating publications,’’ we cannot state
how, or even if, they were actually used. Our research here informs
those evaluating research, but does not report any criteria for that
evaluation, such as ‘‘three top-level journal articles’’ or ‘‘six solid
publications.’’)
Certainly not all schools formally and explicitly use in-house
lists to evaluate research. However, schools often do create formal
in-house lists for evaluation. Van Fleet et al. [5, p. 839] suggest that,
‘‘These rankings are designed to reduce difficulties in evaluating
quality and to help faculty members identify target journals.’’
Additionally, Vokurka [6, p. 345] argues that, ‘‘The rankings of
journals are important to academics because promotion and tenure
decisions are based to a large extent on publication achievements.
These decisions are based primarily on the journals in which
research is published.’’ Our focus is on identifying the most credible
ranking studies in the sense of conforming to the reality of
academic guidelines provided by schools that have journal rating
lists and then comment on these studies and their various
approaches.
2. Background and data
The literature on journal evaluation in operations management
has a long history, as well as being diverse. We include here a
discussion of these studies, as well as a description of the AACSB
survey of journal lists used as a guide for making academic
promotion, tenure, and salary decisions.
2.1. The journal ranking studies
Published studies ranking OM journals over two decades – from
1990 to 2009 – were selected. Table 1 presents the 12 articles, the
nature of the data that were used in each, and the specific table
within each study from which the ranking data were extracted.
Seven of the studies compiled journal rankings based on perception
scores derived from survey data, three based their analysis on
citation data, and two utilized data from other sources—author
affiliation index and behavior-based publication counts. For each
study the final, overall ranking of quality was used. For cases where
the ranking article ranked other dimensions, such as journal
relevance, etc., we selected the data corresponding to the article’s
overall measure of quality. Table 1 presents the specific table
within each paper that the data was extracted from and a
description of the nature of that data.
As can be seen, seven studies were published in the Journal of
Operations Management, three in Omega, and one each in Interfaces
and Manufacturing & Service Operations Management. Eleven of the
studies were published in the 14 year span between 1996 and 2009,
for about one such article per year, showing the increased interest
in publication venues since the mid-1990s. Two of the senior
authors published another such study, the eight other studies being
published by different author teams.
2.2. The AACSB-accredited school survey
In order to capture the reality of the stature of OM journals, we
collected the official lists used to help assess faculty research
output at AACSB-accredited schools [4]. The AACSB was selected
because it is recognized as the major accreditation entity for
business schools worldwide. As Van Fleet et al. [5, p. 340] note:
‘‘A list provides an explicit measure of how a department values
research outlets.’’ Moreover, such lists reflect the current state-ofthe-standings among competing journals in academic practice. To
our knowledge, this data source has not been previously used in
ranking OM journals.
An email was sent to AACSB-accredited universities requesting
a copy of their official journal list, if such was used, for evaluating
faculty publications at their school. The email request was initially
sent in November 2006, followed by two reminders in each of the
two following months. Of the 545 institutions receiving the
request, 206 responded, representing a 38% response rate.
Table 2 offers general demographics of both the responding schools
and the entire population of AACSB-accredited schools.
To determine the representativeness of the set of respondents,
the demographics of the responding schools were statistically
compared to those of the entire AACSB population (see Table 2). For
the categorical measures (i.e., affiliation, geographic region, degree
level offered, and mission priority), one-sample chi-square tests
were run, but only one test (public/private affiliation) was even
marginally significant at the 0.05 level. One-sample t-tests were
utilized for the continuous variables (essentially, different versions
of school size), but no significant differences were found at the 0.05
level. Our conclusion from these tests was that the respondent set
was representative of the entire AACSB population.
While our focus is on OM journal rankings, not on the type of
evaluative mechanisms that different schools use, we did find it of
interest to compare responding schools that have internal lists
versus the entire AACSB-accredited school population. Using the
same approach of one-sample tests to compare the same demographic variables as above, we found that as compared to the
population of AACSB-accredited schools, the schools that have
internal lists have a statistically significantly larger faculty
(98 versus 76 on average) and undergraduate enrollment, higher
research focus as their ‘‘mission priority’’ (19% versus 12%), and
accordingly, fewer schools that are private (19% versus 32%). These
differences, and some others, are presented in Table 3.
Of the responding schools, 83 (40%) provided their formal target
journal lists. This is a fairly large proportion of schools that have
Author's personal copy
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
437
Table 1
The 12 published journal ranking articles.
Year
First author
Journal
Article title
1991
Barman
Journal of Operations
Management
1996
Goh
1996
Vokurka
Omega—International
Journal of Management
Science
Journal of Operations
Management
1997
Goh
1999
Soteriou
2000
Donohue
2001
Barman
2005
Gorman
2005
Olson
Interfaces
2007
Theoharakis
2007
Zsidisin
Journal of Operations
Management
Journal of Operations
Management
2009
Holsapple
Journal of Operations
Management
Journal of Operations
Management
Data type
Table
Column
An empirical assessment of the perceived Perception scores
relevance and quality of POM-related
journals by academicians
An empirical assessment of influences on Citation scores
POM research
2
Mean—quality ratings
4
Normalized total—citation based
The relative importance of journals used Citation rankings
in operations management research—a
citation analysis
Evaluating and classifying POM journals Citation rankings
8
Overall ranking—citations
2
Perception scores
4
Overall rank—age-adjusted across
base years
Mean—quality ratings
Perception scores
3
Perceived quality rating (POM
interest area)
Perception scores
4
Mean—quality ratings
Assessing production and operations
management related journals: the
European perspective
A multi-method evaluation of journals in
the decisions and management sciences
by US academics
Perceived relevance and quality of POM
journals: a decade later
OM forum evaluating operations
management-related journals via the
author affiliation index
Top 25-school professors rate journals in
operations management and related
fields
Insights into factors affecting POM journal
evaluation
Criteria development and assessment of
purchasing and supply management
journals
Omega—International
Journal of Management
Science
Journal of Operations
Management
Manufacturing & Service
Operations Management
Behavior-based analysis of knowledge
dissemination channels in operations
management
Omega—International
Journal of Management
Science
Author affiliation index 2
Author affiliation index
Perception scores
2
Mean quality rating—from top-25
business school professors
Perception scores
4
Perception scores
5
Behavior: publication
counts
4
Mean journal quality
rating—worldwide
Mean rating—based on: ‘‘articles
published in this journal regularly
meet my journal evaluation
criteria’’
Intensity score
Table 2
Demographics of AACSB schools: respondents vs. the population.
Demographic characteristic
Respondents
Population
One-sample test
n
Percent
n
Percent
Statistic
p-Value
Affiliation
Private
Public
51
150
25.37
74.63
169
362
31.83
68.17
w2 ¼ 3.86
p ¼0.050
Geographic region
North America
Europe
Other
187
13
6
90.78
6.31
2.91
446
23
25
90.28
4.66
5.06
w2 ¼ 3.09
p ¼0.213
Degree level offered
Undergraduate only
Graduate only
Both
19
7
168
9.79
3.61
86.60
37
35
415
7.60
7.19
85.22
w2 ¼ 4.73
p ¼0.094
Mission priority
Teaching
Research
Teaching and research equal
Teaching, research and service equal
103
21
63
7
53.09
10.82
32.47
3.61
250
59
157
21
51.33
12.11
32.24
4.31
w2 ¼ 0.61
p ¼0.894
Mean
Std. dev
Mean
Std. dev
Statistic
p-Value
72.5
1818.2
243.5
413.7
178.9
44.12
1472.16
429.29
333.65
207.73
76.7
1811.3
262.2
420.7
208.1
51.19
1459.56
404.87
355.53
282.13
t ¼1.33
t ¼0.06
t ¼0.58
t ¼0.29
t ¼1.86
p ¼0.184
p ¼0.949
p ¼0.566
p ¼0.776
p ¼0.064
Size
Full time equivalent faculty
Undergrad enrolment—full time
Graduate enrolment—full time
Undergraduate degrees conferred
Graduate degrees conferred
Notes: The n’s for the respondents and for the population do not add to 206 and 545, respectively, due to the exclusion of missing data.
p-Valuesr 0.05 are in bold.
Author's personal copy
438
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
Table 3
Demographics of respondent schools with an internal list vs. the population.
Demographic characteristic
Respondent schools with an internal list
Population
n
Percent
n
Percent
Statistic
p-Value
Affiliation
Private
Public
15
64
18.99
81.01
169
362
31.83
68.17
w2 ¼6.00
p¼ 0.014
Geographic region
North America
Europe
Other
69
9
5
83.13
10.84
6.03
446
23
25
90.28
4.66
5.06
w2 ¼7.45
p¼ 0.042
Degree level offered
Undergraduate only
Graduate only
Both
1
2
70
1.37
2.74
95.89
37
35
415
7.60
7.19
85.22
w2 ¼6.71
p¼ 0.035
Mission priority
Teaching
Research
Teaching and research equal
Teaching, research and service equal
23
14
32
4
31.50
19.18
43.84
5.48
250
59
157
21
51.33
12.11
32.24
4.31
w2 ¼11.9
p¼ 0.008
Mean
Std. dev.
Mean
Std. dev.
Statistic
p-Value
98.2
2614.0
357.7
618.3
261.7
44.78
1749.03
546.48
389.49
240.41
76.7
1811.3
262.2
420.7
208.1
51.19
1459.56
404.87
355.53
282.13
t ¼4.10
t ¼3.84
t ¼1.47
t ¼4.21
t ¼1.88
po 0.001
po 0.001
p ¼0.145
po 0.001
p ¼0.064
Size
Full time equivalent faculty
Undergrad enrolment—full time
Graduate enrolment—full time
Undergraduate degrees conferred
Graduate degrees conferred
One-sample test
Notes: The n’s for the respondent schools with an internal list and for the population do not add to 83 and 545, respectively, due to the exclusion of missing data.
p-Values r 0.05 are in bold.
Table 4
Demographics of respondent schools with an OM list vs. all schools with an internal list.
Demographic characteristic
Respondent schools with an OM List
Respondent schools with an internal list
One-sample test
n
Percent
n
Percent
Statistic
p-Value
Affiliation
Private
Public
7
30
18.92
81.08
15
64
18.99
81.01
w2 o 0.01
p ¼0.992
Geographic region
North America
Europe
Other
31
4
2
83.78
10.81
5.41
69
9
5
83.13
10.84
6.03
w2 ¼ 0.03
p ¼0.987
Degree level offered
Undergraduate only
Graduate only
Both
0
2
32
0.00
5.88
94.12
1
2
70
1.37
2.74
95.89
w2 ¼ 1.21
p ¼0.271
Mission priority
Teaching
Research
Teaching and research equal
Teaching, research and service equal
8
7
17
2
23.53
20.59
50.00
5.88
23
14
32
4
31.50
19.18
43.84
5.48
w2 ¼ 1.03
p ¼0.795
Mean
Std. dev.
Mean
Std. dev.
Statistic
p-Value
98.3
2265.7
247.9
643.8
245.5
43.05
1359.84
191.53
384.27
168.24
98.2
2614.0
357.7
618.3
261.7
44.78
1749.03
546.48
389.49
240.41
t ¼0.01
t ¼1.43
t ¼3.29
t ¼0.37
t ¼0.55
p ¼0.989
p ¼0.164
p ¼0.002
p ¼0.714
p ¼0.583
Size
Full time equivalent faculty
Undergrad enrolment—full time
Graduate enrolment—full time
Undergraduate degrees conferred
Graduate degrees conferred
Notes: The n’s for the respondent schools with an OM list and all respondent schools with an internal list do not add to 37 and 83, respectively, due to the exclusion of
missing data.
p-Values r 0.5 are in bold.
their own in-house lists. By comparison, a survey of Management
departments [5] found that only 14% had internal journal lists and a
survey of Accounting departments [7] found that only 13% had
internal journal lists. The remainder of the respondents included
89 schools that indicated they did not have internally generated
lists, 12 that stated they used external lists, such as the Financial
Author's personal copy
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
Times, and 22 that employed Cabell’s Directory of Publishing
Opportunities.
As noted earlier, these lists reflect how journals may influence
university decisions on annual faculty evaluations, tenure and
promotion decisions, research awards, and other research-oriented
activities. Since journals are generally ranked, or at least categorized, at individual schools by their perceived quality [5], the metrics
derived from these lists serve as a reasonable depiction of journal
standing from an ‘‘operational’’ standpoint. Of the 83 school lists
submitted, 37 classified journals in graded tiers and specifically
categorized OM journals in groups labeled as: operations, operations management, production and operations management, supply chain management, and logistics. These school lists were the
ones used in our calculations. Table 4 offers demographic information on these 37 schools, with a comparison to schools that did not
specifically categorize OM journals. There are no significant
differences between the two groups.
3. Results
We next describe our methodology and assessment of statistical
reliability. We follow that with a description of the results of our
analysis of published journal-ranking studies, an analysis of our
AACSB journal ranking data, and a comparison of the two.
3.1. Journal ranking studies
To assess the psychometric soundness of the published ranking
studies, reliability analysis was performed. Reliability is concerned
with the consistency of a measure in different contexts and over
successive trials [8]. Various methods can be used to evaluate
reliability. At some level, each method correlates scores from one
source with scores from another source. Higher correlations
demonstrate more consistency, or reliability, across the sources.
An assessment of the reliability of the rankings of the OM
journal studies was conducted by correlating the ratings of all
possible pairings of the 12 studies listed in Table 1. The nonparametric Spearman Rho correlation coefficient was used due to the
ordinal nature of the data and the small number of journals that are
common between studies. The results of this reliability analysis are
reported in Table 5 [3,6,9, 17–25]. The journal articles are arranged
by the data source of each article (perception, citation, other),
and shaded regions highlight the correlations within each data
source.
Of the 66 Spearman correlation coefficients shown in Table 5, 41
are statistically significant (in bold) at the 0.05 level with the
majority of these significant beyond the 0.001 level. The magnitude
of the statistically significant correlation coefficients ranged from
0.436 to 0.941. Pairs of articles within each data source type are
significantly correlated with one another with rare exception, such
as Zsidisin et al. [9], which is not significantly correlated with any
other study. A possible reason for this is that Zsidisin et al. examines
purchasing and supply chain management journals specifically,
rather than OM (or POM) journals as the other studies rank. It is also
notable that the perception studies tend to be highly correlated
with all the other studies.
3.2. OM journal categories
Our interest in validating the published OM journal ranking
stream using the new data source of in-house journal lists actually
used for evaluating faculty research requires that we identify which
journals are specifically dedicated to OM. For our candidate list of
journals that disseminate OM knowledge, we considered the set of
journals that were included in both the published studies on the
439
dissemination of OM knowledge and the school lists of journals that
are recognized as contributing to OM knowledge. To be conservative at this stage, we only required that a journal be mentioned both
in at least one published study and on at least one school’s list. As
seen in Table 6, this gave us a set of 71 journals; 7 of the 71 journals
appeared on only one published study and only one school list. The
journals are listed in order of the number of published studies they
appeared on, since the published studies preceded the more recent
AACSB school list. As can be seen, there is a close, but not perfect,
correlation between the two lists. (The actual correlations are given
later in the paper for the OM-dedicated journals.)
Next, we followed Holsapple and Lee-Post’s [3] approach to
separating ‘‘OM-dedicated’’ journals from ‘‘Interdisciplinary’’ journals and reference-discipline (‘‘Reference’’) journals. The contrast
between OM-dedicated and interdisciplinary journals is relatively
straight-forward: whether virtually all the papers published in the
journal are dedicated to OM topics or whether they range across
various disciplines (either business or even broader) with OM being
only a portion of the subject matter. The contrast between OMdedicated and reference journals is a bit more complex since the
reference discipline may be either a topic area (e.g., Economics,
Engineering, Information Systems) or a methodology area (operations research, statistics). It was concluded that if the papers in a
journal were related to one of the reference discipline topic areas
rather than OM, then it was a reference journal. For the more
complicated situation of a journal with methodological papers but
related to an OM topic, we classified that as OM-dedicated if the
focus of the papers was on the OM topic but Reference Discipline if
the focus was on methodological issues (e.g., operations research
methodology, statistical methodology).
These three categories (OM-dedicated, Reference, Interdisciplinary) are listed in the right column of Table 6; most of them are
obvious but we describe our logic regarding some of the less
obvious journals. We relied on five potential sources of evidence to
help categorize the journals:
1. The specific Aims and Scope stated by the journal.
2. The type of society (e.g., engineering, economics, operations
research, production research) if the journal is sponsored by
such an institution.
3. The variety of membership groups within the society, if society
sponsored.
4. The diversity of articles actually published in the journal.
5. Holsapple and Lee-Post’s [3] categorization, if the journal
appeared on their list. Since we refer to this article often, we
abbreviate it H&L.
In order to illustrate our logic we describe our categorization for
eleven journals that were problematic to classify for one reason or
another.
Journal of Manufacturing and Operations Management (#30): This
was a publication of INFORMS (the Institute for Operations
Research and Management Science) that was discontinued many
years ago. Its articles were then folded into Management Science.
We designated it as an OM-dedicated journal.
Production and Inventory Management Journal (#15): This journal was originally a publication of APICS, a practitioner society for
production and inventory control professionals, but it ceased
publication many years ago. APICS has recently reinstated the
journal but with a different orientation, and primarily as an
electronic journal directed to P&IC professionals and managers.
Given the large number of papers that were published previously in
the journal that fell in the OM domain, we have designated this, at
least in its original form, as an OM-dedicated journal.
Author's personal copy
440
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
Table 5
Reliability analysis: correlations between published study journal rankings—arranged by data type (perception, citation, other).
Spearman Correlation Coefficient (Number of Journals) p-value
[Barman, 18]
[Soteriou, 19]
[Donohu, 20]
[Barman, 21]
[Olson, 22]
[Theoharakis, 23]
[Zsidisin, 9]
[Goh, 24]
[Vokurka, 6]
[Goh, 25]
[Gorman, 17]
[Holsapple, 3]
[Holsapple, 3]
[Gorman, 17]
Other
[Goh, 25]
[Vokurka, 6]
[Goh, 24]
[Zsidisin, 9]
[Theoharakis,
23]
Citation Data
[Olson, 22]
[Barman, 21]
[Donohu, 20]
[Barman, 18]
Study
[Soteriou, 19]
Perception Data
1
0.757
(17)
0.001
0.779
(15)
0.001
0.904
(17)
0.001
0.728
(16)
0.0
01
0.850
(9)
0.004
0.318
(11)
0.340
0.799
(17)
0.001
0.792
(12)
0.002
0.752
(17)
0.001
0.600
(15)
0.018
0.852
(16)
0.001
1
0.546
(15)
0.035
0.775
(19)
0.001
0.510
(19)
0.026
0.529
(10)
0.116
0.150
(15)
0.594
0.793
(19)
0.001
0.378
(12)
0.225
0.646
(19)
0.003
0.431
(17)
0.084
0.790
(19)
0.001
1
0.868
(15)
0.001
0.830
(16)
0.001
0.898
(8)
0.002
0.261
(10)
0.467
0.629
(15)
0.012
0.705
(10)
0.023
0.648
(14)
0.012
0.679
(15)
0.005
0.654
(15)
0.008
1
0.834
(18)
0.001
0.863
(10)
0.001
0.379
(13)
0.201
0.771
(16)
0.001
0.802
(12)
0.002
0.679
(17)
0.003
0.750
(17)
0.001
0.853
(18)
0.001
1
0.939
(11)
0.001
0.102
(13)
0.741
0.282
(19)
0.243
0.374
(11)
0.258
0.312
(18)
0.208
0.859
(23)
0.001
0.436
(22)
0.043
1
-0.132
(8)
0.756
0.667
(8)
0.071
0.635
(8)
0.091
0.550
(9)
0.125
0.843
(11)
0.001
0.615
(11)
0.044
1
0.178
(14)
0.543
0.503
(8)
0.204
0.134
(14)
0.648
0.314
(14)
0.274
0.506
(13)
0.078
1
0.633
(11)
0.036
0.941
(30)
0.001
0.444
(16)
0.085
0.869
(19)
0.001
1
0.627
(12)
0.029
0.456
(11)
0.159
0.460
(11)
0.154
1
0.326
(17)
1
0.202
0.799 0.372
(19)
(21)
0.001 0.097
1
p-Values r 0.05 are in bold.
First author listed and reference number.
Production and Inventory Management Review (and APICS
News) (#71): This was another publication of APICS that was
discontinued, but it was more of a Newsletter than a journal. This
publication and the P&IM Journal were occasionally mis-referenced, one for the other.
Interfaces (#7): This is another INFORMS journal and is
more directed to practice and application than their academic
journals. As might be expected, the articles cover the full range of
business disciplines, leading us to classify it, as did H&L, as
Interdisciplinary.
Journal of Manufacturing Systems (#28): This is a publication of
the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Although the journal has
occasional articles about the management of manufacturing, the
focus is largely on engineering issues, hence we classified it as a
reference-discipline journal, Engineering in particular. The society
has numerous local chapters and eight ‘‘technical communities’’
but nothing related to management. The ‘‘aims and scope’’ of the
journal does identify such OM issues as strategy, production
planning, quality, and the supply chain as topics of interest, but
the great majority of topics are related to manufacturing
engineering.
International Journal of Production Economics (#19): Although
H&L classify this as an OM journal, close inspection of the heavily
mathematical papers published in the journal leads to the conclusion that this is a reference-discipline journal, Economics in this
case. The aims and scope of the journal note that it focuses on ‘‘the
interface between engineering and management’’ but primarily
through the ‘‘economic environment.’’
European Journal of Operational Research (#6): This journal
publishes both articles directed toward extending the theory of
operations research as well as applications across multiple areas,
and far beyond business, such as agriculture, engineering, government, and so on. H&L classified the journal as Interdisciplinary,
probably because of its range of applications, but inspection
Author's personal copy
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
441
Table 6
71 journals both ranked in published OM studies and listed in school lists.
Journal
No. of times listed in
12 published studies
No. of times listed in
37 school lists
OM-dedicated (D),
reference discipline (R),
interdisciplinary (I)
1. Journal of Operations Management
2. International Journal of Production Research
3. Management Science
4. International Journal of Operations and Production Management
5. Decision Sciences
6. European Journal of Operational Research
7. Interfaces
8. IIE Transactions
9. Operations Research
10. OMEGA—International Journal of Management Science
11. Journal of the Operations Research Society
12. Naval Research Logistics
13. Journal of Supply Chain Management
14. Computers and Operations Research
15. Production and Inventory Management Journal
16. Production and Operations Management
17. Computers and Industrial Engineering
18. Harvard Business Review
19. International Journal of Production Economics
20. Annals of Operations Research
21. IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management
22. Manufacturing and Service Operations Management
23. Operations Research Letters
24. Sloan Management Review
25. Strategic Management Journal
26. Journal of Business Logistics
27. Transportation Science
28. Journal of Manufacturing Systems
29. Mathematics of Operations Research
30. Journal of Manufacturing and Operations Management
31. Business Horizons
32. Journal of Quality Technology
33. Industrial Engineering
34. Quality Progress
35. Simulation
36. Journal of the American Statistical Association
37. Technometrics
38. California Management Review
39. IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, Cybernetics
40. Journal of Management
41. Journal of Scheduling
42. International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics
Management
43. International Journal of Logistics Management
44. Production Planning and Control
45. Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
46. INFORMS Journal on Computing
47. International Journal of Flexible Manufacturing Systems
48. International Transactions in Operational Research
49. Logistics and Transportation Review
50. International Journal of Operations and Quantitative Management
51. International Journal of Service Industry Management
52. Journal of Heuristics
53. Mathematical Programming
54. Networks
55. Quality Management Journal
56. Supply Chain Management Review
57. Communications of the ACM
58. Journal of Global Optimization
59. SIAM Review
60. International Journal of Purchasing and Materials Management
61. Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management
62. Quality Magazine
63. Service Industries Journal
64. TQM Magazine
65. American Journal of Mathematics and Management Sciences
66. Engineering Management Journal
67. IEEE Transactions on Reliability
68. Journal of the ACM
69. Manufacturing Review
70. Mathematical and Computer Modelling
71. Production and Inventory Management Review
12
12
12
12
12
12
11
11
10
10
10
10
10
9
9
8
8
7
6
5
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
28
24
24
22
20
18
17
15
24
23
18
18
17
16
9
28
10
1
17
12
5
19
11
1
1
16
16
6
6
2
1
4
3
3
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
13
D
D
I
D
I
R
I
R
R
I
R
R
D
R
D
D
R
I
R
R
R
D
R
I
R
D
D
R
R
D
I
D
R
D
R
R
R
I
R
R
D
D
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
8
7
6
5
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
D
D
D
R
D
R
D
D
D
R
R
R
D
D
R
R
R
D
D
D
D
D
R
R
R
R
D
R
D
Author's personal copy
442
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
of its aims and scope (‘‘papers that contribute to the methodology
of operational research (OR) and to the practice of decision
making’’), as well as the papers actually published, leads us to
classify it as a reference-discipline journal, namely, Operations
Research.
Omega: The International Journal of Management Science (#10):
This journal is rather eclectic in the papers it publishes but notes in
its aims and scope that it publishes in the ‘‘specific fields or
functions of management,’’ and specifically with implications
to the practice of management rather than purely theoretical
articles. This focus on the implications to practice was emphasized
in recent articles and editorials regarding the journal’s audience
and the nature of the types of problems authors might address
[10–12]. Inspection of the articles appearing in the journal
confirms that it covers all aspects of management, such as
accounting, information systems, and OM. We hence designated
this as an Interdisciplinary journal, which agrees with the H&L
categorization.
Naval Research Logistics (#12): As stated in the journal’s
‘‘Description,’’ the journal focuses on ‘‘operations research, applied
statistics, and general quantitative modeling’’ with special application to logistics. The papers reflect this orientation accurately and
we thus designated this journal as a reference-discipline journal, in
this case both Operations Research and Statistics. H&L came to the
same conclusion.
Decision Sciences (#5): This journal, the ‘‘face’’ of the Decision
Science Institute, used to be a favorite for OM researchers to publish
in when there were no OM-dedicated journals (i.e., prior to 1980).
In spite of the fact that the society, which has 20 ‘‘interest areas,’’
only one of which is OM, clearly states in its description that
it publishes in ‘‘all the functional areas of business,’’ and does
indeed publish across the spectrum of business disciplines, the
journal still seems to carry the earlier ‘‘image’’ among academics of
being an OM journal. Part of the reason may be that the OM
academics still represent a large interest area in the institute (24%
of the membership as of 2009). Nevertheless, the journal has
always been an interdisciplinary journal, as H&L classified it, and so
did we.
Management Science (#3): This, like Decision Sciences, is also a
mainstream journal of a society, INFORMS in this case. And it too
publishes across a wide range of disciplines but not just those
limited to business. Its editorial statement notes that its articles
address management issues with tools from foundational fields
(e.g., economics, statistics, psychology, operations research), as
well as multidisciplinary research. The institute is comprised of ten
‘‘societies’’ of which one is Manufacturing and Service Operations
Management, and constitutes somewhat less than 10% of the
INFORMS membership (as of 2009). And like Decision Sciences,
the articles range across a spectrum of disciplines (including the
military, government, and others). Again, like H&L, we classified
this journal as Interdisciplinary.
Clearly, many journals have contributed to the dissemination of
OM knowledge over the years. This is not unlike other business
disciplines that develop and benefit from work published in a range
of other interdisciplinary and reference-discipline journals. However, not all such journals would be considered to be journals
dedicated to a specific business discipline, and that is also the case
with OM. Hence, we have selected those journals shown as ‘‘OM–
Dedicated’’ from Table 6 and reproduced them in Table 7. As can be
seen in Table 7, three OM-dedicated journals (JOM, IJPR, IJOPM)
were listed in every ranking study, whereas no journal was listed by
every single school on their lists. This may suggest that a bit of
tailoring occurs in creating school lists of OM-dedicated journals to
match faculty research interests. All OM-dedicated journals
appeared at least once in both the collection of ranking studies
and school lists.
Table 7
30 OM-dedicated journals.
Journal
No. of times
listed in 12
published
studies
No. of
times
listed in 37
school lists
Journal of Operations Management
International Journal of Production Research
International Journal of Operations and
Production Management
Journal of Supply Chain Management
Production and Inventory Management Journal a
Production and Operations Management
Manufacturing and Service Operations
Management
Journal of Business Logistics
Transportation Science
Journal of Manufacturing and Operations
Management a
Journal of Quality Technology
Quality Progress
Journal of Scheduling
International Journal of Physical Distribution and
Logistics Management
International Journal of Logistics Management
Production Planning and Control
Supply Chain Management: An International
Journal
International Journal of Flexible Manufacturing
Systems
Logistics and Transportation Review
International Journal of Operations and
Quantitative Management
International Journal of Service Industry
Management
Quality Management Journal
Supply Chain Management Review
International Journal of Purchasing and Materials
Management
Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management
Quality Magazine
Service Industries Journal
TQM Magazine
Manufacturing Review
Production and Inventory Management Review a
12
12
12
28
24
22
10
9
8
4
17
9
28
19
3
3
3
16
16
2
2
2
2
1
4
3
1
13
1
1
1
10
8
7
1
5
1
1
5
4
1
4
1
1
1
4
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
a
These publications were discontinued; P&IMJ has recently been resurrected.
3.3. Final journal rankings
Finally, we proceeded to rank the journals. The 37 tiered school
lists for OM journals collected from AACSB-accredited schools were
used to compute a composite ranking [13] for each journal. Initially,
three obvious measures were calculated: (1) the percentage of
times each journal was listed in the top tier across schools, (2) the
percentage of times in the top two tiers, and (3) the percentage of
times in any tier. However, because the number of tiers differed
among the schools in the sample, a more sophisticated fourth
measure – a weighted mean percentile score – was then computed
for each journal based on its assignment in each school’s graded
tiers. This score accounted for the actual number of tiers within
each school list, the number of journals in each tier, the tier
placement of each journal, and the number of schools listing that
journal. All journals in the same tier at a given school were given the
same percentile measure (the mean for that tier) for that school.
These mean percentiles were then aggregated across the schools in
the sample by creating an average of the mean percentiles for each
journal. The final weighted average mean percentile score was
calculated by multiplying the average mean percentile by the
number of schools listing that journal in one of their tiers. This
group of four school-list metrics, shown in Table 8, reflects how
journals are actually judged and used in practice.
Author's personal copy
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
443
Table 8
Rankings from the AACSB school lists data of the 30 focal journals.
Journal
Journal of Operations Management
Production and Operations Management
International Journal of Production Research
Manufacturing and Service Operations Management
International Journal of Operations and Production Management
Journal of Business Logistics
Transportation Science
Journal of Supply Chain Management
International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics
Management
International Journal of Logistics Management
Production and Inventory Management Journal
Production Planning and Control
Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
Journal of Quality Technology
Quality Management Journal
Logistics and Transportation Review
International Journal of Flexible Manufacturing Systems
International Journal of Service Industry Management
Supply Chain Management Review
Quality Progress
International Journal of Purchasing and Materials Management
International Journal of Operations and Quantitative Management
TQM Magazine
Journal of Manufacturing and Operations Management
Journal of Scheduling
Service Industries Journal
Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management
Quality Magazine
Manufacturing Review
Production and Inventory Management Review
Weighted
average mean
percentile
score
% Times
listed by
schools in
any tier (%)
% Times
listed by
schools in
top tier (%)
% Times
listed by
schools in top
2 tiers (%)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
21.9693
15.7971
13.1545
10.6754
9.4535
9.0677
7.7144
5.0965
4.6064
75.68
75.68
64.86
51.35
59.46
43.24
43.24
45.95
35.14
64.86
29.73
18.92
29.73
13.51
21.62
10.81
2.70
5.41
75.68
62.16
51.35
40.54
35.14
32.43
32.43
18.92
16.22
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
24
26
27
28
29
30
4.0541
3.9122
3.3259
2.3941
2.2922
2.0168
1.9153
1.7355
1.3168
1.0511
1.0422
0.9500
0.8381
0.5688
0.5000
0.5000
0.4929
0.4292
0.2948
0.1806
0.0595
27.03
24.32
21.62
18.92
10.81
10.81
13.51
13.51
10.81
10.81
8.11
5.41
10.81
5.41
5.41
2.70
5.41
5.41
5.41
2.70
2.70
2.70
5.41
5.41
0.00
2.70
2.70
2.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
18.92
10.81
13.51
10.81
8.11
8.11
8.11
5.41
5.41
5.41
5.41
2.70
2.70
2.70
0.00
0.00
2.70
2.70
0.00
0.00
0.00
Overall
ranking
However, the weighted average mean percentile score is the most
nuanced of the four metrics in that it takes into consideration not only
a given journal’s tier placement at each school but also the number of
tiers at the school and the number of journals graded by the school.
Furthermore, in this metric each journal’s score is weighted by the
number of schools that graded that journal. We believe that this is the
best school-list metric available to estimate a journal’s actual standing
in that it is based on the most information. Table 8 presents the final
ranking of the 30 OM journals from the AACSB data based on their
weighted average mean percentile scores. The other scores (percentages of tier inclusion) are also shown in the table.
In order to verify the bona fides of these rankings we correlated
them with the average of the journal ranks across the published OM
journal ranking articles listed earlier. The correlation coefficient of
0.697 (pr0.001) with the published ranking aggregate shows a
strong association, indicating that the rankings from the school lists
are very consistent with the findings in the published stream.
Additionally, we correlated the school rankings with each of the
types of ranking studies (perception, citation, other). While each
type of ranking correlated strongly with the school lists (reality),
perception studies were slightly stronger in association (0.771,
p r0.001). Table 9 presents the correlations.
The rankings of OM-dedicated journals from the school lists and
the published ranking studies are produced side-by-side in
Table 10. The ranking from the published ranking studies was
established by using a double-weighted calculation. First, the rank
for each journal in each study was divided by the number of
journals ranked in that study. The underlying basis for this
adjustment is to take into account the number of journals ranked
in each study (i.e., a journal that ranked number 5 in a study of 200
journals should get a better ranking than a journal that ranked 5 in a
study of 10 journals). Second, the average of these adjusted ranks
was computed across studies and divided by the number of studies
in which each journal appeared. This adjustment factored in the
number of times each journal appeared in the collection of studies
(i.e., a journal that was included in 10 studies presumably has more
visibility and impact than one that was present in only one study).
This final double-weighted average is the determinant of the
journal’s overall rank (the smaller the double-weighted average
the better the rank).
The primary reason for discrepancies between the aggregate
rankings from the published studies versus the AACSB-accredited
school lists is believed to be the timing of the two sets of data, with
the AACSB data reflecting publication reality in early 2007 whereas
the published studies go back almost two decades.
4. Discussion
The comparison conducted in this study of actual lists used to
assess faculty research and the published ranking stream is both
needed (given that examining measures is a norm in scientific
inquiry), and valuable, given the importance attached to publishing
in the ‘‘top’’ journals in evaluation, promotion, tenure, award,
nomination, and other such high-profile decisions. Several points of
interest arise from the results of comparing the published stream of
OM ranking papers to the actual in-house lists used by AACSBaccredited schools to evaluate faculty research.
First, while the aggregate ranking from the published studies is
significantly (and positively) correlated with the in-house lists, there
is some dissimilarity in the rankings, even for the top journals. As
noted earlier, the major reason is believed to be the difference in time
periods between the published studies, on average about a decade. For
instance, the journal Production and Operations Management has
Author's personal copy
444
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
Table 9
Correlations between sources of journal rankings.
Source
Spearman correlation coefficient (number of journals) p-value
School lists
Published studies—all
Published studies—perception
Published studies—citation
Published studies—other
0.697
(30)
0.001
0.771
(23)
0.001
0.771
(10)
0.011
0.747
(13)
0.003
Published
studies—all
Published
studies—perception
Published
studies—citation
0.962
(23)
0.001
0.796
(10)
0.006
0.842
(13)
0.002
0.886
(6)
0.019
0.673
(10)
0.033
0.600
(5)
0.285
Table 10
Ranking of 30 journals: school lists versus published ranking studies.
Journals
Journal of Operations Management
Production and Operations Management
International Journal of Production Research
Manufacturing and Service Operations Management
International Journal of Operations and Production
Management
Journal of Business Logistics
Transportation Science
Journal of Supply Chain Management
International Journal of Physical Distribution and
Logistics Management
International Journal of Logistics Management
Production and Inventory Management Journal
Production Planning and Control
Supply Chain Management: An International Journal
Journal of Quality Technology
Quality Management Journal
Logistics and Transportation Review
International Journal of Flexible Manufacturing
Systems
International Journal of Service Industry Management
Supply Chain Management Review
Quality Progress
International Journal of Purchasing and Materials
Management
International Journal of Operations and Quantitative
Management
TQM Magazine
Journal of Manufacturing and Operations
Management
Journal of Scheduling
Service Industries Journal
Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management
Quality Magazine
Manufacturing Review
Production and Inventory Management Review
School
lists
1
2
3
4
5
Published
ranking
studies
1
3.5
2
5
3.5
6
7
8
9
9
8
6
15
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
10
7
22
17
16
25
17
29
18
19
20
21
22
19
20
21
22
30
23
24
26
11
24
26
27
28
29
30
13
24
14
27
27
12
substantially improved in stature since it began publication in the
early 1990s, but it always takes time for a new journal to establish
its reputation. Similarly, the even more recently initiated journal
Manufacturing and Service Operations Management, sponsored by
INFORMS, is ranked 4th in the AACSB list and 5th in the published
studies list, reflecting the same delay in acceptance for new journals.
And the British journal International Journal of Operations and
Production Management, whose stature appears to have improved
considerably over time in the published studies, suffers slightly in the
AACSB list which is more heavily weighted with American schools
(31 of the 37 schools with tiered OM lists).
Other effects may also be seen in the data. For example, the large
discrepancy in the published vs. AACSB rankings for the Production
and Inventory Management Journal reflect the loss of stature when
an organization decides to terminate a journal; and like the
difficulty of establishing the stature of a new journal, the falloff
in stature of a defunct journal is equally slow, having fallen only 4
ranks in a decade or so. Also, there may be a quantity effect, with
International Journal of Production Research, which is published 24
times a year with a large number of papers in each issue, holding a
high ranking on both lists. And the long-established Journal of
Business Logistics, ranked 6th in the AACSB list but only 9th in the
published studies list, may attest to the value of keeping a journal
publishing in its area of strength (in this case, an area that has come
into prominence in the operations field: supply chains and
logistics) for an extended duration. On the other hand, the Journal
of Supply Chain Management shows the opposite effect, holding the
rank of 6th in the published studies list but only 8th in the AACSB
list, possibly due to the many changes in the name of this journal
over the years and the confusion this generates.
Since this study is the first to present and compare rankings of
OM-dedicated journals from this new source of AACSB in-house
lists and published journal ranking studies, we can also get a sense
of how OM-dedicated journals fare when ranked with related
reference and interdisciplinary journals, as compared to ranking
solely OM journals. Journal rankings offer one cue suggesting the
value placed on different collections of knowledge and, whether
explicitly or implicitly, provide incentives for scholars to publish in
certain journals. If journals of distinct disciplines or research areas
are combined, the focus and potential development of the fields
involved becomes diluted. We thus suggest that there are benefits
in separating journals into distinct disciplines and ranking journals
within those disciplines.
An academic discipline is ‘‘a branch of learning or scholarly
instruction’’ [14]. As such, ‘‘academic disciplines have become
authoritative communities of expertise’’ [15, p. 63]. The community of a discipline influences theory development and shapes the
types of phenomena that scholars in that community attempt to
understand. Journals are a vital component of the academic
community as a key vehicle of communication among scholars.
In fact, it has been claimed that a discipline’s identity is primarily
created by the journals that publish in that discipline [16].
As faculty are offered incentives for publishing in a field’s top or
premier journals, (e.g., greater mobility, research awards, enhanced
reputation, merit pay, etc.), clarity in identifying these top journals
is important. One only need reflect on past tenure and promotion
Author's personal copy
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
discussions, annual review evaluations, faculty hiring decisions, or
target journal selection processes for new manuscripts to see the
potential impact that ‘‘the #1 journal in our field’’ or ‘‘one of the top
three journals in our field’’ has in academia.
Clearly, being the editor of such a journal is also a prestigious
position, but as well carries the responsibility to maintain and
enhance the journal’s reputation. More difficult is the position of
editors of lesser journals, who are trying to move the status of the
journal up during their tenure. We have already seen some
approaches for doing this:
445
categorized OM journals in groups, even with these specifically
designated groupings there could be some differences across
different departmental structures, faculty composition, and over
time, as schools update their lists. Additionally, we do not have
evidence that the lists provided are the only metric used to evaluate
faculty research. Future studies might examine the extent to which
journal rankings are the primary criterion for evaluating research at
schools and the degree to which a portfolio of criteria are explicitly
and formally considered in the evaluation process.
publishing well-respected authors (if they can be enticed to
submit to a less-prestigious journal),
6. Conclusion
selecting only high-quality papers to publish and simulta-
neously reducing the all-important acceptance (selectivity)
rate (but at the risk of not having enough papers to fill all the
issues),
publishing a lot of papers every year, thereby increasing the
journal’s citation rate and popularity (but this conflicts with
being more selective with higher quality),
having a long established history (but hard for an editor to
affect),
publishing on a regular, continuous basis rather than late or
intermittent (a good policy for any journal but sometimes out of
the hands of the editor, especially if the journal is sponsored by a
society),
picking a niche area in an established field (e.g., consumer
research in marketing, logistics or quality in operations, banking
in finance, and ‘‘practice’’ or ‘‘methodology’’ in any management
area) and aiming to be the top journal in this niche area. But will
this detract from the ability of the journal to be recognized as
one of a field’s top disciplinary journals?
5. Limitations
Our research offers guidance for schools that currently do not
use formal lists to evaluate research but wish to do so in the future,
and also for schools that wish to compare their list with that of
other schools. However, the study does not aid schools who choose
to use other metrics of quality besides journal rankings. Further,
given that the focus of our paper is on the validation of the stream of
published journal ranking studies by comparing them to the inhouse journal lists used by AACSB-accredited schools, we do not
know specifically how schools without such lists evaluate research.
It would be interesting to know the varieties of methods employed
to evaluate faculty research, including the degree to which faculty
are asked in the evaluation process to provide their own justification and support for the quality of their publications.
Another limitation of our study involves the lack of knowledge that
we have about schools who did not respond to the survey. We do not
know if non-responders are schools that tend to use lists or tend not
to, or whether those schools share the same pattern of lists/no lists as
those schools who responded. However, our sample does not differ
significantly from the population on key demographic characteristics,
thus suggesting a degree of representativeness.
An additional point to note about the limitations of ranking
studies in general, and ours in particular, is that schools have a
variety of organizational structures which may shape the lists used
to evaluate research. For example, a school with a Department
of Purchasing and Operations Management may include and
rank journals differently than a Department of Management (or
Decision Sciences) which has OM faculty as part of the department,
but they are not the dominant group in the department. While our
study included only lists that were both tiered and specifically
This paper relied on two sources of data to evaluate academic
journals in operations management, arguably the most important
channel for scholarly knowledge generation and dissemination.
Using published ranking studies, we categorized the studies by
type, with most falling into the category of perception studies, a
few being citation rankings, and two others, namely one that used
an author–affiliation index [17] and another that used publication
counts, a behavioral measure [3]. A new source of data, the inhouse target journal lists of AACSB-accredited schools, was introduced in this study. These lists are used by the universities for
evaluation, promotion, tenure, and other such research-oriented
appraisal activities, as well as by others with an interest in
identifying experts in particular business areas. We have shown
that both sources tend to be relatively consistent and reliable.
Using the school lists and published studies, we identified 71
journals where operations management academics tend to publish.
Starting with this list, we then separated, based on a variety of
measures, the OM-dedicated journals from those representing
either reference disciplines for the field (primarily engineering,
economics, and operations research) or the many broader, interdisciplinary journals, resulting in a final list of 30 OM-dedicated
journals.
Then, based on the in-house AACSB data, we derived a weighted
average mean percentile score by which we found how universities
actually perceive the rankings of those journals dedicated to the
operations management field and calculated the rankings of the 30
OM-dedicated journals. We similarly derived one overall ranking
list for the same journals based on the published studies and
compared the two lists, explaining the discrepancies and differences. We concluded that much of the difference between the two
lists is accounted for by inertia effects due to time lags in both
human perception and changes in the journal policies. As a result,
the most up-to-date data should be relied upon more heavily, and
of course, the reality of what the universities are actually using for
their research-oriented decisions. We suggest that updates of our
AACSB data will be important for monitoring changes in the stature
and respect of the journals in the future.
Our results should be of interest to university and business
school administrators and faculty, as well as external stakeholders
with an interest in identifying experts in areas such as quality,
supply chains, scheduling, inventory management, process design,
manufacturing management, and service management. To date,
the great majority of published journal rankings for the operations
management field have confounded these stakeholders by including inappropriate journals from either reference disciplines (e.g.,
engineering, economics, operations research, information systems,
statistics) or from interdisciplinary journals that include marketing, finance, behavior, ethics, and other business, and sometimes
non-business, fields. An ethicist who is well-published in an
interdisciplinary journal such as Business Horizons, or a statistician
who is well-published in a reference-discipline journal such as the
Journal of Heuristics, may not have any competence (or, probably,
Author's personal copy
446
J.R. Meredith et al. / Omega 39 (2011) 435–446
interest) in operations management, or one of its sub-fields like
scheduling.
Here we have identified 30 OM-dedicated journals, some
representing the entire discipline and others focused on individual
sub-areas, and ranked them in terms of how AACSB-accredited
universities actually perceive their quality. This list should be used
in the future to identify those journals relevant to the operations
management field, whether for purposes of comparing regional
perceptions of quality or analyzing coverage of individual topics or
any other particular interest of researchers in the field of operations
management. And, of course, the list and rankings should be
updated on a regular basis to stay current with the perceptions
in the field.
References
[1] Diamond RM. Preparing for Promotion, Tenure, and Annual Review: A Faculty
Guide. second ed.. Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Company, Inc.; 2004.
[2] Fairweather JS. The mythologies of faculty productivity: implications for
institutional policy and decision making. The Journal of Higher Education
2002;73(1):26–48.
[3] Holsapple CW, Lee-Post A. Behavior-based analysis of knowledge dissemination channels in operations management. OMEGA: The International Journal of
Management Science 2009;38(3–4):167–78.
[4] B.R. Lewis, Judging the journals, BizEd 2008, November/December, pp. 42–45.
[5] Van Fleet DD, McWilliams A, Siegal DS. A theoretical and empirical analysis of
journal rankings: the case of formal lists. Journal of Management 2000;26(5):
839–61.
[6] Vokurka RJ. The relative importance of journals used in operations management research: a citation analysis. Journal of Operations Management
1996;14(4):345–55.
[7] Reinstein A, Calderon TC. Examining accounting departments’ rankings of the
quality of accounting journals. Critical Perspectives on Accounting 2006;17(4):
457–90.
[8] Cronbach LJ. Coefficient alpha and the internal structure of tests. Psychometrika 1951;16(3):297–334.
[9] Zsidisin GA, Smith ME, McNally RC, Kull TJ. Evaluation criteria development
and assessment of purchasing and supply management journals. Journal of
Operations Management 2007;25(1):165–83.
[10] Muller-Merbach H. OR of the people, by the people, for the people. OMEGA: The
International Journal of Management Science 2011;39(2):119.
[11] Muller-Merbach H. Five notions of OR/MS problems. OMEGA: The International Journal of Management Science 2011;39(1):1–2.
[12] Paucar-Caceres A. Mapping the changes in management science: a review of
‘soft’ OR/MS articles published in Omega (1973–2008). OMEGA: The International Journal of Management Science 2010;38(1-2):46–56.
[13] Steward MD, Lewis BR. A comprehensive analysis of marketing journal
rankings. Journal of Marketing Education 2010;32(1):75–92.
[14] The Oxford English Dictionary, OED online, ‘‘discipline, n2’’, second ed., Oxford
University Press, 1989, May 29, 2009 /http://dictionary.oed.com/cgi/entry/
50065209S.
[15] Clark BR. The Academic Life: Small Worlds, Different Worlds. Princeton, New
Jersey: Princeton University Press; 1987.
[16] Lowry PB, Romans D, Curtis A. Global journal prestige and supporting
disciplines: a scientometric study of information systems journals. Journal
of the Association for Information Systems 2004;5(2):29–76.
[17] Gorman MF, Kanet JJ. Evaluating operations management-related journals via
the author affiliation index. Manufacturing & Service Operations Management
2005;7(1):3–19.
[18] Barman S, Tersin RJ, Buckley MR. An empirical assessment of the perceived
relevance and quality of POM-related journals by academicians. Journal of
Operations Management 1991;10(2):194–212.
[19] Soteriou AC, Hadjinicola GC, Patsia K. Assessing production and operations
management related journals: the European perspective. Journal of Operations
Management 1999;17(2):225–38.
[20] Donohu JM, Fox JB. A multi-method evaluation of journals in the decision and
management sciences by US academics. OMEGA: The International Journal of
Management Science 2000;28(1):17–36.
[21] Barman S, Hanna MD, LaForge RL. Perceived relevance and quality of POM
journals: a decade later. Journal of Operations Management 2001;19(3):
367–85.
[22] Olson JE. Top-25-business-school professors rate journals in operations
management and related fields. Interfaces 2005;35(4):323–38.
[23] Theoharakis V, Voss C, Hadjinicola GC, Soteriou AC. Insights into factors
affecting Production and Operations Management (POM) journal evaluation.
Journal of Operations Management 2007;25(4):932–55.
[24] Goh CH, Holsapple CW, Johnson LE, Tanner JR. An empirical assessment of
influences on POM research. OMEGA: The International Journal of Management Science 1996;24(3):337–45.
[25] Goh CH, Holsapple CW, Johnson LE, Tanner JR. Evaluating and classifying POM
journals. Journal of Operations Management 1997;15(2):123–38.
Download