Social Science Department St. Marguerite d’Youville S.S.

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Social Science Department

St. Marguerite d’Youville S.S.

10815 Dixie Road, Brampton, Ontario. L6R 2W5

Telephone: (905) 789-5560 Fax: (905) 789-1143

Course Name:

Course Code:

Challenge and Change in Society

HSB 4M1-02

Instructor:

Period:

Ms. D. Speranza (Social Science Office room 307)

5

Room Number: 205

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines the theories and methodologies used in anthropology, psychology, and sociology to investigate and explain shifts in knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviour and their impact on society. Students will analyse cultural, social, and biological patterns in human societies, looking at the ways in which those patterns change over time. Students will also explore the ideas of classical and contemporary social theorists, and will apply those ideas to the analysis of contemporary trends.

OVERALL COURSE EXPECTATIONS

At the end of the course students will be able to:

Appraise the differences and similarities in the methodologies and strategies of

 anthropology, psychology, and sociology applied to the study of change;

Describe key features of major theories from anthropology, psychology, and sociology that focus on change;

Analyse patterns of technological change from the perspectives of anthropology, psychology, and sociology;

Appraise the differences and similarities in the approaches taken by anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the study of trends relating to the baby boom, fertility and fecundity, and the life cycle;

Assess the importance of demography as a tool for studying social trends;

Demonstrate an understanding of the social forces that influence and shape trends;

Appraise the differences and similarities in the approaches taken by anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the study of social challenges pertaining to health, social injustice, and global concerns;

Demonstrate an understanding of social forces that shape such challenges;

Define and correctly use anthropological, psychological, and sociological terms and concepts;

Demonstrate and understanding of the main areas of study in anthropology; psychology, and sociology, and of the similarities and differences among them;

 Demonstrate an understanding of the different research methods used by anthropology, psychology, and sociology to investigate questions of importance within each field, and apply relevant skills correctly and ethically;

 Demonstrate an ability to select, organize, and interpret information gathered from a variety of print and electronic sources;

 Communicate the results of their inquiries effectively.

COURSE CONTENT

This course will be organized according to the following themes:

Unit 1

Introduction to Social Sciences

Unit 2

Unit 3

Social Change

Social Trends

Unit 4 Social Challenges

* With Research and Inquiry Skills built into units 1-4

EVALAUTION POLICY

Students will be assessed and evaluated according to the work they have produced and skills they have displayed. Methods of providing feedback will include assessing completed assignments, tests, co-operative learning activities, simulations and presentations. Student marks will be determined by assessing and evaluating process and product according to the

Achievement Level Chart given below.

Grade Range Achievement Level Achievement Level Description

80–100% Level 4 A very high to outstanding level of achievement.

Achievement is above the provincial standard.

70–79% Level 3

60–69%

50–59%

Below 50%

Level 2

Level 1

A high level of achievement. Achievement is at the provincial standard.

A moderate level of achievement. Achievement is

below, but approaching, the provincial standard.

A passable level of achievement. Achievement is

below the provincial standard.

Insufficient achievement of curriculum expectations. A credit will not be granted.

EVALUATION STRUCTURE

Student work will be assessed and evaluated according to the four achievement categories defined in the document (Ontario Curriculum Grades 11 and 12, Social Science and Humanities, 2000).

Category and Description

Knowledge and Understanding:

Includes content acquired throughout the course and comprehension of its meaning and significance.

Weight

25%

25%

Thinking:

Deals with the use of critical and creative thinking skills and or processes.

Communication:

 Is conveying meaning through various forms.

25%

25%

Application:

Includes the use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts.

RESOURCES

Bain, Colin et.al. Transitions in Society: The Challenge of Change. Toronto: Oxford University

Press, 2002.

REPLACEMENT COST

The replacement cost for a lost, stolen, or damaged textbook which is beyond repair is $85.00. The cost of repairing a damaged textbook will be paid by the student.

FINAL GRADES

The four assessment and evaluation categories are reflected in day-to-day activities, quizzes, unit tests, culminating activities, and on the final examination.

The final grade in this course will be based on:

Introduction to Anthropology,

Psychology, and Sociology

Grade Distribution

Term Work

Culminating Performance Task (CPT)

Examination

70%

10%

20%

OTHER EVALUATION ISSUES

Late Submissions: Daily assignments and performance tasks submitted late are subject to a penalty of 10% per day to a maximum of 1 day. Culminating activities and assignments will be subject to a penalty of 10% per day to a maximum of 1 day or the last day of class which ever comes first.

Tests and Quizzes: There will be a minimum of 4 tests. Students will be quizzed at anytime on daily material covered in class. A note must accompany all missed tests and

students must be prepared to write on the day of their return. A quiz will only be administered once during class time.

Final Examination: At the end of the course students will write a final exam. Failure to

write the exam will result in an examination grade of ZERO.

Plagiarism: There is no tolerance for plagiarism. All sources must be documented using

MLA format. Plagiarism will result in a mark of ZERO on assignments

.

Please refer to the Student Agenda Handbook (2008/2009) for school policies on late assignments, incomplete assignments, missed tests and examinations, plagiarism, absences, school suspensions and other related issues.

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