Document 14415490

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Center for Black Music Rerearch, Columbia College Chica

Spring 2 0 0 0 Tracing U.S. Black Vernacular Musical Styles

[hicago musician, collector, and educator Charles E. Walton has worn many hats during his long areer. Many knew

him as

the house-band dnnnmer of Von Freeman's long-running South Side jam session

at

Club

Enterprise on

75th

Street or,

per-

haps, as a member of the Johnny Pate

Trio. Others

have experienced

his edu-

cational philosophies

during his tenure

as a professor

at

Malcolm X

College, a local

junior college. And

within

the

small

circle

of

black music

hihliophiles in

the city,

Walton

is

known

as

a col- lector

of

rare

black

music

memorabilia.

These experiences have

given

Walton a

-

.

nersoective

A

of

-

black

music history of the last

fifty years.

At

age seventy-five,

he

shows

little

sign that his

passion

for

music is

abating.

Raised in what

was known as

1

I

local

Musician Sptlight

community on Chicago's South

Side,

Walton

heard the popular

musical

styles of

the day.

However, his

musical

career

did not begin

in earnest

until 1945

when

he

entered

Chicago's

Roosevelt

University

to pursue

a

music degree

in voice. While

study-

ing at

Roosevelt, Walton begru

gigging

with

smaU

bands

around

town and became

fasci- nated

with the drums.

He soon invested in his first

drum set.

After brief

tenures

at Kentucky

State

College and Maryland State

University

in

pursuit of a degree in music educa- tion-a switch from his voice major-

Walton returned to

Chicago because he decided

that

the freelance work that

1

BY

MONICA

(as available to him in

lentucky

and Maryland wuld not adequately sup-

port the

lifestyle he desired.

In 1949, in an

attempt

to become a more b p o n s i - blew man, he

dropped

out

of chool

and landed a regular

job.

But

his musical

interests were

too great

to completely abandon his dream

of

a

music career.

By day, he worked for the Board of

Health,

and,

by

night, he

freelanced,

playing with an array

of

musiciansa

veritable

who's

who of the

Chicago music scene.

The

Johnny Pate Trio ca. 1950. Top to bottom:

Charles Walton, Johnny Pate, Lionel Bright.

Photograph murtey

of @'?e Vivian

G.

H a d Resean-h CoIi~'on

Amwidn W i r y

a d Chicago

Pubik

library.

Eventually

he

realized that the "respon-

sible

adult" in

him was

too

much

in love

with

music to settle for

anything

less than his full commihnent

to

music.

Like

many

musicians before

him,

Walton decided

to

"try

New

York,"

and in

1957, he moved

to

New York City.

But the

Big

Apple's crowded

streets

and fast-paced lifestyle

did

not appeal

to Walton, and he

soon refurned

to

Chicago

to

f i ~ s h college degree.

He gradnated from Roosevelt

University with

a

degree in music

edu-

cation

and

soon

began

graduate study.

At the

same time, he worked as the director

of a

community music founda- tion

that still

exists today.

By

1970,

Walton

had established

a

career

as

a professor

at

Malcolm X College. There he

taught

music theory

and

composi- tion for

nineteen

years. His unique and quite varied

perspectives,

gained from his experience

as

a practicing musician, served him and

his students well.

Today, the energetic Walton

is con-

centrating on

a

project

he calls

"Bronzeville," a

collection

of inter- views and photographs of Chicago's

African-American music

community. It features numerous musicians, particu-

larly Walton's

contemporaries.

Walton says that

he is

attempting

to capture the

spirit

of the

1940s

and 1950s when

Bronzeville

was "happening."

This kind of work is invaluable as

more and

more of

these musicians pass

away,

(continued on page

2)

taking with them memories of an important historical moment. Over the years, Walton has collected numerous pieces of memorabilia to document his lifelong mterest in Chicago music. His collection is now permanently housed in the Vivian

G.

Harsh Research

Collection of Afro-American History and Literature

at

the Carter G.

Woodson Regional Branch of the

Chicago Public Library. The collection has among

its

holdings rare pho- tographs, recordings, and taped oral histories. Belinda Jones, an archivist at the Harsh Collection, states that the value

of

Walton's

work

is its 'pefsonal touch."' It is one of the few collections by a musician that documents

African-

American involvement in the Chicaga

jazz

scene. It includes fare photos of a young Miles Davis performing at an after-hours jam session and Duke

Ellington participating in an early Bud

Billiken parade. Photos from the

Walton Collection are featured at the pellter for Black Music Research in a

The Johnny PateTrio at theSuthedand Hotel.

1955.

Johnny Pate (bas), Lionel Bright (piano). Charles WaNon

(drums).

Phofcgrapb murtesy

of tbe

Yivian

G

H&'Ra~eaIrh Co~enion

HMoryend lhfatum, airago

FuMir Ubraw

montage timefine. librarian

a d

Black Music Research, says that

'

Wdton is unusual because he is "a practicing musician

who

thinks

archivally-he knows the

import*--

of saving things." Indeed, we can

all

thank Walton for helping to preserve for posteriiy a vital part of our nation's

n

mdergroduaie df

the

Uni~ersiity

Pennsylm

Sterling Plump

Profenerof d k a w h e r i a a n Studiff andEegiisb,

UniveniTj of llfincisa Chicago

Robert

PNter

R&B Mitn, Goldmlne, and writer,

Charles D. Spencer and Associates, Chitauo

Tabatha

Center

I

RusseU.Koyias

Chicago Patk

District's

South Shore Culwral tenter

'Charles

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Shew1 If

Chief Exec&e Offreer. M i i ~ r in&~reide& cp

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Members of Project Stop-Time Advisory Committee

Tabatha Russell-Koylass

is Center

Director of the Chicago Park District's

South Shore Cultural Center. She teaches courses in dance and arts man- freelance choreographer. Russell-

Koylass holds a master's degree m interdisciplinary arts from Columbia

College Chicago and was a faculty member in the dance department for three and one-half years. She has per- formed nationally and abroad with the

Chicago-based Gus Giordano Jazz

Dance Chicago, Joseph Holrnes

Chicago Dance Theatre, Mordine and

Company Dance Theatre, and with

Robin Lakes Rough Dance and David

Rousseve.

Charles

R.

Sherrell

II

is Chief Executive

Officer of Mariner Broadcasters, Inc., president of CD 1570-AM radio sta- tion, and president of the Chatham

Business Association in Chicago. He is past president and chairman of the

National Institute of Corporate

Responsibility. Sherrell is very active in developing jazz music appreciation by African-American adults and chil- dren. He is a former high school and college instructor and holds doctorates in linguistics and anthropology.

Hazel B. Steward

is Region Three

Education Officer with the Chicago

Public Schools. She provides services and resources for and oversees the daly operations of more than 100 schools and serves over 55,QOO

Chicago elementary and high school students. Steward is a member of the

National Education

Association, the

Chicago African-American Teachers

Association, the American Association of School Admhstrators, as well as

- tions. She serves on the boards of the

Consortium of Chicago School

Research Constituent Advisory group,

Project Serve, and the Principals

Coalition for the arts. Steward has puh- lished extensively and lectured throughout the United States.

CBMR Staff

%mud A. Floyd Jr.

Ihreetor

Marsha 1. Heizer

Asmiate Dmctor

&@or

Morris A. Phibbs

of

Developmrot P

ranne Flandreau

u u m a n and Arehim'

Johann 5. Buis

Edueaut

Coleridge-Taylor Perkir.,.. o r b h n of

Periomance Acuv~ueS

Marcor Sueiro

Sound Specialist

(rill

T. 5. Galloway

bled

Stop-Time

Coordinator

and Music

h

Guthrie Ramsey Jr.

Editor.

StopRme!

R~chard Wang

Consuitmg

Edaor,

SiopTW

-

Trenace V, Ford

Manaping Editor,

Stop-Em!

Axie Breen

'

T

;fi

I

It was

a

show

of love

and

enjoymm?

The Mdcolm

X

College President's that took place on

$,200D,

in

Gala Committee would like to extend

&rovidence-St. Mel's Auditorium. The its heaafelt appreciation for the perfor-

Ewsemble

Stop-Time did a beautiful perSmmance.

After

the mance of Ensemble Stop-Time on

" 7 -

:

Friday, Febrvary

4,2000. assembly, students axid

st?#

%

The entire evening was a

mne up

to me, or sent e- m i l s t e h g how much they enjoyed the

show.

The Dean of Students said

the

Lower

School in the balcony even enjoyed tbmelves. I

was

sitting on the main

~ ~ w ~ ~ - # ~ d

-

-

- wonderful blend of music preserr tation of the

African-

American

styles,

and exceptional musicianship. The variety

of

sounds

frop

ensemble was a true floor,

and

I could see

teachas,

stu- dents, 4ministcatoi8, and a few outside

pests

doing

the same. I think

Maggie

Bwwn

really stole the show.

Keep up the

good

work and we hope to have Ensemble Stq-Time back again. Give thaalrs to

all

the crew. We love you

and

wekdme you m our fami- ly

at

Providence-St. Mel. testimony to the legacy of our people past, present, and future. Thanks for continuing to make

CBMR a p o w e m force

the

archive of musical history and preservation to our musk.

May you experience continued suc- cess in your future programs and endeavors.

(

Randall

hQ.

h h n a ~ n ,

@Career

Progrms, x

College

Beverly

A.

Hadley,

Executivtiveaiector of

Admlrsims, PmvLlence-St.

ikisl

School

1

I

,.

,, of Stop

nmef we avalable

free

of charge To recave your

issue or

to

,"form

us of a change of address, send

your name and address

m

Stop-Tuner

Cenier for Black Music Researcl

Columbia

College &=ago

600

South Mtchaan Avenue arcall (312) 3G7559, fax (312) 344-8029, e-mail wlum edu.

Vls~t home page at www

I

I

"He's

a

Winner"

A

Retrospective Tribute

to

Chicago's Curtis Mayfield from

the

Hip-Hop Generation

' W

ith the death of Cnrtis

Mayfield in December 1999, the music indusuy lost

one of

its most innovative and

influ-

entil voices. A Chicago native son,

Mayfield was born

June

3,

1942. He will be remembered for bringing a social consciousness to soul music.

From the late 1950s to the mid-1960s, his work helped to develop the

"Chicago Sound'' during

his

tenure

with

the popular quintet,

the

Impressions. Writer and lead singer

Mayfield

penned

such memorable hits as "People Get Ready," "Keep ou

Pushing," and "We're a

Wmw."

These songs showcased themes

of

racial uplift and

spiritual

inspiration for

blacks in

the midst of the civil rights

struggle,

and, at the same time, forecasted the stylistic shift from rhythm and blues to soul. Like the spirituals

a

century before,

Mayfield's

music spoke to the hearts of African Americans, encourag- ing

them to

persevere and to m s c e n d

and, most

important, to change

their

circumstances. Mayfield's artistic activism caused many to consider his work "the soundtrack

to

the Civil

Rights movement."

When he

left

the

hnpressions in 1970 to pursue a solo cmer, Mayfield achieved critical acclaim

as

the creative force

behind

tl

platinum-selling soundtrack

to

Supeifry

(1972). a definitive blaxploitation film of the

, early 1970s. The film

chroni-

cled the

life

of

a drug

dealer entangled in the

undenvorld

of ghetto drug

culture.

Mayfreld's soundtrack

was

stunning. His mellow falsetto voice glides over exquisitely

crafted

arrangements

of

I lending

his

lyrics about life

in

the' drug strings, horns,

and

percussion, game

soulful

yet strident tenor.

Hits

such as the film's

title

track, Treddie's

Dead," and "Pusheman" secured

Mayfield's

status

and

the Supel-fy

soundtrack as cultural icons of the

Black Power Movement.

Arguably, the idealism and advocacy for social change tbat characterized much of the music of

the

1960s was lost on

the

disco and the dance

floors

of the 1970s. However, Mayfield worked against the tide and contmued to write music with a political con- sciousness, capturing

the mood

of the historical moment. Lyrics from his first solo single, "(Don't Wow)

If

There's a

Hell Below We're

All

Going to GO" typify Mayfield's

tone

during that time:

I

Blacks

and the crackers

Police

and

their backers

They'te all political actors

His bold exploration and illumination of America's racial politics are c a p tured on other songs such

as

'We

People

Who

Are Darker

Than Blue" and "Mighty Mighty (Spade

and

Whitey)."

With hit singles whose themes

range from

sensual love ballads to reflections on ghetto life, he remained

commer-

cially viable. Mayfield also continued his

work on film scores,

receiving

acclaim for

the soundtrack

to

Claudine

(1974). and

Let's Do ItAgain

(1975).

Perhaps

his greatest film contribution after

Supel-fy

was

the soundtrack to the

1976

Pllm

Sparkle.

His collaboration with

Aretha Franklin on

"'Hooked on

Your

Love,"

one of the hit singles from

Sparkle,

was

a

crowning achievement.

Over

the

next

two

decades, Mayfield

was extremely prolific, releasing

more than

a dozen albums.

To my ears, much of

Mayfield's creative verve can be

amibuted

to his innova- tive use of

patterns and

char- acteristics that have always

been

qualities of

black

music.

Wl.--.-:

in the

interplay

of

his vocals

and instrumental mangements

or

in

those passages

in which

Mayfield allows the

instruments

to "do

the

talk- ing," there is a constant,

although

var- ied, pattern

of

call-and-response. The recording of "Move on Up,"

a

hit from his solo career that

is

reminiscent of his civil rights anthems from his days with the Impressions, concludes with an exknded

instrumental

passage in which the horns dominate the

sound-

scape over a

driving

percussion sec-

tion.

When a saxophone solo enters along

with

Maytield's

own

impeccable guitar work, the instruments

C O ~ U N - cate powerfully with

each

other and with

the

listeners. s o from

the

Supeifry

soundtrack also show Mayfield's

use

of

African-American music traditions.

The liner notes

to the soundtrack cite the call-and-response between the horns and piano on "Junkie Chase!'

And

the

second instrumental,

'Think,"

like

much of his work, references

or

signifies on the blues and

gospel

gen- res.

In today's musical milieu, in which the popular music industry generates a lot of

dollars but

little

creativity,

Mayfield's name may not be familiar to younger listeners. However, they are indirectly exposed to his work through a new generation of artists who, like

Mayfield, also use concepts from the black musical traditions and recognize his influence on their own styles.

If imitation is truly the highest form of flattery, then the hip-hop community has paid great homage to

Mayfield through countless covers and samplings of his work. Hip-hop producer Sean

"Puffy"

Combs sampled "Give Me

Your Love," the theme from

SuperjZy's

infamous bathtub love scene, and incorporated it into

Mary

1.

Blige's

"I'm the Only

Woman."

Rapper Ice-T cites Mayfield as one of the artists who directly influenced his work. Hip-hop

1 poets, such as Nas and the Notorious

B.I.G., who rap about surviving as black men in the urban underclass, are referencing Mayiield's musical lamen- tations on ghetto life.

After a tragic accident in

1990 left

Mayfield a quadriplegic, the music industq began to recognize his accom- plishments with various honors and tributes. But the industry only con- firmed what many of us have known

for

years: Mayfield was one of a hand- ful of artists who was "right on time" and will continue to he timeless. His work will live on as an inspiration to future generations.

Tract

Curry

1s

a senror at the Universrty of Pe~syiwnin.

Curtis Mayfield

Resources

The following selections are available in the CBMR Library and Archives, open

Monday through F r i d a y f i m

9

AM.

to

5

P.M.; telephone: (312)

344-7586.

1963.

The ~ ~ ~ r e s s r o n s

ABC-450).

1964.

Keep on pushing

(ABC ABC-493).

1964.

Never endcna lm~ressions

ABC-

468).

- .

1965.

One by one

(ABC ABC-523).

1965.

People get ready

(ABC ABC-505).

1966.

Rzdin'high

(ABC ABC-545).

1967.

The fabulous Impressions

(ABC ABC-

606).

1968.

This is my country

(Curtom CRS

8001).

1968.

We're a winner

(ABC ABC-635).

1969.

The versattle Impressions

(ABC ABC-

668).

1969.

The young rnods'forgotten story

(Curtom CRS 8003).

1970.

Check our your mind

(Curtom CRS

8006).

Solo

1970.

Curtis

( C u m 8005).

1971.

Curtis live

(Curtom CRS 8008).

1971.

Roots

(Curtom CRS 8009).

I

1972.

Superfly

(Curtom CRS 8014).

1973.

Back to the world

(Curtom CRS 8015).

1973.

Curtrs in Chicago

(Curtom CRS 8018).

1974.

Got tofurd a way

(Curtom CRS 8604).

1974.

Move on up

(Buddah 4015).

1974.

Sweet exorcist

( C m m C R S 8601).

1975.

Let's do i f aaatn

(Curtom CU 5005).

1975.

There's no ;ace like America today

(Curtom CU 5001).

1976.

Give,

-

take, and have

(Curtom CU

5007)

1977.

Never say you can't survive

(Curtom

CU 5013).

1977.

Short eyes

(Curtom CU 5017).

1978.

Do tt all night

(Curtom CU 5022).

1979.

Heartbeat

(RSO 3053).

1980.

The right combination

[with Linda

Cldford] (RSO 3084)

1980.

Something to believe in

(Cmom CUR

3077).

'

1981.

Love

1s

the place

(Boardwalk NB1-

33239).

1982.

Honesry

(Boardwalk M-33256-1).

1985. We

come in peace with a message of love

(CRC CRC 2001).

1988.

Live in Europe

(Curtom CUR 2901).

1990.

Take it to the street

(Curtom CUR

2008).

1996.

New world order

(Warner Brothers

9-46348-2).

B l b ~ a p l i v

Alexander, Michael. 1969. The

Impressions.

Rolling Stone

49: 28-30,

Blum, Russ. 1999. Soul legend Curtis

Mayfield, 57, dies. [Albany,

N.Y.]

Times

Union,

December 27: B8.

Cummings, Tony. 1974. The gentle genius writes on.

Black Music

1, no. 10 (Sept.):

19-20.

Flanagan, Bill. 1993. Black history: Speech meets Curtis Mayfield.

Musician

176:

60-67.

Gonzales, Michael A. 1998. The legend of soul: Long live Curtis Mayfield. In

Soul:

Black powel; politics, and pleasure.

New

York:

New

York University Press.

Gradwell, Ian. 1990. Curtis Mayfield.

Feber

2 50-58.

Hewitt, Paolo. 1983. So proud: The moral standard of soul.

New Musical Express

(July): 24-26, 43.

Hoekstra, Dave. 1995. Honors for a native son: Mayfied returns for a star-studded tribute.

Chicago Sun-Times,

February 23:

32.

Holtzberg, Maggie. 1996. Curtis Mayfield.

In

Portrait of spirit: One story at a time.

Oakville, Ont., Canada: Disability Today

Publishing Gmup.

Kening, Dan. 1990. Keep on pushing:

Friends say injured Mayfield "can't stop

-. now."

Chicago Tribune,

sect. 13, 16.

September

2:

Kot, Greg. 1993. An unfettered soul: C d s

Mayfield won't let hard

times

stop the music.

Chicago Tribune,

April 11: sec.

13, 10.

1996. Theme songs: Curtis

Mayfield answers the call with a new album.

Chicago Tribune,

October 1.

Mayfield, Curtis. 1996.

Poetic license in poem and song.

Beverly Hills, Calif.:

Dove Books.

Obrecht, Jas. 1994. Keep on pushing: A

Curtis Mayfield tribute.

Guitar Player

28

(June): 71-72.

Ofari, Earl. 1972. Curtis Mayfield: A man for all people.

Soul Illustrated 3,

no. 5:

19-20.

Phillips, Chuck, and

Andy

Widders-Ellis.

1991. Curtis Mayfield: The soul of an

R&B genius.

Guitar Player

25 (August):

52-56.

Ptuter, Robert. 1993. Curtis Mayfield and

-. the impressions.

Goldmine

331 (April 2):

12-20.

1999. Curtis Mayfield. In

International Dictionary of Black

Composers,

vol. 2: 789-793.

Turner, W~lliarn Jr. 1992. Keep on pushing: The Impressions. In

Sacred

Music of the Secular Cily.. From Blues to

Rap. Black Sacred Music

6, no. I:

206-217.

Members of

Ensemble Stop-Time

Ken Chaney

began his music career as a teenager, playing piano with hands in his hometown Edmonton, Alberta,

Canada. After a short stay in Detroit,

- studied composition at Roosevelt

University and also worked with jazz greats Milt Jackson, Donald Byrd,

Slide Hamuton. Harold Land, Bobbv

Hutchison, Max

Roach, Randy

Crawford, Chet

Baker, John

Klemmer, and many others.

Chaney has performed at major venues throughout the world. As a member of the

Young-Holt

Unlimited trio, he appeared at

Ken Chanev

Camegle Hall, Madison Square

Garden, the Apollo Theatre, and the

Montreaux Jazz Festival in

Switzerland; at the Chicago Jazz

Festival in Grant Park with The

Awakening; and at the Ravinia Jazz

Festival and throughout Europe and

Singapore with his own group the Ken

Chaney Xperience.

The Ken Chaney Xperience has appeared in concert with many fine musicians, including Roy Ayers,

Angela Bofill, Natalie Cole, Miles

I

Wilson. Voted the best jazz group in

Chicago by the Ninth Annual Reggae

Awards, the Ken Chaney Xperience was also awarded first prize in the

Hennessy Best of Chicago Jazz Search on March 31,

1992.

Chaney's recordmgs include

Funky

Duck, Superfly, Soulful Strut,

and

Young and Holtful,

w~th

Unlimited;

Brand New Feeling, Hear

Sense and Feel,

and

Mirage,

with The

Awakening;

When We Were Lovers,

with John Klemmer; and

~ i b e

Alive,

with the Ken Chaney Xperience.

Chaney can be heard on the sound- trachs of the movies

Trial Run, The

Last Cold Justice,

and

Hoodlums.

Trumpeter

Burgess 1. Gardner

has performed with various jazz greats, including Count Basic,

Ray Charles Orchestra (as lead trum- pet), Max Roach, and Horace Silver, with whom he toured. Gardner has appeared in concert at the

AspedSnowmass Jazz Festival in

Aspen, Colorado; the Chicago Jazz

Festival with the Bill

Russo Orchestra; and the Ojai Jazz

Festival in Ojai,

California.

Gardner's television studio orchestra credits incluae

150fh

Birthday Party of

Chicago (1987)

and

Yesterday, Today,

Forever: Motown's

25th Anniversary

television special

(1983).

His recordings

Burgess Gardner

include

The M-Squad (1968)

with the

Count Basie Orchestra;

Burgess

Gardner: Music Year 2000 (1982),

his debut solo album, which he produced; and

Oops!!! (19831,

the debut album of the California State University-

Fullerton Jazz Ensemble, which he recorded and produced.

A former Chicago high school band duector, Gardner was the

1988

recipi- ent of the Certificate of Appreciat~on for Outstanding and Dedicated Service from the Austin Community Academy

High School Band, and, in

1992

he received the F'rinc~pals Excellence

Award, presented by WMAQ-TV

Chicago.

*@,,&+wm!-mw

.

-,...,,

/ . :

in

Andy Goodrich

is one of Chicago's sts. For two con- secutive years, he was named winner nist" award at the

Notre Dame Jazz Festival, and the late bassist W.

0.

Smith cited Goodrich as

"one of the finest alto sax players I have heard"

(Side Man: The Long Gig of

W

0. Smith,

1991).

In 1981,

along with

Freddie Hubbard,

Tony Bennett, Betty

Carter,

Art

Blakey,

Clark Teny, Zoot

Simms, Stephanie

Mills, David Brubeck, and Louie Bellson,

Goodrich was invited to participate in a trib- ute to Lionel Hampton at the Kennedy Center for the Performing

Arts.

Goodrich performed with Langston Hughes in one of his early Jazz and Poetry concerts at Fisk

University and has also performed in

Buntrock Hall. Symphony Center

' Symphony Center box office.

Call

(312) 294-3000.

May

13. 2000, 2 3 0

P.M.

Chicago Park

Dirict's

Douglas Park

1401

South Sacramento Avenue

Free and open t o the public

Co-sponsored by the Office of

Community Arts Partnerships

I

Tracing

U.S.

Black Vernacular Styles

Introduction t o Project Stop-Time

The StopmTime Devi-Jan

King Porter Stomp

Bevelopment (1906-1999)

Ferdmand "Jell,

Onginal Plano Compofiition (1906)

New Orleans/Chlcago Style Jazz (m the style of Loms Armstrong)

New York Style JazzlSwng (m the style of Fletcher Henderson)

Late Swing (m the style of Teddy f i l l )

Bopesque (an onginal bebop compos~tlon)

Avant-Garde (in the style of the AACM)

Black Music Forms in tk United States

(19th

century-1999)

I"ve Been 'Buked (Negro spmtual, late

19th

century)

Search Me Lord (gospel song, 1948) me

Bo Dlddley

(R&B,

1955)

What'd I Say (R&B/soul, 1959)

Shining Star

(soul, 1975)

Message (rap, 1982)

Traditional

Thomas

A.

Dorsey

Bo D~ddley

E C q

Charlm

W h i t ~ ~ l e y ~

Earth,

Wind

and

Fire

Fl&her/Glover/ChaselR~$on

Grandmaster

Flash and the

Furious

F ~ v e

Stretch

Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson

concert in clubs, in theaters, and on college campuses with Cannonball

Adderley, Thad Jones, Hank

Crawford, Louis Smith, Andrew

White, W. 0. Sm~th, many others.

He has appeared as guest soloist and clhcian at the Madison College Jazz

Festival, Hamsonburg, Virginia; fea- tured soloist for "An Afternoon of

Jazz" with the Universny of Maryland and Howard Univers~ty

Ensembles; guest c h c i a n and soloist at Aquinas College's Annual

Intercollegiate Big Band Jazz Festival,

Grand Rapids, Michigan; and featured artist at the Memphis in May Beale

Street Music Festival.

CBMR

Community

Culture Council

The CBMR Community Culture

Councll 1s an active and supportive committee of community and organiza- tlon leaders that will assist the Center in reaching communities throughout

Chlcago.

Membcrr

of the CBMR

CaJnmunitpCxr~

Darlene Blackburn

Darlene Blackburn Dance Troupe

Joe Ann Bradley

Community Action Group

Lucia Cruz

Neon Street Programs

Anastasia Davis

Chicago Park District

Ernest Dawkins

AACM

Lisa Duncan

Chameleon Company

Emily Hooper-Lansana

Youth Theater Coalition of Chicago

Paul Kelly

Dyett School

Michelle Lawrence

Little Black Pearl Workshop

Nalani McUendon

Center for Communications Resources

Efe McWorter

Chicago Park District

Jackie Samuels

Bethel Cultural Arts Center

Mary Young

Grand Boulevard Community Arts Initiative

Performance Spectacular

at

Symphony

Center

T he Center for Black Mnsic

Research is pleased to announce that Ensemble Stop-Time and the

New Black Music Repertory

Ensemble will be presente&in a joint performance at Symphony Center on

Friday, May

5, and Saturday, May

6.

This will he the first and only chance to hear both of these stellar ensembles in a combined performanceand one of the last chances to hear Ensemble

Stop-Time in a formal concert setting before the end of Project Stop-Time.

This special concert

will

provide a hint of the things to come in the

Center's performance activities. Since

1987, the Center has presented nearly

150 performance events by the original

,

Black Music Repertory Ensemble,

Ensemble Kalinda Chicago, and

Ensemhle Stop-Tie. At the conclusion of the current year's performance sea- son, the missions and repertoires of

all

these groups will be merged into a sin- gle large ensemble--the New Black

Music Repertory Ensemble, which began its gradual introduction during the past year.

Although Ensemhle Stop-Time and the New BMRE will perform separate sets at the May 5 and 6 performances, you

will

get a taste of the widely varied repertoires that will become common fare for future presentations of the New

BMRE. You will hear music of Jelly

Roll Morton, Duke Ellington, Thomas

A. Dorsey, and Earth, Wind, and Fire, paired with a violin concerto by the

Chevalier de St. Georges (a composer and violin prodigy in the royal courts of 18th-centnry France) and concert works written by composers of the 20th century.

dl

tickets are

$15

(general adrnis- n) and may be purchased at the

Symphony Center box office, 220

South Michigan Avenue. The box office is open Monday through

Saturday 10

A.M. to

6

P.M.

and Sunday

11

A.M.

to 4

P.M.

Credit card orders may be placed by calling (312) 294-

3000.

Don't miss this opportunity! Please join us for t h ~ s musical experience in the intimate and superb acoustic environment of Symphony

Center's Bnutrock Hall.

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