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Program Planning and Assessment (PPA)
for Academic Programs
Comprehensive Review, Annual Review & Action Plan
Spring 2014
The purpose of Program Planning and Assessment at Hartnell College is to obtain an honest and
authentic view of a program and to assess its strengths, opportunities, needs, and connection to the
mission and goals of the college. The process is based on the premise that each academic program
reviews assessment data and uses these data to plan for improvement. The results of these annual
cycles provide data for a periodic (every five years) comprehensive review that shows evidence of
improvement and outlines long-range goals.
The Program Planning and Assessment process will improve and increase the flow of information
about student learning, student success and student behavior at Hartnell College. The result of the
process will also improve institutional effectiveness.
Program/
Discipline
Digital Arts
Date Completed (must be
in final form by 3/31/14)*
3/3/14
Date Submitted
to Dean
3/3/14
*Please note that you should work with your colleagues and dean to ensure that this report is
completed, revised as needed, in its final form and submitted no later than the end of March.
List of Contributors, including Title/Position
Jerri Nemiro: Instructor, Digital Arts
This PPA report is organized in 3 sections and 11 subsections as follows:
I.
II.
III.
Comprehensive Review – a. Overall Program Effectiveness, b. Instructional Staffing,
c. CTE Programs – Labor Market & Achievement, and d. Program Goals.
Annual Review – a. Course Data & Trends, b. Teaching Modality, c. Curriculum,
d. Outcomes, and e. Previously Scheduled Activities.
Annual Action Plan – a. New Activities and b. Resource Requests.
INSTRUCTIONS
 For programs/disciplines scheduled for comprehensive review in spring
2014, please complete Sections I, II, and III.
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 For programs/disciplines scheduled for annual review, please complete
Sections II and III.
I.
COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW
Please complete this section for programs/disciplines scheduled for
comprehensive review in spring 2014. Go to Section II for programs/disciplines
scheduled for annual review in spring 2014.
A. OVERALL PROGRAM EFFECTIVENESS
1. Describe your program in terms of its overall effectiveness over the past several
years.
Please consider the questions below in describing your program/discipline/area.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
How are students/employees served by the program?
What are the unique aspects of the program?
How does the program relate to the needs of the community?
How does the program interface/collaborate with other programs on campus?)
What is working well in the program/discipline?
If there is a sequence of courses in your program, what process or framework is used to
ensure alignment?
How is consistency maintained between/among multiple sections of a single course?
Has the program explored alternative scheduling approaches?
Do prerequisites, co-requisites and strongly recommended skills continue to meet program
needs? Are there special considerations regarding capabilities of incoming students?
What professional activities have faculty recently (last three years) participated in?
The Digital Arts Program offers an Associate degree and Certificate in Digital Arts with an emphasis
in graphic design, digital photography and video and animation and illustration. The Digital Arts
program trains students in the fields of graphic design, digital graphics, 2D digital illustration, 2D
photographic imaging, digital video and audio editing, 2D and 3D animation, 3D modeling, storyboard
development for animation and interactive digital media interface design.
Students are served in this program with both transfer credit and workforce training. This program
requires the students to establish a dedication to lifelong learning as they progress through their career.
It is also on the forefront of incorporating digital technology into the arts. Students in this program are
required to develop the ability to work well in a team environment along with being strongly selfmotivated.
This program has a strong tie to the local community through the placement of internships in local
media art companies. Over the past fifteen years, the program has placed over 75 student internships in
digital arts. The commitment to internships began in 2000, when the program was awarded a two-year
FSS grant in “Discipline Directed Internships” through the California Community College Chancellor’s
office. In 2010, the program achieved the status of a statewide new media center. This was a grant
funded three-year program through the California Community College Chancellor’s office. The Hartnell
College “Central California New Media Center” brought many new activities to the college and the
community. Through the new media center grant, the college was able to offer the following:
• Summer academies in digital animation and digital video to high school and community
college students.
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• Intern opportunities for students with local digital media art companies.
• Real life client driven student team-based digital media art projects.
Some specific examples of the internships that digital art students participated and completed are:
Employers and interns:
Employer: Ron Eastwood: MCOE, Intern: Oliva Bernal
• Created corporate identity.
Employer: Ray Cleaveland: KSBW TV, Intern: Juan Gutierrez
• Created video commercials for such clients as JM Electric, Rabobank,
Gold Star Motors.
Employer: Jason Martinez: JM Design, Interns: Reggie Sugabo, Floyd Fernando,
Diana Gonzalez, Martin Martinez
• Created logos, flyers, business cards for clients.
Employer: Trish Sullivan, Gilroy Arts Alliance, Interns: Emmy Sanchez, Augie
Escabado, Danielle Wohr
• Created video PSA’s on the arts.
Employer: Hartnell College Digital Art Dept. Interns: Paulina Campos, Jose Alan
Garcia, Sandra Santos, Valeria Jacuinde, Hoshimi Aimes.
• Worked on content design and site development for web page.
Employer: Bjorn Jones, Cesar Chavez Library, Steinbeck Library: Intern: Cynthia
Martinez
• Created instructional materials in video and animation. Taught
workshops at the library digital art lab for the community).
Employer: Scott MacDonald, The Californian: Intern: Abel Rodriquez
• Photojournalism digital photography assignments.
Currently, the Hartnell College Digital Arts program is working in collaboration with
ALBA, to offer student internships. ALBA is a non-profit farm education and business incubator
program creating opportunities for farm workers to become organic farmers. The program is working
with Kaley Grimland: Business Enterprise Development Specialist at ALBA in Salinas. The purpose of
our collaborative effort is to develop a partnership to offer student internships in digital art and design,
digital media and marketing support. The intent is for the interns to help farmers develop promotional
materials for their business. The Digital Art faculty has already met with students interested in the
internships. These students have been trained in resume writing and their resumes have been sent to
ALBA for review. While the students are waiting for interviews, they are working with the digital art
faculty to refine their portfolios.
The Digital Arts program also participates in many educational liaison activities.
These activities serve to increase recruitment and retention, development educational, community and
industry partnerships, and assure that the program’s curriculum meets the needs of current university
transfer requirements and workplace entry.
An example of some of the most recent activities are:
•
Articulation day field trip to CSUMB. March 14, 2014
This is the second year that Hartnell College, Gavilan and CSUMB have offered this
collaborative event through the Title 5 grant. Hartnell College Digital Art students
travel to CSUMB for the day.
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•
•
•
•
CSUMB Communication Design Education Conference, California State University at
Monterey Bay.
The purpose of this conference was to work on an articulation plan for the Hartnell College
digital art classes to articulate to CSUMB core lower division classes in communication design.
This conference included CSUMB faculty and administration and faculty from Hartnell
College, Gavilan College, Cabrillo College, Monterey Peninsula College, and San Mateo
College. The end of the planning session achieved a planning development of course
alignments as see below.
The Hartnell College / CSUMB articulation has since been completed and is on assist.org.
Advisory board member: Mission Trails ROP: Graphic design program.
Recruitment activities and to encourage local high school and community college
collaboration.
Maya Modeling workshop for visiting high school students from “ Centre de formation
professionnelle des Riverains”, Quebec, Canada.
The digital art faculty taught a 2-hour workshop to a group of digital technology and media
high school students from Quebec, Canada. The workshop covered the construction of a
musical instrument in Autodesk Maya; from basic primitive polygons into the finished and
surfaced 3D model.
Hartnell College, “Family Health & Science Fair”: Pluto Room.
Attended the “Family Health & Science Fair” all day in the Pluto room. Six student interns and
myself presented to the community an animation that we created “New Horizons for a Little
Planet.” Our intent was to inform the community about the Hartnell College Digital Art
department and it’s offerings, and how this project exhibited the use of the digital art faculty
and students to create educational media for science.
The digital art faculty is committed to student success and the achievement of either an AA degree,
certificate, or transfer preparation. In the past five years, the program has been very successful in
achieving CSU articulation. CSU’s such as Northridge and CSUMB have strong course-to–course
articulation with our courses as indicated on assist.org. Even though the classes in the digital art
program are open entry with no prerequisites, the faculty has put together a two-year plan to better
assist the students and counselors with preparation for degree or certificate. The time scheduling of
courses rotate each semester to assist students to achieve their goal. We are conscious of the needs of all
students; even if they can only attend during the day or night. Many of the classes are offered back to
back on the same day. This helps students plan their class schedule around work and childcare. With
this scheduling, it assists many students who enroll in more than one digital art class during a semester.
The digital art faculty is committed to a life-long path of research and development. The Digital Art
program is dedicated to keeping the curriculum current and relevant to the needs of the industry
standards. Our courses are reviewed and updated through the college curriculum committee frequently
to keep the program up to date. Every semester requires the faculty to research and develop with new
technology, software applications, and innovative methods of visual problem solving.
As a result of all the SLO assessment and evaluation, the digital art has implemented many changes in
the classes to improve teaching and learning. The overall theme is to increase the student’s ability
to use critical thinking in the context of visual problem solving. The goal has always been for
the student to acquire a healthy balance of both right and left-brain activities. As a digital artist, the
student must be able to successfully implement core aesthetic principles within the logistical
arena of technology.
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To recap, the digital art program is committed to student success both in and beyond the classroom.
The faculty have worked very hard to raise over 800K of grants funds, placed over 75 internships, and
develop digital media team projects for students in digital art.
The major client-based digital media team projects have a special interest: digital media projects that
combine art and science. The main projects that we have completed so far are:
• Project 1: “How to use an Autoclave” a digital video and animation presentation created how to
sterilize surgical instruments that we created for the Hartnell College animal health science
department.
• Project 2: “Osmosis” a digital media presentation created on osmosis that we created for the
Hartnell College biology department: Our client was Dr. Alex Edens
• Project 3: “New Horizons for a Little Planet” a digital animation dome presentation on the New
Horizons mission to Pluto. Our clients were Andy Kreyche and Olivia Davalos.
The Digital Arts program is a comprehensive program that trains students in all areas of digital art in
order to gain access to employment in this high-paying career. It also prepares students for transfer to 4
year schools in the digital arts and offers some basic general education humanities requirements.
The program has close ties with an advisory committee of industry professionals for advice on
curriculum and equipment needs.
Advisory Committee.
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B. INSTRUCTIONAL STAFFING
1. In the table below enter the number of sections offered and the number of full
time and adjunct faculty in your program/discipline by term over the past several
years.
Term
No. of
Active
Sections
Full-time
Faculty
Adjunct
Faculty
2. What staffing factors/challenges have influenced the effectiveness of the program?
[Begin response here]
DIGITAL ARTS PROGRAM IS ANNUAL REVIEW FOR YEAR 2014
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C. CTE PROGRAMS – LABOR MARKET & ACHIEVEMENT
Please complete this section if the program is Career Technical Education
(CTE). Go to subsection D if the program is not CTE.
1. Describe the demonstrated effectiveness on the program over the past several
years with levels and trends of achievement data, including degree/certificate
completions (awards) and employment statistics.
[Begin response here]
2. Describe the number of, activities of, and recommendations resulting from
advisory committee meetings that have occurred over the past two years. What
information and/or data were presented that required or currently require
changes to be made to your program?
(Please attach copies of meeting minutes over the past two years and a list of committee
members and their respective industries/areas.)
[Begin response here]
3. Does labor market data and/or the need for additional education indicate that
changes should be made to your program? Does the program (continue to)
meet a labor market demand and/or fulfill an important step toward
higher/additional education?
[Begin response here]
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D. PROGRAM GOALS
1. List and describe program/disciplinary goals for the next comprehensive
review cycle—Fall 2014 through Fall 2018. Be sure to highlight innovative,
unique, or other especially noteworthy aspects.
A new mission and vision is currently before the board for approval in February. In considering
your program’s future goals, please review the proposed new mission and vision statements.
VISION STATEMENT
Hartnell College will be nationally recognized for the success of our students by
developing leaders who will contribute to the social, cultural, and economic vitality of
our region and the global community.
MISSION STATEMENT
Focusing on the needs of the Salinas Valley, Hartnell College provides educational
opportunities for students to reach academic goals in an environment committed to
student learning, achievement and success.
[List and describe program goals here]
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Hartnell College Catalog/2013-14
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II. ANNUAL REVIEW
This section must be completed for ALL academic programs, including those
scheduled for a comprehensive review in spring 2014.
A. COURSE DATA & TRENDS
1. Please evaluate the 3-year trend of enrollment and success of courses in your
program/discipline. Identify the courses you are choosing to examine this
current year in the list below. You do NOT need to evaluate trends for each
course every year.
Course
Number
Art 77
Art 80
Art 70
Course Name
Introduction to Digital Video
Intro to Digital Photo/Photo Imaging
Intro to Graphic Design/Computer
Graphics
Does the course have any DE
(online or hybrid) sections?
no
no
no
Please use the data that have been provided. Analyze trends that you observe with respect to
the data for the identified courses and answer the following questions.
Using the data for enrollment and success below, I would like to indicate the necessity of the Art
70 and Art 80 courses to be offered more than once a year. They are core classes in our
program and need to be offered both Fall and Spring semesters. Art 72 can be considered as
“test” or “proof”; as it is a core course. Art 72 is offered both Fall and Spring semester and has
full enrollment consistently.
ENROLLMENT
2. Review the enrollment data. Describe and analyze any patterns or anomalies
that you notice. What do you make of these patterns or anomalies? What
actions should be taken to ensure continuous improvement?
Enrollment data of Digital Arts shows the following:
Art 70: Fall 2010; 35, Fall 2011; 43, Spring 2012: 26, Fall 2012: 32
Art 71: Fall 2010: 35, Fall 2011: 35, Fall 2012: 35, Spring 2013; 1 (independent study to petition
to do credit by exam)
Art 72: Spring 2011; 40, Spring 2012: 28, Fall 2012: 29, Spring 2013: 25
Art 73: Spring 2011: 33, Spring 2012: 25, Spring 2013: 25
Art 74: Fall 2010: 31, Fall 2011: 19, Fall 2012: 28
Art 76: Spring 2011: 26, Spring 2012: 32, Spring 2013: 30
Art 77: Spring 2011: 34, Spring 2012: 39, Spring 2013: 31
Art 80: Fall 2010: 34, Fall 2011: 31, Fall 2012: 41, Spring 2013: 31
Art 85: Fall 2011: 20 (revised made inactive)
Over the three-year period of 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13, Digital Art enrollment data has
indicated stable full class size enrollment. Class size is limited to 29 by computer lab stations.
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Many sections go over that enrollment limit. Core classes such as Art 72 are offered both Fall
and Spring semester. Enrollment trends show the need for other core classes Art 70, Art 80 to
become offered in the future more than once a year.
SUCCESS
3. Review the success data. Describe and analyze any patterns or anomalies that
you notice. What do you make of these patterns or anomalies? What actions
should be taken to ensure continuous improvement?
Success data of Digital Arts shows the following:
Art 70: Fall 2010; 69%, Fall 2011; 72% Spring 2012: 69%, Fall 2012: 72%
Art 71: Fall 2010: 80%, Fall 2011: 86%, Fall 2012: 71%, Spring 2013; 0% (independent study to
petition to do credit by exam)
Art 72: Spring 2011; 68%, Spring 2012: 75%, Fall 2012: 69%, Spring 2013: 80%
Art 73: Spring 2011: 79%, Spring 2012: 84%, Spring 2013: 88%
Art 74: Fall 2010: 68%, Fall 2011: 79%, Fall 2012: 79%
Art 76: Spring 2011: 77%, Spring 2012: 50%, Spring 2013: 73%
Art 77: Spring 2011: 71%, Spring 2012: 69%, Spring 2013: 71%
Art 80: Fall 2010: 76%, Fall 2011: 71%, Fall 2012: 73%, Spring 2013: 84%
Art 85: Fall 2011: 80% (revised made inactive)
Over the three-year period of 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13, the average overall college success
rate varied from a low 67% of and a high of 73%.
Over the three-year period of 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13, the average Digital ART success
rate varied from a low 50% of and a high of 88%. Digital Art success rates are considerably
higher than the overall general college success rate. Digital Art success rates average out between 7080%.
DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES
4. Describe the demonstrated effectiveness of the program over the past several
years with levels and trends of achievement data, such as degree and certificate
completions/awards.
AA degree in Digital Art -0614:
2010-11: 2
2011-12: 4
2012-13: 10
From the year 2010-11 to 2011-12, the amount of students completing an Associate Art degree
in Digital ART doubled.
From the year 2011-12 to 2012-13, the amount of students completing an Associate Art degree
in Digital ART more than doubled.
The digital art faculty has worked hard over the past five years to achieve CSU and UC course to
course articulation. The digital art faculty has also developed a two-year plan to guide students
with course sequencing.
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B. TEACHING MODALITY
1. Enter the number of Distance Education Courses, both fully online and hybrid
sections, along with the number of full-time and adjunct faculty.
Term
No. of DE/
Online
Sections
No of
Hybrid
Sections
Fulltime
Faculty
Adjunct
Faculty
2. Compare student success in the DE teaching environment with success in the faceto-face teaching environment in the same course. Are there differences? To what
do you ascribe the differences in your program? Discuss any other relevant factors
regarding diverse teaching modalities and environments, such as specific
locations.
Not applicable, no distant education online classes currently.
3. Describe the process to change and improve student success in DE
courses/sections in your program, and any other relevant factors regarding
diverse teaching modalities and environments, such as specific locations.
Not applicable, no distant education online classes currently.
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C. CURRICULUM
Complete the following tables pertaining to courses scheduled for review.
Courses scheduled for
review during AY 201314 as previously
specified
Art 70
Art 71
Art 72
Art 73
Art 76
Art 77
Art 80
Art 84
Courses scheduled for
review during AY 201415
Art 74
Last date of approval
for this class was
2/4/2010
Faculty member(s)
responsible for
coordinating
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Faculty member(s)
responsible for
coordinating
Jerri Nemiro
Hartnell College Catalog/2013-14
(a) Was the course
reviewed and (b) taken
through the curriculum
process?
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Date of approval (or
anticipated approval)
by Curriculum
Committee
10/17/2013
10/17/2013
10/17/2013
10/17/2013
10/17/2013
10/17/2013
10/17/2013
3/7/2013
Target semester and
year—Fa 2014 or Sp 2015
Sp 2015
98
D. OUTCOMES
Use your Program Outcome Maps to assist you in this subsection. As you plan your course
assessments, keep the higher level program outcome in mind. While course level assessment
serves the purpose of examining the teaching and learning for that particular course, it also
provides the data that will be viewed collectively for assessment of the associated program
level outcomes.
PROGRAM LEVEL OUTCOMES
1. Please complete the following tables.
List Program level outcome(s)
scheduled for assessment as
previously specified
PLO 3: Structure visual information
What changes have occurred
in the program/discipline as
a result of dialogue?
utilizing digital design aesthetic
All course syllabi were revised.
New lecture PDF handouts
principles.
were designed in all classes.
Was the Program
Outcome Assessment
Summary completed?
Yes
New projects: more visual problem
solving / critical thinking.
List Program level outcome(s)
scheduled for assessment in
AY 14-15
PLO 1: Produce effective technical
proficiency in the creation of digital
artworks and projects.
Have your course level
SLOs needed for this
program level outcome
been assessed or
scheduled for assessment?
Yes
2. Describe how program level outcomes were specifically addressed by the
program/discipline during the past year.
For example, were data gathered at the course level? Was there review and analysis of the
data? How did the discipline faculty engage in discussion? Were any interventions conducted?
Are there any plans to make changes to certificate/degree programs or improvements in
teaching and student learning?
Fall semester 2013: Data gathered at the course level for PLO outcome assessment:
PLO #3: Structure visual information utilizing digital design aesthetic principles.
Art 70
rated 0-20 points
Participants: 28 students
65%: 18 students achieved the top rating of 35 pts.
Remaining 35% achieved the following results:
5: 30 pts., 2: 29-15 pts. 2: 15-10 pts., 1: Below 9 pts.
Art 71
26 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top rating of 30 points.
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Actual assessment showed higher than expected outcomes.
89% (24 students) achieved top rating of 30 points.
11% (2 students) achieved rating of 20-15 points.
Art 72
Actual assessment showed higher than outcome expectation.
76% (18 students) achieved top rating of 30 points.
24%: Remaining achieved the following results:
2 students: 29-11 points
4 students: 10-0 points
Art 74
Actual assessment showed above outcome expectation.
73% (17 students) achieved top rating of 10 points.
27%: Remaining achieved the following results:
5 students: 9-0 points
Calculations from global portfolio of assignments and classes above:
6 / 100: unacceptable
4 / 100: min-unacceptable
10 / 100: competant expected
80 / 100: high level
What we looked at: We looked at PLO #3: Structure visual information utilizing digital design aesthetic
principles. In order to assess this program outcome, we focused on the ability of the students to use
their critical thinking skills in the application of digital design aesthetic principles. In particular the case
study involved visual problem solving in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional digital art projects.
The projects incorporated the ability of the digital artist to visually problem solve utilizing line, shape,
value or chiaroscuro, color, repetition, proportion, balance, scale, harmony and gestalt. The specific
focus came from the following projects:
Art 70: Introduction to Graphic Design / Computer Graphics
Project: Poster (0-20 points)
Two-dimensional poster (incorporating logo design, photos, type and vector graphics)
Art 71: Introduction to 2D Digital Illustration
Project: Perceptions of 2D digital illustration: (0-20 points)
Two-dimensional digital vector illustration (line, variable line or cross-hatching, tonal value or chiaroscuro,
color, proportion and harmony.)
Project: Perception of the indication of a light source in 2D digital illustration: (0-10 points)
Two-dimensional digital vector illustration (lighting angle, direction and quality)
Art 72: Introduction to Digital Art
Project: Interactive portfolio: planning and production. (0-30 points)
Interactive portfolio of digital art projects (raster graphics and brush techniques, vector graphics,
chiaroscuro, color, lighting angle and direction, perspective, digital imaging, and sequential animation).
Art 74: Digital Three-Dimensional Design and Modeling
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100
Project: Basic 3D design principle project: (0-10 points)
Traditional 2D design principles applied in 3D, (value, angle of view, color, focal point: methods of creating emphasis)
What we found: The results from all the projects and classes above were aggregated into a “capstone”
visual portfolio representation of the ability to structure visual information utilizing digital design aesthetic
principles in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional form.
The results were aggregated from 100 students. The specific make up was:
Art 70: 28 students
Art 71: 26 students
Art 72: 24 students
Art 74: 22 students
(6/100) or 6% structured visual information with unacceptable evidence of visual problem solving with digital
design aesthetic principles
(4/100) or 4% structured visual information with minimally acceptable or inconsistent evidence of visual
problem solving with digital design aesthetic principles
(10/100) or 10% structured visual information with competent, expected evidence of visual problem solving with
digital design aesthetic principles
(80/100) or 80 % structured visual information with high level of excellence in evidence of visual problem
solving with digital design aesthetic principles
The digital art program at Hartnell College offers two paths: an Associate of Art Degree in Digital Arts and a
Certificate in Digital Arts. The program meets the needs of both workforce training and transfer to a university for
upper division study. In the past five years, we have been very active in both CSU and UC articulation with our
program. Many of our classes have achieved course-to-course articulation status with California universities. We
have also been very active in acquiring internships for our students and additional grant-based activities to benefit
the program and the students.
Students in the digital arts must be able to successfully combine right-brain visual problem solving with left-brain
logistics. In 2011, the digital arts department looked at all the SLO assessment across all of the classes in the
program and assessed that critical thinking and visual problem solving needed to be increased in the program.
The department revised all the course syllabi in 2013 and updated all the assignments/projects to further this
goal. The results of this year’s program level assessment indicates that this revision has been very effective in
achieving student success in our program.
Also, in 2012-2013, the instructor created very detailed PDF handouts to supplement the assignment and lecture
materials. The handouts utilize a balance of written description with “screen shot” pictures of a process. The
purpose of these supplemental materials are to do the following:
•
To describe to the students the purpose and pathway of an overall topic before they begin the specifics.
•
To relate to all learners, both verbal and visual. Many of the students in this program benefit immensely
from the inclusion of visual samples in my handouts. “ A picture is worth a thousand words”, especially to artists.
•
To explain specific lessons, but also for the students to use the handouts to apply to their own individual
scenarios in the future.
•
To explain the core aesthetic principles of visual art and its importance in the visual problem solving of art
within technology.
All case studies indicate that student success is clearly tied to the ability of basic learning skills; (reading and
writing.) The common thread indicates that students that achieved a high level of excellence (80%) brought to the
program a clear understanding of basic learning skills. The students that achieved unacceptable (6%) needed
assistance in basic leaning skills.
What our next steps are:
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101
We plan to continue the use of periodic individual progress reports throughout each semester in order to give
each student feedback on their progress. Many students already make office hour appointments for individualized
help on certain projects after a progress report. This allows the instructor the opportunity to work with the students
that have challenges with basic learning skills; such as reading and writing. The goal is to assure that the basic
learning skills are not a hindrance to understanding and achieving the ability to structure visual information utilizing
digital design aesthetic principles. Our next goal will be work with the tutoring center for students that need
additional help with basic learning skills.
Revision of the AA degree and Certificate program was approved 2/20/2014 by the curriculum committee.
The Revision is displayed below:
Hartnell College Catalog/2013-14
CORE COMPETENCIES
3. Describe how Core Competencies were specifically addressed by the
program/discipline during the past year. For example, were data gathered at
the course level? Was there review and analysis of the data? How did the
discipline faculty engage in discussion? Were any interventions conducted? Are
there any plans to make changes to courses or improvements in teaching and
student learning?
We are at the stage of SLO and PLO assessment. As of Spring 2014, ALL of the current Digital
Art courses and ALL of their SLO’s will have been assessed once, and some even assessed twice.
As of Spring 2014, 2 of the 4 of the PLO’s will have been assessed once. Concentration now is
on completing the PLO assessment for all the PLO’s. After this is completed, core competency
assessment will begin.
COURSE LEVEL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
4. Please complete the following tables.
List courses scheduled for
SLO assessment as previously
specified
Art 70
Art 71
Art 72
Art 74
In what term was
the course
assessed?
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
Fall 2013
List courses scheduled for
SLO assessment in
AY 2014-15
Art 77
Art 73
Faculty member(s)
responsible for
coordinating
Jerri Nemiro
Jerri Nemiro
Was the Course
Assessment Summary
Report completed?
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Target semester
and year—Fa 2014
or Sp 2015
Sp 2014
Sp 2014
5. Describe course level assessments results and how they will influence your
plans moving forward.
I began the development of the SLO’s for the digital art department in the academic year 200910. I completed the first SLO assessment for Art 70: Introduction to Graphic Design/Computer
Graphic at the end of the fall semester of 2010. By the academic year 2011-2012, all PLO and
SLO development for the entire digital art program and all of its classes were created. I have
completed the 1st round the SLO assessment for Art 76 and Art 80. I have completed both the 1st
round and the 2nd round of SLO assessment for Art 70, Art 71, Art 72, and Art 74. I will complete
the SLO assessment for Art 77 and Art 73 during Spring semester 2014.
As a result of all the SLO assessment and evaluation, I have implemented many changes in my
classes to improve teaching and learning. The overall theme was to increase the student’s
ability to use critical thinking in the context of visual problem solving. My goal has
always been for the student to acquire a healthy balance of both right and left-brain activities. As
a digital artist, the student must be able to successfully implement core aesthetic
principles within the logistical arena of technology
Art 70 SLO 1 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate the effective application
of design principles for graphic design printed imagery.
Assessment was based on the compilation of a corporate identity design system in the following
projects:
Poster project: rated 0-20 points (4 posters: BW Line, Grayscale, 2 color Pantone, CMYK).
Catalog project: rated 0-15 points (8 page Catalog)
Participants: 28 students
For some students, basic learning skills (reading and critical thinking) are a challenge. To
resolve this issue, the instructor will schedule class lab time for students to "turn in" the poster
project and catalog for assessment before completion. This allows feedback before project
completion to assure students comprehend the visual aesthetic principles specified in the
project.
The assessment shows 5% below the expectation. The goal was 70% of the students achieve top
rating of 35 pts.
Students were given three detailed progress reports throughout the semester. Students were also
given very detailed notes and handouts for each project. All projects incorporated increased use
of visual problem solving and critical thinking.
Incorporate group discussion and critical visual analysis of two distinctly different poster
designs. Incorporate group discussion and critical visual analysis of two distinctly different
catalog designs. Discussion on how a cohesive design was achieved in both catalogs.
Art 70 SLO 2 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate an awareness of the
influence of graphic art and artists on the lives of all individuals, cultures and societies.
Assessment was compiled from the following:
Logo project: rated 0-20 points:
Research and design on the following parts:
Type and imagery fusion (2 styles of logos, 1 final logo, 2 versions)
Visual pun, mind-mapping creative process (1 final logo, 2 versions).
Participants: 28 students:
83%: 23 students achieved the top rating of 20 pts.
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Remaining 17% achieved the following results:
2: 19-15 pts. 2: 14-7 pts., 1: Below 7 pts.
Minimum expectation was 70% of students achieve top rating of 20 points.
Actual results were higher at 83% of students achieve top rating of 20 points.
Students were given a very detailed handout and description of the project and the research
involved. The handout included detailed notes on the process and several visual examples.
Critical thinking and visual problem solving was incorporated into the research and the visual
mind mapping exercise.
The assessment illustrates that the mind mapping exercise is a very effective method to help
students comprehend design as a visual problem solving process. Logo design was utilized as the
topic for this SLO since the design should achieve it's corporate identity in all cutures and
societies.
Incorporate a group mind-mapping exercise. Students research in smalll groups 2 logo designs
that illustrate a visual fusion through mind-mapping. The two designs will exhibit an approach
from two different geographic locations.
Art 71 SLO 1 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate the effective application
of digital illustration principles for two-dimensional imagery.
The assessment was based on a 2 projects:
1. Perceptions of 2D digital illustration: rated 0-20 points;(line, variable line or cross-hatching,
tonal value or chiaroscuro, color, proportion and harmony.
2.Perception of the indication of a light source in 2D digital illustration project: rated 0-10
points. (lighting angle and direction. lighting quality; specular or diffuse).
26 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top
rating of 30 points.
Actual assessment showed higher than expected outcomes.
89% (24 students) achieved top rating of 30 points.
11% (2 students) achieved rating of 20-15 points.
The students who did not meet the top rating on this SLO were students whose attendance was
absent on the lecture days that applied to this SLO. Attendance was essential for the
understanding of the illustration perceptions in this SLO.
The goal was to take the student beyond the technical execution of digital illustration and to be
able to apply visual problem solving and criitical thinking to their own illustrations. With the
changes in the course syllabus and projects for this year, this goal was met. The course syllabus
has been revised since last year. The revision includes changes in projects that incorporate more
application of visual problem solving and aesthetic critical thinking in the realm of 2D digital
illustration.
Art 71 SLO 2 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate an awareness of the
influence of art and artists on the lives of all individuals, cultures and societies and the
connection to contemporary digital illustration.
The assessment was based on the final exam project: rated 0-10 points. This project
incorporated 1-point perspective illustration and research from historical and contemporary
artists using 1-point perspective.
26 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top
rating of 10 points.
Actual assessment showed higher than expected outcomes.
97% (25 students) achieved top rating of 10 points.
3% (1 student) achieved rating of 0 points.
Attendance was mandatory for this project. 1 student did not attend and did not achieve this
SLO assessment.
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Incorporate group research on historical and contemporary artists before the final exam project.
This will allow the students time to exhibit to the entire class their illustration and their research
that inspired it. It will expose the students to even more awareness of the influence of art and
artists on the lives of all individuals, cultures and societies and the connection to contemporary
digital illustration.
The course syllabus has been revised since last year. The revision includes changes in projects
that incorporate research into historical and contemporary artists use of illustration principles.
Art 72 SLO 1 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate the ability to critically
formulate a theme, premise, script and storyboard plan for a digital art project.
The assessment was based on the following:
Final Interface project: Part 1: Planning stage: rated 0-10 points.
24 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top
rating of 10 points.
Actual assessment showed higher than outcome expectation.
76% (18 students) achieved top rating of 10 points.
24%: Remaining achieved the following results:
2 students: 7 points
4 students: 5-0 points
In order to effectively plan for this final interface project, all projects for the student's final
portfolio must be completed. The instructor created a detailed outline for the students to follow
to increase their time management skills for this project. See the attached document. This was
effective in this second round of assessment for this course. Even with the revised time
management detailed outline, 16 % of the students still had some time management issues for
their final portfolio preparation.
In order to increase the time management skills of the students, the instructor will incorporate
"check in" times on the status of all portfolio projects before the actual due date. This will allow
individual student and instructor discussion time on their project progress.
The course syllabus has been revised since last year. The revision includes more specific
directions for all projects.
Art 72 SLO 2 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate effective technical
proficiency with digital art tools.
The assessment was based on the following:
Final Interface project: Part 2:
Development and production stage: rated 11-30 points.
24 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top
rating of 30 points.
Actual assessment showed higher than outcome expectation.
76% (18 students) achieved top rating of 30 points.
24%: Remaining achieved the following results:
2 students: 29-11 points
4 students: 10-0 points
In order to effectively create and produce the final interface portfolio project, all previous
projects for the student's final portfolio must be completed. The instructor created a detailed
outline for the students to follow to increase their time management skills for this project. See
the attached document. This was effective in this second round of assessment for this course.
Even with the revised time management detailed outline, 16 % of the students still had some
time manangement issues for their final portfolio preparation.
In order to increase the time management skills of the students, the instructor will incorporate
"check in" times on the status of all portfolio projects before the actual due date. This will allow
individual student and instructor discussion time on their project progress.
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The course syllabus has been revised since last year. The revision includes more specific
directions for all projects
Art 72 SLO 3 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate the ability to analyze the
history of digital art, its social impact and career and industry trends.
The assessment was based on the following:
Final project: Part 3:
Research Powerpoint or Word presentation: rated 0-5 points.
24 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top
rating of 5 points.
Actual assessment showed higher than outcome expectation.
80% (19 students) achieved top rating of 5 points.
20%: Remaining achieved the following results:
4 students: 4-0 points
The instructor created a detailed outline for the students to implement this SLO as part of their
final exam project. See the attached document. A week before the final exam, students were
required to complete research for this Part 3 presentation of the final. The third part of the final
exam project was very effective in the implementation of individual student analysis of the
history of digital art, its social impact and career and industry trends. The instructor will plan an
even more effective approach for the future that will allow the students time to present their
research presentation to the entire class. This will increase the students exposure to even more
examples of the analysis of the history of digital art, its social impact and career and industry
trends.
Incorporate class presentation time of each student's indivdual research. This will increase the
students exposure to even more examples of the analysis of the history of digital art, its social
impact and career and industry trends.
The course syllabus has been revised since last year. The revision includes more specific
directions for all projects.
Art 74 SLO 1 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate an awareness of the
relationship of the historical three-dimensional design principles of Egypt, Greece and the
Renaissance to the contemporary digital 3D arena.
The assessment was based on the following project:
Media project presentation rated: 0-10 points.
This project incorporated the analysis of aesthetic principles of design in 3D and to compare and
contrast contemporary to historical.
22 students participated.
The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top rating of 10 points.
Actual assessment showed higher than expected outcomes.
73% (16 students) achieved top rating of 10 points.
27%: Remaining achieved the following results:
1 student: 7 points
5 students:5-0 points
The students exhibited strength in their awareness and understanding of 3D design aesthetic
principles. They successfully researched contemporary examples of the 3D design principles.
After assessment, more emphasis will be given to the awareness of the relationship of the
historical three-dimensional design principles of Egypt, Greece and the Renaissance.
After assessment, more emphasis will be given to the awareness of the relationship of the
historical three-dimensional design principles of Egypt, Greece and the Renaissance.
Incorporate an additional lecture session on the sculptural 3D design principles from the
historical art of Egypt, Greece and the Renaissance. The instructor will also rewrite the
description of the project used for assessment. The description will include more specific
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directions on how to compare and contrast contemporary 3D design principles with those from
art history.
The course syllabus has been revised since last year. The revision includes changes in projects
that incorporate research into historical and contemporary artists and their use of aesthetic
principles in 3D design.
Art 74 SLO 2 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate effective technical
proficiency with digital three-dimensional design and modeling.
The assessment was based on the following three projects:
Digital Inorganic Additive_Subtractive_Sculptural 3D Project:
rated 0-20 points.
Organic modeling projects.
Head: 0-15 points
Hand: 0-10 points
22 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top
rating of 45 points.
Actual assessment showed 1% below outcome expectation.
69% (15 students) achieved top rating of 45 points.
31%: Remaining achieved the following results:
2 students: 44-35 points
5 students: 10-0 points
The most important element for the students to grasp is the implementation of their concept
design into 3D form. In order to achieve this, they must be able to plan out the schematics of
their model before the actual creation. This semester students were required to produce a 2D
schematic plan before their 3D model creation. This showed increased strength in critical
thinking and visual problem solving in digital 3D design. The instructor created very detailed
handouts on the creation of inorganic and organic models. See the documents attached. These
handouts include both written and visual schematics for students to acquire polygonal and
NURB modeling techniques. The one challenge for the students was time management of the
projects to assure completion by the due date.
The one challenge for the students was time management of the projects to assure completion
by the due date. The course projects include two type:
1. Projects created with instructor in order to lecture specific techniques and aesthetic
principles.
2. Projects where each student applies the learned concept to their own creation of 3D design
and modeling. This requires individual critical thinking and visual problem solving in 3D.
In order to increase the time management skills of the students, the instructor will incorporate
"check in" times on the status of projects before the actual due date. This will allow individual
student and instructor discussion time about their model schematics and how to achieve the
result the most efficient and aesthetically pleasing way.
The course syllabus has been revised since last year. The revision includes changes in projects
that incorporate the use of critical thinking and visual problem solving in digital 3D design. The
projects were revised to include visual schematics and planning before the actual model
creation. Emphasis on additive and subtractive sculptural methods in organic and organic
models were more throughly covered in the revised syllabus and project design. The instructor
created very detailed handouts on the creation of inorganic and organic models.
Art 74 SLO 3 Assess results Fall 2013: The student will demonstrate the ability to critically
formulate the visual information into aesthetic design products in a digital three-dimensional
environment utilizing line, plane, volume, mass, texture, color, context and material.
The assessment was based on the following project:
Basic 3D design principle project: (10 points)
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Traditional 2D design principles applied in 3D, (value, angle of view, color, focal point: methods
of creating emphasis)
3D concept, research and construction from primitive basic shapes.
22 students participated. The minimum expectation was 70% of the students will achieve the top
rating of 10 points.
Actual assessment showed above outcome expectation.
73% (17 students) achieved top rating of 10 points.
27%: Remaining achieved the following results:
5 students: 9-0 points
The one challenge for the students was time management of the project to assure completion by
the due date.
The one challenge for the students was time management of the project to assure completion by
the due date. The course project includes two types:
1. Projects created with instructor in order to lecture specific techniques with the 3D aesthetic
principles.
2. Projects where each student applies the learned concept to their own creation of 3D design
and modeling. This requires individual critical thinking and visual problem solving in 3D.
In order to increase the time management skills of the students, the instructor will incorporate
"check in" times on the status of the project before the actual due date. This will allow
individual student and instructor discussion time about their model schematics and the
implementation of the visual design aesthetics in their 3D design project.
The course syllabus has been revised since last year. The revision includes more specific
directions to the one project that is exclusively dedicated to this SLO.
6. Describe assessment activities that need to be strengthened or improved. What
are the challenges to achieving these improvements?
Fall semester 2013, I revised the syllabi for all the classes in the digital art program.
Digital art requires the students to achieve a balance of right and left-brain skills. They must
use their critical thinking skills to visually problem solve and apply aesthetics within the
logistics of technology. The handouts that I prepare for each lecture and project topic utilize
a balance of written description with “screen shot” pictures of the process. I actually do all
the projects myself and capture the process for them. I utilize the handouts for the following
reasons:
•
To describe to the students the purpose and pathway of the overall topic before
they begin the specifics.
•
To relate to all learners, both verbal and visual. Many of the students in this
program
immensely from the inclusion of visual samples in my handouts. “Picture is worth
a thousand words”, especially to artists.
•
To explain specific lessons, but also to be able to use these handouts to apply to
the students own individual scenario in the future.
•
To explain the core aesthetic principles of visual art and its importance in the
visual problem solving of art within technology.
I have incorporated individual progress reports for all the students in my classes. Each
student receives an individual progress report three times during the semester. It lists all the
projects and the “points” that they have received on each project.
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Also, five weeks before the semester is over, I give them a very detailed timeline of what
items need to be completed for final projects.
The progress reports have been an effective way to give each student feedback on their
progress. Many students make office hour appointments for individualized help on certain
projects after a progress report. This allows me to work with the students that have
challenges with basic learning skills; such as reading and critical thinking. My next goal will
be to work with students that still have challenges with time management skills. I plan to
incorporate "check in" times on the status of all portfolio projects before the actual due date.
This will allow more individual student and instructor discussion time on their project
progress.
The most important element for the students to grasp is the implementation of their
concept design into 3D form. In order to achieve this, they must be able to plan out
the schematics of their model before the actual creation. Below is a synopsis of some of
the work that I created to increase the student’s ability to implement critical thinking and
visual problem solving in digital 3D design. My detailed handouts on the creation of
inorganic and organic models include both written and visual schematics for students to
acquire polygonal and NURB modeling techniques.
Evidence 1: Art 74: Digital Three-Dimensional Design and Modeling
SLO: the student will demonstrate effective technical proficiency with digital threedimensional design and modeling.
The most important element for the students to grasp is the implementation of their
concept design into 3D form. In order to achieve this, they must be able to plan out
the schematics of their model before the actual creation. Below is a synopsis of some of
the work that I created to increase the student’s ability to implement critical thinking and
visual problem solving in digital 3D design. My detailed handouts on the creation of
inorganic and organic models include both written and visual schematics for students to
acquire polygonal and NURB modeling techniques.
Project: Inorganic digital sculptural methods: additive or subtractive
(booleans)
Project deliverables:
•
Acquire a photograph or the actual object
•
Create the 2D visual schematic plan
•
Create the 3D model by implementing the steps of the 2D schematic in 3D form
•
Add surface color and quality to the 3D model
•
Render 3 stills
Evidence 2: Art 74: Digital Three-Dimensional Design and Modeling
SLO: the student will demonstrate effective technical proficiency with digital threedimensional design and modeling.
Handouts I created for the students to implement the deliverables:
Project: Organic digital sculptural methods: Creating a character head in
polygonal form
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Project deliverables:
•
•
•
•
•
Design 2D character concept art
Implement the concept art in reference planes
Create the 3D model from basic polygon primitives
Add surface color and quality to the 3D model
Render 3 stills
Evidence 3: Art 71: Introduction to 2D Digital Illustration
SLO 1: The student will demonstrate the effective application of digital illustration
principles for two-dimensional imagery.
SLO 2: the student will demonstrate an awareness of the influence of art and artists on the
lives of all individuals, cultures and societies and the connection to contemporary digital
illustration.
I designed and implemented a new final exam for Art 71 for Fall semester 2013. This
new final exam incorporated an effective use of both SLO 1 and 2. Students had to
“demonstrate the effective application of digital illustration principles for two-dimensional
imagery” by the creation of a digital vector illustration in 1 point perspective. In addition,
the students had to “demonstrate an awareness of the influence of art and artists on the
lives of all individuals, cultures and societies and the connection to contemporary digital
illustration” with research on historical and contemporary artists using 1 point perspective.
Art 71: New Final Exam that I designed to implement SLO 1 and 2:
Art 71_Fall2013_Final Exam Project
This project will involve the following:
1. Illustrations that use 1-point perspective.
2. Research of (painting, photography, illustration, architecture, etc. that exhibits the use
of 1-point perspective).
Evidence 4: Art 70: Introduction to Graphic Design / Computer Graphics
SLO 1: the student will demonstrate the effective application of design principles for
graphic design printed imagery.
SLO 2: the student will demonstrate an awareness of the influence of graphic art and
artists on the lives of all individuals, cultures and societies.
I designed a new project based on the evolution of a logo design into a corporate identity
system.
The overall theme incorporated the critical thinking and visual problem solving involved in
logo development and design. Students went through a process of “visual ideation” or “mind
mapping” before the implementation of their design into 2D vector graphics.
I also designed and implemented a new final exam for Art 70: Fall semester 2013.
This new final exam incorporated the use of their logo design into the last element of their
corporate identity system. The new final exam was targeted as an effective use of both SLO 1
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and 2. Students had to “demonstrate the effective application of design principles for
graphic design printed imagery” by the creation of a CD design that incorporated their logo
design. They also had to create all the color separations for the print process. In addition, the
students had to “the student will demonstrate an awareness of the influence of graphic art
and artists on the lives of all individuals, cultures and societies” with research either a
historical and contemporary graphic designer that inspired them and articulate the aspects
of the designer’s visual aesthetics they found particularly inspiring.
Art 70: New Project that I designed to implement SLO 1:
Art 70: Visual problem solving with typography and logo design
Part 1: Letterform or letterforms and an image
or
Typography formed to imply the shape of an image
This project will incorporate an image or implication of an image and a
letterform or letterforms (typography).
This project will be in Black and White for now.
Later we will progress into color.
Using a letterform or type character, which is familiar and easily recognizable, in
combination with an image or object. To “fuse” the letterform and the image until they are
completely integrated and create a form that is a new single visual unit from the two
elements combined.
Concepts we will apply in this project:
1. Abstraction with an image and a letterform.
2. We want to fuse the image and the letterform to make one cohesive visual image. Make a
“synthesis” of both into a “single visual unit”.
3. Think about two items and how you can “fuse them together”.
4. You can fuse typography into an image or shape.
5. You can imply a connection of two attributes by the “visual synthesis” of the shape of an
attribute and the shape of the letterforms.
6. Look at the positive and the negative space for inspiration. (You can imply the fusion
through the relationship of the negative and the positive space.
7. Think about the choice of linear or silhouette design.
8. Think about the linear design choices; curved versus angular.
9. Think about “abstraction” and how it can be used to detach from realism. Work with
aesthetic design principles; line, shape, value, repetition, texture, emphasis, association,
scale, balance, placement, and composition.
Art 70: New Final Exam that I developed and designed to implement SLO 1 and
SLO 2:
Begin by placing in your research of either a historical and/or contemporary graphic
designer that inspired you and expect to articulate the aspects of the designer’s visual
aesthetics you found particularly inspiring.
Art 70: Fall 2013: Final Exam Project: CD Design: CMYK with Separations: PT 1
1.
Select your original CMYK photo from your poster design
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2.
3.
Open the photo up in Photoshop
Decide whether you want a clipping path for your design or not (an irregular
shape for your photograph instead of square or rectangular)
Art 70: Fall 2013: Final Exam Project: CD Design: CMYK with Separations: PT 2
Before we begin Part 2, see samples below of Part 1 and Part 2 all completed:
Based on your CD design from Part 1, you are working on one of the approaches
below.
Art 70: Fall 2013: Final Exam Project: CD Design: CMYK with Separations: PT 3
Putting the four channel photo separations into the Illustrator document
Before we begin Part 3, remember based on your CD design from Part 1, you are working
on one of the approaches only in the notes.
Evidence 5: Art 80: Introduction to Digital Photography and Photographic
Imaging
SLO 1: the student will demonstrate effective technical proficiency with digital
photographic imaging.
After completing my SLO assessment of Art 80 on 3/24/2012, I implemented refinements
and modifications to improve the student success and learning.
Refinements/Modifications:
T o im prove the overall quality of the final digital photo
portfolio, an additional lecture session will be given to digital control over highlight and
shadow control through lighting contrast and the understanding of photographic color
theory in both additive and subtractive methods of light.
I developed and created five new handouts and refined projects covering digital
control over highlight and shadow control through lighting contrast and the
understanding of photographic color theory in both additive and subtractive methods of
light.
Art 80: New handouts and refined projects that I created to refine the
implementation of SLO 1: New handout 1
Traditional and Digital Zone System: Part 1
Contrast, Lighting and Subject Brightness Range
• Contrast: Difference between highlights and shadows.
Art 80: New handouts and refined projects that I created to refine the
implementation of SLO 1: New handout 2
Digital Zone System and Levels: Part 2
Levels
• Input levels: Your original values
• Output levels: Your adjusted values
• Subject Brightness Range: Achieved from a combination of the subject matter and
the lighting condition.
• High Key, Low Key, Average Key
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Art 80: New handouts and refined projects that I created to refine the
implementation of SLO 1: New handout 3
Digital Curves:
• Working with the relationship between:
• Original values (input levels)
• Adjusted values (output levels)
Art 80: New handouts and refined projects that I created to refine the
implementation of SLO 1: New handout 4
Photographic Color Correction PT1
Identifying the color cast that needs correction
Photography: Color wheels and their complements
• Let’s look at visuals that illustrate photographic color theory.
Art 80: New handouts and refined projects that I created to refine the
implementation of SLO 1: New handout 5
Photographic Color Correction: PT 2
How to color correct: RGB mode and CMYK mode
Photography: Specific color cast examples and how to correct
• Let’s use the principles of color correction to correct the color cast issues we made in the
art 3 handout.
E. PREVIOUSLY SCHEDULED ACTIVITIES
This subsection focuses on activities that were previously scheduled. An activity can address many
different aspects of your program/discipline, and ultimately is undertaken to improve or enhance your
program/discipline, and keep it current.
Activity scheduled
What success has
been achieved to
date on this activity?
Will activity
What challenges
existed or continue continue into
AY 14-15?
to exist?
Will activity
continue into
AY 15-16?*
1. Title 5 grant:
Completed lower
division articulation to
CSUMB of Art 70, 71,
72, 76, 80. Encourage
student success and
transfer.
Need to continue
Title 5 grant funding
for this project.
Yes, if Title 5
still supports it.
CSUMB/Hartnell/Gavilan
student articulation field
trip.
2.
Yes
3.
* For each activity that will continue into AY 2015-16 and that requires resources, submit a separate
resource request in Section III.
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1. Evaluate the success of each activity scheduled, including activities completed and
those in progress. What measurable outcomes were achieved? Did the activities
and subsequent dialogue lead to significant change in student learning or program
success?
The outcome of the Title V grant activity with Hartnell College and CSUMB is a completed
articulation of several Hartnell College Digital Art courses to CSUMB lower division courses in
communication design. The articulation is the following:
Art 71 Hartnell College = CST 202 CSUMB
Art 72 Hartnell College = CST 201 CSUMB
Art 70 Hartnell College = CST 227 CSUMB
Art 76 Hartnell College = CST 209 CSUMB
Art 80 Hartnell College = CST 228 CSUMB
III. ANNUAL ACTION PLAN
This section must be completed for ALL academic programs, whether scheduled
for annual or comprehensive review in spring 2014.
A. NEW ACTIVITIES
This subsection addresses new activities for, and continuing new activities into, AY 2015-16. An
activity can address many different aspects of your program/discipline, and ultimately is undertaken to
improve, enhance, and or keep your program/discipline area current. A new activity may or may not
require additional resources. Activities can include but are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
NEW CURRICULUM
FURTHER DEVELOPMENT OF THE PROGRAM OR SERVICE
GRANT DEVELOPMENT AND PROPOSALS
FACULTY AND STAFF TRAINING
MARKETING/OUTREACH
ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT
STUDENT SERVICES
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES
SUPPORT OPERATIONS
FACILITIES
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1. List information concerning new projects or activities planned. Please keep in mind that
resources needed, if funded, would not be approved until spring 2015 and provided until
FY 2015-16. Ongoing activities involving resources that will no longer be available from
grant funds starting FY 2015-16 must be planned for appropriately.
Activity
1. Revise AA
Cert in Digital
Art
Strategic
Plan
Goal(s)
No. &
Letter
(e.g.,
5A)*
Goal 1A
Goal 2A
Goal 2B
2.
Fig Group:
Science, Art,
Digital Art
Goal 1A
Goal 2A
Goal 2B
3.
Goal 1A
Goal 2A
Goal 2B
CSUMB /Hartnell
Student
Articulation trips
4.
Related
Courses,
SLOs, PLOs,
or goals
Desired
Outcome(s)
Resources
Needed
Person
Responsible
PLO 1,2,3
Add Art 13 &
Art 84 to
major
electives.
Take out Art
75.
Apple
Remote
Desktop,
Art 84 part
time
faculty,
drawers for
tablets.
Jerri Nemiro
PLO 1,2,3,4
Described in
activity
detail below
Apple
Remote
Desktop,
drawers for
tablets.
Ann Wright
Eric Bosler
Jerri Nemiro
Lawrence
Yee
Jerri Nemiro
Stan Crane
Title V grant
Increase
student
transfer rate
to any CSU
or UC
Estimated
Date of
Completion
(can be more
than one
year in
length)
Approved by
Hartnell
College
curriculum
committee
2/20/2014
Spring 2016
3/14/2015
Comments
Constant
revision of
curriculum and
degrees and
certificates
shows the
faculty
commitment to
research and
development.
This will be a
three-year
project starting
Spring 2014.
This would be
third year of
this activity.
5.
* See Appendix A for a list of the 11 goals in the college’s Strategic Plan.
*** Please complete this page for each new activity. ***
2. This item is used to describe how the new activity, or continuing new activity, will
support the program/discipline.
Activity #1
Consider:
• This activity: the most current revision of the AA and certificate in Digital Art, has been
approved by the curriculum committee on 2/20/2014. It revises the degree and certificate to
include the Art 84: Digital Art Portfolio and Business Practices course and Art 13: ThreeDimensional Design.
a) Describe the new activity or follow-on activity that this resource will support.
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The resources requested to support this activity are: Apple Remote Desktop software,
furniture drawers for drawing tablets and one part time faculty member to teach Art 84
in Spring of 2015.
b) Describe how this activity supports any of the following:
1) Core Competency
2) Program level Outcome
3) Course level Outcome
4) Program/Discipline Goal
5) Strategic Priority Goal
The program level outcomes for the digital art program have been revised this past year to the
following:
1.
Produce effective technical proficiency in the creation of digital artwork or projects.
2.
Design effective visual communication for print, animation, and interactive media.
3.
Structure visual information utilizing digital design aesthetic principles.
4.
Appraise and analyze an awareness of the influence of digital art and artists on the lives of all
individuals, cultures, and societies.
The revision of the AA Degree incorporates the inclusion of 84: Digital Art Portfolio and Business Practices. This
course supports the goal of the program, which is for the students to achieve success in employment preparation
or transfer to a four-year university. Both of these goals require a portfolio than demonstrates “technical
proficiency in the creation of digital artwork or projects” and the ability to “structure visual information utilizing
digital design aesthetic principles
c) Does this activity span multiple academic years?
YES
NO
If yes, describe the action plan for completion of this activity.
[Begin response here]
d) What measureable outcomes are expected from this activity? List indicators of
success.
Indicators of success will be measurable by the transfer rate and employment placement if digital
art students.
e) What are the barriers to achieving success in this activity?
Tracking the students after they graduate from Hartnell College to measure the indicators of success.
The Title V grant has begun to offer the campus methods of tracking.
Activity #2
Consider:
• This activity: A Title V grant sponsored FIG group incorporating the collaboration of art and
science. Proposal: The “Symbiosis” of Science and Art Inside and Outside the Classroom.
•
Faculty: Ann Wright, Lawrence Yee, Eric Bosler and Jerri Nemiro
f) Describe the new activity or follow-on activity that this resource will support.
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The resources requested to support this activity are: Apple Remote Desktop software,
furniture drawers for drawing tablets. The digital art program will be involved in the creation
of digital art, video and or animation that visualizes scientific process and principles for STEM.
g) Describe how this activity supports any of the following:
6) Core Competency
7) Program level Outcome
8) Course level Outcome
9) Program/Discipline Goal
10) Strategic Priority Goal
The major theme after SLO assessment was the need to enhance the critical thinking and visual
problem solving skills of all digital art students. Many revisions to instruction and assignments have
already been made in order to achieve this goal. This activity will also work to achieve this goal. The arts
give form to invisible ideas, theories and processes. Our students will learn to utilize critical thinking
visual problem solving to visualize scientific information and procedures. We have already produced a
“pilot project” that exhibits the success of an art and science project: The new media center sponsored
project “New Horizons for a Little Planet”. This is an animation for the Hartnell College planetarium
education program.
h) Does this activity span multiple academic years?
YES
NO
If yes, describe the action plan for completion of this activity.
This will be a three year activity that will be completed Spring of 2016. Action plan:
Initial research, inventory and assessment of findings, assembly of findings into visual form, delivery to
entire faculty and students.
i) What measureable outcomes are expected from this activity? List indicators of
success.
The measurable outcomes will to develop a process of “teachable critical thinking skill sets” to apply
to Digital Art, Visual Art and STEM students.
j) What are the barriers to achieving success in this activity?
The purpose of this project is to break through pre-conceived barriers that art and science are two
distinct mind-sets and experiences. Our goal is to create useful “outside the box” critical thinking for the
students by the realization that great scientists are artists and great artists are scientists.
Activity #3
Consider:
• This activity: A Title V grant sponsored field trip to CSUMB Communication Design Program for
Hartnell College Digital Art students.
•
Jerri Nemiro, Stan Crane: Title V Activity Director
k) Describe the new activity or follow-on activity that this resource will support.
[Begin response here]
l) Describe how this activity supports any of the following:
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11) Core Competency
12) Program level Outcome
13) Course level Outcome
14) Program/Discipline Goal
15) Strategic Priority Goal
[Begin response here]
m) Does this activity span multiple academic years?
YES
NO
If yes, describe the action plan for completion of this activity.
[Begin response here]
n) What measureable outcomes are expected from this activity? List indicators of
success.
[Begin response here]
o) What are the barriers to achieving success in this activity?
[Begin response here]
B. RESOURCE REQUESTS
If new/additional resources are needed for your program/discipline, it is important that you identify
them and project their cost, and that these resources and costs be considered through the College’s
integrated planning (governance, budget development, funding decision making, and resource
allocation) processes. A resource is likely to be something needed to support an activity that you have
identified in IIIA. above, in which case you must link the resource with a specific activity number (first
column below). ). All resource requests completed in the various columns of a specific row
must be linked to the new or continuing activity numbered on the first column of that
same row. A resource could also be something necessary for your program/discipline to function
properly to improve student learning, such as updated equipment in a classroom; in such case be sure
to note that the resource is NOT tied to a specific activity.
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* Personnel: Include a C, F, or M after the amount to indicate Classified Staff, Faculty, or Manager.
** S for Supplies, E for Equipment. If additional supplies, for example, are needed for ongoing activities, this
should be requested through the budget rollover process.
*** H for Hardware, S for Software
Activity
No.
1&2
AA
Degree,
Fig
1
AA
Degree
1&2
AA
Degree,
Fig
Personnel
Classified
Staff/
Faculty
(C/F/M)*
Supplies/
Equipment
(S/E)**
Remote
Desktop for
32 stations
S
Part time
faculty to
teach Art
84: Spring
2015
F
4.
5.
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Technology
Hardware/
Software
(H/S)***
Furniture for
J216, Drawer
pullouts for
drawing
tablets
E
Contract
Services
Training
Travel
Library
Materials
Science
Labs
Projected
Costs
$160
($79.99
per 20
seats)
Prescribed
rate for
one 3 unit
course
(lecture
and lab)
$3456
(32X$108)
APPENDIX A. Strategic Priorities & Goals
(from Hartnell College Strategic Plan 2013-2018)
Priority 1: Student
Access
Goal 1A: Hartnell College will provide higher education, workforce development, and lifelong
learning opportunities—with seamless pathways—to all of the college’s present and prospective
constituent individuals and groups.
Priority 2: Student
Success
Goal 2A: Hartnell College will provide a supportive, innovative, and collaborative learning
environment to help students pursue and achieve educational success.
Goal 2B: Hartnell College will provide a supportive, innovative, and collaborative learning
environment that addresses and meets the diverse learning needs of students.
Priority 3: Employee
Diversity and Development
Goal 3A: Hartnell College is committed to 1) increasing diversity among its employees; 2)
providing an environment that is safe for and inviting to diverse persons, groups, and
communities; and 3) becoming a model institution of higher education whose respect for
diversity is easily seen and is fully integrated throughout its policies, practices, facilities, signage,
curricula, and other reflections of life at the college.
Goal 3B: To attract and retain highly qualified employees, Hartnell College is committed to
providing and supporting relevant, substantial professional development opportunities.
Priority 4:
Effective Utilization of Resources
Goal 4A: To support its mission, Hartnell College is committed to the effective utilization of
its human resources.
Goal 4B: Hartnell College is committed to having its physical plant, furnishings, and grounds
maintained and replaced in a planned and scheduled way to support learning, safety, security,
and access.
Goal 4C: Hartnell College will maintain a current, user-friendly technological infrastructure
that serves the needs of students and employees.
Goal 4D: Hartnell College is committed to maximizing the use and value of capital assets,
managing financial resources, minimizing costs, and engaging in fiscally sound planning for
future maintenance, space, and technology needs.
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Priority 5:
Innovation and Relevance for Programs and Services
Goal 5A: Hartnell College will provide programs and services that are relevant to the realworld needs of its diverse student population, while also developing and employing a culture of
innovation that will lead to improved institutional effectiveness and student learning.
Priority 6: Partnership
with Industry, Business Agencies and Education
Goal 6A: Hartnell College is committed to strengthening and furthering its current
partnerships, in order to secure lasting, mutually beneficial relationships between the college
and the community that the college serves.
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Additional information for Resources Request: PPA: Digital Art: Spring 2014
Resource Request 1:
Apple Remote Desktop Software for 32 stations: J216
(31 in J216 lab and one for Long’s office in IT)
Cost: $79.99 per 20 seats; Total $79.99X2 = $159.98 (add tax and shipping if
necessary)
Justification: This offers the instructor an effective teaching tool. Each student client
computer station can be displayed and worked on by the instructor station.
Resource Request 3:
31 drawers to attach to desks for pull out of the Wacom drawing tablets
(31 in J216 lab)
Cost: $107.95 each; Total $107.95 X 31 = $3,345.45 (add tax and shipping if
necessary)
Justification: This offers a more stable and secure method of student use of the Wacom
drawing tablets. Currently the tablets have to be disassembled after every class. The
constant disconnection can shorten the life of the tablet. A more secure and stable
method would be to have the tablets at every station and available to “pull out” when
the student needs is.
We will need advice from Stephen Otero to make sure that this vendor and drawer is
the best solution.
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