CHEM 131 ... (Semester # 1 lecture for non-majors)

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21
Appendix 6 – New CHEM Course Overviews
CHEM 131
Chemistry I – Fundamentals of General Chemistry
(Semester # 1 lecture for non-majors)
Chemistry is the study of matter and involves our entire environment, both the animate and
inanimate worlds. Chemical topics range from those that are biological in nature to those involving
basic physics. In an introductory chemistry course the goal is to learn something of the properties
of everyday materials, to learn the language of chemistry, and to gain some facility in thinking like
a chemist. The language of chemistry is learned the old-fashioned way by memorization and
practice. The chemist's thought processes begin with careful observations, following which an
attempt is made to fit these observations into a model that describes a set of similar observations
and mathematical calculations are carried out in order to use quantitative observations in the
prediction of other properties of matter. Particular attention will be given to bonding and the shapes
of molecules since these matters play an important role in organic chemistry that is the subject of
CHEM 231 and 241, the second and third semesters of the four-semester sequence for freshmen and
sophomores.
A student in CHEM 131 should memorize the names, symbols and definitions of the SI
system of units of measurement of mass, length, time, temperature and amounts of substance along
and units of volume and pressure derived from the SI system. The SI scaling prefixes (e.g., micro,
mega) must be learned. To begin learning the chemist's language, memorize the names and
symbols of elements 1-30 and Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sn, Sr, I, Xe, Cs, Ba, Au, Hg, Pb, Bi. In the first
few weeks of this course the names and formulas of the common acids and bases will be learned
along with the names, formulas, and charges of the common ions. The student will be responsible
for knowing the names, formulas, and basic properties (especially the phase, gas, liquid, or solid) of
the compounds dealt with in lab or discussed in lecture.
READING:
The attached syllabus gives a reading assignment for each week. Complete the reading before
coming to lecture on Monday.
Chemistry 131 Syllabus
22
CHEM 131 Syllabus and Reading Assignments
Text: Chemistry, McMurry and Fay, 4th edition
Week
Reading
Topic
THE PERIODIC TABLE
1.1-1.4
2.3-2.6
2.7-2.8
week 2
2.9-2.13
5.7-5.13
week 1
PT and the properties of the elements
PT and atomic structure
molecules
chemical compounds; nomenclature
electronic configuration of atoms;
electronic configuration and the PT
IONS AND THE CHEMISTRY OF IONIC SUBSTANCES
week 3
4.1-4.9
week 4
6.1-6.12
electrolytes; reactions in aqueous solution: metathesis
and redox reactions; oxidation numbers; the Activity series
electronic structure of ions and periodic relations
ionic bonds in Main Group chemistry
COVALENT BONDS
week 5
7.1-7.7
EXAM 1
covalent bond; Lewis electron-dot structures
week 6
week 7
7.8-7.9
7.10-7.14
formal charge; VSEPR
hybridization; MO theory
BULK PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS
week 8
week 9
8.1-8.14
10.1-10.6
EXAM 2
thermochemistry; entropy; free energy
microscopic/macroscopic connections; solids
week 10
10.11; 11.1-11.8
phase diagrams; solutions
EQUILIBRIA
week 11
week 12
13.1-13.6
15.1-15.16
week 13
16.1-16.5
EXAM 3
equilibrium state; equilibrium constant; LeChatelier’s principle
acid/base equilibria; hydrolysis; weak acids and weak bases
Lewis acids and bases
buffers; titrations
QUANTITATIVE CHEMISTRY
week 14
3.1-3.12
16.6
Chemistry 131 Syllabus
stoichiometry; solution stoichiometry
titration calculations
23
CHEM 132
General Chemistry I Laboratory
(semester # 1 laboratory for non-majors)
Required Text:
Chemistry 1 Laboratory, Maryann McDermott Jones, 2005-2006
Chemistry is the ultimate observational science. Elements, compounds and ions all have easily
observed characteristic physical (color, state of matter, density, solubility in water and other solvents,
electrical conductivity, hardness) and chemical (to react with water or oxygen in the air, to displace
other chemical species from solution, to generate gases–recognized by the formation of bubbles or
smells–when treated with acid) properties. When such species participate in a chemical reaction and
undergo chemical change, the products generated have physical and chemical properties different from
the starting materials and these properties are easily observed and characterized. Through observation,
students can both create for themselves a data bank of personally defined information about properties
unique to individual chemical species, which they will be likely to recall when later encountered, and
recognize from changes in these observed properties when a chemical reaction occurs, as well as
identify the newly formed chemical species.
CHEM 132 laboratory is structured around this premise. It first emphasizes observation and
measurement as the primary tools of the science, allowing students to construct their data banks of
retrievable characteristic information. It then directs them to apply that information as in studies of
series of traditional chemical reactions.
Week
Experiment
I
II
Check-in and Expectations
Use of Electronic Balance and Volumetric Glassware
Volume and Mass Measurements and the “Size” of a Mole
III
Physical Properties of Ionic Compounds
IV
Metathesis Reactions and Activity Series
V
VI
Reactivity Trends in the Periodic Table
Redox Reactions of Halogens/Halides
Anion Analysis
VII
Empirical Formula of a Synthesized Compound
VIII
Heats of Reaction
IX
Chemical Equilibrium and
X
Dissociation of a Weak Acid; Hydrolysis
XI
Buffers
XII
Introduction to Acid-Base Titration
XIII
Limiting Reagent in a Synthesis Reaction
LeChâtelier’s Principle
24
CHEM 146
Text:
Principles of General Chemistry
(semester # 1 lecture for majors)
Principles of Modern Chemistry. Oxtoby, Gillis & Nachtrieb (5th edition)
There will be a similar pattern of courses sequencing/curriculum revision for Chemistry and
Biochemistry majors with somewhat deeper and more extensive coverage of the material.
Chemistry is the study of matter and involves our entire environment, both the animate and
inanimate worlds. Chemical topics range from those that are biological in nature to those involving basic
physics. In an introductory chemistry course the goal is to learn something of the properties of everyday
materials, to learn the language of chemistry, and to gain some facility in thinking like a chemist. The
language of chemistry is learned the old-fashioned way by memorization and practice. The chemist's
thought processes begin with careful observations, following which an attempt is made to fit these
observations into a model that describes a set of similar observations and mathematical calculations are
carried out in order to use quantitative observations in the prediction of other properties of matter. Particular
attention will be given to bonding and the shapes of molecules since these matters play an important role in
organic chemistry that is the subject of CHEM 231 and 241, the second and third semesters of the foursemester sequence for freshmen and sophomores.
A student in CHEM 131 should memorize the names, symbols and definitions of the SI system of
units of measurement of mass, length, time, temperature and amounts of substance along and units of
volume and pressure derived from the SI system. The SI scaling prefixes (e.g., micro, mega) must be
learned. To begin learning the chemist's language, memorize the names and symbols of elements 1-30 and
Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Ag, Sn, Sr, I, Xe, Cs, Ba, Au, Hg, Pb, Bi. In the first few weeks of this course the names and
formulas of the common acids and bases will be learned along with the names, formulas, and charges of the
common ions. The student will be responsible for knowing the names, formulas, and basic properties
(especially the phase, gas, liquid, or solid) of the compounds dealt with in lab or discussed in lecture.
CHEM 146 Syllabus and Reading Assignments
Week
Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4
Topic
Reading assignments,
Exams (HE) and
problem sets (PS)
PT; atomic structure; electronegativity; Lewis dots
3.1-3.4
Ionic bonding; covalent bonding; VSEPR
3.4-3.8
Hybridization & MO theory; chemical formulae 16.3-4; 2.1-3
Hour Exam 1; Reactions - in gases, liquids,
2.3-5; 6.1-2
solids; activity series
Week 5
More reactions – activity series; properties of gases 6.4; 4.1-4
Week 6
Ideal and real gases – bulk and molecular pictures
4.3-.7
Week 7
Condensed phases – extended and molecular;
5.2-6
phase transitions and diagrams
Week 8
Hour Exam 2;
7.1-.3
Thermochemistry, heat capacity; Hess’ Law
Week 9
Entropy and Gibb’s energy – the basics
8.1-3; 8.7
Week 10
Equilibrium – Keq, Q, Le Chatelier
9.1-9.5
Week 11
More equilibrium – acid/base chemistry
10.1-4
Week 12
Acids and bases – buffers, titrations; polyprotic 10.5-8
Week 13
Hour Exam 3; solubility and precipitation
11.1-5
Week 14
Capstone topic – ties together all CHEM 146
Final exam: Cumulative
PS1
PS2
HE1
PS3
PS4
PS5
HE2
PS6
PS7
PS8
PS9
HE3
PS10
25
CHEM 147
Class Hours:
Required Text:
Principles of Chemistry Laboratory
(semester # 1 laboratory for CHEM/BCHM majors)
One 4-hour lab each week
Chemistry 147 Laboratory, Maryann McDermott Jones, Fall 2005
There will be a similar pattern of courses sequencing/curriculum revision for Chemistry and
Biochemistry majors with somewhat deeper and more extensive coverage of the material. CHEM
147 includes a four-hour lab whereas CHEM 146 is a three-hour lab.
Chemistry is the ultimate observational science. Elements, compounds and ions all have easily
observed characteristic physical (color, state of matter, density, solubility in water and other
solvents, electrical conductivity, hardness) and chemical (to react with water or oxygen in the air, to
displace other chemical species from solution, to generate gases–recognized by the formation of
bubbles or smells–when treated with acid) properties. When such species participate in a chemical
reaction and undergo chemical change, the products generated have physical and chemical
properties different from the starting materials, properties which are similarly easily observed and
characterized. That means that through observation in the laboratory, students can create for
themselves a personally defined data bank of likely-to-be-recalled properties unique to individual
chemical species, only to later recognize--from observation of changes in these properties--when a
chemical reaction has occurred, and the identity of newly formed chemical species.
This is a central premise around which CHEM 147 Laboratory is structured. Initially, the
exercises emphasize observation and measurement as the primary tools of the science with which
students will construct their data bank of retrievable characteristic information. The course then
leads students to apply that information to traditional chemical processes involved in the analysis of
representative inorganic compounds, as well as the synthesis of others. The sequence of
experiments is structured so that each subsequent exercise builds on the experience of the last,
expanding the understanding of the fundamental chemical bases for earlier observations and their
implication in subsequent applications. The approach of the majors course is more quantitative than
that in the non-majors lab and explores techniques not introduced in CHEM1 Lab.
Chemistry 147 Syllabus
26
Laboratory Schedule
Week
Experiment
I
Check-in and Expectations
Use of Electronic Balance and Volumetric Glassware
Volume and Mass Measurements and the “Size” of a Mole
II
III
VI
Physical and Chemical Properties of Ionic Compounds
Reactivity Trends in the Periodic Table
Redox Reactions of Halogens/Halides
Cation Separation; application to Identification of an Unknown Ionic
Compound
Empirical Formula of a Synthesized Compound
VII
Synthesis and Gasimetric Analysis of Nitrite Complexes
VIII
Heats of Reaction
IX
Chemical Equilibrium and LeChâtelier’s Principle
X
Dissociation of a Weak Acid; Hydrolysis
XI
Buffers
XII
Introduction to Titration: Acid-base and Redox
XIII
Preparation and Analysis of Nickel Complexes
IV
V
Chemistry 147 Syllabus
27
CHEM 271
General Chemistry and Energetics
(semester # 4 lecture for non-majors)
Chemistry 271 deals with some of the physical aspects of chemistry. These topics will be
treated in the context of the lecturer’s personal research interest. The defined content, presented in
all sections of CHEM 271, will include electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and an introduction to
thermodynamics with emphasis on the application of free energy functions. The contextual material
may be drawn from biochemistry, analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, or
materials chemistry depending upon the lecturer’s special interests.
Chemistry, 4th edition, by McMurry and Fay will be the text for the defined content.
Reading and homework assignments are given below. As in CHEM 131, homework and quizzes
will be carried out on-line. In addition, the student can anticipate reading and homework
assignments specific to the research topic chosen by the lecturer.
Assignment
number
1
Reading
Topics
Homework
12.1-12.6
Rates of reaction
2
12.8-12.13
3
8.5-8.10
Reaction mechanisms
Temperature dependence
Catalysis
Energy and enthalpy (review)
Hess’ Law (review)
Entropy
Spontaneity
Entropy and temperature
Second Law of
thermodynamics
Free energy
Redox reactions (review)
Galvanic cells
Standard reduction potentials
Cell potentials and Keq
electrolysis
11.41, 43, 48, 53, 55, 67, 71,
113, 125
11.69, 81, 97, 99, 105, 107,
113, 115, 125, 131
17.1-17.2
4
17.3-17.6
5
6
17.7-17.11
4.6-4.10
18.1-18.3
18.4-18.13
7
8.xx, yy, zz
17.aa, bb, cc, dd, ee, ff, gg, hh
………….
……………..
……………….
28
CHEM 272
General Bioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory
(semester # 4 laboratory for non-majors)
Required Text:
Reference Texts:
Chemistry 272 Laboratory, Ebrahimian and McDermott-Jones, Spring 2007
Skoog, West, Holler and Crouch, Analytical Chemistry, An Introduction, 7th ed (or
Christian, Analytical Chemistry, 6th ed).
Ninfa and Ballou, Fundamental Laboratory Approaches for Biochemistry &
Biotechnology
CHEM 272 laboratory is intended as the principle laboratory experience students studying Chemistry
and Biochemistry will have in Analytical Chemistry, a field dedicated to the chemical characterization of
matter, both qualitative and quantitative. In that regard, it will cover traditional topics in analytical
chemistry: precision and accuracy in measurement; statistical analysis of data and defining acceptable
error limits; traditional analytical techniques such as acid-base and oxidation-reduction titration;
chromatography techniques to separate molecules for analysis; and use of spectrophotometric and
electrochemical instrumentation to analyze those materials.
However, the design of CHEM 272 recognizes the biological/biochemical interests of a majority of the
students who enroll and the molecules analyzed will be those encountered in biochemical systems and of
importance in biological processes. The specific analytical and separation techniques employed and
procedures explored are those most frequently encountered in the biochemistry laboratory.
The course is a co-requisite to CHEM 271 and should be viewed as an appropriate accompaniment to
the first lecture course in Biochemistry, BCHM 461.
Week
Experiment
III
Check-in and Expectations
Volumetric Glassware
Calibration of Burets/Micropipettes
Use of Analytical Balances
Analytical Solution Preparation
IV
Application of Beer’s Law
V
Titration of Polyprotic Acids
VI
Separation of Peptides based on Net Charge
VII
VIII
Lab Make-up Week
I
II
Determination of Protein Concentration by Various Methods
IX
Gel Filtration Chromatography
X
XII
Redox Titration of Ethanol by Dichromate
Determination of a Redox Potential and Thermodynamic Properties of NAD+
ºNADH transition
Determination of Enzyme Kinetic Parameters
XIII
Lab Make-up Week
XI
29
CHEM 276
General Chemistry and Energetics - Majors
(semester # 4 lecture for CHEM/BCHM majors)
Instructional Materials:
Principles of Modern Chemistry. Oxtoby, Gillis & Nachtrieb (5th edition)
There will be a similar pattern of courses sequencing/curriculum revision for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors with
somewhat deeper and more extensive coverage of the material.
Chemistry 276 deals with some of the physical aspects of chemistry. These topics will be treated in
the context of the lecturer’s personal research interest. The defined content, presented in all sections of
CHEM 271, will include electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and an introduction to thermodynamics with
emphasis on the application of free energy functions. The contextual material may be drawn from
biochemistry, analytical chemistry, physical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, or materials chemistry depending
upon the lecturer’s special interests.
Chemistry, 4th edition, by McMurry and Fay will be the text for the defined content. Reading and
homework assignments are given below. As in CHEM 146, homework and quizzes will be carried out online. In addition, the student can anticipate reading and homework assignments specific to the research topic
chosen by the lecturer.
CHEM 276 Syllabus and Reading Assignments
Week
Topic
Week 1
Thermodynamics – a review
Week 2
Free energy – what is it and why is it free?
Week 3
Thermodynamics and Equilibrium
Week 4
Applications of equilibrium; Hour Exam 1,
Week 5
Introduction to electrochemistry
Week 6
Electrochemistry - applications
Week 7
Kinetics – time dependent chemistry
Week 8
Reaction coordinate diagrams in 2 & 3 dimensions
Week 9
Kinetics and transport: diffusion
Week 10
Hour Exam 3; Begin special topic
Week 11
special topic
Week 12
special topic
Week 13
special topic
Week 14
special topic
Final exam: Cumulative
PS = problem set
HE = hour exam
Reading
Assignment
7.1 – 7.5
8.2-8.7
PS1
9.1-9.8
PS2
Literature
HE1
12.1-12.4
PS3
12.5-7; literature PS4
13.1-13.5
HE2
13.6-13.7
PS5
supplemental
PS6
HE3
PS7
PS8
HE4
PS9
30
CHEM 277
Required Text:
Reference Texts:
Fundamentals of Analytical and
Bioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory
(semester # 4 laboratory for CHEM/BCHM majors)
Chemistry 4 Laboratory, Ebrahimian and McDermott Jones, Spring 2007
Skoog, West, Holler and Crouch, Analytical Chemistry, An Introduction,
7th ed (or Christian, Analytical Chemistry, 6th ed).
Ninfa and Ballou, Fundamental Laboratory Approaches for Biochemistry
and Biotechnology
There will be a similar pattern of courses sequencing/curriculum revision for Chemistry and Biochemistry
majors with somewhat deeper and more extensive coverage of the material. CHEM 277) will be 3 credits with a one
hour lecture and two 3-hour labs per week.
CHEM 277 one of two laboratory courses for chemistry and biochemistry majors in
Analytical Chemistry, a field dedicated to the qualitative and quantitative chemical
characterization of matter. It will cover traditional topics in analytical chemistry: precision and
accuracy in measurement; statistical analysis of data and defining acceptable error limits;
traditional analytical techniques such as acid-base and oxidation-reduction titration;
chromatography techniques to separate molecules for analysis; and use of spectrophotometric
and electrochemical instrumentation to analyze those materials.
However, the design of CHEM 277 recognizes the biological/biochemical interests of a
majority of the students enrolled and the importance of biology in modern science. The majority
of the substances analyzed will be those encountered in biochemical systems and biological
processes. The specific analytical and separation techniques employed and procedures explored
are those frequently encountered in the biochemistry laboratory.
The course is a co-requisite to CHEM 276 and should be viewed as an appropriate
accompaniment to the first lecture course in Biochemistry, BCHM 461.
Chemistry 277 Syllabus
31
Spring 2007 CHEM 277 Chemistry Laboratory
Week
Experiment
IA
Check-in and Expectations
Volumetric Glassware
IB
IIA
IIB
Calibration of Burets/Micropipettes
Use of Analytical Balances
Analytical Solution Preparation
Quantification of Colored Compounds
Titration of Polyprotic Acids
IIIA
IIIB
IVA
Titration of Small Peptides
Separation of Peptides based on Net Charge
IVB
Identification of Unknown Peptides
V
Lab Make-up Week
VIA
Determination of Protein Concentration by Various Methods
VIB
Determination of Unknown Concentration
VIIA
VIIB
Chromatographic Separation of Proteins: Gel Filtration Chromatography
VIIIA
/B
IX A
IX B
XA/B
XI
HPLC Gel Filtration Chromatography
MW Determination by SDS-Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Introduction to Oxidation-Reduction Titration
Determination of a Redox Potential of NAD+ ºNADH by Potentiometic
Titration
Alcohol Dehydrogenase Reaction
Lab Make-up Week
XII-A
Enzyme Kinetics
XII-B
XIIIA
XIIIB
Coupled Enzymatic Reactions
DNA Amplification
Identification of Unknown Plasmids
Chemistry 277 Syllabus
32
Appendix 7 – Supporting Letters
From: Katherine Pedro Beardsley [[email protected]]
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:09 PM
To: [email protected]
Subject: Re: Chem course changes
Bob,
Hi. I have reviewed the College of Life Science's proposal to change the sequencing of Chemistry courses. I have also had
the Department of Psychology review your proposal.
We support your proposed changes and implementation/phasing plans as outlined.
With Regards,
Kathy
Katherine Pedro Beardsley, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean
College of Behavioral and Social Sciences
Suite 2141 Tydings Hall
University of Maryland
College Park, MD 20742
email: [email protected]
phone: 301-405-1692
fax:
301-314-9086
www.bsos.umd.edu
From: Viki Annand [[email protected]]
Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2005 6:54 AM
To: Robert Infantino
Subject: Re: Chem course changes
Dear Bob,
Sorry about the delay. We have reviewed the course changes and see no problem with this change. We plan to advise our
advisors and let our students know. I am told that this will not affect our PT students as a second chemistry is no longer
needed. We are hoping that the pre-med advisor in L & S will give us some guidance for our pre-med students.
Viki
**********************
Viki S. Annand, Ed.D.
Assistant Dean
College of Health and Human Performance
(301) 405-2473
33
From: Scott Wolpert [[email protected]]
Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2005 4:44 PM
To: Michael Brown; Robert Infantino
Subject: Re: change in CHEM curriculum
Mike,
This is our understanding.
Scott
Michael Brown wrote:
> Scott
> I confirm that we accept the changes to the CHEM curriculum on two
> conditions, already negotiated and agreed, that CHEM 113 be available
> next AY (below) and that Geology majors have access to CHEM 135 & 136
> for the future (earlier e-mails), which we expect to be the revised
> requirement for the Geology major for the future.
> Mike
>
> At 03:30 PM 2/23/2005 -0500, you wrote:
>
>> Mike,
>> As discussed, with the full understanding that CHEM 113 will be
>> taught in spring 06 then Geology supports the proposed changeover in
>> chem curriculum. (Note Geology already has emails about seat
>> availabilities.) Please affirm.
>> Scott
>
> **********************************************************************
>
> Michael Brown, Professor of Geology and Chair of Department
>
> Department of Geology
[email protected]
> Geology Building
http: www.geol.umd.edu
> University of Maryland
Direct line: 301 405 4080
> College Park
Exec. asst.: 301 405 4065
> MD 20742-4211
Dept. office: 301 405 4082
> USA
Direct fax: 301 314 7970
>
Dept. fax: 301 314 9661
>
> **********************************************************************
>
> LABORATORY FOR CRUSTAL PETROLOGY (Information at:
> http: www.geol.umd.edu/pages/faculty/BROWN/LCP/lcp.htm)
> **********************************************************************
34
Subject:
Date:
From:
To:
Re: FW: Undergraduate Programs
Fri, 08 Apr 2005 17:36:28 -0400
Scott Wolpert <[email protected]>
Robert Infantino <[email protected]>, Victor Korenman <[email protected]>
Dear Victor K,
The proposed change in Chemistry sequences has the support of CMPS. Our main audience in Geology will be
better served by the redesigned sequence.
Scott W
Subject:
Date:
From:
To:
RE: ECE BS/MS Proposal
Fri, 8 Apr 2005 15:11:30 -0400
"Gary A. Pertmer" <[email protected]>
"'Victor Korenman'" <[email protected]>
Vic Also, I met with Bob Infantino and Herm Ammon - we're OK with opening CHEM 135 to non-engineering majors
(our main worry was that seats might not be available to all of our engineering students, especially towards the
end of preregistration in summer - but Chemistry has said that won't be a problem. Both ENGR and CHEM will
monitor seats over the summer to make sure that there is sufficient space).
CHEM 136, though, will remain restricted to engineering majors.
Gary
Subject:
Date:
From:
To:
CC:
Undergraduate Programs
Thu, 07 Apr 2005 11:28:06 -0400
Victor Korenman <[email protected]>
"Robert L. Infantino, Jr." <[email protected]>
"Joelle C. Presson" <[email protected]>, "Herman L. Ammon" <[email protected]>
Bob,
Just a reminder that the modified curricula for all your undergraduate programs have not yet been approved.
We are waiting for letters from CMPS and ENGR endorsing the changes to the Chemistry sequence. I believe the
ball has been put clearly into your court.
Vic
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