Comprehensive Self-Evaluation Report March 2011

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Comprehensive
Self-Evaluation Report
March 2011
Prepared for the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities
NWCCU Revised Standards and Process
Contents
Introduction
Institutional Context ................................................................................................................................... 1
Preface ........................................................................................................................................................ 2
Institutional Changes .............................................................................................................................. 2
Topics Requested by the Commission .................................................................................................... 3
Date and Manner of Most Recent Review of Mission and Core Themes ................................................ 4
Chapter One: Mission, Core Themes, and Expectations ............................................................................. 5
Section I: Mission ................................................................................................................................... 5
Section II: Core Themes, Objectives, and Indicators .............................................................................. 7
Theme 1: Academic Transfer .............................................................................................................. 7
Theme 2: Workforce Preparation ........................................................................................................ 9
Theme 3: Basic Skills ....................................................................................................................... 10
Theme 4: Service to Community ...................................................................................................... 10
Rationale for Measurability of Achievement in Core Theme Objectives .......................................... 12
Section III: Chapter One Summary ....................................................................................................... 13
Chapter Two: Resources and Capacity ..................................................................................................... 14
Section I: Governance ........................................................................................................................... 14
Section II: Human Resources ................................................................................................................ 16
Section III: Educational Resources ....................................................................................................... 18
Section IV: Student Support Resources ................................................................................................ 28
Section V: Library and Information Resources ..................................................................................... 31
Section VI: Financial Resources ........................................................................................................... 33
Section VII: Physical and Technical Infrastructure ............................................................................... 35
Section VIII: Chapter Two Summary ................................................................................................... 39
Chapter Three: Institutional Planning ....................................................................................................... 40
Section I: The Planning Process ............................................................................................................ 40
Section II: Data Analysis and Resource Allocation............................................................................... 43
Section III: Emergency Preparedness and Contingency Planning ......................................................... 44
Section IV: Chapter Three Summary .................................................................................................... 45
Chapter Four: Core Theme Planning, Assessment, and Improvement ...................................................... 46
Section I: Core Theme 1 – Academic Transfer ..................................................................................... 52
Planning for Academic Transfer ....................................................................................................... 52
Assessment of Academic Transfer .................................................................................................... 54
Improvements in Academic Transfer ................................................................................................ 67
Section II: Core Theme 2 – Workforce Preparation .............................................................................. 72
Planning for Workforce Preparation ................................................................................................. 72
Assessment of Workforce Preparation .............................................................................................. 74
Improvements in Workforce Preparation .......................................................................................... 85
Section III: Core Theme 3 – Basic Skills .............................................................................................. 89
Planning for Basic Skills ................................................................................................................... 89
Assessment of Basic Skills ............................................................................................................... 91
Improvements in Basic Skills ......................................................................................................... 101
Section IV: Core Theme 4 – Service to Community ........................................................................... 103
Planning for Service to Community ................................................................................................ 103
Assessment of Service to Community ............................................................................................ 104
Improvements in Service to Community......................................................................................... 117
Section V: Chapter Four Summary ..................................................................................................... 120
Chapter Five: Mission Fulfillment, Adaptation, and Sustainability ........................................................ 121
Section I: Mission Fulfillment ............................................................................................................ 121
Section II: Adaptation and Sustainability ............................................................................................ 126
Conclusion .............................................................................................................................................. 127
Appendix A: Data Sources ...................................................................................................................... 128
Introduction
Among the oldest two-year community colleges in Washington State, Grays Harbor College marked its
80th year in 2010. Conceived by a group of Aberdeen citizens in 1929 and incorporated on August 7,
1930, the college held its first day of classes on September 28, 1930. The college operated as a private
institution until 1945, when the Aberdeen School District assumed control and provided financial
stability. That affiliation continued until 1967, when the State Legislature created the public community
college system and designated the counties of Grays Harbor and Pacific as the college‘s service district.
With that legislation came the college‘s charge of providing open access to academic transfer courses,
workforce education, adult basic skills and community education opportunities. (Eligibility Requirements
1, 2)
The main 40-acre campus is located high on a hill overlooking the cities of Aberdeen and Hoquiam, the
Chehalis River, and the college‘s namesake, Grays Harbor. The site includes an accessible model
watershed surrounding Lake Swano; this environment provides excellent outdoor learning space for the
college‘s science and natural resources programs, as well as recreational resources for the community.
In keeping with the college‘s commitment to open access throughout its service area, the college operates
three community education centers in the two-county district. These include the Riverview Education
Center, which is in a college-owned building in Raymond that was renovated in 2001; the Columbia
Education Center in Ilwaco in Southern Pacific County, which began operations in a leased building in
1997 and moved to a new college-owned facility in 2006; and the Whiteside Education Center in
downtown Aberdeen, which opened in 1998 and provides easily accessible space for the college‘s adult
education programs.
In the 2008-2009 school year, Grays Harbor College served 4,495 state supported students, or 1,797 fulltime equivalent (FTE) students. Of this total, 46 percent enrolled in academic courses, 25 percent in
workforce education programs, 22 percent in adult basic skills courses and 8 percent in pre-college or
developmental classes. A majority of students (68%) enroll in on-campus day classes at the main campus.
A variety of courses are also offered in the evenings, at the community education centers, and at the
centers via interactive television; 17% of enrollments are in these areas. A growing number of students
(15%) enroll in online courses, which are available through Washington Online and also via curriculum
developed by many GHC instructors. Others are enrolled in hybrid courses, which combine various inclass and online learning techniques. Full-time students account for 60% of enrollment, while part-time
students make up 40%.1
This report will describe and examine GHC‘s mission, core themes, strategic directions, college-wide
goals, and desired student abilities in light of key indicators that allow the college to determine the degree
to which it is accomplishing its purpose.
Institutional Context
Within this 3,000-square-mile district, numerous rural communities combine for a total population of
approximately 90,000 people. Grays Harbor College provides much needed educational services to this
southwestern corner of Washington. While 87% of the population in the college‘s service area is white,
the student population has a broader cultural mix, with 25% students of color. The student body is more
female than the state community-college average: 61% of GHC‘s students are female, compared to a
system average of 57%. The median student age, at 29, is three years higher than at the state level. The
college also serves a greater proportion (9%) of students with disabilities than the system average of
4.6%. Thirty-eight percent of students have children; nearly half of those are single parents. More than
half of all students (53%) work either full-time or part-time. A significant proportion of students (48%)
receive need-based financial aid.2
Over the years, the college‘s district has been dramatically affected by economic downturns in the timber
and fishing industries; the area was gradually beginning to regain strength when the 2008 economic crisis
hit. Extreme weather conditions during the past two winters also have prolonged the struggles of this area.
Unemployment rates continue to be among the highest in the state and businesses and industries exist in
unsettled conditions. The college takes very seriously its role in helping the broader community to meet
both immediate and longer-term challenges.
Grays Harbor College offers numerous Associate degrees. Associate in Arts and Associate in ScienceTransfer degrees are designed to transfer to the 22 four-year colleges and universities within Washington
State; other degrees offered include Associate in Business, Associate in Pre-Nursing, Associate in Science
(non-transfer), Associate in Applied Science and Associate in Technology degrees. Certificate programs
are also available in a variety of workforce education programs including accounting, automotive
technology, business, carpentry, commercial truck driving, criminal justice, diesel technology, early
childhood education, energy technology, forestry, health sciences, human services, industrial control
systems, medical records, office technology, and welding. Through the Adult Basic Education program,
the college offers an extensive schedule of math and English basic skills and developmental education
courses, English as a Second Language, high school completion, and General Educational Development
testing and certificates. Lifelong learners in the district are also served with a varied selection of
community service courses.
As the only higher education institution in the two-county area, GHC works to provide opportunities for
residents to pursue four-year degrees without leaving their jobs, families and homes. Toward that end, the
college has entered into partnerships with The Evergreen State College and City University.
Grays Harbor College complies with the standards and related policies of the Northwest Commission on
Colleges and Universities and discloses all information that the commission may require in order to carry
out its evaluation and accreditation functions. The college further agrees that the commission may make
known the nature of any action, positive or negative, regarding its status with the commission to any
agency or to members of the public requesting such information. (Eligibility Requirements 20 & 21)
1
Preface
Institutional Changes Since the Last Report
While the governance system has not changed since the last full self-study and review process, there
have been several changes in the leadership and management of the college. The inclusive process of
committee participation across the district has continued. The recent strategic planning process has
included participation from virtually the entire college community and many members of the surrounding
community, as described in Chapter One: Mission and Goals and Chapter Three: Institutional Planning.
The college continues to establish new committees to address current and emerging issues such as
sustainability, diversity, international students/study abroad, and accreditation.
Between 2000 and 2005, the college‘s instructional program adopted statewide direct transfer
agreements in Business, Nursing, and two Associate in Science Transfer degrees, and made several
significant adjustments to the transfer AA degree. In 2007, the college piloted Common Course
Numbering (CCN) for the Washington State Community and Technical College system. Changes that
have occurred in professional/technical curricula since the college‘s full-scale accreditation visit in 2001
include discontinuation of certificates or degrees in eight programs, temporary deactivation of three
programs, and the addition of nine new programs.
Student Services has initiated several improvement efforts since 2001 in response to both internal selfevaluation and student suggestions, including greater coordination with the Business Office, a new book
loan service, an emergency fund, and a fund to assist high school completion students. In spring 2003 the
students approved a new comprehensive fee that covers the cost of assessment testing, parking, bus
passes, and graduation; in spring 2009, students passed a self-imposed building fee to support eventual
construction of space in a new student union building. A statewide Opportunity Grant began in January
2008 to provide intense wrap-around services and additional funding to eligible students in six
professional/technical programs. Since 2001 the college has increased advising/counseling services for
students at community education centers and online, and has implemented group entry advising in order
to serve more students and to provide an orientation to the college. In 2004, the Department of Education
awarded GHC a five-year Title III Strengthening Institutions Grant, which provides $365,000 annually to
improve the transition rate of students who begin in ABE/ESL/GED and developmental education
courses; to support faculty development activities that will increase student success; to develop student
services that improve the student‘s overall experience; and to enhance institutional research and
assessment. The following year the college received for the first time a four-year Student Support
Services grant under the federal TRiO program, designed to provide intensive support to 160 firstgeneration, low-income and/or disabled students who are in transfer majors.
Several changes to facilities have occurred since 2001. A new childcare facility opened in winter 2010.
Although funding to completely replace the A.J. Hillier Union Building has been stalled for at least a
decade, renovation of the kitchen and cafeteria areas was completed in fall 2009. State funds were
awarded to finalize design of a new SMArt (science, math, art) building, and work is proceeding on this
project. The Jewell Manspeaker Instructional Building opened in 2007, replacing several existing
classroom buildings and consolidating administrative functions and faculty offices. The adjacent Music
Pavilion houses faculty offices, classrooms, meeting space, and rehearsal/performance space. The
Spellman Library, built in 1966, was completely remodeled in 2003, the same year that the college‘s
Bishop Center for Performing Arts was expanded and renovated. A new welding/automotive technology
building opened in 2008 and the program‘s previous facility was remodeled for carpentry instruction. In
2002, the 500 building was remodeled to include a fitness lab, locker rooms, a weight room, and office
areas; in that same year, a remodel of the 300 building improved the air quality of the facility that houses
2
art and life sciences. In 2006, a new building was constructed in Ilwaco, South Pacific County, to house
the Columbia Education Center, which had been housed in a leased building since 1997. In other
community education center projects, the Riverview Center in Raymond was remodeled to facilitate onsite and ITV courses in 2002; a greenhouse at that location opened in 2009. The Simpson Education
Center in Elma closed in 2009.
Topics Requested by the Commission
The Commission had no recommendations or requests following the 2006 interim report. The following is
a summary of the college‘s compliance with the three recommendations received during 2001‘s
comprehensive self-study.
Regularly and systematically evaluate the priority goals established by the Board and use this
evaluation to influence planning and budget allocations.
Following the April 2001 accreditation visit, the college developed a comprehensive system for the
evaluation of its priority goals. Working with the Board of Trustees, the college identified multiple
indicators of effectiveness for each of the ten priority goals. Measurement of these indicators is based on
qualitative and quantitative data from a wide variety of sources including the results of surveys distributed
among students, faculty, administration, classified staff, and the external community. The entire college
community has since been engaged in the development of the institution‘s strategic plan, which has
included revision of the college‘s vision, mission and values, as well as revision of the priority goals and
strategic directions. The strategic plan, from the overall vision, mission and values to the specific action
strategies, is now the basis for the college‘s budget development process.
Implement a regular and continuous assessment plan for every segment of the college.
The college has implemented a comprehensive and continuous system of evaluating all areas of the
college to provide information for future planning; allocating short- and long-term resources; improving
programs, services and student success; and strengthening institutional accountability. Program reviews
are completed annually by all non-instructional and student support areas of the college. Instructional
review requires assessment, documentation, and analysis of student learning at the course, program, and
institutional levels as well as enrollment management, current program management (expansion,
reduction, or elimination) and new program development. Tracking and documentation is maintained by
work areas by the office of research, assessment and planning, and by the office of the vice president for
instruction. Analysis is based on data from diverse sources including student work, a comprehensive data
warehouse system linking student outcomes with employment, employer needs, feedback from local
advisory groups, data provided through the community colleges‘ statewide Student Management System,
and national and local surveys designed to assess the perceptions of current students and graduates. The
office of research, assessment and planning conducts institutional assessment activities and provides data
to each college program for ongoing assessment and planning. An annual institutional effectiveness report
provides faculty, staff and administration with multiple indicators for the evaluation of student learning
and the effectiveness of programs and services.
Renovate and remodel the John Spellman Library to meet safety and access standards.
Grays Harbor College received $6.5 million in state funding for major renovations, and the facility was
completely remodeled during the 2002-2003 academic year. The newly renovated library, which reopened in fall 2003, meets or exceeds all safety and access standards.
3
Date and Manner of Most Recent Review of Mission and Core Themes
In July 2008, the college began the development process for the current strategic plan with a Board of
Trustees retreat. The process has followed that of the previous cycle, which began in 2005, in that it is a
comprehensive and inclusive campus-wide process linking strategic directions, annual goals, institutional
practices and budget development. The timeline of the plan was extended to four years (as opposed to the
three years of the previous cycle) to better match the state budget cycle and to allow longer term action
plans and strategies for addressing emerging needs.
During the retreat, the college and board adopted the strategic directions of the State Board for
Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) and created a first draft of goals for those directions. The
entire campus community became involved in the process with an all-campus day in September 2008,
dedicated to reviewing the college‘s mission, vision, and values. Small groups representing cross sections
of the college community reviewed the documents of the other 34 community and technical colleges as
well as colleges nationwide. Small-group feedback was brought back to the all-campus group and
gathered to create several drafts of possible revisions for all three components.
With the launch of the 2008-2009 academic year, a new strategic planning committee was appointed,
comprising 25 members and the Board of Trustees. The committee established a blog for comment on the
possible revisions as well as the proposed draft, and in March, it adopted the final version. The strategic
planning committee and the executive team met regularly in February, March and April 2009 to develop
final goals, strategies, and indicators of success. Goals were developed using what was learned from the
previous planning cycle as well as integration of the annual effectiveness report, which had been
produced as a separate document. The result of that process was a carefully considered, relevant list of
quantitative and qualitative indicators for each goal area that will determine the college‘s degree of
success in meeting each specific goal.
Through the late spring of 2009, the Accreditation Steering Committee, with detailed input from the
Instructional Council and Division Chairs group, used the revised mission, vision, and values to develop
the four core themes with their attendant goals, indicators and outcomes, which would provide the
structure for the current self-study process.
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Chapter One: Mission, Core Themes, and Expectations
Section I: Mission (Standard 1.A)
Mission Statement (Standard 1.A.1)
Grays Harbor College provides meaningful education and cultural enrichment through academic transfer,
workforce preparation, basic skills, and service to community. This mission is widely published,
appearing on the college‘s website, in its catalog, and posted across campus.
Interpretation of Mission Fulfillment (Standard 1.A.2)
The college‘s vision is to be a catalyst for positive change by fulfilling its mission to provide meaningful
education and cultural enrichment through academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills, and
service to community. The college defines mission fulfillment as making effective use of resources and
capacity in order to achieve demonstrable success in student progress and completion, stakeholder
satisfaction, and community involvement and enrichment. The mission is fulfilled through applying to the
core themes the institution‘s stated values: access to educational opportunities; success for students,
faculty and staff; excellence in programs, practices and principles; respect for diversity of people, ideas,
culture and the environment; and effective and efficient use of resources. Specific indicators of mission
fulfillment are included within each set of core theme objectives in Section II of this chapter.
Articulation of Acceptable Threshold of Mission Fulfillment (Standard 1.A.2)
The college determines its degree of mission fulfillment by examining the extent to which the institution‘s
core values are upheld in service of each of the four core themes that anchor the mission. The following
report demonstrates in detail the ways in which the college upholds its values and fulfills its mission by
using its available resources; planning, implementing, and assessing its programs; and working toward
continuous improvement and sustainability. In determining an acceptable threshold for mission
fulfillment, the Accreditation Steering Committee took a cue from the many instructional review reports
detailed in Chapter Four that gauged the success of a particular course, program or degree outcome based
on the target that 90% of students would achieve 80% mastery or better. Using the same benchmark
applied to instruction, the committee determined that an acceptable threshold of mission fulfillment would
be that 90% of the criteria for fulfillment would rate an 80% score or higher. For the purposes of this
institutional rubric (see Table 1.1.1), the 20 individual criteria (five institutional values applied to each of
the four core themes) are rated on a scale of 1-5, based on the following scale, which uses a holistic
analysis of achievement based on the data contained throughout this report:
5 Substantially Achieved: Available resources are used effectively, planning and implementation are carried
4
3
2
1
out systematically, assessments indicate significant levels of success, and improvements are ongoing.
Approaching Achievement: Serious attempts are being made to use available resources effectively and to
plan and implement systematically, assessments indicate some success, and serious efforts at
improvement are being made.
Progress Toward Achievement: Measurable efforts at effective resource allocation and systematic
planning and implementation are observed, assessments indicate movement toward success, and the need
for improvement is recognized.
Minimally Addressed: Resource allocation, planning and implementation have not been a priority,
meaningful assessment needs to be developed, and areas for improvement need to be identified and
addressed.
Not Addressed: The college does not address this criterion meaningfully.
5
Acceptable Threshold of Mission Fulfillment (90% @ 80%)
Academic Transfer
Access to educational opportunities
/5
Success for students, faculty and staff
/5
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
/5
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture and the environment
/5
Effective and efficient use of resources
/5
Workforce Preparation
Access to educational opportunities
/5
Success for students, faculty and staff
/5
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
/5
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture and the environment
/5
Effective and efficient use of resources
/5
Basic Skills
Access to educational opportunities
/5
Success for students, faculty and staff
/5
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
/5
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture and the environment
/5
Effective and efficient use of resources
/5
Service to Community
Access to educational opportunities
/5
Success for students, faculty and staff
/5
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
/5
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture and the environment
/5
Effective and efficient use of resources
/5
Table 1.1.1 Actual self-assessment appears in Tables 5.1-5.4, Chapter Five (Mission Fulfillment).
6
Section II: Core Themes (Standard 1.B.1)
Grays Harbor College has identified four core themes as fundamental elements of the college‘s mission:

Academic Transfer

Workforce Preparation

Basic Skills

Service to Community
These core themes represent GHC‘s purpose as a public community college dedicated to serving the
diverse needs of this large rural district, and in fact, they are drawn directly from the college‘s mission
statement.
Each core theme is a manifestation of an essential element of the mission that guides institutional
planning and allocation of resources across the major systems of the college: governance, personnel,
instruction, student support, library, technology, finance and facilities. Further, each core theme provides
its own distinct means of realizing the college‘s five Desired Student Abilities: disciplinary learning,
literacy, critical thinking, social and personal responsibility, and information use. (Standard 1.B.1,
Eligibility Requirement 3)
Core Theme 1: Academic Transfer (Standard 1.B.2)
One key element of GHC‘s mission is the preparation of students who intend to continue their education
by transferring to a four-year college or university.
The primary transfer degree offered at GHC, the Associate in Arts (AA) degree, meets the requirements
for the Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) under the guidelines of the Inter-College Relations Commission
(ICRC). It comprises three major components:

General college requirements (18 credits)
 writing skills (10 credits)
 quantitative skills (5 credits)
 physical education (3 credits)

Distribution requirements (45 credits)
 social sciences (15 credits)
 humanities (15 credits)
 sciences (15 credits)

Specified and general elective coursework (30 credits)
7
Other academic transfer degrees offered at GHC include a direct-transfer associate degree in business and
several direct-transfer associate in science degrees. Requirements for these degrees are similar, but not
identical, to those for the AA degree, and meet all ICRC guidelines.
Specific objectives, outcomes and indicators of achievement for Core Theme 1: Academic Transfer
appear in Table 1.2.1 below.
CORE THEME 1: ACADEMIC TRANSFER
OBJECTIVE 1: Students display high rates of progress and completion.
Intended Outcome: Students achieve
high rates of progress toward degree.
Indicators of Achievement:
1.1 Percentage of students earning 15 credits in a year
1.2 Percentage of students earning 30 credits in a year
1.3 Percent of degree-seeking students making substantial progress
toward degree
Intended Outcome: Students achieve
high rates of progress in essential skills
courses.
Indicators of Achievement:
1.4 Percentage of students successfully completing the quantitative
reasoning requirement in a year
1.5 Percentage of students successfully completing the writing skills
requirement in a year
OBJECTIVE 2: GHC transfer students are prepared to succeed at their receiving institutions.
Intended Outcome: Students achieve
high rates of completion.
Indicators of Achievement:
2.1 Percentage of degree-seeking students who are transfer-ready
(defined by SBCTC as attaining 45 college-level credits)
2.2 Percentage of degree-seeking students earning an associate
degree
2.3 Percentage of “completers” who transfer
Intended Outcome: Degrees are current
with direct-transfer agreements (DTAs).
Indicators of Achievement:
Intended Outcome: Transfer students
perform well academically at
baccalaureate institutions.
Indicators of Achievement:
Intended Outcome: Students
demonstrate high levels of achievement
in student learning outcomes.
Indicators of Achievement:
2.4 GHC degrees’ alignment with all ICRC and JAOG DTAs.
2.5 GHC transfer students’ GPAs at four-year institutions
2.6 Percentage of students achieving success in course-level outcomes
2.7 Percentage of students achieving success in program-level
outcomes
Table 1.2.1
8
Core Theme 2: Workforce Preparation (Standard 1.B.2)
A second key element of GHC‘s mission is the preparation of students who intend to enter the workforce
upon achieving their educational goals at the college. Grays Harbor College offers Associate in Applied
Science (AAS) degrees in accounting, business management, criminal justice, energy technology, forestry
technician, health sciences, human services, industrial control systems technology, and office technology;
Associate in Technology (AT) degrees in automotive technology, carpentry, diesel technology, and
welding; and certificates of completion/achievement in the above degree areas plus commercial truck
driving, early childhood education, medical records office assistant, medical coding and medical
transcription. Specific objectives, outcomes, and indicators of achievement for Core Theme 2: Workforce
Preparation appear in Table 1.2.2 below.
CORE THEME 2: WORKFORCE PREPARATION
OBJECTIVE 1: Students display high rates of progress and completion.
Intended Outcome: Students display
high rates of progress.
Indicators of Achievement:
1.1 Percentage of students completing computation requirement
1.2 Percentage of students workforce-ready (45 or more vocational
credits)
Intended Outcome: Students display
high rates of completion.
Indicators of Achievement:
1.3 Percentage of Workforce Preparation students who earn a degree
1.4 Percentage of Workforce Preparation students who earn certificates
OBJECTIVE 2: GHC professional technical programs are responsive to current market demand.
Intended Outcome: Professional
technical programs respond to input
from relevant sources.
Indicators of Achievement:
2.1 Programs’ use of advisory committee input for program review and
improvement
2.2 Programs’ relevance/demand monitored via Workforce Explorer,
Worksource Demand/Decline list, and labor market data
2.32.3 Sustainable enrollment in workforce programs
OBJECTIVE 3: Students earning GHC professional/technical degrees and certificates are prepared for
employment in their field of study.
Intended Outcome: Students are
prepared for employment.
Indicators of Achievement:
3.1 Employment rates for students who complete programs
3.2 Employment rates for students who leave programs
3.3 Average annual pay by program
3.4 Percentage of licensure or certification exams scored at or above
regional and national averages
Intended Outcome: Employers are
satisfied with GHC graduates.
Indicators of Achievement:
Intended Outcome: Students
demonstrate high levels of
achievement in student learning
outcomes.
Indicators of Achievement:
3.5 Employers’ satisfaction with GHC graduates
3.6 Percentage of students achieving success in course-level outcomes
3.7 Percentage of students achieving success in program-level outcomes
Table 1.2.2
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Core Theme 3: Basic Skills (Standard 1.B.2)
A third component in GHC‘s mission is providing basic skills instruction (developmental education,
ABE/ESL/GED, student success) for adults in the community. Grays Harbor College offers English
language courses for non-native speakers as well as courses in reading, writing, and mathematics for adult
learners who have not completed a high-school diploma or who need to refresh skills. Specific objectives,
outcomes, and indicators of achievement for Core Theme 3: Basic Skills appear in Table 1.2.3 below.
CORE THEME 3: BASIC SKILLS
OBJECTIVE 1: Students display high rates of persistence and progress.
Intended Outcome: Students display high
rates of persistence.
Indicators of Achievement:
Intended Outcome: Students display high
rates of progress.
Indicators of Achievement:
1.1 Pre/Post test % rates
1.2 Percentage of ESL students making level gains on CASAS
1.3 Percentage of ABE students making level gains on CASAS
1.1 1.4 Average achievement gains of ESL students
1.5 Average achievement gains of ABE students
1.6 Percentage of IBEST students making level gains
OBJECTIVE 2: Students attain the necessary skills in reading, writing, arithmetic and English language
to pursue and achieve their goals.
Intended Outcome: Students attain skills
necessary to pursue and achieve their
goals.
Indicators of Achievement:
2.1 Percentage of students transitioning to developmental or collegelevel courses
2.2 Percentage of students who complete IBEST
2.3 Percentage of students enrolled in GED preparation classes
earning their GED
Intended Outcome: Students
demonstrate high levels of achievement
in student learning outcomes.
Indicators of Achievement:
2.4 Percentage of students achieving success in course-level outcomes
2.5 Percentage of students achieving success in program-level
outcomes
Table 1.2.3
Core Theme 4: Service to Community (Standard 1.B.2)
The fourth component of GHC‘s mission is providing relevant and meaningful service to meet the
professional, cultural, and educational needs of the community at large.
Grays Harbor College offers a variety of programs designed to provide adult learners with opportunities
to develop or enhance skills needed to be successful in their professions, as well as programs designed to
provide learners of all ages with the opportunity for personal growth and enrichment.
10
As the only institution of higher education in the two-county area, GHC takes very seriously its mission
to broaden the experiences and enrich the lives of the larger community through offerings designed to
heighten civic awareness as well as both curricular and extra-curricular programs in the creative and
performing arts. Beyond this, the college is committed to its role as model of service, stewardship, and
good citizenship for the community. Specific objectives, outcomes, and indicators of achievement for
Core Theme 4: Service to Community appear in Table 1.2.4 below.
CORE THEME 4: SERVICE TO COMMUNITY
OBJECTIVE 1: GHC provides general and customized professional development opportunities in
response to demand.
Intended Outcome: GHC provides quality
professional development opportunities.
Indicators of Achievement:
Intended Outcome: Professional
development opportunities are effective.
Indicators of Achievement:
1.1 Number of contract training courses offered for business or
professional development
1.2 Student and employer satisfaction with classes/training
OBJECTIVE 2: GHC provides a wide variety of opportunities for cultural enrichment.
Intended Outcome: GHC offers courses
in the creative and performing arts.
Indicators of Achievement:
2.1 Number of course offerings related to creative and performing
arts
2.2 Sustainable enrollment in courses related to creative and
performing arts
Intended Outcome: GHC offers cultural
events for the community.
Indicators of Achievement:
2.3 Number of musical and theatre events offered by/at the college
2.4 Number of non-matriculating community members participating in
cultural events offered by/at the college
2.5 Number of art exhibits and events offered by/at the college
OBJECTIVE 3: GHC provides lifelong learning opportunities for all ages in response to community
interest.
Intended Outcome: The college provides
opportunities for lifelong learners of all
ages.
Indicators of Achievement:
3.1 Sustainable enrollment in classes offered for lifelong learning
3.2 Participation numbers in learning opportunities provided for precollege-age students
3.3 Number of speakers/forums hosted by the college
OBJECTIVE 4: GHC serves as a resource for the community at large, exemplifying service, stewardship,
and good citizenship.
Intended Outcome: The college
exemplifies service, stewardship, and
good citizenship.
Indicators of Achievement:
4.1 Number of initiatives that serve the broader community
4.2 Number of initiatives that achieve efficiencies and sustainability
4.3 Number of initiatives that provide options and stability for future
generations
Table 1.2.4
11
Rationale for Measurability of Achievement in Core Theme Objectives
(Standard 1.B.2)
The measures included in the above tables are meaningful indicators of the college‘s efforts toward and
achievement of its outcomes, objectives, core themes, and mission as outlined below.
Progression and completion rates (Core Themes 1, 2, 3) measure students‘ movement toward and
success in meeting their educational goals. Specific measures included above are valid indicators of
persistence, preparation in core skills areas, and achievement of articulated educational goals.
Achievement of course-level and program-level outcomes (Core Themes 1, 2, 3) measure students‘
mastery of the skills and knowledge required to be successful within specific content areas as well as
within the broader goals of their chosen programs, certificates and degrees.
Transition and goal-completion rates (Core Themes 1, 3) measure how well GHC prepares students to
move beyond the ABE/ESL and developmental transitions programs and to succeed in college-level
work.
Compliance with external guidelines (Core Themes 1, 3), by linking GHC students‘ achievements with
state and federal requirements as well as with requirements for transfer to four-year institutions, measures
students‘ preparation for work at the developmental or college level as well as students‘ preparedness for
acceptance at receiving institutions.
GPAs at four-year institutions (Core Theme 1) measure how well GHC prepares students to succeed
after transfer.
Responsiveness to current market demand (Core Theme 2) is a valid measure of students‘
employability upon completion.
Employment and wage data (Core Theme 2) measure how well GHC prepares students to succeed in the
workplace.
Licensure and certification data (Core Theme 2) are crucial elements in determining student
preparedness to enter the workforce.
Sustainable enrollment (Core Themes 2, 4) in workforce and community-service courses is a valid
indicator of both demand and the college‘s ability to provide services.
Satisfaction surveys (Core Theme 4) are reliable measures of both participant and employer response
that can be used in future planning.
Numbers of courses and events (Core Theme 4) offered to enhance cultural awareness and
understanding, as well as participation rates, measure community involvement in the life of the college in
a variety of ways.
Numbers of initiatives (Core Theme 4) that serve the broader community, achieve sustainability, and
provide for the future measure college involvement in the life of the community in a variety of ways.
12
Section III: Chapter One Summary
Chapter One provides an overview of the college‘s purpose; the manifestation of that purpose through
core themes, goals, outcomes and indicators; and the realization of that purpose through strategic
institutional directions. Together, these principles and measures constitute the framework within which
the college community analyzes, evaluates and improves the college‘s fulfillment of its mission.
The goals, strategies and indicators included in this chapter are, at this point, descriptive. Not included are
the various data sources used for measurement that will be included in subsequent chapters whose
purpose will be more analytical, evaluative and prescriptive than descriptive.
To create this report, the members of the Accreditation Steering Committee (listed below), with assistance
from many others within the college community, relied upon existing practices in strategic planning and
institutional effectiveness that have been in place for most of the past decade. To achieve the purposes set
out in the revised NWCCU guidelines, they applied those existing practices to the college‘s newly
identified four core themes. Although the core themes have been at the heart of the college‘s articulated
mission for quite some time, they had not previously provided the structure for self-study; as the college
has moved forward with this structure, the committee has achieved further clarification of the criteria by
which achievement of goals is measured.
The process of adopting the new reporting methodology has been challenging in some ways, but
ultimately is deeply rewarding, for it has called upon the college community to view what were
previously regarded as separate components of the college in a more holistic way. In other words, it has
encouraged the college to move beyond analysis to engage in meaningful synthesis. This process can only
enhance efforts toward continuous improvement as an institution.
Accreditation Steering Committee
Dr. Ed Brewster, president
Laurie Kaye Clary, vice president for instruction
Dr. Arlene Torgerson, vice president for student services
Keith Foster, vice president for administrative services
Dave Halverstadt, chief human resources officer
Debbie Reynvaan, director of research, assessment and planning
Lynne Lerych, faculty (English)
Dr. Chris Portmann, faculty (sociology)
13
Chapter Two – Standard Two: Resources and Capacity
Section I: Governance (Standard 2.A)
System of Governance (Standard 2.A.1-3)
Grays Harbor College is a public community college in Washington State, serving District 2, which
includes Grays Harbor and Pacific counties. Within this district, institutional governance is delivered by
multiple representative entities, each with distinct policies and processes. The Board of Trustees sets
overall policy for the institution and delegates administrative authority to the president. The Executive
Team provides administrative leadership and comprises the president and his direct-reports (three vice
presidents and two chief officers). President‘s Cabinet includes representatives of all college
constituencies, including faculty, students, classified staff, vice presidents and chief officers. Members of
this group bring issues and concerns from their areas and work with the president to revise and review
operational policies. Input is sought from President‘s Cabinet before the Board of Trustees adopts new or
revised policies. Instructional Council, which includes all division chairs, two vice presidents, three deans
and two associate deans, addresses curriculum and academic policy issues. Numerous other campus
committees disseminate information and serve in an advisory capacity for key administrators and the
president. The council of the Associated Students of Grays Harbor College is responsible for student
governance (Standard 2.A.1).
As one of 34 community and technical colleges within the Washington State Board for Community and
Technical Colleges (SBCTC) system, GHC receives oversight, coordination and support services from
that state agency according to the Community and Technical College Act of 1991 (revised). The Revised
Code of Washington (RCW) section 28B.50 is the primary statute for the state‘s community colleges.
SBCTC has a nine-member board, appointed by the governor, to set overall policy and direction for the
two-year college system. The board in turn appoints an executive director to provide supervision and
leadership to the system. A policy manual detailing policies for governing SBCTC is available online. As
a state government entity, GHC is also subject to rules, regulations and policies established by other state
agencies, boards and commissions (Standard 2.A.2, Eligibility Requirement 4).
As required by SBCTC, GHC maintains regional accreditation with the Northwest Commission on
Colleges and Universities, and reviews accreditation requirements at Board of Trustees‘ work sessions,
Executive Team meetings, President‘s Cabinet meetings, Instructional Council meetings, and ASGHC
student council sessions. Only after input and review by the appropriate groups does the Board of
Trustees consider adoption of new or revised policies. GHC has collective bargaining agreements in
effect with the GHC Federation of Teachers Local #4984, representing the faculty, and the Washington
Public Employees Association, representing the classified staff. Any changes proposed to these
agreements during negotiations are reviewed to ensure that they support accreditation requirements
(Standard 2.A.3).
Governing Board (Standard 2.A.4-8, Eligibility Requirement 7)
GHC‘s Board of Trustees includes five members, each appointed by the governor and confirmed by the
State Senate to five-year terms (see Table 2.1.1). If an appointment is made with less than five years
remaining in the term, the trustee serves for the remainder of that term. Typically trustees are re-appointed
once, so they may serve for approximately 10 years total. Occasionally appointments are made for more
than two terms, but this is not a common practice. None of the trustees have contractual, employment or
financial interests in GHC (Standard 2.A.4).
14
Trustee
Residence
Original
Appointment
Term Ends
Rebecca Chaffee, chair
Raymond
2004
2012
Dennis Colwell
Aberdeen
1998
2011
Randy Rust
Grayland
2009
2014
Fawn Sharp
Ocean Shores
2004
2013
Montesano
2000
2010
Carol Warfield
Table 2.1.1
The Board of Trustees acts only as a committee of the whole and has responsibility for the governance of
policy for the college (Standard 2.A.5). It approves the vision, mission, values, goals and strategic plan
for the college and delegates the responsibility for operations to the president or designee. The board
monitors progress toward accomplishment of goals in the strategic plan on at least a quarterly basis, and
on mission outcomes annually. College policies fall into the two general categories of board policies,
which pertain to the responsibilities and authority of the Board of Trustees, and operational policies,
which govern all of the operations of the college. The board regularly reviews, revises, and adopts both
board and operational policies for the college (Standard 2.A.6).
The Board of Trustees is charged with the authority to hire a president, who serves as chief executive
officer of GHC. The authority and responsibility for the CEO to implement and administer boardapproved policies related to the operation of GHC are assigned in board policy, as is the formal annual
performance evaluation of the CEO (Standard 2.A.7, Eligibility Requirement 8).
The Board of Trustees establishes annual group and individual goals and assesses those once a year,
normally at a retreat in the fall (Standard 2.A.8).
Leadership and Management (Standards 2.A.9-11, Eligibility Requirement 9)
The college employs a chief executive officer, a chief academic officer, a chief student services officer, a
chief financial officer, a chief human resources officer, and a chief information technology officer. These
officers have appropriate qualifications for their respective positions and constitute the college Executive
Team (E-Team). The E-Team meets on a weekly basis and is responsible for the planning, organization,
and management of the college and for assessment of its achievements and effectiveness.
Policies and Procedures (Standards 2.A.12-30)
Academic policies, including the use of the library and information resources, are posted on the college
website as operational policies 301 through 318, and are communicated to affected students, faculty and
all other constituencies. In addition to the operational policies, policies regarding all requirements of
employment for academic employees are covered in the negotiated agreement with GHC Federation of
Teachers #4984. Policies regarding transfer of credit, published in the 2009-2011 college catalog,
maintain the integrity of the college‘s programs while ensuring efficient mobility of students between
institutions (Standards 2.A.12-14).
All policies pertaining to students are posted on the college website as operational policies 401-415, and
are readily accessible to students and all other constituencies (Standards 2.A.15-17). These policies
include students‘ rights and responsibilities, standards, appeals, student activities, and other policies
15
relevant to students. In addition to the website, the students‘ rights and responsibilities are published in
the Student Handbook, which is updated and distributed to students on an annual basis.
Policies pertaining to Human Resources (operational policies 601-701) are available on the college
website to all employees and other constituents (Standards 2.A.18-20). These policies are reviewed and
updated on a regular basis. Employees are apprised of all employment expectations and are evaluated
regularly. Employee records are secure and confidential. In addition, policies regarding employment
practices and requirements are contained in the negotiated agreements with the GHC Federation of
Teachers #4984 for faculty, and with the Washington Public Employees Association for classified staff.
The college adheres to ethical standards in all of its operations and relationships, ensuring institutional
integrity (Eligibility Requirement 6); it is governed and administered with respect for individual rights in
a fair and nondiscriminatory manner according to its mission, vision and values (Eligibility Requirement
5). The vast majority of standards governing work assignments, rights and responsibilities, and criteria
and procedures for evaluation, retention, promotion and termination of college staff are contained in the
classified staff and faculty labor contracts (Standards 2.A.21-26). Staff receive training on these
employment standards, including their rights and responsibilities. Work assignments, rights and
responsibilities, and criteria for evaluation, retention, promotion and termination of college staff not
covered by labor contracts are stated in college policies and procedures or in Washington State law. All
human resources records are stored in a locked file room that is only accessible by HR staff. Medical
records are kept separate from personnel files and are stored in the chief of human resources‘ office in
locked file cabinets. Policies regarding institutional integrity are integrated throughout the board and
operational policies. The college website is the primary means of communication to the community and is
continually reviewed for accuracy in portraying the mission, programs and services of the college.
Publication materials are regularly updated to ensure integrity of information as changes are made to
programs and services of the college. College policies also clearly address standards of ethics, conflicts of
interest and other expectations for the Board of Trustees and all college employees. The college‘s policy
regarding intellectual property with respect to faculty work product is stated in Article III Section 4 of the
faculty contract. Accreditation status is clearly stated, as appropriate, in all communications, and is never
assumed for the future. All contractual obligations of the college ensure the integrity of the college.
In light of its commitment to academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills and service to
community, Grays Harbor College actively promotes and supports the free search for truth and its free
expression. Operational Policy 205 addresses academic freedom for college employees and students, and
protects the independent development and exchange of ideas. The college‘s policy regarding academic
freedom with respect to faculty is further articulated in Article III Section 2 of the faculty contract
(Standards 2.A.27-29, Eligibility Requirement 15).
Operational policies 501 through 522 clearly define responsibility for the development and management
of the college‘s finance and facility resource reports that are presented annually to the Board of Trustees
for approval. The board also receives quarterly reports on the status of both the operating and capital
budgets (Standard 2.A.30).
Section II: Human Resources (Standard 2.B)
Introduction and Standards
The college is staffed with qualified personnel to successfully meet its operational and support
responsibilities (Standard 2.B.1). All staff have clearly stated job descriptions or labor contract articles
that accurately reflect the duties, responsibilities and levels of authority assigned to each position. The
16
college has stated criteria in HR policy and procedures that set forth the process governing the recruitment
and selection of college staff. Procedures for recruiting and hiring faculty are found in Operational Policy
653 and in Article VII of the faculty contract. Procedures for hiring classified staff are found in Article 4
of the staff contract.
Classified staff and exempt staff (both regular exempt and exempt administrators) are evaluated
regarding their work duties and responsibilities on a regularly scheduled basis (Standard 2.B.2). Policies
regarding the evaluation of classified staff are found in Article 6 of the staff contract.
The college encourages professional development (Standard 2.B.3). The staff development and training
committee provides financial support for all classified staff returning to college to assist with tuition and
books. In addition, the college supports training for classified staff to enhance their skills and
development in their current jobs. Policies regarding classified staff development are found in Article 9 of
the staff contract. Exempt staff are sent to training designed to develop skills for their current and future
jobs in higher education. The college also supports exempt staff who wish to return to college for
advanced degrees. Faculty professional growth and development needs and opportunities are identified in
individual professional growth plans. The college supports faculty who request to attend seminars and
conferences or take sabbaticals related to their fields of instruction. Policies regarding professional growth
for faculty are found in Article XII Section 4 of the faculty contract.
Faculty
The college employs sufficient numbers of qualified faculty to meet its instructional and academic
objectives with an emphasis on fulfilling the institution‘s core themes of academic transfer, workforce
preparation, basic skills and service to community. Faculty are employed in accordance with college
academic and human resources policies as well as with the faculty labor contract, as referenced above
(Standard 2.B.4, Eligibility Requirement 10).
Faculty workload and responsibilities are defined in Article IV of the faculty labor contract (Standard
2.B.5). The standards employed in this definition of faculty workload and responsibilities reflect the
college‘s expectations for faculty concerning teaching, service, scholarship, research and artistic creation.
All tenured faculty are evaluated annually using multiple indices directly related to faculty member roles
and responsibilities, including evidence of teaching effectiveness, as detailed in Article VIII of the faculty
contract (Standard 2.B.6). A comprehensive post-tenure evaluation occurs at least once during each fiveyear period of service. The post-tenure evaluation process for professional/technical faculty is coupled
with the required five-year professional/technical certification. At the beginning of each five-year posttenure review period, each faculty member develops a professional growth plan in consultation with the
appropriate administrator. Progress toward completion of this plan is discussed annually. Once per year,
student course evaluations are collected for all courses taught by each tenured faculty member. Also
annually, each tenured faculty member is observed by the appropriate vice president or dean, who writes a
summary report which is discussed with the faculty member. If areas for improvement are identified as
part of the annual observation, a plan is developed to address these concerns.
The five-year comprehensive post-tenure evaluation process includes:
 discussion of the faculty member‘s five-year self-evaluation;
 review of the annual administrative observation summaries;
 review of yearly student course evaluations; and
 review and discussion of the faculty member‘s progress in relation to the professional growth
plan.
The comprehensive evaluation culminates with:
17




summary and recommendations by the appropriate administrator;
the faculty member‘s comments on the above document;
determination of the faculty member‘s professional growth plan for the next five-year evaluation
cycle; and
placement of the signed comprehensive evaluation form in the faculty member‘s official
personnel file.
All non-tenured faculty are evaluated annually using multiple indices. Professional growth plans are
developed for non-tenured faculty in collaboration with the appropriate administrator. In each of the first
three quarters of teaching and once each year thereafter, direct supervisors of part-time faculty are
responsible for consulting with the division chair to ensure that the part-time faculty member is observed
by a qualified member of the division or an appropriate administrator. Each quarter and in each class
taught, part-time faculty are evaluated by students.
Section III: Educational Resources (Standard 2.C, Eligibility Requirement 11)
Introduction
Grays Harbor College offers a range of educational programs to support its mission of providing
meaningful education and cultural enrichment through academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic
skills, and service to community.
As Chart 2.3.1 indicates, GHC‘s enrollment has remained fairly consistent over the past six years, with a
marked increase in the two most recent fall quarters for which data are available. In general, as overall
enrollment has increased, enrollments among students whose educational intent is workforce or academic
transfer has also
increased, while
enrollments
among students
who intend to
achieve basic
skills or personal
enrichment has
declined. Note:
the figures in
this chart are
based on
students‘ selfdisclosure of
educational
intent and not on
actual course
enrollments.
Chart 2.3.1 3
The college continues to attract a significant percentage of high school graduates from across the service
district, as Table 2.3.1 shows:
18
SBCTC Recent High School Graduates Report
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
District Graduates
880
999
972
963
986
972
896
Number enrolled at GHC
204
273
271
288
291
243
280
Percentage enrolled at GHC
23%
27%
28%
30%
30%
25%
31%
Table 2.3.1 4
Standards
All degrees and certificates offered by the college contain appropriate content and rigor and are
designated appropriately following generally accepted titles ratified by the state‘s community and
technical colleges (Standard 2.C.1). Course content culminates in clearly identified student learning
outcomes and is consistent with the requirements for similar degrees and certificates at peer institutions.
Course requirements for each degree and certificate are clearly stated in the college catalog and on the
web. Courses are named and numbered to reflect the discipline and level of instruction, and the catalog
descriptions for all courses numbered above 100 indicate the requirements each course fulfills. Human
Development and Freshman Year Experience courses in areas such as study skills, career planning, and
college success assist students in making a smooth transition to college. These courses are numbered
above 100 and may count for general elective credit in degree and certificate programs.
All transfer degrees align with statewide Direct Transfer Agreements (DTAs) and Major Related Program
agreements (MRPs). The college‘s transfer degrees are periodically reviewed by the Inter-College
Relations Commission (ICRC), a statewide group of two- and four-year institutions whose purpose is to
facilitate transfer between institutions for students pursuing baccalaureate degrees in Washington State.
GHC‘s most recent Ongoing Articulation Review (OAR) was completed in 2007-2008. Professional
technical degrees and certificates comply with State Board for Community and Technical Colleges‘
(SBCTC) program approval requirements. Any changes to program requirements must be filed with the
state board to update the college‘s program inventory. Advisory committees for all professional/technical
programs meet at least twice a year to provide input on current employment needs and industry practice.
Significant program changes are reported to NWCCU through the substantive change process. These
processes ensure that GHC programs have the appropriate content and rigor and are identified with
designators consistent with recognized fields of study and requirements of receiving institutions.
GHC has defined learning outcomes for all courses, programs, certificates and degrees (Standard 2.C.2).
In AAS and AT degrees and in certificates, a program is defined as the profession for which the student is
training, e.g. automotive, criminal justice, human services, etc. Related instruction outcomes are also
identified. In transfer degrees, program is defined as the required distribution area (i.e. communications,
quantitative reasoning, humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and PE). The expected learning
outcomes for all degree and certificate programs are clearly posted on the college‘s website and are
available in the Counseling and Advising Center. Course-level learning outcomes are clearly listed on all
course syllabi. General education at Grays Harbor College is designed to help students become
intellectually free and able to make informed, enlightened decisions. Courses offered throughout the
humanities, the social sciences, the natural sciences, and the professional/technical fields emphasize the
valuable and remarkable achievements of humankind. General education offerings provide students the
opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills, encouraging them to develop in the general education
learning outcomes or Desired Student Abilities (DSAs): Disciplinary Learning, Literacy, Critical
Thinking, Social/Personal Responsibility, and Information Use. These DSAs are clearly posted on the
college‘s website, in the college‘s online catalog, and linked in course syllabi.
19
Awarding Credit
The college operates on the quarter system and calculates its contact time and credits according to
SBCTC guidelines for all modes of instruction including lecture, laboratory and clinical courses
(Standard 2.C.3). Credits for alternative modes of class delivery and scheduling (including online, ITV,
hybrid and block classes) adhere to the same content, rigor and expected learning outcomes as more
traditionally structured courses. GHC Administrative Procedure 302.06 outlines the Board of Trustees‘
approved grading parameters. All courses are subject to the same curriculum approval processes and
norms for the award of credits.
The college offers courses in all four core theme areas through its Extended Learning division via
distance technologies as well as face-to-face at three locations in Grays Harbor County: the Aberdeen
campus, Westport, and Ocean Shores. The college also operates two centers in Pacific County: the
Riverview Education Center in Raymond, and the Columbia Education Center in Ilwaco. In response to
recent budget cuts, the college closed its Elma outreach center in summer 2009. Since 2000, GHC has
contracted with the Department of Corrections to provide educational services for 2,000 offenders
incarcerated at Stafford Creek Corrections Center. In 2008-2009, an average of 802 offenders per quarter
enrolled in classes taught by 14 full-time and two part-time GHC instructors. Programs included Basic
Skills (Adult Basic Education, English as a Second Language, GED preparation), Vocational Skills
(Building Maintenance Technology, Information Technology, Welding Technology) and Life Skills
(Offender Change, Partners in Parenting). Table 2.3.2 outlines the programs offered through Extended
Learning.
Extended Learning Options @ Grays Harbor College
Academic Transfer
Workforce Preparation
Basic Skills
Online and multipledelivery Associate in Arts
transfer degree at the
Riverview Center in
Raymond and Columbia
Education Center in Ilwaco
Certificates in Microsoft
Office Applications, Medical
Records Office Assistant;
support courses in HUST and
pre-nursing on the Aberdeen
campus
Adult Basic Education
at the Whiteside Center
as well as education
centers in Raymond,
Ilwaco, and around the
service area
Contract and studentfunded training to
employers
Hybrid direct transfer
liberal arts AA degree to
five Native American
communities in Western
Washington
Certificates in Microsoft
Office Applications, Medical
Records Office Assistant;
Office Technology AAS at
Columbia Education Center,
Ilwaco
English as a Second
Language at Whiteside,
Raymond, Ilwaco, and
other locations around
the service area
Level 1 Emergency
Medical Training
cooperatively with Grays
Harbor/Pacific County
Emergency Medical
Services Council
ITV delivery of the AA
degree between and among
the Aberdeen campus and
off-campus sites in Pacific
County
Online, hybrid and ITV
delivery of courses in
workforce preparation degree
and certificate programs,
including ICST at Satsop and
energy/forestry at Centralia
GED at Whiteside,
Raymond, Ilwaco, and
other locations around
the service area
Online certificate in
Early Childhood
Education serving
continuing education
requirements for
childcare professionals
Online and hybrid delivery
of courses in academic
transfer programs
Vocational training programs
at Stafford Creek Corrections
Center
ABE, ESL, GED at the
Stafford Creek
Corrections Center
Childbirth training for
parents in cooperation
with the Grays Harbor
Department of Health
Table 2.3.2
20
Community Service
Flagger Training
Extended Learning operates as part of the college‘s instructional program and is supervised by the vice
president for instruction. The division is supported by a dean. Courses supporting college degrees and
certificates use course syllabi, texts and learning materials recommended by divisions. Part-time
instructors teaching course sections on and off campus are recruited or nominated and recommended
through a process requiring division review. If there is a disagreement between the continuing education
dean and a division regarding the qualifications of an individual part-time instructor candidate, the dispute
is resolved by the vice president for instruction. The dean of extended learning and the associate dean for
Stafford Creek serve on the Instructional Council and the Instructional Management Team. Both also are
members of the college‘s Exempt Team.
Extended Learning‘s yearly schedules are developed through a collaborative process that includes
division review and negotiation and final approval by the vice president for instruction. The faculty
review process for part-time instructors is outlined in Article VIII Section 4 of the faculty contract and
includes quarterly student course evaluations and annual class observations. The dean reviews on-campus
part-time instructors, and full-time division members are invited to observe Pacific County classes.
Reports of class observations and student course evaluations are on file. Full-time faculty serve as points
of contact and resources for part-time instructors regarding scope, breadth and depth of courses.
Degree Programs (Standard 2.C.4, Eligibility Requirement 12)
The college‘s degree programs demonstrate coherent design with appropriate breadth, depth, sequencing
of courses, and synthesis of learning. Courses are sequenced to ensure that students carry information and
skills mastered in one course into the next. Learning outcomes within the specific disciplines and courses
emphasize key components of program-level learning outcomes, thus ensuring that the completion of the
degree represents an integrated and synthetic educational whole. Each degree or certificate is designed to
be completed in a reasonable time frame and scheduling is planned so that students have the opportunity
to complete developmental coursework and prerequisites in a timely manner.
All GHC degree and certificate programs are published in the college catalog and on the GHC website
under Transfer Degrees and Workforce Preparation where admission and graduation requirements are
clearly listed. Students can run online degree audits at any time to ensure that they are meeting
requirements and fulfilling the breadth and depth of subject matter exploration, as well as to compare
progress in relation to different degree options.
Transfer degrees are specifically designed to meet lower-division general education requirements at all
public-funded, as well as many private, baccalaureate institutions. AA degrees require courses primarily
from the liberal arts and include minimum and maximum credits in communications, quantitative
reasoning, humanities, social science, and the natural sciences to ensure breadth of learning. GHC also
requires three credits of physical education. The AB-DTA, APN-DTA, and AS-T degrees are more
prescriptive about the courses that satisfy distribution requirements since they are specially designed to
prepare students for entry into specific schools or professions at the baccalaureate level. AS degrees do
not fulfill direct transfer requirements, but completion of coursework in all distribution areas is required.
At the time of this evaluation, the college is in the process of adopting a series of AAS-T (Associate in
Applied Science-Transfer) degrees in the following workforce preparation programs: Accounting,
Business Management, Criminal Justice, Human Services, Natural Resources, and Nursing. The AAS-T
degree is designed for the dual purpose of qualification for immediate employment and preparation for
junior status in a Bachelor of Applied Science program. Five associate degree programs are currently
available to prepare students for academic transfer.

Associate in Arts DTA (AA) is for students who plan ultimately to seek a bachelor's degree from
a four-year college or university. A student transferring with an AA degree enters all Washington
21
public and many private four-year institutions with junior-level standing and all general education
requirements satisfied. This degree requires courses primarily from the liberal arts area. Students
work with their academic advisors in planning for specific majors/programs, including:
Anthropology (survey, cultural, archaeology, Native American, Pacific Northwest)
Art (appreciation, drawing, design, painting, printmaking)
Economics (survey, micro, macro)
Education (survey, practicum)
English (composition; creative writing; literature: American, British, Shakespeare,
World, Multicultural, Gender)
Film (interpretation, production)
Foreign Languages (Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Polish, Russian,
Spanish)
History (Western Civilization, U.S., Pacific Northwest, Native American, AfricanAmerican, 20th Century Europe, England)
Library (information resources, research)
Mathematics (survey, finite, precalculus, calculus, statistics, differential equations)
Music (appreciation, theory, vocal/instrumental studio, performance)
Philosophy (survey)
Physical Education (team/individual sports, fitness)
Political Science (law, foreign policy, U.S. government)
Psychology (general, lifespan, abnormal, adjustment, social)
Sociology (survey, justice, criminology, social problems, marriage/family)
Speech (public speaking, group discussion)
Theatre (survey, acting, directing, stagecraft, lighting, makeup, performance)

Associate in Science-Transfer (AS-T) Tracks 1 and 2 are for students intending to transfer to a
four-year institution to earn a bachelor‘s degree in a science or engineering major. Earning a
GHC AS-T degree ensures completion of similar lower-division general education requirements
as first-and second-year students in the same fields at the four-year institution. The AS-T track 1
degree is designed to prepare students for upper division study in chemistry and related fields.
The AS-T track 2 degree is designed to prepare students for upper-division study in engineering,
physics, and related fields.

Associate in Business (AB-DTA) is for students who intend to secure a bachelor‘s degree in
business from a four-year college or university. Students who complete the AB-DTA degree will
have satisfied the lower-division general education requirements and lower-division business
requirements at the baccalaureate institutions.

Associate in Pre-Nursing (APN-DTA) is for students who plan to be RNs but who want to begin
their nursing careers with a baccalaureate degree.

Associate in Science (AS) is not designated as Direct Transfer Degree and is intended for
students planning to transfer to a four-year institution to pursue professional or pre-professional
programs. The basic goal of the requirements is to complete the departmental requirements at the
institution to which the student plans to transfer. Students work with their academic advisors in
planning for these programs as requirements can be tailored for the students' intended majors.
Credits earned from this degree transfer on a course-by-course basis, and therefore, general
education requirements might not be completed.
Associate in General Studies (AGS) allows maximum exploration of courses by the student. It is not
intended for students who plan to transfer to a senior institution and pursue a baccalaureate degree.
22
Professional/technical degrees and certificates are designed specifically for entry into the workforce
and to meet industry demand. All degrees or certificates of 45 credits or more require a core of related
instruction in communications, computation, and human relations. Required coursework is developed in
conjunction with business and industry professionals. Industry representatives also serve on advisory
committees which meet at least twice a year. Where applicable, curriculum includes industry skills
standards that prepare students for national certification and licensing exams. Health programs are
accredited through professional organizations with rigorous standards and requirements. Two associate
degree programs and two certificate programs are available to prepare students for employment.

Associate in Applied Science degree (AAS) is designed for students whose primary goal is to
enter the job market after completion. It is not generally designed for students desiring to transfer,
although there are a few exceptions. Students earning an AAS degree will typically complete
requirements in three areas: 1) core classes – those directly needed in the career field; 2) support
courses – those that provide additional knowledge and background needed in the career field; and
3) general education courses, including communications, computation and human relations. Some
AAS degrees require completion of more than 90 credits. AAS degrees are available in the
following areas (fields marked CC also offer Certificates of Completion, while fields marked with
CA offer Certificates of Achievement):
Accounting (CC, CA)
Business Management (CC, CA)
Criminal Justice (CC)
Energy Technology (CC)
Human Services (CC)
Industrial Control Systems (CC)
Natural Resources-Forestry (CC)
Nursing (CC, CA)
Occupational Entrepreneurship
Office Technology (CC, CA)

Associate in Technology degree (AT) is designed for students whose primary goal is to enter the
job market after completion. This degree is not designed for transfer. Students earning an AT
degree will typically complete requirements in three areas: 1) core classes – those directly needed
in the career field; 2) support courses – those that provide additional knowledge and background
needed in the career field; and 3) general education courses, including communications,
computation and human relations. Some AT degrees require the completion of more than 90
credits. AT degrees are available in the following areas:
Automotive Technology (CC, CA)
Carpentry Technology (CC, CA)
Diesel Technology (CC, CA)
Welding Technology (CC, CA)

Certificate of Completion (CC) is for the student whose goal is to enter the job market upon
completion. A CC typically requires 45+ credits and includes core courses in the career field as
well as general education requirements in communications, computation and human relations.
The difference between a Certificate of Completion and a degree is the depth and breadth of
training provided in the career field.
Commercial Truck Driving (CA)
Building Maintenance (Stafford Creek)
Information Technology Core (Stafford Creek)
Medical Records Office Assistant (CA)
Welding (Stafford Creek)
23

Certificate of Achievement (CA) is designed to enhance the knowledge or background of
someone already in the field and typically includes 2-3 classes.
Early Childhood Education
Faculty Involvement
Faculty have the primary responsibility for the design, approval, and implementation of curriculum
(Standard 2.C.5). For all programs that grant college-level credit, the process for course and program
development and approval generally begins at the division level. In some cases, initiatives may be
prompted by an advisory committee, community entity, or program manager. Development of programs
and course syllabi is typically the responsibility of proposing faculty members. Division chairs review
each proposal and its rationale at a Division Chairs‘ meeting, often inviting the proposing faculty
member(s) to answer questions and discuss initial feedback. Following this initial review, each division
chair takes proposals back to the respective divisions for discussion. The chairs bring commentary from
their divisions to a subsequent meeting of Division Chairs and, after any modifications are made, the
program is presented to the Instructional Council (IC).
The IC oversees and approves all curricular development and revision (Operational Policy 302). The
group, chaired by the vice president for instruction, includes all division chairs, the Instructional
Management Team, the vice president for student services, and the associate dean for admissions and
records. The IC gathers input from faculty and other college constituencies in order to make decisions
concerning the college‘s curriculum, including addition and deletion of courses and programs. Council
members consider the merit of each proposal, its institutional impact, and its compatibility with the
institution‘s mission. While the process can be expedited, the preferred process takes as long as two to
three months to allow a thorough evaluation at both the faculty and administrative levels. Chart 2.3.2
below illustrates the curriculum approval process at GHC.
Chart 2.3.2
24
Responsibility for fostering and assessing student learning lies directly with faculty. All faculty have
course outcomes listed in their syllabi. As part of ongoing instructional review, faculty assess at least
three course outcomes each year following the agreed-upon reporting process. Division chairs collect
faculty work and provide assessment reports for discussion by the Division Chairs group and the
Instructional Management Team (IMT). Division chairs are also responsible for working with their
divisions to ensure that program-level student learning outcomes are being assessed. Division chairs and
IMT members work closely with institutional research, assessment and planning to review data and to
monitor degree and institutional learning outcomes.
Faculty have a major role in the selection of new faculty, both full-time and part-time. Prior to
advertising an open full-time position, the vice president for instruction meets with the appropriate
division chair to review and update essential and desirable qualifications, teaching responsibilities and
other criteria. Faculty comprise the majority of membership on screening committees for full-time faculty
positions with representation from both the division with the vacant position and at least one other
division. It is the committee‘s responsibility to determine what is requested in the application, to review
all applicants, to select and interview qualified candidates, and to make recommendations to the vice
president for instruction and to the president. The president makes the final determination in consultation
with the committee and the vice president. Faculty members comprise the majority on tenure committees
as well.
Faculty also have a role in selecting part-time instructors. When additional faculty are needed, the vice
president or dean consults with division chairs for recommendations. Faculty members vet part-time
applicants and make recommendations on which courses, if any, they may teach. Faculty also assist with
observing part-time instructors as their schedules allow.
Course assignments throughout all instructional divisions require use of the library and information
resources (Standard 2.C.6). Library orientation is a common feature in English and Developmental
Education, affecting students nearly campus-wide. Students across the curriculum are required to
complete research projects and presentations, researched term papers, internet searches, source summaries
and evaluations, and related assignments. An increase in the number of hybrid and online courses has
heightened the need for and use of information technologies. The college has articulated its commitment
to library and information resources by including these skills in its Desired Student Abilities.
Extra-Institutional Credit
At this time, Grays Harbor College does not award credit for prior experiential learning (Standard
2.C.7).
GHC has clearly established and published guidelines for accepting transfer credit from other institutions
(Standard 2.C.8). For transfer purposes, GHC recognizes those institutions that have received regional
accreditation, or are accredited by national, professional and specialized accrediting bodies recognized by
the U.S. Secretary of Education. Credits are transferred from institutions that are candidates for
accreditation. Evaluations of transfer credit are made from official transcripts requested by the student to
be sent to the GHC Admissions and Records Office. Transcripts are evaluated on a course-by-course
basis. A written evaluation indicates which transfer credit has been accepted and the GHC course
equivalent for that credit.
Washington State community and technical colleges offer reciprocity to students transferring within the
system. Students who complete any individual course that meets a distribution degree requirement or who
fulfill entire areas of their degree requirements at one college will be considered to have met those same
requirements if they transfer to another community or technical college in Washington. GHC was an early
25
adopter of Common Course Numbering (CCN) designed to assist students in knowing that a course they
have taken at one institution will transfer to another easily. In CCN, the same courses are titled and
numbered in a similar way at every Washington community college and are designated with an ―&‖ (e.g.
ENGL& 101).
Transfer guidelines, including limitations, are clearly published in the college catalog and on the college‘s
website. Students who wish to appeal a decision concerning acceptance of transfer credit may appeal in
writing to the vice president for instruction.
While the majority of GHC students transfer with state-approved direct transfer agreements, the college
does have specific articulations for upside-down degrees with the Evergreen State College to provide
transfer opportunities for professional/technical students.
Undergraduate Programs
The depth, breadth and integration of the general education program (Standard 2.C.9) is addressed
in board policy 301, which establishes general requirements for all GHC degrees, including:
a)
b)
earning a minimum of 90 quarter hours of credit in courses numbered 100 or above, plus
three credits of physical education activity courses. No credit in a physical education activity
may be substituted for academic credit in meeting graduation requirements.
earning a minimum of 23 of the last 45 quarter hours applicable toward the degree while in
attendance at Grays Harbor College.
The four direct-transfer degrees (AA, AS-T, AB-DTA, APN-DTA) require 90 credits of academic
coursework, as outlined in Chapter One Section II of this report, including requirements in writing skills,
quantitative skills, distribution courses in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, as well as
electives. This degree is intended as the transfer degree for liberal arts majors and meets all general
education requirements (GERs) at state public and many private baccalaureate institutions. To ensure
depth and breadth, students are required to select coursework from different areas within each distribution
category including at least one lab science course.
Neither the non-DTA Associate in Science (AS) nor the Associate in General Studies (AGS) satisfies all
the GERs of receiving institutions, nor do they guarantee junior standing at the baccalaureate institution.
The AS, however, assists students in completing discipline-specific courses in their chosen fields of study
and requires credits in the major academic distribution areas. The AGS requires coursework in the same
areas as the DTA degrees, including college-level writing and quantitative skills as well as the three
distribution areas, but with fewer credits required in each area, the student is allowed maximum
exploration of interest areas within the required 90 credits.
Each Associate in Applied Science (AAS) and Associate in Technology (AT) degree fulfills the specific
requirements of one of the vocational curricula listed in the catalog. These degrees are earned by students
completing a two-year program designed to give them specific job market entry skills as well as related
instruction in computational, communication and interpersonal relations skills, and appropriate levels of
technology-related education.
All degrees have identifiable and assessable learning outcomes that are clearly published in the catalog
and on the web (Standards 2.C.10-11). In transfer degrees, each academic division (humanities, social
science, natural science) is considered a program, and as such has its own identified learning outcomes
that correspond to specific learning outcomes articulated at the discipline and course level. Thus, students
26
will achieve the program-level outcomes regardless of the combination of courses they take to meet the
distribution requirements within a program.
Professional/technical programs have identified outcomes specific to the vocation as well as outcomes for
related instruction in communications, computation and human relations. Related instruction outcomes
are identical or parallel to those identified in academic distribution areas as students can choose from a
variety of courses to fulfill related instruction requirements.
The outcomes align with expectations of statewide transfer and major ready program agreements as well
as business and industry expectations and standards, and link directly to the college‘s DSAs and to GHC‘s
stated institutional goals and indicators of mission fulfillment.
Graduate Programs (Standards 2.C.12-15) NOT APPLICABLE
Continuing Education and Non-Credit Programs (Standards 2.C.16-19)
The Continuing Education program offers contract, non-credit and lifelong learning classes, which are
recommended to the vice president for instruction by the extended learning dean for approval. The dean
proposes annual budgets to the vice president for instruction; allocations are made through instruction.
These programs support the college mission by providing or extending access to meaningful education
and cultural enrichment through service to community.
Credits for college courses funded and operated through extended learning are determined by the
institution as part of the course development and approval process, which includes division and
Instructional Council review and recommendation. GHC does not award Continuing Education Units for
non-credit learning experiences. The college‘s Student Management System lists all credit and non-credit
courses created by GHC no matter their funding source. The online quarterly schedule lists all courses by
geographic location and method of delivery. The extended learning division maintains course syllabi for
all credit and non-credit courses it offers.
Based on 2009-2010 data, Table 2.3.3 describes the size of the Continuing Education program:
Extended Learning Program
Enrollment (all funding sources)
Number of Classes
Number of Students
Contract Training
13
255
EMT Training
1
24
Flagger Training
9
170
Childbirth Training
7
67
Lifelong Learning CSI-CS
167
2,000
Total
197
2,516
Table 2.3.3 5
One of the mission areas of Grays Harbor College is to provide meaningful education and cultural
enrichment through Basic Skills programs, which provide opportunities for individuals to obtain the skills
in reading, writing, mathematics, and the English language necessary to pursue and achieve their
27
personal, academic and professional goals. These programs are included in the statutory mission of
Washington community and technical colleges (RCW 28B.50) and address the needs of Grays Harbor and
Pacific counties, which have low adult educational attainment rates compared to the state average.
Both developmental and adult basic education courses are offered through the college‘s Transitions
program. The developmental curriculum includes pre-college courses in reading, writing, and math, and
currently has three tenured faculty positions: one in reading, one in English, and one in mathematics.
Developmental education courses are offered for credit but do not count toward certificates or degrees, as
they are below college level.
The ABE curriculum includes sequences of English as a Second Language (ESL) classes as well as Adult
Basic Education (ABE) and General Educational Development (GED) classes in math, reading and
writing. GED classes also include instruction in science and social studies. Students are placed in the
appropriate classes based on an assessment of entry skill levels. Advancement to subsequent levels is
based on post-instruction assessment. The Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) is
the state-authorized assessment instrument. Students pay a state-mandated tuition of $25 per quarter for
ABE courses. This tuition may be waived based upon student financial need. ABE course offerings are
supported by a combination of federal funding, which is allocated through the SBCTC in the form of
grants to individual districts, local district funds, and other funding sources identified and secured by
department faculty and staff. Because ABE courses are at a high school equivalent or below, they are not
offered for academic credit.
The ABE department currently has two tenured faculty positions at the main Aberdeen campus, one in
ESL and one in ABE/GED. Adjunct instructors teach a majority of class offerings. Classes are held at
Whiteside Education Center in Aberdeen, on the main campus in Aberdeen, at the Raymond and Ilwaco
education centers, and at community locations throughout the district. The college offers a substantial
Basic Skills program at Stafford Creek Corrections Center, where eight tenured faculty positions support
coursework in ABE/ESL/GED.
Section IV: Student Support Resources (Standard 2.D)
The GHC Learning Center provides a variety of academic resources, beginning with study groups,
access to computers and study skills information, and a homework lab (Standard 2.D.1). Students at the
main campus have access to 48 hours per week of in-person peer tutoring services in subjects such as
math, sciences, and psychology. Students taking classes at other educational centers or whose schedules
don‘t match the LC‘s hours can request tutoring on an individual basis. The Writing Desk provides 19
hours of support per week for writing assistance and English tutoring.
For distance learners and other students not on the main campus, GHC is a member of the multidisciplinary eTutoring Consortium. Another online learning tool, ModuMath, provides practice relevant
to the curricula of all of the college‘s developmental math courses. Links to online resources in math,
English, science, computers/software and study skills – as well as handouts on a variety of study skills
subjects – can be found on the Learning Center website.
The college has just begun a two-year pilot project requiring all new students to enroll in a two-credit
Freshman Year Experience (FYE) course, Creating Success in College and Life. This course
emphasizes personal responsibility, motivation, and use of resources along with study skills. The course is
offered via both traditional and ITV formats to provide an opportunity for new students at the educational
centers to enroll; as of fall 2010, an online version of the class is offered. GHC‘s Early Alert program
28
was piloted during spring quarter 2009 and expanded for fall quarter. It is designed to identify early in the
quarter students who miss class or struggle on assignments or tests. Currently all FYE instructors and
teachers in developmental reading, writing and math courses are targeted to participate by submitting
student names to the Office of Student Success, at which time the students‘ other instructors are contacted
for progress reports. Subsequent discussions with students identify obstacles and issues affecting success
and provide information on resources and possible solutions. The Promote Student Achievement and
Student Success (PASS) mentoring program was fully implemented during 2008-2009. The program is
targeted to new students who are informed of the program during New Student Orientation and in FYE
and developmental education classes. Students who request mentors are then matched with employees
who have volunteered their services. Mentors have included staff, faculty and exempt personnel. During
2008-2009, 55 students participated in the program; 89% of those students returned the next quarter. Of
those who had a mentor in fall 2008, 59% were still at GHC one year later. The PASS program is
currently undergoing a transition toward peer-to-peer mentoring in order to include more students.
A college-wide safety committee meets monthly to review safety and security issues and to provide
input on emergency procedures and training opportunities (Standard 2.D.2). The Director of Campus
Safety and Security, along with college operations staff, responds quickly when repairs or modifications
are needed. An Emergency Procedures Action Plan has been completed and is reviewed regularly.
All state and federal requirements are met regarding:

Crime statistic notification

Mutual aid agreements with police and fire departments

Emergency notification systems for students and staff

Statewide first responder information systems for mapping buildings

Safety and security policies and procedures

Disclosure requirements
This information is published on the website and/or in the Student Handbook. The safety committee also
reviews the college‘s campus safety report annually.
GHC‘s recruitment, admission, and completion policies reflect the philosophy of an open admission
institution that values the four core themes of academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills, and
service to community (Standard 2.D.3). All new students are provided with the opportunity to attend a
New Student Day orientation. In addition, entry advisors provide key enrollment and financial aid
information. A comprehensive online orientation is also available for students to return to as questions
arise (Eligibility Requirement 16).
Elimination of programs does not occur frequently (Standard 2.D.4). When it does, every effort is made
to provide all the instruction necessary for students enrolled in such a program to meet necessary
requirements and complete the program in a timely manner (Operational Policy 315).
Current and accurate information regarding institutional mission and core themes, entrance
requirements and procedures, grading policy, academic programs, learning outcomes, required course
sequences, rules and regulations for conduct, student rights and responsibilities, refund policies, academic
calendar, financial requirements, and qualifications of full-time faculty and administrators are all
available to students and other stakeholders on the GHC website and in the GHC catalog (Standards
2.D.5-7). Much of the preceding information, along with tuition, fees, and other program costs, are
published in the college‘s quarterly schedule, which is available to students online (Eligibility
Requirement 17). The college‘s only program that requires licensure is Nursing. The Nursing Program
29
Information Packet available at the Nursing program website provides information on eligibility
requirements for licensure and includes a link to a site for job opportunities and salary expectations.
The Admissions and Records office began using document imaging in 2007 for securing student
records; this system is backed up nightly. Older records are kept in a locked, fire-resistant room and, as
time permits, these records are scanned into the document-imaging system as well. All online transcript,
admission and registration records are kept on a distant server and backed up nightly. The college follows
records retention guidelines outlined by the State of Washington for all records, whether paper or image.
The college‘s operational policies 403 and 403.01 ensure confidentiality and release of student records.
Students are further advised of their FERPA rights via notices in the class schedule and college catalog.
Only authorized personnel have access to the student data system.
Grays Harbor College provides a full range of financial assistance including Federal Title IV, loans,
work study and scholarships, as well as Washington State jobs, grants, waivers and scholarships
(Standards 2.D.8-9). Students are able to access information about these programs through the college
catalog, student handbook, on the web page and in person. The institution notifies students of any
repayment obligations in writing. The Financial Aid Office actively follows a loan default management
plan and monitors the loan default rate regularly. The five most recent default rates are noted in Table
2.4.1 below:
Financial Aid Default Rates
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
13.2%
15.6%
11.6%
9.6%
12.2%
Table 2.4.1 6
Academic advising is provided by faculty and counseling department staff (Standard 2.D.10). Training is
provided to all new advisors, and all advisors are provided with regularly updated information via email
or general meetings. New students meet with an entry advisor for their first quarter registration and are
then assigned to a permanent advisor based on their academic interests. Students provide evaluation of
advising services through the Student Service Survey and the Survey of Graduating Students.
Requirements for degrees are published in the catalog and transfer assistance is provided by the
counseling office, TRiO and select advisors. An Advising Expectations statement is provided in the
college catalog which details advisor and student responsibilities in the advising process.
The Student Activities and Leadership Program aims to provide meaningful out-of-classroom
opportunities that make for solid educational experiences (Standard 2.D.11). The program, staffed by
one full-time person and one part-time employee, is responsible for providing administrative support,
guidance and oversight to the campus activities board, student government, and student clubs. In fall
quarter 2009, there were 15 active campus organizations, each with a mission relevant to one or more of
the college‘s core themes: academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills, and service to
community. All campus activities embrace the unique interests of the club and the diversity of its students
and contribute to an active campus community.
Yearly leadership training opportunities are provided to student leaders. Students attend workshops,
statewide conferences, and international conventions. Further, the program oversees the AmeriCorps
Students-in-Service program, which administers education awards based on the number of hours served in
the community. In fall quarter 2009, 10 members were enrolled in this program. The SALP office also
provides support and guidance to students through the study-abroad process. GHC students and faculty
30
have studied and taught in Italy and Costa Rica. The bylaws, constitution, and financial code of the
Associated Students of Grays Harbor College provide the policies and procedures that guide students and
the college in the governance of this program area. A student representative attends all college Board of
Trustees meetings and is on the agenda to report on activities and to provide a student perspective on
issues.
GHC‘s auxiliary services include both food service and a bookstore at the Aberdeen campus (Standard
2.D.12). Food service is available to students from 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. A recent renovation of the kitchen
and cafeteria areas (now called Charlie‘s Café) has provided a space that students enjoy using not only for
eating but also, increasingly, for studying and socializing. A recent survey of employees and students was
an impetus for changes in both food selection and service standards. This service is not contracted out. No
food services are provided at other campus sites. The bookstore is an important partner in the intellectual
climate of the college. Staff review student comments from the annual Student Services Survey and make
changes as appropriate based on this feedback. Faculty and staff have the opportunity to provide informal
input at all times. The Aberdeen bookstore staff work hard to provide efficient and supportive bookstore
services to the off-site educations centers as well. Students can order texts by phone and the books will be
shipped to them; recently the bookstore has initiated a textbook rental service as well.
The college provides the opportunity for student athletic participation on five different sports teams
(Standard 2.D.13). GHC is a member of the Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges
(NWAACC). The mission of the college and the NWAACC are compatible. Student athletes follow the
same procedures in applying for admission, financial aid and progress towards degree, as do all other
students at GHC. Student athletes adhere to the same academic standards as all other students and they
also meet NWAACC eligibility requirements for athletic competition.
To verify identity in distance education, the college collects social security numbers (SSNs) from
students via the application process at the time of admission (Standard 2.D.14). That contact information
is used to provide students with a secure means to access online courses and is not accessible to anyone
else. When students log into their online classrooms, they use their SID (college-assigned student
identification number) and the first five letters of their last name as their first log on. They are prompted
to change the password upon the first log on. Since the SID is connected to the SSN, the SID is a
verifiable form of identification; since it is not the actual SSN, the student‘s privacy is protected.
Section V: Library and Information Resources (Standard 2.E, Eligibility Requirement 13)
Library Media Services‘ mission statement speaks directly to the mission and core themes of the college:
The John Spellman Library exists to meet the learning, teaching, and research needs of GHC's students,
faculty, and staff, and to enhance the cultural and intellectual environments of the Twin Harbors. The
LMS staff (one administrator, three full-time classified staff, one full-time faculty librarian, and several
part-time staff and librarians) manifests its mission statement through the appropriateness of its
collections, its services, and its hosted events (Standard 2.E.1).
The collection of printed books and journals, audio visual materials, electronic databases, and AV
equipment for both classroom and student use are carefully selected to meet the needs of all instructional
programs at the college. These selections are guided by parameters expressed in the official collection
development policy (Operational Policy 308) and procedures (308.02). Access to electronic resources is
provided to both local and remote users via the web, and LMS staff routinely send physical materials to
off-site education centers or to home addresses when the need arises.
31
Services include reference assistance both at the reference counter in the main library and via electronic
means (chat and email). As a member of the Online Computer Library Center‘s Question Point
cooperative, LMS staff provide reference service at times when the library is not open. The library facility
itself hosts a range of study environments designed to meet the varying needs of a diverse population—
group study rooms, quiet study areas, individual carrels, small tables, etc. Open access computers are
available in both the library and Media lab, with laptops available. As part of the wireless campus, the
facility also hosts access to the internet from students‘ personal computers. The Media Lab offers the
space, equipment, and staff support for students to develop such media as PowerPoint, videos and photo
presentations, and its staff works with faculty to incorporate such technology into their classroom
expectations. Finally, the library houses the campus art gallery, exhibiting 5-8 shows per year. Each year
sees three recurring shows that highlight the works of GHC students, local high-school students, and
established artists from the community. Other shows are chosen from artist submissions. All shows serve
to both expose students to art they might not otherwise experience and to support community interest in
the visual arts.
The library itself is open 63.5 hours per week, Monday-Saturday, with Saturday hours designed to
complement the Sunday hours of the campus‘ main open computer lab, thus allowing students 7-day
access to computers.
The library‘s planning is consistently guided by data that include feedback from constituents (Standard
2.E.2). Input from users is routinely gathered as LMS staff help with research needs. Discussions with
classroom faculty are routinely conducted in order to ascertain future changes they wish to make, to
confirm there are no plans that would change current demand, and to alert instructors to evidence of
problems students are having with their assignments. Statistics for online resource use are automatically
gathered and then analyzed as part of the decision-making process regarding subscriptions. Internal work
flow data, such as time-to-completion for book orders, is regularly analyzed to assist in adjusting work
assignments of staff. Faculty input into selection of resources is both welcomed and solicited. Depending
on funding, staff identify specific subject areas for in-depth collection analysis, weeding, and acquisition,
with the intent of bringing the area up to a level that allows for new assignments or new instructional
objectives. Significant instructor input is a factor in selecting such areas for in-depth review. The Library
Advisory Committee consists of both faculty and student representatives, who offer broad input as to the
needs of their constituencies. The assistant dean for Library and Media Services sits on both the
Instructional Council and Instructional Management Team, so the library is involved in campus-wide
instructional planning.
Instruction in library skills to support academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills, and service
to community is the most important single activity of LMS (Standard 2.E.3). It is accomplished through a
2-credit Library class, through individual orientations focused to the assignments and goals of specific
classes, and through each reference transaction, whether in person or remote—LMS staff work from the
theory that ―giving them the answer‖ is less important than ―teaching them to find the answer.‖ Media
Lab assistance goes beyond the intricacies of various applications, making certain to guide students to
incorporate use of valid information into the presentation and also to structure the presentation to
communicate effectively. Both Library and Media staff also participate in the Student Success workshops
on campus which are headed up by the Learning Center each quarter.
Less direct instruction is provided by the tutorials and research guides available on the library‘s web site,
in cooperation with classroom faculty in the design and implementation of their curricula (described in
section 2.C.6), and in the fundamental design of both the library website and the library catalog interface
as effective teaching tools. LMS provides support by posting notices of new publications for possible
acquisition. The Media Lab routinely helps faculty and staff prepare presentations and copy media as
32
appropriate, and supports classroom installations of AV equipment. The library hosts a closed reserve
function, and is currently working to expand this into the electronic realm to better serve remote students
and classes.
Quality and adequacy of the collections and services are evaluated by direct comments from users as they
are served and faculty as they work with library staff (Standard 2.E.4). Faculty also forward comments
they hear from their own students and alert LMS staff to problems they see reflected in student work.
Statistics gathered from circulation counts, gate count, use of study rooms, and use of various electronic
resources are all factored into these evaluations.
The most meaningful outcomes evaluation, however, would measure the effect LMS efforts have had on
students‘ learning in their classes, and the effect those efforts continue to have in their lives after GHC.
While no such instrument currently exists, a federal grant recently awarded to the community and
technical college system has as one of its goals the development of such a methodology. As part of this
grant, GHC‘s faculty librarian and a part-time librarian are teaming with two faculty from the Transitions
program to design a relevant project. This project and those at other colleges are to be completed over the
next year and are expected to yield ideas that can be used beyond the grant‘s specific focus on transition
education.
Security is assured in several ways. Ensuring secure password access to databases is subject to continual
re-evaluation as the LMS brings on new e-services to ensure compliance with both contracts and
copyright law. To assure physical security to staff, a minimum of two people are scheduled to be on duty
at all times, preferably two on each of the facility‘s two floors. The main collection—both information
materials and equipment – is tattle-taped to reduce loss. Security of art displays is a challenge, since
continuous supervision is impossible. This reality is addressed by alerting artists of the security situation
and by being mindful, in selecting works for exhibit, of those pieces deemed to have a high likelihood of
theft or vandalism.
Section VI: Financial Resources (Standard 2.F, Eligibility Requirement 18)
Administrative Services houses the college‘s business functions, including central accounting, foundation
accounting, travel and other employee reimbursements, grant and contract accounting, purchasing,
contracting, cashiering, and payroll verification for the college. Payroll is processed in Human Resources.
GHC demonstrates fiscal stability with sufficient cash flows and reserves to support college programs
and services (Standard 2.F.1). Financial reports (budget to actual, fund balances, etc.) are prepared
quarterly for the Board of Trustees, and reviewed with the board by the vice president for administrative
services.
Risk is managed appropriately to ensure financial stability. A contingency dollar amount (typically
greater than $100,000) is built into the annual budget for unexpected expenditures. SBCTC and the
State of Washington have emergency funds available for high-dollar-amount emergency repairs or
maintenance. The Board of Trustees has approved setting aside an operating reserve equal to fifteen
percent of the annual operating budget. The college participates in a self-insurance liability program
through the State of Washington. Additional commercial policies are also purchased through the State to
protect assets not covered under the self-insurance program.
Budgets are planned and developed annually through an inclusive process that incorporates input from
all campus units (via each chief and vice president) and review by the Executive Team (Standard 2.F.2).
The E-Team also reviews requests for new positions and new expenditures brought forward by campus
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units. A balanced budget in accordance with expected revenues is then presented to the Board of Trustees
for final adoption. Budget planning considers historical averages, tuition and fee rates, and state
allocations, and is realistic and conservative with respect to expected revenues.
Enrollment management is tied closely to the dollars allocated to direct instruction; these funds include
full-time faculty salaries and the part-time faculty salary pool. Course offerings are planned to align
student demand with capacity as closely as possible. GHC‘s state funding allocation is based on FTE
enrollment targets. Grants, donations, and non-tuition revenue are incorporated into budget planning. The
majority of grants are determined in time to be included in the budget before final approval. Federal and
state funding such as Perkins, WorkFirst, Worker Retraining, and Adult Basic Education are allocated
through SBCTC, and dollar amounts are determined in advance. The college‘s largest source of nontuition revenue is the monies collected from K-12 school districts within GHC‘s service area for Running
Start (the state‘s dual enrollment program for high school students). These revenues are projected based
on historical enrollments and tracking the number of potential Running Start students who take the
required placement assessment.
GHC meets institutional policies, guidelines and processes as well as state and federal regulations
through its accounting system (Standard 2.F.3). Financial functions are centralized in the business office
on the main campus. The assistant dean of financial services reports to the vice president for
administrative services. Accounting functions are managed through an integrated financial management
system (FMS) that was developed for Washington community and technical colleges and is common
across all SBCTC institutions. The FMS system maintains all required accounting data for state reporting,
but can also support customized local reports. The FMS system provides timely and accurate information
by supporting multiple reporting options for use by program managers and business office personnel
(Standard 2.F.4). Expense reports can be reconciled against the allocation given to each campus unit;
revenue reports can be generated to see if tuition or non-tuition revenue is meeting projections.
Responsibility for capital projects and facilities is delegated by the Board of Trustees to the president in
GHC policy (see 501, 503, 506). Capital planning is carried out through the GHC Facilities Master Plan,
normally updated every five years, most recently updated in December 2007. Requests for state capital
funds follow a comprehensive and competitive process managed by SBCTC. Colleges requesting funds
for new construction, replacement facilities, or renovation submit an extensive Project Request Report
(PRR) for each project desired. All requests across the system are scored according to published criteria
and a unified capital budget request for the entire SBCTC is presented to the state legislature (Standard
2.F.5). In addition to requesting state allocation of capital funding, GHC also has the option to request
capital project funding through the state through a Certificate of Participation (COP). With legislative
approval, the state issues bonds, and the proceeds are used to fund construction or acquisition of facilities.
The college then has the obligation to repay this certificate over a 20-year period. Prior to COP approval,
the college‘s overall fiscal position is vetted by SBCTC and the State Treasurer. Only after the fiscal
integrity of the institution has been proven is the COP issued. SBCTC also makes annual or biennial
allocations to GHC for maintenance, repairs, and minor projects. Each capital project is assigned a unique
budget code by SBCTC. Budgets are monitored both locally and by the SBCTC. Monthly capital
meetings are held by the vice president for administrative services with the assistant dean for financial
services and several of the accounting staff who process capital paperwork to provide coordination of
payments, solution of problems, and attainment of necessary deadlines, as well as to address questions.
Any deviations from the approved allocations are noted and may require additional justification and
demonstration of financial viability (typically through positive fund balances) and approval by SBCTC.
Each auxiliary enterprise at GHC has a separate designated fund. These include data processing (fund
443, rarely used), printing (fund 448, Service Center), motor pool (fund 460), bookstore (fund 524),
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parking (fund 528), food services (fund 569), and other auxiliary (fund 570, rarely used). The president or
designee is authorized to make fund transfers from unobligated fund balances as necessary to avoid
negative cash balances in local operating funds at the close of an accounting period in accordance with
RCW 43.88.260 (Standard 2.F.6).
Financial records at GHC are audited every two years by the Washington State Auditor‘s Office (SAO)
and annually by the SBCTC (Standard 2.F.7, Eligibility Requirement 19). Safeguards are built into the
FMS which alert fiscal services staff of errors. The SBCTC carries out monthly reconciliation and alerts
college staff to any errors that the FMS did not immediately detect; error corrections are made in a timely
manner.
The SAO‘s biennial audit is comprehensive. The SBCTC‘s annual performance reviews focus on grant
funds, local capital funds, and earmarked state allocations. GHC must respond in writing in a timely
fashion to all audit findings and management letters. Any audit findings or management letters are always
follow-up items in the next audit. During the audit exit conference, the president and two board members
are present to hear the recommendations and corrective actions suggested by the SAO. GHC‘s most
recent audit, completed in the fall of 2008, resulted in no audit findings.
GHC has authorized two organizations to conduct fundraising activities on behalf of the college: the
GHC Foundation and Choker Club, GHC‘s athletic booster club (Standard 2.F.8). The GHC Foundation
was incorporated in 1963 for the purpose of encouraging, promoting, and supporting educational
programs and scholarly pursuits in connection with GHC. The Foundation provides significant
scholarship support to GHC students and contributes funds to the college for special projects and events.
The Choker Club supports athletic teams and student athletes through memberships, an annual golf
tournament, dinners, etc. GHC student clubs and organizations may also engage in fundraising to support
their activities; each organization maintains a separate account with the college. Disbursements from
these accounts are made in accordance with established college practices.
Section VII: Physical and Technical Infrastructure (Standard 2.G, Eligibility
Requirement 14)
Physical Infrastructure
As a learner-centered community college that exists to improve people‘s lives through academic transfer,
workforce preparation, basic skills, and service to community, Grays Harbor College is committed to
providing well maintained, technologically capable, and safe physical facilities that contribute to an
educational atmosphere that is conducive to learning (Standard 2.G.1). In 2010, GHC celebrated its 80th
year as a college with a culture of dedication to teaching and service to students. This culture was
recognized and commended by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges‘ Commission on
Colleges in its 2006 Accreditation Report: ―There is much to commend at Grays Harbor College
including the dedicated employees who create a nurturing environment for student growth and the general
appearance and condition of the physical campus.‖
Grays Harbor College employees have a history of making personal sacrifices to help keep the college
operating. Although the college was established in 1930, it was not until 1945 that full faculty salaries
were paid on a regular schedule. Faculty and staff have donated their time and expertise to help develop
facilities for the college. This history has cultivated a community that is accustomed to creatively
―making do‖ within limited resources.
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The main campus in south Aberdeen was actually constructed in the mid-1950s by the Aberdeen School
District with funding from the sale of bonds approved by the district‘s citizens. The design and
construction standards were those set by the K-12 system at that time. The standards then, far different
from those of today, placed a greater emphasis on speed and economy of construction; less importance
was given to longevity and safety of buildings.
Since 1967, when the community college system was organized statewide, the college has requested and
received capital funds from the state legislature for repairs, minor works, and more recently, renovation
and construction of facilities. Through careful maintenance and prudent use of capital funds, the facilities
continue to function despite some of them being over 50 years old.
The director of safety and security is the contact for the college‘s Hazard Communication Program
required by the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA). This program includes training
for college employees on the handling and disposal of hazardous materials and on personal protective
requirements; labeling hazardous containers; providing supervisors and employees with copies of material
safety data sheets; informing contractors of hazardous materials used at the college; and employees
performing hazardous non-routine tasks such as cleaning storage containers that contain hazardous
materials required to perform the job (Standard 2.G.2).
GHC is currently classified as a small quantity generator. The director of safety and security ensures that
the dangerous waste annual report is completed if required by the Washington State Department of
Ecology. The director of safety and security meets monthly with the Grays Harbor County Local
Emergency Planning Committee, which deals with hazardous material spills or hazardous materials
concerns within the county.
GHC updates its Facilities Master Plan every three to five years in a manner consistent with the
college‘s mission and core themes (Standard 2.G.3). The most recent update was completed in December
2007. The process for producing the plan provides for input from all functional areas of the organization,
as well as opportunities for public and student review. The process is driven by program needs and
involves a contracted architecture firm with experience in educational environments to prepare the plan
and manage the process of developing and evaluating it. The plan articulates seven goals:
• Refine vehicular and pedestrian circulation
• Create a lasting impression
• Minimize any sense of isolation
• Capitalize on the natural setting
• Promote universal design and a barrier-free attitude
• Update building infrastructures
• Coordinate landscaping with the surrounding environment
GHC always strives to ensure that the equipment purchased is of a quality and life cycle that will benefit
the college for long-term use (Standard 2.G.4). Having a sufficient quantity of equipment is always a
challenge for both technology and other instructional equipment. Often major equipment purchases result
from one-time funding initiatives or capital project funding. Technology purchases have benefitted from a
five-year Title III grant that included an emphasis on improving technology and access both on the main
campus and the education centers. In addition, a number of student computer labs have been replaced and
upgraded through funding from the student technology fee.
Existing campus conditions are described in Table 2.7.1 below.
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Existing Campus Conditions
Building
Function
Size (gsf)
Built
Improved
100 - Hillier Union Building (HUB)
bookstore, student services,
food services
22,882
1957
1964, 1993, 2009
200 - Joseph A. Malik Building
WorkFirst, student programs, IT
12,435
1957
1985, 1996
300 Building
life sciences, art, journalism
14,765
1957
2000, 2001
400 Building
vacant
19,310
1957
1995
450 Building
ITV, classrooms, computer lab
5,170
1998
500 Building
gym, fitness, weight training
18,815
1957
1964, 2001
700 - Jon V. Krug Building
carpentry, maintenance
23,305
1971
2006, 2010
800 - Math & Sciences Building
classrooms, labs
18,240
1971
1400 Building
childcare center
6,246
2010
1500 - John Spellman Library
library, media technology,
learning center, art gallery
25,155
1966
2003
1600 - Bishop Center for Performing Arts
auditorium seating for 440
12,825
1974
2003
1700 - John M. Smith Aquaculture Center
fisheries program
3,855
1984
1997
1800 - Diesel Technology Building
shops, classroom
9,485
1988
1900 - Automotive/Welding Technology
Building
shops, classrooms
21,500
2007
2000 - Jewell C. Manspeaker Instructional
Building
classrooms, business office, HR,
administrative offices
71,800
2006
2100 - Whiteside Education Center (Aberdeen)
classrooms, administration offices
5,396
1925
1998, 2000, 2010
2200 - Riverview Education Center (Raymond)
classroom, administration offices
12,660
1925
2005, 2009
2200G - Greenhouse (Raymond)
life sciences
1,824
2009
2400 - Simpson Education Center (Elma)
classroom, administration offices
(currently not in use)
1,792
1998
2600 - Columbia Education Center (Ilwaco)
classroom, administration
6,342
2006
2700 - Grounds Shed
sand, gravel, equipment
1,945
2010
Table 2.7.1
Technological Infrastructure
Grays Harbor College‘s technology infrastructure has changed significantly in the last decade in order to
better fulfill its core themes of academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills, and service to
community (Standard 2.G.5). The campus has responded to the increased usage of the internet and
computer support required by instruction, student services, and the business office. As of 2010-2011, the
campus network supporting the technology infrastructure had upgraded from 10 Mb/s bandwidth to
100Mb/s. There are approximately 1,000 computers in staff offices and student labs including main
campus, education centers, and off-campus sites. There are 22 computer labs distributed throughout the
Aberdeen main campus, located near the departments that integrate computer usage into their curricula.
The library has computers for student use and the campus also maintains one open computer lab for
students. There are an additional 10 labs located on sites other than the main campus.
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To support the instructional process in the past, audio/visual equipment that consisted of videotape
players with monitors were moved from room to room; now, VCR and DVD players are in most
classrooms (Standard 2.G.6). All new and many existing classrooms have been equipped with data drops
for Internet access and ceiling LCD/DLP multimedia projectors mounted overhead. New and remodeled
buildings have multimedia equipment planning at the design process level. Classrooms with mounted
projectors also have computers to support PowerPoint presentations, web browsing, video streaming, etc.
Visual presenters such as Elmo (or similar) document cameras are placed in locations as faculty indicate a
need for this type of projection equipment. In addition, 75% of the classrooms include an interactive
smart monitor allowing instructors to include comments or other annotations as material is projected.
These multimedia stations are available in an increasing number of classrooms.
In 2004, a limited pilot wireless project included 3 access points in the library. In July 2007, a campus
wide wireless project included an Aruba controller and 20 access points to be located in buildings across
campus as well as two of the education centers. The campus information technology staff then developed
procedures to allow staff, students and visitors access to the network from anywhere on campus.
The Information Technology (IT) staff supports the campus computers, networks, telephone PBX,
computer labs and office computers, and coordinates the purchasing of any new computer-related
equipment. This common point of coordination assures the purchase of the correct equipment and
maintains efforts to establish campus technology levels.
Students have the ability to perform many tasks online, such as registering for classes, checking grades,
online tutoring, accessing the Library databases, online advising, requesting transcripts, accessing
financial aid data, and completing degree audits. Many of these services can be accessed from the Kiosk,
a web page students can access on or off-campus.
GHC provides short training sessions covering topics of interest to faculty, staff, and students. Topics are
determined by informal surveys or the implementation of new or upgraded versions of software. The IT
department provides an online Helpdesk system allowing end-users to submit help requests electronically.
IT staff members are knowledgeable and experienced in each of the software programs utilized on
campus. They are a valuable resource to provide prompt service to students, staff, and faculty.
The college recently added an emergency generator to ensure the telephone PBX and the main campus
internet connection remains available during extended power outages. This allows GHC to maintain
communication during these times.
All campus departments have the opportunity to request technology initiatives during the strategic
planning process (Standard 2.G.7). The campus hardware replacement plan ensures that individual office
machines and all student computer lab machines are upgraded on a regular basis without individual
departments having to purchase or request the upgrades. Expenditures from the student technology fee are
proposed and approved by the Tech Fee committee, which is made up of five students, two faculty
members, and the chief information officer. These purchases have generally focused on areas that will
serve the largest number of students. Technology requirements for any new or remodeled spaces are
included in all pre-design and design discussions.
The technical infrastructure of the institution is maintained and upgraded to keep up with changing
technological needs and requirements based on a five-year strategic plan that takes into account current
technology forecasts, new or potential uses of existing technologies, industry adoption, and maturity
levels of current and emerging technology trends (Standard 2.G.8).
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Section VIII: Chapter Two Summary
This chapter comprises a descriptive accounting of the resources and capacity Grays Harbor College calls
upon to achieve its goal as a catalyst for positive change in the community. Although recent funding
reductions at the state level have presented serious challenges to the institution, the cooperative and
creative efforts of administration, faculty, staff and students have helped to ensure that GHC makes the
best possible use of its resources and capacity to fulfill its mission. Indeed, as information in this chapter
has outlined – and analysis in later chapters will confirm – Grays Harbor College provides access to the
broadest range of meaningful educational opportunities efficiency allows for all members of the service
area who choose to improve their lives through the college community.
At the heart of GHC‘s mission – to provide meaningful education and cultural enrichment through
academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills, and service to community – is its educational
program. The institution‘s educational resources, as well as its broader resources – governance, human
resources, student services, library, finance, physical/technical facilities – exist to support the students and
the broader community in pursuing that education.
As demonstrated in the preceding pages, the college has a clear and effective governance structure that
articulates defined roles for all members of the college community. Policies and procedures, reviewed on
a regular basis, are clear, publicly available, and understood by all stakeholders. Faculty and staff are well
qualified, professional, and dedicated to student success. All college functions – from instructional
programs to technical infrastructure, from library to finance, from student activities to physical plant – are
designed, implemented, maintained, assessed and improved in ways consistent with the institution‘s
mission and core themes. In preparing the description of resources and capacity in this chapter, members
of the Accreditation Steering Committee, along with members of the broader college community,
reflected on what lay ahead in this process, looking forward to measuring and evaluating the ways in
which the college makes use of its resources and capacity to achieve mission fulfillment.
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Chapter Three: Institutional Planning
Section I: The Planning Process (Standards 3.A.1-2)
Grays Harbor College develops and implements several types of institutional plans that address the entire
college district (Standards 3.A.1-2).
Strategic Planning: 2005-2009
In May 2005 Grays Harbor College launched a new era in strategic planning that resulted in a
comprehensive and inclusive campus-wide process designed to articulate the college mission, vision and
values, and to link the college‘s strategic directions, annual goals, institutional practices and budget
development into one document that would guide the college in its planning efforts for 2006-2009. Over a
two-year period, the process was guided by a 45-member college Strategic Planning Committee that
included constituents from all areas of the college. The first year‘s activities included six separate phases
of data gathering and input that came together to create the final strategic plan:
PHASE ONE: Internal Data Gathering – Strengths/Weaknesses/Opportunities/Threats (SWOT)
Workshops More than 110 students, faculty and staff participated in facilitated small-group discussions
to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that will face the college in the next 10 years
and to position GHC for those challenges. The workshop focused on nine key areas, and the feedback was
used to help the Strategic Planning Committee understand community perceptions of the college‘s current
status.
PHASE TWO: External Data Gathering – SWOT Workshops To gather data from external partners,
the college welcomed more than 40 representatives from the K -12 system, business and industry,
government, and community leaders to the campus to address the following questions: What are your
perceptions of Grays Harbor College? How does the college currently impact your organization? What
changes do you foresee in your organization/field in the next decade? What role do you see for GHC over
the next ten to fifteen years? Local students in grades 10, 11 and 12 of the district‘s main high schools
were surveyed as well as spring 2005 GHC students to gather their perceptions of Grays Harbor College.
PHASE THREE: Strategic Planning Retreat An all-day retreat was held for members of the strategic
planning committee, the Division Chairs group, the Board of Trustees, and student participants. Members
received comprehensive notebooks prior to the meeting containing data from the internal and external
SWOTs and the GHC institutional effectiveness report as well as labor market data, employer and student
satisfaction surveys, local economic development data and other assessments. The first half of the retreat
was spent reviewing the data to identify broad themes in seven key areas (instructional programs, student
support, technology, resource development, facilities/grounds, personnel, and climate/community) that
formed the basis of the college‘s strategic directions. The second part of the workshop included large- and
small-group facilitated discussions designed to review potential mission, vision, and values statements.
After analyzing available data and information, each group developed a presentation for the campus
community at the annual fall kick-off days, identifying needs for the next five to 10 years as well as
recommendations for addressing those needs.
PHASE FOUR: Articulating the College Vision The entire campus community participated in a
college-wide review and discussion of information presented by the Strategic Planning Committee. Two
items provided the agenda focus: What does GHC need to accomplish in the next two years toward
fulfilling its mission and vision? and After reviewing drafts of the mission, vision, and values, what
recommendations can be made to the Strategic Planning Committee?
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PHASE FIVE: Fall Kick-Off A full day of the opening week‘s activities centered on presenting the
campus with the work that had been accomplished to date as well as the timeline, development plan and
implementation of GHC‘s strategic plan for 2006-2009.
PHASE SIX: Strategy Development and Implementation The implementation of the new strategic
plan also followed a comprehensive and inclusive process. All areas of the college were divided into
planning units. Each unit received a strategic planning template made up of three sections:



Section 1 identified the program, administrator of the program, staff, full-time and part-time
faculty, and history and mission of the previous three years.
Section 2 addressed needs of the planning unit including assessments related to staffing,
equipment/technology, achievement of previous years‘ goals, and future short- and long-term
goals.
Section 3 identified the action plan that the unit was submitting to help the college achieve the
goals of the strategic plan over the next three years, including the specific strategy, responsibility
for completion, collaborators, assessment measures, timeline, and budget impact. All units of the
college were encouraged to submit strategies for any goals that they believed their efforts could
successfully impact.
The data gathered from the various units of the college were consolidated into a final strategic plan and
presented to the Board of Trustees for approval. The strategic plan was the basis for budget planning in
each of these years, and a portion of each year‘s budget was designated to fund specific strategies that
were determined by the budget committee to be the highest priority for the coming year.
In order to maintain momentum and active engagement, the college adopted a very ambitious schedule of
reporting to the campus and Board of Trustees during the three years of the strategic plan. A database was
developed to produce reports on multiple levels detailing strategies accomplished, progress toward goals
and statistics related to work completed, in progress, and not yet begun. Key administrators from the ETeam monitored and gathered progress updates from their areas, which were used to create quarterly and
annual narrative and statistical reports. These reports were posted on the GHC website for the campus and
the community and distributed at regularly scheduled Board of Trustees meetings.
A key player throughout this process was the college‘s office of research, assessment and planning,
whose mission is to facilitate the collection, analysis, and communication of data used to support
decision-making, planning, assessment, and fulfillment of the college‘s mission. The office is tasked with
maintaining quality college data sources and other information resources required to respond to internal
and external requests, including longitudinal student data and data relevant to institutional effectiveness,
strategic planning, and accreditation. The office is also responsible for tracking and reporting progress to
the college community as well as completing an annual, comprehensive institutional effectiveness report.
Strategic Planning: 2009-2013
In July 2008, the college began the development process for the current Strategic Plan with a Board of
Trustees Retreat. The timeline of the plan was extended to four years to better match the state budget
cycle and to allow longer-term action plans and strategies for addressing emerging needs.
During the retreat, the college and board adopted the strategic directions of the SBCTC as the college‘s
new strategic plan directions and created a first draft of possible goals for those directions (see document
here).
41
For the campus community, the all-campus day during fall kick-off was dedicated to reviewing the
college‘s mission, vision, and values. Small cross-sectional groups reviewed the documents of the other
34 community and technical colleges as well as colleges nationwide. Small-group feedback was brought
back to the all-campus group, resulting in several drafts of possible revisions for all three components.
With the launch of the 2008-2009 academic year, a new Strategic Planning Committee was appointed,
consisting of 25 members and the Board of Trustees. The Strategic Planning Committee established a
blog for comment on the possible revisions and their proposed draft and in March adopted the final
version (see Mission, Vision, Values March 2009). The college mission was revised to reflect clearly the
college‘s four core themes of academic transfer, workforce preparation, basic skills, and service to
community, in consideration of the new standards being developed by the Northwest Commission on
Colleges and Universities. GHC‘s new mission, vision, and values were adopted by the Board of
Trustees.
The Strategic Planning Committee and the Executive Team met regularly in February, March and April
2009 to develop final goals, strategies, and indicators of success for the 2009-2013 plan. Goals were
developed using what was learned from the previous planning cycle and the results of the annual
institutional effectiveness report.
Due to financial constraints at the state level, including budget reductions for all of higher education,
members of the Budget Development Committee and the Strategic Planning Committee were integrated
into one group to develop strategies based upon the parameters of the current budget. New strategies are
developed annually as part of the budget development process and annual review of the previous years‘
accomplishments. In the past two years, due to the significant budget reductions experienced by the
college, the mission, values and strategic plan were tools for determining the priority of programs and
services to be sustained or eliminated. The highest priority in that process was maintaining access for
students to the four core theme areas of the mission. It is essential that the college make effective use of
resources and capacity in order to achieve demonstrable success in student progress and completion,
stakeholder satisfaction and community involvement and enrichment in relation to the four core themes.
The Strategic Planning Committee, institutional researcher and E-Team held several meetings in May and
June to determine appropriate indicators of success for the strategic plan and the core themes of the
mission. The result of that process was a carefully considered list of quantitative and qualitative measures
for each goal area and core theme that will determine the college‘s success at meeting each specific goal
and the outcome for each mission core theme.
Over the summer months, E-Team members submitted reports to the office of research, assessment and
planning, summarizing achievement of strategic plan goals in their areas of responsibility. These reports
were used to develop the 2008-2009 (Year 3) strategic planning progress report.
In September 2009, the final progress report on the 2006-2009 strategic plan was shared at the annual
exempt retreat. Copies of the college‘s new mission, vision and values as well as the 2009-2013 strategic
plan were distributed to all exempt staff. These items were also distributed electronically to all faculty and
staff prior to fall kick-off in September 2009.
A Board of Trustees retreat was also held in September 2009. The board reviewed the 2008-2009 (Year 3)
report of the 2006-2009 strategic plan as well as the new 2009-2013 strategic plan. Based on those two
documents, the board adopted four focused priorities for each strategic plan goal for the 2009-2010
academic year. Quarterly reports of progress on the strategic goals were presented to the Board of
Trustees.
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Another Board of Trustees retreat was held on February 23, 2010. An annual calendar for planning and
assessment was presented to the board that identifies each step of the planning process and the timeline
for each. Results of the most recent institutional effectiveness report (annual report), which had been
revised to align with the 2008-2009 strategic plan goals, were discussed. The president provided a midyear progress report on the 2009-2013 strategic plan. The indicators of success included in the plan were
discussed and minor changes were made. The board adopted focused priorities for strategic plan goals for
the 2010-2011 academic year. These focused priorities for the strategic plan goals were used to develop
the 2010-2011 budget, which was presented to the board and approved in July 2010.
Section II: Data Analysis and Resource Allocation (Standards 3.A.3-4)
During fiscal years 2005-2006, 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 the college employed its strategic plan to
inform the budget planning process. Strategies were developed as far down within the organization as the
individual unit level. These strategies were synthesized into a comprehensive strategic plan. A budget
committee made up of a cross-section of campus reviewed the strategies and prioritized the budget-related
strategies for funding (Standards 3.A.3-4).
In fiscal years 2008-2009 and 2009-2010, the budget planning process functioned as an emergency task
force, focusing on strategic reductions in the base budget rather than allocation of new resources to fund
strategic goals and initiatives. The collective impact of state budget shortfalls passed along to higher
education, and specifically the community college system, has been serious. During FY09, FY10, and
forward into FY11 the cumulative reduction is nearly 19% of the college‘s state funding base. This trend
has alarming implications for the future of the college as well as the entire community and technical
college system.
The process of planning in this environment has been challenging. The approach was straightforward and
effective, and was the right response given the huge funding shortfalls the college has had to contend
with. The president and vice president for administrative services hosted a number of budget forums with
the entire campus community. Staff and faculty across the campus were invited to share their ideas for
budget savings and efficiencies. During the entire process, the administration worked hard to keep the
campus informed. The E-Team was asked to communicate with those reporting to them to gather input
from all levels of the college into the budget decisions. For example, the vice president for instruction met
with the Division Chairs group as well as the Instructional Management Team to seek feedback about
needs as well as reductions. This information was passed along for decision-making purposes.
The college‘s mission as well as core themes informed this process; the guiding principles used during
this process came out of the strategic plan:






Maintain the highest quality of education and service for the largest number of students,
within available resources
Maintain student access to the comprehensive mission
Minimize the negative impact on College employees (faculty and staff)
Use the college mission as the determinant of budget priorities
Keep people informed about the process as it develops
Conduct a transparent process that is inclusive and respectful of students, faculty and staff
As a result, the institution was able to retain quality, services, and access with a minimal number of actual
lay-offs. The specter of further looming state budget cuts continues to threaten the college‘s ability to
maintain this balance.
43
Section III: Emergency Preparedness and Contingency Planning (Standard 3.A.5)
Grays Harbor College participates in significant planning related to emergency preparedness, safety and
security. This planning is conducted by the director of safety and security, with participation from the
Safety Committee, which includes representation from faculty, classified employees, students and exempt
personnel. Annually, the components of planning and providing information include emergency
preparedness, campus safety and security, and an accident prevention program required by the
Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA).
Emergency Preparedness at Grays Harbor College addresses four purposes: prevention, preparedness,
response, and recovery. These four purposes have been met by:









mutual aid agreements with Aberdeen Police/Fire Departments, Grays Harbor Health Department
shelter agreement with the American Red Cross; emergency supplies stored at the college
direct two-way radio communication with Grays Harbor Emergency Management
generators to provide power to computer servers and the telephone system
special purchase cards to ensure quick buying power in emergencies
fire alarm drills; participating in emergency exercises and tabletop exercises with city, county and
state officials dealing with active shooters, tsunamis, earthquakes, and hazardous material spills
a trained on-campus community emergency response team to deal with emergencies
participation in Washington‘s mapping program through the state‘s Association of Sheriffs and
Police Chiefs
employees‘ completion of the required National Incident Management System (NIMS) training
Campus Safety and Security information is available to the campus community on the college‘s website
and in printed form (Student Handbook, Emergency Procedure Sheets and the Emergency Action Plan)
and posted in labs, classrooms and offices. This information includes the campus safety report, crime
statistics, personal safety, fire safety, earthquakes, tsunamis, armed intruder/active shooter, and crime
prevention.
An emergency notification system is available to students, staff, and community members allowing text
message, e-mail and/or voice message notification of emergencies and campus closures. A convenient
enrollment process for the emergency notification system is linked from the college‘s main web page. In
addition, emergency notification is also sent using the college‘s audix telephone system, a reader board at
the main entrance to campus and local radio and television stations.
The college‘s Behavior Intervention Team (BIT) was formed to address the myriad concerns about
students in distress with the goal of offering preventive and supportive assessment and intervention. This
is accomplished through proactive tracking and monitoring of problematic behavior and by providing
timely assessment, consultation, referral, intervention and support.
The focus of the college‘s Accident Prevention Program is on providing training and education to the
college community. A safety orientation is required for all new employees. In addition, the following
training and classes have been made available:
First Aid/CPR/AED – Fire extinguisher & vehicle safety training – CERT training
Hazardous communication program – Blood borne pathogens – High voltage safety
Chainsaw safety – Natural and propane gas safety – Pandemic flu – Forklift training
Self-defense – Bomb threat training – Robbery awareness – Personal safety
44
Section IV: Chapter Three Summary
As described in the preceding pages, Grays Harbor College engages in meaningful and ongoing planning
designed to lead to mission fulfillment. Planning activities involve the entire campus community in a
systematic and open process that is integrated into the daily lives of faculty, staff, students, and
stakeholders in the broader college community. Opportunities for input into the college‘s planning
process exist on both formal and informal levels. Formally, all constituents are invited to participate in
information sharing through scheduled and announced activities as described earlier in this chapter.
Informally, feedback from members of the campus community is welcomed through a wide variety of
avenues. Data gathering is both continuous and episodic, with individual programs and departments
maintaining ongoing efforts to update records and secure feedback so that essential data are available for
regular planning activities, such as the schedule and budget development processes. These planning
activities are consistently driven by analysis and evaluation of all available data.
As all members of the college community have discovered in recent years, the institution‘s emergency
preparedness and contingency planning have served the college well by ensuring recovery of service
quickly in the aftermath of unforeseen natural events. Careful planning and preparation have placed the
college in an excellent position for mission fulfillment in times that have proven uncertain owing to both
budgetary and natural challenges.
The college‘s plans are carefully made, conscientiously implemented, and publicly shared. The college‘s
priorities are regularly reviewed and revised as a part of ongoing planning; once set, they are the rubric
against which all institutional planning is measured. All budgeting, scheduling, and allocation of
resources whether human, physical or financial are predicated upon adherence to the college‘s
comprehensive strategic plan and priority goals. The strategic plan and priority goals are directly linked to
the college‘s vision, mission, core themes, and institutional values.
45
Chapter Four:
Core Theme Planning, Assessment, and Improvement
Grays Harbor College‘s Mission and Core Themes align directly with state of Washington statute that
requires community colleges to ―offer thoroughly comprehensive educational, training, and service
programs to meet the needs of both the communities and students served by combining high standards of
excellence in academic transfer courses; realistic and practical courses in occupational education, both
graded and ungraded; community services of an educational, cultural, and recreational nature; and adult
education, including basic skills and general, family, and workforce literacy programs and services.‖
Planning: Instructional Review (Standard 3.B.1-3, Eligibility Requirements 22, 23)
Since 2007, faculty and instructional managers have been developing, implementing, and refining an
ongoing instructional review process to continually analyze programs and course offerings for
effectiveness in meeting the educational and training needs of the community. Instructional Review
involves the following activities:
1. Systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data to assess the overall design and
effectiveness of programs. The information gathered and analyzed aids in planning, decisionmaking, personnel development, and allocation and use of college resources.
2. A systematic evaluation process to determine if programs should be expanded, continued,
reduced, or terminated.
3. A process to determine if need and resources exist for new program development.
This initiative is a direct result of Grays Harbor College‘s 2006-2009 Strategic Direction 1: Instruction
(“Evaluate program offerings, scheduling, and resources across the district in order to formulate a
comprehensive plan to meet the needs of our students and communities while promoting educational
excellence in teaching and learning”), Goal 1.1 (“Develop and implement a system to evaluate all
instructional programs to identify community needs for new programs, growth, continued status, or
possible elimination”), and Goal 1.2 (“Create a class schedule that is more flexible and provides options
for the diverse community of students in our district”). The instructional review process collects and
analyzes data in direct support of the college‘s 2009-2013 Strategic Goal 1 (“Program offerings and
services are relevant, flexible, high-quality, and responsive to the changing needs of the community”),
Goal 2 (“Enrollment reflects district demographics with special emphasis on underserved populations”),
Goal 3 (“All students achieve their educational goals”), and Goal 4 (“Students smoothly transition from
K-12 and to colleges and universities”). A key player in instructional review is the college‘s office of
institutional research, assessment and planning.
Instructional review involves three levels of assessment, analysis and improvement. Part 1, Course Level
Review, is completed individually by faculty and includes analysis of resources, instructional
methodologies, academic support, enrollment and scheduling, and course-level student learning outcomes
assessment. Faculty are also asked to report any changes to course outcomes and their impact on program
and degree outcomes. Reports are submitted to the vice president for instruction and to the respective
division chair and reviewed jointly by the Instructional Management Team and Division Chairs.
In Part 2, Program Level Review, the college uses enrollment, budget, and scheduling information from
faculty to determine the annual course schedule, program needs, and budget requests. Instructional
managers also analyze student progression data and enrollment trends for each core theme area on a threeyear rolling basis. Division chairs are responsible for compiling program-level outcomes assessment
results and recommendations based on faculty course outcomes assessment.
46
In Part 3, Institutional Level Review, instructional managers analyze and synthesize core theme
indicators and mission fulfillment. Updates are made as necessary to the Instructional Technology Plan,
Instructional Equipment Plan, and Academic Support Plan. Data are reviewed to determine program mix
and new program development to ensure that changes in community demographics and economics are
appropriately represented in instructional programs. It is at the institutional level that the college reviews
assessment of its Desired Student Abilities (DSAs). Revisions to all levels of instructional review are
made as necessary. Table 4.1 outlines these three parts of the process.
Instructional Review at a Glance
Part 1
Faculty
Resources
Enrollment Management
Instructional Methods
Course Outcomes Assessment
Part 2
Instructional Management Team/
Division Chairs
Annual Schedule
Completion Rates & Progression
Rates/Concerns & Improvements by
core theme
Enrollment Trends overall and by core
theme
Instructional Support Services
Priority of Resources/New or Cuts
Part 3
Instructional Management Team/
Division Chairs
Program Mix/New Program
development
Long range planning (to include
Instructional Technology Plan,
Instructional Equipment Plan,
Academic Support Plan)
Institutional outcomes:
1. DSAs
2. Core Themes
Program Outcomes Assessment
Table 4.1
Assessment results are disseminated to constituents in a variety of ways. Annual instructional and noninstructional reviews, course- and program-level outcome assessments, and institutional effectiveness
reports are posted on the college‘s website, accessible by both on campus and off-campus constituencies.
The college also posts all accreditation self-studies and NWCCU Evaluation reports on its website. An
annual accreditation status report and Student Achievement Initiative results can also be found on the
State Board for Community and Technical Colleges‘ website.
Assessment of Instruction (Standards 4.A.1-6, Eligibility Requirements 22, 23)
The first instructional review, including enrollment management and a full cycle of assessing the Desired
Student Abilities, was completed by faculty in December 2008. In 2009-2010, faculty completed the
remaining sections of Instructional Review Part I, addressing instructional methodologies, academic
support services, and resources. Results and improvements are noted within each core theme.
Instructional Review 2008 indicated that revisions to learning outcomes assessment processes were
needed. Faculty and the Division Chairs group developed new processes for both course and programlevel assessment and degree outcomes were updated. Faculty are employing these new processes in their
2010-2011 instructional review.
Student achievement of learning outcomes at the course and program levels is measured by way of
the intensive instructional review process described at the beginning of Chapter Four. Each faculty
member conducted course-level outcomes assessment projects during 2009-2010. These projects
measured the achievements of students with respect to individual course outcomes; faculty then analyzed
the articulation between these course outcomes and program-level outcomes as well as articulation
between course outcomes and general-education outcomes or desired student abilities (DSAs) at the
institutional level. The division chairs and other faculty with leadership positions then prepared reports
47
that synthesized the course-level outcomes and analyzed the results assessed. The college recognizes the
need to actively involve part-time faculty in learning outcomes assessment. The Division Chairs group is
currently developing a course outcomes assessment process for part-time instructors. Training is
scheduled for spring quarter 2011 with full implementation in fall 2011.
In 2007-2008, 23 full-time faculty members participated in a syllabus update/revision project. Table 4.2
shows each instructional division‘s average ratings for the four components of the college‘s general
education outcomes (DSAs) with a 4 rating indicating the highest emphasis on that ability across the
division‘s programs and courses. The college needs to revisit the assessment process for its Desired
Student Abilities (general education outcomes) but has chosen to delay this review until 2011-2012.
GHC Instructional Divisions’ Ratings of General Education Outcomes
Business
Developmental Education/ABE
Health Sciences/Nursing
Humanities/Communications
Industrial Technologies
Science and Math
Social Science/PE
Counseling
Critical
Thinking
2.7
3.5
3.5
3.3
2.6
3.1
3.2
4.0
Literacy
2.3
3.7
3.5
3.0
1.8
2.6
2.4
3.0
Social & Personal
Responsibility
1.7
1.8
3.7
1.7
3.1
1.3
3.3
4.0
Information
Use
2.0
1.5
3.5
1.6
1.6
1.6
2.4
2.0
Table 4.2 7
Overall, Grays Harbor College students perceive that they have experienced high-quality programs and
services during their time as students. One question students are asked in GHC‘s graduate surveys is
―Based upon your experience as a student at GHC, how would you rate the quality of instruction?‖ Over
the last three years for which data are available (2007-2009) 89% of students rated the quality of
instruction ―excellent‖ or ―good,‖ while just 3% rated the quality of instruction ―poor‖ or ―very poor.‖ 8
Students overall believe their experiences at GHC have prepared them to succeed through achievement of
both general education and discipline-specific outcomes, as demonstrated through graduate survey data
gathered from 2007 to 2009 in response to the prompt ―Indicate to what extent you agree that the college
has contributed to your progress in each of the campus-wide learning outcomes‖ (see Table 4.3).
GHC Graduates‘ Perceptions of Learning Outcomes Achieved
Competency in the Disciplines
Literacy
Critical Thinking
Social/Personal Responsibility
Information Use
Agree/Strongly Agree
2007
2008
2009
2007
86%
88%
94%
85%
90%
6%
9%
1%
10%
5%
84%
82%
92%
82%
84%
87%
88%
94%
81%
90%
Undecided
2008
2009
12%
12%
7%
12%
11%
10%
7%
4%
14%
7%
Disagree/Strongly Disagree
2007
2008
2009
8%
3%
5%
5%
5%
4%
6%
2%
6%
4%
3%
5%
2%
6%
2%
Table 4.3 9
Of all students earning degrees in 2008-2009 (437), 23.1% were students of color while 7.3% were
students with disabilities. In the overall student population, 26% were students of color and 9% were
students with disabilities.10 While these numbers indicate a correlation between access and success for
diverse groups of students, some survey data gathered in recent years indicate that student perceptions of
the college‘s achievement of diversity goals are lower than desired. In 2008, for example, only 60% of
48
students agreed or strongly agreed that faculty, staff and students at this college are welcoming to people
of different social classes, while 35% strongly disagreed. Similarly, only 58% of students said that the
college often or sometimes increased their awareness of the contributions to society made by cultures
different from their own, while 42% said that this rarely or never occurred. When broken down by
minority status, these data tell a somewhat different story. For example, in 2005 (the most recent year for
which these data are available) only 36% of non-minority students said that GHC encourages contact
among students from different economic, social and racial or ethnic groups very much or quite a bit,
compared to 46% of self-identified minority students. In some respects, these numbers appear to be
improving over time. For example, when asked how much their college experience encouraged their
understanding of people of other racial and ethnic backgrounds, the percentage of students who said
―very little‖ decreased from 30.1% in 2002 to 23.4% in 2008.11 Based on these results, and on the figures
in Table 4.3, special emphasis will be placed on Social/Personal Responsibility across the curriculum.
Improvements in Instruction (Standards 4.B.1-2)
Based on the results of the 2008 instructional review and a follow-up analysis of enrollment data,
significant revisions were made to the 2009-2010 annual schedule of classes. The revisions were designed
to increase fill rates in course sections and to responsibly cancel low-enrolled courses while preserving
the breadth and depth of course offerings across the core themes. Changes included:








Reducing the number of course sections offered each quarter in areas such as PE, Computer
Applications, and General Biology
Combining sequenced courses such as SPANISH II/III and PHYSICS 122/222 and 123/223
Closing programs with historically low enrollment – Natural Resources (Fisheries, Aquaculture,
Watershed), AUTOCAD, and GIS
Replacing low enrolled specialty courses with high enrolled courses within the same content area
(history, political science)
Moving some courses to every other year scheduling (Math for Elementary Education)
Raising class caps on Industrial Technology courses (from 16 to 20)
Canceling ―trailing‖ sections of course sequences (e.g. a second sequence of General Chemistry
beginning winter quarter)
Including online sections in faculty load (rather than as overload) and moving lower enrolled
courses to overload
These efforts resulted in a dramatic change in student-faculty ratios, which improved from 17.09 in fall
quarter 2008 to 22.24 in fall quarter 2009. Table 4.4 describes the changes in the college‘s student-faculty
ratios over the past decade.
Changes in Student-Faculty Ratios Over Time
Fall
Quarter
Student-Faculty
Ratio GHC
Percentage Change from
Previous Year
Student-Faculty
Ratio CTC System
Percentage Change from
Previous Year
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
18.08
19.44
18.62
18.11
17.75
17.45
15.64
17.09
22.24
+5.5%
+7.5%
-4.2%
-2.7%
-2.0%
-1.7%
-10.4%
+9.3%
+30.1%
23.09
23.71
23.51
21.89
21.21
21.61
21.43
22.03
23.93
+1.7%
+2.7%
-0.8%
-6.9%
-3.1%
+1.9%
-0.8%
+2.8%
+8.6%
Table 4.4 12
49
In the face of historic budgetary restraints, these changes provided the college with the resources and
flexibility needed to address the sharp increase in the number of students the college served across all
core themes in 2009-2010. As illustrated in Table 4.5, all enrollment types except ABE showed
significant increases over both targets and actual previous enrollments.
2009-2010 Enrollment Data by FTE Increase
Core
Theme
BI 0709 target
2008-2009
actual
2009-2010
actual
% of target
% of prior
year actual
Total State Supported
all
1,826 (08-09)
1,827 (09-10)
1,797
2,004
110%
112%
Total All Funding Sources
all
N/A
2,582
2,762
N/A
107%
Transfer High Demand
1
31
29
41
132%
141%
Workforce High Demand
2
25
24
31
124%
129%
Worker Retraining
2
204 (08-09)
205 (09-10)
205
339
166%
165%
ABE
3
497
387
346
70%
89%
2, 3
14
36
46
329%
128%
1, 2, 3,4
N/A
450
824
N/A
183%
Enrollment Type
IBEST
eLearning
Table 4.5 13
Twenty-eight new sections of high demand courses were added to the 2009-2010 class schedule including
Human Anatomy & Physiology, Writing Fundamentals, English Composition, College Preparatory
Reading, Fundamentals of Speech, General Chemistry, Pre-Algebra, Fundamentals of Arithmetic,
Accounting, Psychology, Nutrition, Sociology, Basic Computers and Fitness Lab.
In fall 2010, for Instructional Review Part Two, the Instructional Management Team examined student
progression and retention data from 2007-2008 through 2009-2010. Information reviewed included
progression/success rates through developmental education coursework to college coursework;
progression/success rates through sequential course work needed for program completion; progression
rates through ABE/GED/ESL levels; Core Course completion rates; part-time retention/completion rates
compared to full-time retention rates; completion rates by core theme; and whether graduation/completion
rates reflect student demographics. As a result, the IMT identified four areas of focus for the coming year:
 Progression through developmental math to completion of the quantitative reasoning requirement
remains low despite continuing efforts to improve course curriculum.
 The number of students reaching the ―tipping point‖ (defined as completing 45 college credits)
remains lower than expected. While the IMT suspects that this may be related to coding, it bears
further investigation to make sure students are progressing satisfactorily.
 Completion rates at off-campus centers are very high compared to on-campus. The IMT wants to
make sure that instruction in off-campus courses (taught primarily by part-time faculty) matches
the rigor and expectations of on-campus (primarily taught by full-time tenured faculty).
 Completion/ progression rates in course sequences in the sciences is low and needs to be
reviewed in light of the efforts to increase science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM)
graduates.
In fall quarter 2010, faculty reviewed enrollment data from 2009-2010 and completed enrollment
justifications that included:
50



suggestions as to which class caps can or should be raised for efficiency (budget savings, to
reduce the need for part-time or overload contracts);
rationales for having any class caps below 25 students;
rationales for continuing any low enrolled courses/sections in the 2011-2012 annual schedule.
Based on responses, divisions will make recommendations for the 2011-2012 annual schedule and for
faculty teaching loads. This information will be reviewed by IMT and Division Chairs in winter 2011. In
addition, IMT will review enrollment trends for the past three years as well as enrollment projections for
the coming biennium. This information will be used in schedule planning, course distributions, and
budget requests.
Instructional Methodologies
As part of instructional review, all full-time faculty completed a questionnaire that described the
instructional methodologies used in the courses/sections they taught in 2009-2010. Twelve on-campus
faculty members instruct solely in a traditional lecture/lab format. This is most predominant in the
industrial technology courses within the workforce preparation core theme. The remaining on-campus
faculty (32) use web-enhanced, hybrid, or fully online methods of instruction in addition to traditional
means.
The number of faculty members and courses employing electronic instructional tools has exploded in the
years since the college‘s last comprehensive self-study, as detailed throughout this chapter. The greatest
increase has been in Core Theme 1 (Academic Transfer), where the total of online courses offered has
increased by 44% in the past three years; during that same time frame, courses offered through the state‘s
online consortium, WAOL, have decreased by 72% while online courses developed and taught locally
have increased 46-fold (from two courses in 2007-2008 to 92 in 2009-2010). Academic transfer courses
making use of hybrid (online and other) methods of instruction have increased significantly as well; the
college offered no such courses as recently as 2007-2008; the following year, 51 hybrid courses were
offered, and by 2009-2010 that number had nearly doubled to an even 100. Although the raw numbers of
online and hybrid courses in Core Theme 2 (Workforce Preparation) are lower than in academic transfer,
the rates of increase are similar, with total online courses increasing from 18 to 69 over three years and
total hybrid courses increasing from 1 to 45 in the same time period. In Core Theme 3 (Basic Skills),
online and hybrid offerings are limited to the developmental education program, which has decreased its
online offerings from 24 in 2007-2008 to 21 in 2009-2010 while increasing hybrid offerings from three in
2007-2008 to 49 in 2009-2010.
The methods used by the 11 full-time faculty at Stafford Creek Corrections Center are restricted by the
Department of Corrections. Only one faculty member employs web-enhanced tools in the form of
prepackaged CDs, DVDs, etc. Internet access is not permitted.
The college is encouraged by the number of faculty incorporating technology into the classroom. To keep
instruction current and relevant, the following improvements were indicated for 2010-2011:
 The college must prioritize instructional technology purchases when making necessary budget
reductions.
 Faculty remain unclear about appropriate uses of new technologies even in courses identified as
web-enhanced, hybrid and online, so continued training is a must.
 Supervisors and division chairs need to ensure that students achieve the Desired Student Ability
of Information Use across the curriculum regardless of instructional modality. Particular attention
must be given to traditional instruction.
51
Section I: Core Theme 1 – Academic Transfer
Planning for Academic Transfer (Standards 3.B.1-3)
Grays Harbor College offers coursework in communications, health and physical education, humanities,
mathematics, sciences, and social sciences for students whose educational focus is a bachelor's degree and
beyond. GHC‘s Associate in Arts, Associate in Science-Transfer, Associate in Business, and Associate in
Pre-Nursing degrees fulfill the requirements of statewide direct transfer agreements (DTAs) with
baccalaureate institutions. The Associate in Science degree is tailored for students preparing to transfer in
specific professions.
Planning to address the academic transfer core theme objectives of ―Students display high rates of
progress and completion‖ and ―GHC transfer students are prepared to succeed at their receiving
institutions‖ occurs in multiple ways. As part of instructional review, faculty analyze enrollment data
from the previous year to determine what changes can be made for efficiency (budget savings, reducing
the need for part-time and overload instruction, etc.). Faculty also provide the justification for setting any
class capacities below 25 students. For low-enrolled courses (sections enrolled at less than half of the
existing cap), faculty provide the rationale for offering those courses/sections in the next year‘s schedule.
This information is essential to building an annual class schedule that maximizes opportunity for student
progression and completion. The information is also used to build faculty loads and to determine the need
for adjunct faculty.
The majority of courses in the academic transfer programs are offered during weekdays on the main
campus in Aberdeen. However, a number of these courses are offered in a traditional classroom setting
via continuing education either at the college‘s learning centers in other locations or on the main campus
in the evenings (see Table 4.1.1). The number of courses offered via CE has decreased in recent years.
Continuing Education TRADITIONAL Courses in Academic Transfer by Location
2007-2008
66
16
9
91
Aberdeen
Raymond
Ilwaco
TOTAL
2008-2009
60
19
9
88
2009-2010
39
11
10
60
Table 4.1.1 14
In recent years, the college has expanded its eLearning options, which have replaced some CE offerings.
While continuing to offer online courses through Washington State‘s online learning consortium
(WAOL), the college has supported GHC faculty efforts to develop the institution‘s own courses that are
offered entirely online or via hybrid or ITV methods. As Table 4.1.2 indicates, online instruction in
academic transfer programs has grown significantly in the past few years, notably in privately-owned
GHC courses. As locally created options have increased, the need for WAOL courses has decreased.
ONLINE Courses in Academic Transfer by Venue
Washington Online
GHC privately owned
Total
2007-2008
124
2
126
2008-2009
118
24
142
Table 4.1.2 15
52
2009-2010
89
92
181
In 2008-2009, faculty in large numbers developed two types of hybrid courses for academic transfer
students: hybrid/Angel courses make use of reduced traditional class sessions that are supplemented by
class activities using WAOL‘s Angel online learning service; hybrid/alternative courses make use of
reduced traditional class sessions that are supplemented by alternative class activities that may or may not
be online but do not use Angel technology. Table 4.1.3 demonstrates the remarkable growth in these
instructional methods in the past two years.
HYBRID Courses in Academic Transfer by Method
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
Angel component (H)
0
10
15
Alternative components (H5)
0
41
85
Total
0
51
100
Table 4.1.3 16
A final method of offering academic transfer courses to students at a distance from the main Aberdeen
campus involves ITV teleconferencing. Table 4.1.4 describes the number of ITV courses in the past three
years; the number of courses involving intra-center communication have increased to a greater extent than
from Aberdeen to other learning centers.
ITV (Interactive Television) Courses in Academic Transfer by Location
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
from Aberdeen to Pacific County
5
3
7
between locations in Pacific County
4
12
12
Total
9
15
19
Table 4.1.4 17
The vice president for instruction represents the college on two statewide bodies, the Articulation and
Transfer Council (ATC, part of the SBCTC governance structure) and the Joint Access Oversight Group
(JAOG, a standing committee that meets about six times a year with representatives from the public and
independent academic degree-granting institutions and the Higher Education Coordinating Board) and
serves as an alternate college representative to the Inter-College Relations Commission (ICRC, a unit of
the Washington Council on High School-College Relations). These groups work collaboratively to
enforce transfer policies and to recommend and approve transfer policy changes. The vice president
brings these system-wide conversations and deliberations back to the GHC Division Chairs and
Instructional Council for review, discussion and/or implementation. When new degrees are considered, a
Degree Committee is convened. New degrees must be approved by the Instructional Council, the GHC
Board of Trustees, and by SBCTC through the transfer degree approval process.
The college uses a variety of data sources for its academic transfer core theme planning. Student
progression and completion is tracked using the Student Achievement Initiative (SAI) database, the
Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), SBCTC annual reports, and campus
institutional research reports. To determine how well students are prepared to succeed after leaving Grays
Harbor, the college reviews National Student Clearinghouse reports and information provided by the
baccalaureate institutions. Student learning outcomes for transfer courses, programs and degrees,
including the Desired Student Abilities (DSAs), are clearly identified and assessed annually.
53
Assessment of Academic Transfer (Standards 4.A.1-6)
Objective 1: Students display high rates of progress and completion.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to two
specific outcomes:
 Students achieve high rates of progress toward degree
 Students achieve high rates of progress in essential skills courses
Student progress toward degree is measured via a variety of indicators. One means of determining this
indicator is through examining the percentage of students earning benchmark numbers of college-level
credits over the course of a year. For students who have indicated that their academic goal is a transfer
associate degree, the target rate is 35% earning 15 credits in a year and 30% earning 30 credits in a year.
Table 4.1.5 indicates the actual rates of achievement among this group of students from 2006-2007
through 2008-2009. While these numbers are moving in the right direction, the college intends to make
improvements in this area.
Student Progress Toward Degree in Academic Transfer Programs
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
Percentage of students earning 15 credits in a year
30
28
32
Percentage of students earning 30 credits in a year
23
22
26
Table 4.1.5
18
- Indicators 1.1 and 1.2
Another indicator in this area is the comparative percentages of degree-seeking students who make
substantial progress toward the degree, who make some progress toward the degree, or who leave their
programs early. The SBCTC defines substantial progress as four or more quarters‘ enrollment for students
who declare degree completion as their goal.
Percentage of Degree-Seeking Students Making Substantial Progress Toward Degree
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
Percent making substantial progress
57%
52%
61%
Percent making some progress
23%
29%
23%
Percent of early leavers
20%
19%
16%
Table 4.1.6 19 - Indicator 1.3
As Table 4.1.6 indicates, in 2008-2009, the percentage of degree-seeking students who made substantial
progress toward degree was up significantly compared to 2007-2008 and 2006-2007. The percentage of
students who made some progress, but not substantial progress, has fluctuated a bit, increasing the most
when the percentage of students making substantial progress has decreased. The greatest difference is
displayed among the early leavers: these numbers have dropped consistently, even when the rate of
substantial progress lagged behind the rate of students making some progress. Student retention and
persistence has been a college-wide focus over the last several years with dedicated personnel and other
resources allocated to the effort. In addition to the support provided by various grant programs, such as
TRiO and Title III, the college created the position of director of student success. It is likely that this
emphasis on retention and persistence has been a factor in the 9-point improvement in the percentage of
full-time students making ―substantial progress‖ as well as the 3-point decline in ―early leavers‖ reflected
54
in the 2008-2009 data. The college views these numbers as positive indicators of success in progress
toward degree; the target goal with respect to this indicator is to maintain the current level of substantial
progress while decreasing the percentage of early leavers by 2%.
Student progress in essential skills courses is measured via a variety of indicators. One means of
determining this indicator is through examining the percentage of transfer-intent students successfully
completing the quantitative reasoning requirement in an academic year. The best available data for this
indicator comes from the quantitative points assessed by the SBCTC, shown in Table 4.1.7 below. When
students who have indicated that their academic goal is a transfer associate degree, the target rate is 32%
achieving the quantitative reasoning requirement in a given year. The actual rate of achievement among
this group of students in 2008-2009 was 27%, compared to 25% in both 2006-2007 and 2007-2008.20
Transfer Students Earning Quantitative Reasoning Points in a Year
Year
Total Transfer Students
# earning QRP
% earning QRP
2006-2007
1,104
280
25%
2007-2008
955
240
25%
2008-2009
1,009
276
27%
Table 4.1.7 21 - Indicator 1.4
Another indicator in this area is the percentage of transfer-intent students successfully completing the
writing skills requirement in an academic year. Table 4.1.8 shows the number of transfer students
enrolling in and completing English 102 or English 235, either of which satisfies the writing skills
requirement for the AA degree. The target for improvement is a 2% increase in successful completion.
Students Completing the Writing Skills Requirement
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
Total
Transfer Students
Enrolled in
culminating WS
course
% enrolled
# successfully
completing WS
requirement
% successfully
completing WS
requirement
1,104
955
1,009
346
310
353
31%
32%
35%
230
201
259
67%
65%
73%
Table 4.1.8 22- Indicator 1.5
Objective 2: GHC transfer students are prepared to succeed at their receiving institutions.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to four
specific outcomes:
 Students achieve high rates of completion
 Degrees are current with direct-transfer agreements (DTAs)
 Transfer students perform well academically at baccalaureate institutions
 Students demonstrate high levels of achievement in student learning outcomes
Rates of completion are measured through two indicators. The first indicator is the percentage of degreeseeking students who are transfer-ready according to the SBCTC‘s definition of attaining 45 college-level
credits. The target rate for transfer readiness is 25% The actual rate of transfer readiness among all
transfer-intent students in 2008-2009 was 20%, which was a slight drop from the previous year (at 21%)
55
and a fairly significant improvement over the 2006-2007 rate of 14% (Indicator 2.1).23 The rates for
transfer readiness are on track to achieve the goal.
The second indicator used in measuring completion rates is the percentage of degree-seeking students
earning an associate degree. The target rate for this measure is 36%. In 2008-2009, the actual rate of
degree-seeking students earning an associate degree was 34%, compared to 26% the previous year and
15% in 2006-2007 (Indicator 2.2).24 Recent increases in this rate represent a sharp positive trend and
substantial achievement of the target.
The third indicator used in measuring completion rates is the percentage of completers who transfer. A
survey of 487 transfer students from GHC‘s class of 2007-2008 conducted by the SBCTC found that 252
students (52%) either earned a degree or were considered completers according to SBCTC‘s definition
(completion of 45 college-level credits); 218 students (45%) transferred to another institution to continue
their education. Among those
who transferred, 48 (22%)
transferred to an in-state or
out-of-state two-year college;
the remaining 170 students
6% 1%
Earned less than 45
(78%) transferred to four-year
credits
schools. Of those who
transferred to four-year
Transferred to a 2-year
schools, 140 (82%) transferred
college
to an in-state public or private
Transferred to an in35%
four-year university; 27 (16%)
48%
state university
transferred to an out-of-state
four-year university; and three
Transferred to an outstudents (2%) transferred to
of-state university
private career schools (see
10%
Chart 4.1.1). The target is to
Transferred to a
increase by 2% the number of
private career school
completers who transfer.
Transfer Students
Chart 4.1.1: Transfer students one year after leaving GHC25 - Indicator 2.1
The college‘s compliance with direct-transfer agreements is measured by comparing GHC‘s associate
degrees with all transfer agreements under the ICRC and the JAOG. GHC‘s degrees and certificates were
last reviewed by the ICRC‘s Ongoing Articulation Review Committee (OAR) in 2007. While minor
adjustments were recommended, the OAR Committee found that GHC is substantially in compliance with
adherence to the spirit and the letter of Washington Council and ICRC policy guidelines relating to the
structure of the Transfer degrees (Indicator 2.3).
Since the review, two substantive changes have been discussed in direct transfer agreement (DTA)
requirements. The first involves changing the communications requirement from ―Communication Skills
(10 credits): must include at least two courses in English composition which total to at least six credits.
Remaining credits, if any, may be an additional composition course or designated writing courses or
courses in basic speaking skills (e.g. speech, rhetoric, or debate)” to “Communication Skills (10 credits):
must include at least five credits (5) of English composition. Remaining credits may be used for an
additional composition course or designated writing courses or courses in basic speaking skills (e.g.
speech, rhetoric, or debate).” This proposal, discussed by both the Division Chairs group and the
Instructional Council, will not require any change to GHC degree requirements.
56
The second change seeks to delete the prerequisite of intermediate algebra for the quantitative reasoning
requirement in the DTA and replace it with language regarding college readiness. The proposed language
has generated substantial disagreement among two- and four-year institutions. The vice president, who
serves on both the Articulation and Transfer Council and the JAOG, is monitoring developments and
reports regularly to both Division Chairs and Instructional Council.
A Transfer Students‘ Rights and Responsibilities document mandated by the Washington State legislature
was approved by JAOG in December 2008, and by the educational leadership of the public and private
baccalaureates and community and technical colleges in 2009. GHC has linked to this document on the
college website‘s transfer page.
The academic performance of transfer students after they move on to baccalaureate institutions is
difficult to measure for a variety of reasons. Although the college maintains satisfactory records regarding
numbers of students transferring to institutions in the state, some students transfer out of state or to instate schools that don‘t provide transfer data to community colleges. Beyond this, most schools –
including the two institutions receiving the highest percentage of GHC graduates, The Evergreen State
College and Washington State University – don‘t routinely provide data on the academic progress of
students after they transfer. The SBCTC is currently working with the Higher Education Coordinating
Board (HECB) to develop a statewide database that will provide the information needed to determine
student success after transfer to public baccalaureate institutions. However, the fairly sparse data the
college does have from receiving institutions indicates GHC transfer students maintain satisfactory
academic progress at their receiving institutions, often performing better than their peers in comparison
groups (see Table 4.1.9).
GHC Students‘ GPAs after Transfer
Receiving
Institution
Most Recent
Report
Cumulative
GPA
# of
students
CWU
Sp 2010
3.02
54
EWU
UW
WSU Pullman
WSU Vancouver
WSU Distance Ed
WWU
W 2004
W2009
W 2007
W 2007
W 2007
F 2009
2.86
3.16
2.95
2.88
3.31
2.50
19
17
55
4
56
14
Comparison Group
Freshmen
Sophomores
Juniors
Seniors
All Transfer Students
All Undergraduates
NA
NA
NA
All Undergraduates
Comparison
GPA
2.75
2.88
2.96
3.11
3.00
3.19
NA
NA
NA
3.02
Table 4.1.9 26- Indicator 2.4
The college website publishes program-level outcomes in all academic transfer programs as well as
general education outcomes (DSAs). Program-level reports were prepared in the following Academic
Transfer programs: business, health and physical education, humanities, mathematics, science, social
science, and transitions. Complete reports for all of these program areas, as well as for programs
providing non-instructional support of academic transfer, can be found by clicking on the names of the
programs within the summary reports that follow; the individual course-level outcomes assessment
reports that led to the program-level instructional reports can be found here.
The Business DTA program examined program outcome 2: "Understand methods and modes of inquiry
specific to traditional and contemporary areas of knowledge in the humanities and arts, natural and
57
physical sciences, mathematics, and the social sciences." The outcomes assessment methodology
involved the use of a standardized and validated student examination, the Test of Understanding of
College Economics (a discussion of the history and reliability of this assessment is available here).
Questions taken from the TUCE microeconomics test were incorporated into the Principles of
Microeconomics winter 2010 final exam for 30 students. Each of the questions was specifically related to
one or more of three categories of outcomes which are referred to as the three "cognitive specifications."
Results of the scores on these questions were made available by way of item analysis processing
following the exam and are cross referenced with these outcome specifications by content and cognitive
categories. Table 4.1.10 shows the distribution of the TUCE questions by these categories:
Test Question Content and Cognitive Specifications by TUCE #
1. Recognition and
Understanding
Content Categories
Cognitive Categories
2. Explicit
Application
8
A.
Basic Problem
B.
Markets and Prices
1, 2, 11, 18
C.
Theories of Firm
11, 17, 21
D.
Micro Role of Government
3. Implicit
Application
13
6, 27
Table 4.1.10 27- Indicators 2.5 and 2.6
Table 4.1.11 shows the specific assessment results by category for each TUCE question. The GAP
column indicates the positive or negative relation and the size difference between the TUCE norm scores
and the student scores on the winter exam:
Comparison of TUCE Scores and Student Scores
by Item, Learning Content, and Cognitive Category
TUCE #
TUCE %
Final %
GAP + or -
1
2
6
8
11
13
17
18
21
27
49
39
45
36
31
50
42
40
44
41
73
40
63
23
83
67
60
23
60
73
24
1
18
-13
52
17
18
-17
16
32
Content and
Cognitive Category
B2
B2
D1
A2
B2, C2
C3
C2
B2
C2
D1
Table 4.1.11 28- Indicators 2.5 and 2.6
Scores on the student exams exceeded the TUCE-4 norms on 8 of the 10 questions, shown by the positive
value indicated in the GAP column. This indicates that the outcomes of (a) ability to recognize and
understand economics terms, concepts and principles and (c) ability to conduct implicit application of
terms, concepts and principles are being met. However, in two areas, TUCE #8 and #18, there was a
negative gap. Both negative gaps were in cognitive category 2 involving A2 and B2, the explicit
application of terms, concepts and principles outcome. However, other questions involving cognitive
category B2, such as questions 1, 2, and 11, showed above average scores. This points to the conclusion
that the opportunity for improvement is not in the cognitive skill explicit applications area in general, but
rather more specifically, in the content area of basic (economic) problems as related to the explicit
58
applications outcome. As noted in the tables above, that area focuses on the topics of scarcity, opportunity
cost and choice in particular.
The Health and Physical Education program has four outcomes:
1. Understand and articulate the various components of fitness (e.g., cardiovascular endurance,
strength, flexibility, body composition).
2. Understand, articulate, and evaluate how various factors (e.g., genetics, diet, activity) promote
health and wellness.
3. Understand and employ safe workout practices.
4. Identify, understand, evaluate, and apply appropriate fitness strategies (e.g., diet, exercise).
Faculty in the program assessed three course-level outcomes:
A. Develop a personal philosophy that incorporates lifestyle and health.
B. Develop a knowledge and appreciation of specific methods of personal health assessment.
C. Develop valid strategies for personal lifestyle behaviors.
These three course outcomes relate to the four program outcomes in the following ways: Course-level
outcome A relates to all four of the program outcomes, course-level outcome B relates directly to
program outcomes 2 and 4, and course-level outcome C relates directly to all program outcomes. The
course syllabus articulates the course outcomes identified in the assessment projects. These outcomes are
also linked to the DSAs outlined in the syllabus. Disciplinary learning and critical thinking relate directly
to all of the program and course outcomes. While social and personal responsibility relates more closely
to the course outcomes, it also links with program outcomes 2 and 4. Information use is a common
denominator for all program and course outcomes since application of research is vital to understanding
and evaluating these outcomes.
Student mastery of the various learning outcomes was ascertained using multiple choice tests and
assessment of student presentations. Successful achievement for each outcome was demonstrated by
students who answered the test questions (80%) that measure each outcome correctly and by students who
recognize these outcomes in their oral presentations. Data showed that 30 students who were in Health
Promotion and Fitness class in winter 2010 had an average grade a little above B. A little more than 70%
of the grade was based on the above assessments (multiple choice tests and oral presentations). According
to these data, the course outcomes were met and the assessments proved to be accurate indicators of
student learning (Indicators 2.5 and 2.6).29 Therefore, the student learning goal was achieved.
The Humanities program has four core outcomes:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Demonstrate literal and inferential comprehension.
Communicate clearly and effectively in appropriate contexts.
Understand and interpret human achievements in various forms.
Analyze and synthesize meaning in verbal, visual and/or auditory media.
Because the first two Humanities program outcomes are identical to the two Communications program
outcomes, analyzed in that program‘s report for Core Theme 2: Workforce Preparation, the academic
transfer report focused on assessment of those course outcomes directly relevant to program outcomes 3
and 4. All of the program‘s nine course-level outcomes assessments focused on courses required or
recommended for academic transfer students: three courses devoted to writing skills, one course focused
on speaking skills, one course in library/information sources, one course in literature, one course in visual
art, one course in music theory, and one course in foreign language (Spanish). The results indicate that
59
students in Humanities program courses achieve or approach the targeted success rates fairly consistently,
with two exceptions being Speech and Spanish, where the rates are somewhat lower. Discussion of plans
to address these rates appears in the Improvements portion of this section. Student mastery of the
outcomes in all nine courses analyzed was determined using a combination of objective testing, written
projects, and hands-on authentic performance. Assessment of course outcomes relevant to Humanities
program outcome 3 appears in Table 4.1.12.
Assessment of Humanities Program Outcome #3:
Understanding and interpreting human achievements in various forms
Course
Targeted Success Rate
Actual Success Rate
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
90%
75%
80%
80%
85%
65%
85%
81%
English Composition
Speech
Information Resources
Art Appreciation
Table 4.1.12 30- Indicators 2.5 and 2.6
Assessment of outcomes relevant to Humanities program outcome 4 appears in Table 4.1.13.
Assessment of Humanities Program Outcome #4:
Analyzing and synthesizing meaning in verbal, visual and/or auditory media
Course
Targeted Success Rate
Actual Success Rate
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
90%
90%
90%
90%
65%
80%
85%
55%
89%
86%
64%
81%
English Composition
Spanish
Shakespeare
Writing Fundamentals
Music Theory
Art Appreciation
Table 4.1.13 31- Indicators 2.5 and 2.6
The specific course outcomes identified in all of these assessment projects are clearly articulated in course
syllabi. Within the syllabi, these outcomes are also linked to general-education DSAs – in the case of the
Humanities program, both outcomes 3 and 4 are directly linked to the critical thinking and information
use DSAs. Key required courses for students in academic transfer rely heavily on assignment and
assessment of work, such as the work analyzed in winter 2010, that demonstrates achievement of both
Humanities program outcomes. These key courses offered through the Humanities program therefore
provide a means for ensuring that students completing degrees for academic transfer achieve the
identified outcomes in the humanities.
The Mathematics program has three core outcomes:
1. Apply algebraic, analytic, geometric or statistical reasoning to solve abstract and applied
problems appropriate to an individual discipline
2. Interpret mathematical, quantitative or symbolic models such as formulas, graphs and table, and
draw inferences from them
3. Employ basic symbolic or quantitative reasoning to support a position or conclusion
60
Two of the three outcomes assessment projects undertaken by faculty in the Mathematics program
focused on courses required or recommended for students in academic transfer: Calculus II and
Precalculus I. Both of the course assessments measured students‘ achievement of outcomes directly
relevant to program outcome 1; one of the course assessments [Precalculus I] measured students‘
achievement of outcomes directly relevant to program outcome 2; and one of the course assessments
[Calculus II] measured students‘ achievement of outcomes directly relevant to program outcome 3.
Assessment of Mathematics Program Outcomes #1, #2, and #3 via Course Outcomes (CO)
Success = 80% of Students Achieving 70% or Higher
Precalculus I
Calculus II
Outcome #1
% achieving 70%
CO #1
CO #2
CO #3
80
70
95
80
85
Outcome #2
% achieving 70%
Outcome #3
% achieving 70%
CO #1
CO #2
CO #3
75
95
80
85
32
Table 4.1.14 - Indicators 2.5 and 2.6
As indicated in Table 4.1.14, the results of these assessments show that students in the Calculus II class
consistently achieved the target outcome while students in the Precalculus I class approached or achieved
the target. The specific course outcomes identified in all of these assessment projects are in course syllabi.
Within their individual reports, faculty described the link between the assessed course outcomes and the
program outcomes. At the degree level, all three Mathematics program outcomes link to DSA 1,
disciplinary learning, and DSA 3, critical thinking. All of the courses in the transfer math curriculum rely
heavily on the assignment and assessment of work, similar to the work used for the 2010 assessment
projects, that demonstrates achievement in the three Mathematics program outcomes. At least one of these
courses is required of any student earning a two-year transfer degree. As such, these courses offered
through the Mathematics program provide a means for ensuring that students who complete two-year
transfer degrees achieve the identified outcomes in mathematics and quantitative skills.
The Science program has four core outcomes, which were assessed in 2009-2010 as indicated in Table
4.1.15 below:
1. Understand the nature of science, including the role of observation in the development of
scientific theories and laws;
2. Use the language of science to interpret and communicate scientific information;
3. Use scientific knowledge to analyze and evaluate data and solve problems; and
4. Obtain and analyze experimental data.
The analyses below addressed all four of the science program outcomes. Each instructor analyzed three
course outcomes; each of the four program outcomes was assessed by at least two faculty members.
Science syllabi also link course outcomes to DSAs. Although science courses tend toward an obvious
focus on competency in the discipline, the other four DSAs are also directly addressed: outcome #2 (use
the language of science) is linked to literacy; outcome #3 (analyze and evaluate data and solve problems)
is linked to critical thinking; the safe and effective running of labs (outcome #4) is linked to social and
personal responsibility. Of the 18 analyses, 12 (67%) indicated students had met the criteria for success.
Of the successes, targets were met in all the lab studies (outcome #4). Of the 13 non-lab analyses, only
seven (54%) indicated students had met the criteria for success. This would suggest that students have a
harder time with the non-lab parts of science curriculum.
61
Results of Science Program Outcomes Assessment, 2009-2010
Program
Course
Target Success Criteria
Outcome
(specific objective/outcome)
(80% of students achieving)
Actual Success
Rate
75% of questions correct
81%
CHEM 121 (atomic structure)
75% or higher
64%
EARTH 102 (development of plate tectonics)
65% or higher
64%
BIOL 160 (parts of the cell)
72% or higher
95%
BIOL 160 (motion across cell membrane)
72% or higher
82%
BIOL 260 (pathogenicity)
75% of questions correct
80%
BIOL 260 (infectious disease)
75% of questions correct
84%
ASTRO 101 (basic stellar properties)
65% or higher
58%
BIOL 160 (Mendelian traits)
72% or higher
87%
CHEM 121 (periodic law applied to elements)
75% or higher
85%
75% or higher
95% (1st exam)
BIOL 260 (history of microbiology)
#1
#2
#3
CHEM 162 (draw/interpret Lewis structures)
CHEM 162 (gas laws)
CHEM 162 (rate laws and rate problems)
#4
50% (Final)
75% or higher
39%
75% or higher
56% (3rd exam)
33% (Final)
CHEM 121 (obtain/analyze experimental data)
sample within ±20%
100%
CHEM 162 (lab work – 3 studies, 3 outcomes)
75% or higher
100% (avg 96%)
PHYS 122/222 (obtain/analyze experimental data)
90% or higher
87.5%
Table 4.1.15 33- Indicators 2.5 and 2.6
The Social Science program has four outcomes, as described in the second column of Table 4.1.16 below.
One of the program assessment projects focused on a course (SOC& 101) that can be used to meet the
Social Science area C requirement for the AA. The assessment project found that question mastery ranged
from 100% to 43%. Clearly, some concepts or questions were more difficult than others. Course outcome
mastery, as measured by sets of questions, ranged from 89% to 67%. Combined mastery for the three
outcomes under analysis was 80%. Interestingly, on the first test, the average for section A (n = 37) was
80%, and the class average for section B (n = 45) was 79%. A two-tailed t-test indicated no statistically
significant differences between the two sections. A combined mastery average of 80% and class averages
(test) of 80% and 79% were above the 75% ―minimum overall score‖ that served as the general
benchmark for this analysis ( Indicators 2.5 and 2.6).34 Therefore, the goal was achieved.
62
Articulation of Relationships Between Course and Program Outcomes in Social Sciences
Relationship
Social Science Program Outcomes
Course Outcomes
Relationship one – The sociological perspective
(group membership influences, if not determines,
individual behavior) is unique to the discipline of
sociology, and student mastery of this concept
requires students to distinguish sociology from other
academic disciplines.
Understand, articulate, and evaluate a.
the similarities and differences
between and among various social
sciences
Develop an
understanding of the
sociological
perspective
Relationship two – Sociology is a body of knowledge
that seeks to describe the relationships inherent in the
social world. Being able to understand sociological
concepts as they relate to daily living requires
students to understand how various social factors
influence the life course.
Understand, articulate, and evaluate b.
how various factors (e.g., social,
personal/individual, historical,
political, and economic) influence
human behavior
Develop an
understanding of
sociological concepts
as they relate to and
describe daily living
Relationship three – Theoretical perspectives such as
interactionism, structuralism, and conflict theory posit
unique theories regarding the workings of the social
world. These theoretical perspectives seek to
articulate the factors that influence the daily workings
of the social world.
Understand, articulate, and evaluate b.
the applicability of significant
theoretical perspectives (e.g., conflict
theory, feminist theory, cognitive
behavioral theory) as they relate to
contemporary social issues
Develop an
understanding of
sociological concepts
as they relate to and
describe daily living
Relationship four – Sociology is a social science that
seeks to identify and describe the relationships
between and among various social factors that
influence human behavior. The ability to apply
research from various social science disciplines
requires students to have a basic understanding of
sociology as a science.
Identify, understand, evaluate, and c.
apply research literature from multiple
social science disciplines
Develop an
understanding of
sociology as a social
science
Table 4.1.16
The course outcomes measured in this assessment cycle are clearly defined and listed in course syllabi,
and within individual syllabi, course outcomes are linked with the college‘s DSAs. The relationship
between course-level outcomes and program-level outcomes is not included in course syllabi, but it is
included as part of the program reporting process. Because students completing the AA degree are
exposed to a variety of social science courses (at least three) they have ample opportunities to develop
proficiency in the four program outcomes. Table 4.1.13 articulates the relationships between course-level
outcomes and program-level outcomes.
The Human Resource office assessed its effectiveness in promoting the college‘s academic transfer
programs in a variety of ways, most notably through its program outcome 8: All new employees to GHC
are fully oriented to the college. Two measures were used to assess this outcome: the existence of
comprehensive new-employee training and of a mentoring program for new employees. Analysis of this
outcome indicates that this is an area in which HR needs to improve. Currently, the college engages in
some training and informal mentorship, but it does not have a uniform or consistent means of orienting
new employees to the college. The negotiated faculty contract provides for advancement on the salary
schedule based on professional development. Full-time faculty also pursue professional development by
taking advantage of sabbatical leave for advanced study in discipline-specific areas, writing, research, and
development of course materials that apply new approaches to student learning. Funding available
through the Title III grant, the Outcomes Assessment Committee, and the college‘s Excellence Awards
provides opportunities for faculty to enhance teaching and learning. There were no funds available for
Excellence Awards in 2008-2009.
63
For the Student Services Division as a whole, student satisfaction is measured through the Student
Services Survey. The average satisfaction level for all program areas is 90% (with a range from a low of
83% to a high of 97%).35 This overall satisfaction measure indicates that the division as a whole is
achieving a strong level of service to students. While the division hasn‘t established a minimum desired
satisfaction level, the overall 90% is considered strong and healthy. During 2009-2010, effectiveness of
specific Student Support initiatives in relation to the academic transfer programs was assessed in the
following program areas. Because the Student Services division supports all students, unless otherwise
indicated, these initiatives apply as well to the workforce preparation theme and the basic skills theme.
In the Admissions & Records area, a goal of working collaboratively with other offices on specific
measures was completely achieved and the two goals of effective and efficient registration and strong and
effective customer service approached achievement. Improvement was reflected in all five of the
achievement measure areas related to student satisfaction. In the two areas where processes were
evaluated, both approached goal.36 The Athletic Department assessed five objectives, three of which
were achieved, while two approached achievement. These objectives involved creating tracking systems
and identifying baseline numbers. For example, the end-of-year eligibility rating target for freshmen is
90%; the actual 2008-2009 result was 82%. Student athletes tend to be in the academic transfer and
workforce preparation areas; basic skills students rarely participate. The target graduation rate for
sophomores is 40%; the actual result for 2008-2009 was 28.5%.37 The tracking system that has been
identified will significantly improve the department‘s ability to support and monitor student success.
Six goals and 16 outcomes were established in the Counseling & Advising program review. For these
goals, 20 indicators of achievement were set. Of these, 12 were measured in 2009-2010, with nine being
achieved and three approaching achievement. Notable among these are providing an effective advising
program and coordinating an effective counseling program. Currently 84% of students find counseling
services to be effective; the goal for this indicator is 90%.38 Disability Support Services has four
program goals; five of ten indicators were assessed in 2009-2010. Of those indicators, four were achieved
and one approached achievement. The other indicators will be assessed in 2010-2011. The 2009 survey
revealed that 6% of students were unaware of disability support services; following efforts to provide
better information, the number of students reporting they were unaware decreased to 4% in 2010.39 In
Financial Aid, five goals were established; two are directly related to processes that cannot be completed
until fall 2010. Of the remaining goals, survey evidence showed that, with the exception of one indicator
of 89%, all other satisfaction indicators met or exceeded 90%. Financial aid file review outcomes were
very positive with less than 1% waiting longer than six weeks for a response. Appeals never exceeded a
two-week response time and, with the exception of one month of data, professional judgment requests
were responded to within the two-week target. Considering financial aid applications were up 68% in
2009-2010, the achievement of these indicators is remarkable.40
For the Student Success program review, five goals were determined with 16 indicators of achievement.
Of those, 12 were achieved with the remaining four approaching achievement. It is significant to note that
both the mentoring and FYE courses contributed significantly to quarterly retention. In 2008-2009 the
baseline average retention rate was 67%. In 2009-2010, FYE students had 79% retention and students
participating in the mentoring program had 85% retention. It appears that these programs have a
significant impact for a quarter or two but that the retention rate is not sustained over three or more
quarters.41 Part of the Student Success program has included the Learning Center. Four of five learning
Center goals were achieved. A significant increase of use was reported in the Student Services Survey
with an increased use of 13%. And 100% of students indicated the Learning Center was important or very
important to their success. The vast majority (85%) are satisfied with services.42 The TRiO Student
Support Services program, which focuses on transfer students, has met or exceeded four goals. The goal
of a 50% persistence/retention rate was met with a very strong 82% and the objective of 79% of students
in good academic standing was met with a strong 86%. The transfer rate goal was 30% and the program
64
achieved a 59% transfer rate.43 Further data regarding the success of TRiO students appear in Table 4.1.17
below. Note: ―persistence rate‖ is defined as participants who are continuing students, or who have
graduated and/or transferred to a four-year school.
TRiO Program Persistence Rates
Year
Number of
Students in
Cohort
Persistence Rate*
(Year to Year
Objective is 50%)
Graduate / Transfer in 3 years
(Project Objective is 42%)
Number of Students Served
(Mandatory 160 participants)
2005-2006
161
83%
44%
161
2006-2007
47
70%
55%
161
2007-2008
86
85%
56%
162
Table 4.1.17 44
The John Spellman Library and Media Services program has five key goals, each with indicators and
measurements of specific outcomes. In determining its effectiveness in supporting academic transfer
programs in 2009-2010, Library and Media Services examined three objectives relating to instruction:
 GHC students are information competent upon completion or graduation.
 Information resources and AV equipment are available to meet the needs of the campus
community.
 Library and Media Services provide facilities and equipment for individual student study.
Information competency efforts are measured through four indicators: numbers of students attending
library or media orientations; an increase in students enrolling in the two information literacy courses,
LIB 101 and LIB 120; transcripts of e-transactions, which confirm that reference librarians teach skills
rather than simply providing answers and that increased numbers of students make use of Media Lab
assistance; and responses from the annual faculty survey of academic support, which show faculty
incorporating information competency learning goals into their curricula. Analysis of these outcomes
indicates some successes and some areas for improvement. The number of library/media orientations
increased from 28 to 42 (a 50% increase) over 2008-2009, and enrollment in the information competency
courses increased from 24 to 56 (133% increase) over the same time period. In reference assistance, etranscripts were reviewed by all librarians to ensure the promotion of skill building, discrepancies
discussed, and training undertaken to correct the problems identified. In media production, the data do not
adequately identify tasks students are performing while working in the Lab to allow assessment of skill
gains. Finally, with respect to information competency outcomes across the curriculum, the data indicate
that while 25 of 47 on-campus faculty include information competency in their curricula, few treat it as a
goal that requires a consciously constructed series of steps to build to the needed skill levels; of these
faculty, 11 are in academic transfer programs. Only nine faculty incorporate media assignments into their
curricula, eight of them in transfer programs. Of the 559 books and media programs purchased by the
library in 2009-2010, 510 were obtained either specifically for academic transfer student support (411) or
for general student support (99); of the 17 databases purchased during that time period, 11 are targeted
toward academic transfer (7) or general student support (4).45
Use rates of information resources (circulations of physical items, access statistics of online materials, use
of reference services) should correlate to enrollment. The annual faculty survey of academic support
should indicate LMS is not an inhibitor in faculty creating/designing curricula. Year-end measurements
showed that overall circulation of physical materials increased from 7,423 to 8,319 (12.2%); use of full
text articles retrieved from e-resources increased from 40,030 to 44,394 (10.9%). None of the faculty
responses hint at problems caused by lack of resources. Face to face reference transactions decreased by
371 (26%), from 1,406 to 1,035, from August 2009 to September 2010, while chat reference transactions
increased from 37 to 137 over the past two years; and email transactions increased from 65 to 135, for a
65
total 160% increase in electronic reference. Statistics regarding library use include gate count, study room
use, and Media Lab use; these should correlate directly with enrollment; complaints from users about the
facility should be minimal. Gate count increased from 51,280 to 63,349 (23.5%) over the two years.
Maximum capacity times (number of times all study rooms were in use at the same time) increased from
159 to 255 (60.4%) over the two years. Media Lab use increased from 691 to 861 over the last two
years.46
For the Administrative Services program, the program review process provided an opportunity to
evaluate for the first time the ways in which personnel within the program respond to the needs of the
academic transfer programs. Administrative Services assessed its effectiveness in supporting academic
transfer programs by examining the following initiatives undertaken in 2009-2010 to meet the objective
of providing facilities and infrastructure to promote the safety, comfort and learning of students:
 SMArt Building design (new facilities for science, mathematics and art)
 Book rental program (new opportunity for academic transfer students)
 New child care facility
 Pre-design for new student union facilities
 GHC Alert
 Student union facelift
 Parking expansion to accommodate increased enrollment
 Student government: west wing student union remodel
All of these changes and improvements to facilities have been the result of regular formal assessment via
the Facilities Use Survey, which is completed biennially, or through informal assessment via campus
feedback.
The Grays Harbor College Foundation (GHCF) seeks to increase opportunities for deserving students
to realize their educational goals by offering scholarship assistance and strong support of the academic
environment. Mission fulfillment is based on achievement of the following objectives:
 Award scholarships annually
 Provide financial assistance to Grays Harbor College
 Increase the number of donors and donations
The GHCF‘s sole responsibility is to support GHC through scholarships, financial assistance in specific
programs, and capital projects. The 27-member board collaborates directly with the college president
along with the foundation‘s executive director. For 2010-2011, the board approved $67,000 in other gifts,
including support for athletics and athletic scholarships, book loans, childcare grants, GED testing, the
summer musical, and much-needed instructional equipment. In determining its effectiveness in supporting
academic transfer programs, the foundation examined indicators and measures of success in meeting its
stated goal to increase the number of scholarships granted annually. The data show that the GHCF
increased the number of scholarships granted from 206 (for a value of $333,479) in 2009-2010 to 222 (for
a value of $390,045) in 2010-2011. Total scholarships awarded for 2010-2011, including both foundation
awards and college awards through the financial aid office, amount to over $445,000. 47 Additionally, the
foundation worked with its board to fund ―underwater‖ scholarships, whose endowment is less than the
original gift value due to poor performance in the financial markets, through the General Excellence
Fund. The GHCF also achieved the significant goal of updating its electronic database, increasing the
number of contacts and correct addresses, leading to increased correspondence with all donors.
The Public Relations office supports the academic transfer core theme by promoting enrollment
deadlines and procedures as needed as well as preparing pertinent features and news stories on such topics
as options in eLearning, student orientations, and available tutoring and Learning Center services.
66
The Information Technology department‘s mission is to provide service and support to the students,
faculty and staff of Grays Harbor College by providing implementation, integration, application, delivery
and support of information and instructional technologies. The IT team is committed to efficiently and
effectively providing communications, academic and administrative computing, printing, email services
and related information resources that support and enhance teaching, learning, and community service at
the college. The department has eight program outcomes; in 2009-2010 the department assessed three
focused objectives:
 utilize technology resources to support the learning environment effectively and efficiently
 improve technology infrastructure
 increase faculty and staff proficiency with technologies
Initiatives undertaken in 2009-2010 aimed specifically at enhancing the academic transfer core theme
include increasing the number of classrooms with appropriate technologies (―smart‖ classrooms) by
adding Sympodium interactive monitors, computers and data projectors; adding ModuMath instructional
software, which has been very successful in the Learning Center on the Aberdeen main campus, to the
Riverview, Columbia, and Whiteside sites in addition to adding access to an online version for distance
education students; installing additional laptops for the biology department lab; increasing campus
bandwidth capability and utilization; and maintaining maximum system ―up-time‖ for the website,
WebBoard, WebEvent, the Exchange email server, and general internet connectivity.
The IT department maintains approximately 350 computers to support the work of faculty and staff. In
addition to computers, the college maintains 22 servers (up from 15 in 2006-2007) that are used for print
serving, data sharing, login authentication, employee and student email accounts, web servers, message
boards, and instructional support in specific instructional programs. The college has adopted a five-year
replacement cycle for faculty and staff computers. GHC currently has 544 computers that are specifically
available to students in open labs, classroom labs, testing facilities and the library, an increase of 19 since
2006-2007 but a decrease of 75 from the 2007-2008 total, due to termination of the CIS program and the
closing of the Simpson Education Center in Elma. The current availability ratio is one computer for every
4.75 full-time students. Although the figure appears lower than in recent years, student need has
decreased even while enrollment has increased: all buildings on the main campus as well as in Raymond
and Ilwaco have wireless capability. Approximately 150 students bring their own laptops to school and
connect to the wireless network. The college has adopted a three-year replacement cycle for student
computers. In 1998, students voted to establish a technology fee that would supplement the college‘s
financial commitment to technology improvements. To date, $1,484,865 has been collected through this
fee which provides computer equipment, supplies, and staffing for college classrooms, labs, and
programs.48
Improvements in Academic Transfer (Standards 4.B.1-2)
At present the academic transfer programs are operating at or near – and in some cases beyond – capacity.
Enrollments in traditional and eLearning courses are robust, with both recent high-school graduates and
returning non-traditional students filling classrooms both real and virtual. Student-faculty ratios have
achieved their most efficient in the history of the college, and graduates continue to rate their experiences
at the college ―excellent‖ in high numbers. Rates of student success as demonstrated through course and
program outcomes assessment are strong, although some areas for improvement have been identified, and
transfer students perform well at their receiving institutions based on the limited data available on which
to gauge their continued success. Across the academic transfer programs, the area most in need of
improvement appears to be in the rates of specific goal achievement, including completion of key
requirements in math and English as well as completion of benchmark numbers of academic credits
within specified timeframes.
67
Objective 1: Students display high rates of progress and completion.
Two key pieces of data highlight the greatest improvements in rates of progression and completion: the
percentage of degree-seeking students earning an associate degree has improved 19% since 2006-2007,
with a high of 34% for 2008-2009, and the percentage of students making substantial progress toward a
degree increased 9% from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009 with a high of 61%. These data document that more
GHC students are being retained for four or more quarters, and greater persistence is an important factor
in increased degree completion. Grays Harbor College has made a commitment to improved student
success; efforts to achieve that goal are documented and supported by data throughout this report.
This accreditation process has also provided the opportunity for another improvement in academic
transfer: the college now has clearly written outcomes and goals with measureable indicators for all
transfer programs that can be evaluated at the faculty and administrative levels. This process has included
important discussions of what appropriate indicators of program success are and has led to the
identification of the data most relevant to measuring that success. This work will allow the college to
clearly communicate outcomes to students. In addition, having consistent data to review on a regular basis
will allow challenges to be identified in a more systematic way so areas for improvement can be
identified more efficiently for a faster response.
Objective 2: GHC transfer students are prepared to succeed at their receiving institutions.
The 2009-2010 Instructional Review process marked the first time that faculty across the academic
transfer programs engaged in a unified process of course and program outcomes identification,
assessment, analysis and evaluation. In the previous 3-year assessment cycle (2006-2009), every
instructional division assessed each of the college‘s five DSAs. Course outcomes were linked to the
DSAs, and ratings identified the level of emphasis for each DSA within division courses. Division
averages were calculated and analysis and recommended changes followed a gap analysis of the average
ratings. While these efforts were useful to individual faculty in making course-level changes, the current
process has resulted in a much more holistic approach to the planning, assessment and improvement of
academic-transfer instruction. Specific improvements indicated by program-level assessments appear in
the following pages, but a few shared ideas have emerged across the programs. The first is an awareness
of the need to assess the assessment process: faculty across the programs remarked upon discoveries
made about what should be assessed and how it should be assessed, and indicated an intent to make
changes in the process for the next instructional review. A second general observation has to do with
time: faculty in nearly every program indicated that improvements will require reallocation of time with
students, both in and out of the classroom, in order to enhance student success. Finally, several programs
discussed issues relevant to student preparation and commitment, and expressed the intent to address
these issues in the coming year.
A key advantage of the TUCE assessment tool used in the Business DTA program is its ability to be used
as a pre- and post-testing tool. Consequently, the Business program intends to use it as a course and
program evaluation tool in fall 2010 and winter 2011. There will be opportunities to utilize and assess the
effectiveness of alternative learning approaches, such as web-based interactive exercises. The course and
program outcomes can also be evaluated in comparison with those of peer institutions with the possible
goals of modification and improvement. Student input as to the characteristics of course outcomes and
program outcomes is a possible area of exploration for future improvement of the assessment effort. The
assessment efforts in this area can be incorporated into a multi-year plan for assessment beyond the
currently existing time frames.
The overall student achievement rate for the four course-specific assessments of Humanities program
outcome 3 (―understand and interpret human achievements in various forms‖) was 78%, while the overall
68
student achievement rate for the six course-specific assessments of outcome #4 (―analyze and synthesize
meaning in verbal, visual and/or auditory media‖) was 76%. The target mastery score for outcome #3
averaged 81%, while the target mastery score for outcome #4 averaged 86%. In terms of pure numbers,
students in the Humanities program tended to do better on tasks relevant to outcome #3 than on tasks
relevant to outcome #4: the success-to-target rate for outcome #3 is 78/81, while the rate for outcome #4
is 76/86. There is likely a variety of explanations for this distinction on a course-by-course basis, but one
overall observation might be that the core activities of outcome #3 (understanding and interpreting) are a
degree simpler than those of outcome #4 (analyzing and synthesizing). The activities at the heart of
outcome #4 are also the mental processes most crucial in critical thinking. As a result of these two facts
(more complex activities, more necessary to critical thinking), it is possible that at the same time faculty
set a fairly high bar for achievement of outcome #4, students found the tasks in this area more
challenging. Beyond this general observation, individual faculty have made the following
recommendations for improvement: refining the process through which students revise their work;
modifying the use of class time to allow for more instruction in evaluation methods; incorporating more
internet-based instructional materials for out-of-class preparation; addressing issues of student attendance;
increasing the use of in-class peer reviews of student writing; increased use of repetition and re-testing;
heightened use of computerized instructional aids; enhanced use of in-class drill/practice; and considering
a prerequisite change. An additional improvement in the Humanities/Communications Division is that
faculty members in the English department have collaborated to write a comprehensive textbook that
covers English composition at the pre-college, Composition I and Composition II levels; this book is
available free of charge online for all students in all courses using the text. Current plans call for all fulltime English faculty to make use of this text by the end of the 2010-2011 academic year.
Although the Mathematics program faculty assessed high success rates in the Calculus II course, these
results are partly attributable to the fact that the 2010 course included an unusually large proportion of
very good students. The implementation of graded homework projects as a replacement for quizzes used
in past years has also had a positive effect on success rates. The projects contributed less than 25% of the
total points used in each of the three course outcomes assessed, but there is evidence they have improved
test scores for some students. Student response to replacing quizzes with projects was very positive, even
though the projects take up far more class time and study time for the students. The projects, as well as
classroom learning activities, may contribute more than traditional lecture does to student learning of ‗soft
skills‘, such as determination, collegiality, responsibility, and authentic self-esteem. So, investment of
class time in these activities will continue and will increase in the future. Finally, even though the course
success rate on course outcome (a) was 95%, only 57% succeeded at a level of 80% or above. Since this
is arguably the most fundamental learning outcome for the course, more class time should be devoted to
this outcome throughout the course next year. While the Precalculus I course achieved a level of success
in the learning outcomes assessed for this report, the course needs to be restructured so more time can be
spent working on concepts, notation, procedures and applications unfamiliar to most students prior to
taking the course. In 2010, the course needed to move rapidly due to the use of two different textbooks in
the Precalculus I and II courses. While the focus on problem-solving skills in the second text, the
University of Washington‘s Precalculus, is attractive, the time needed to cover that text impacted
negatively on student learning of more basic precalculus skills. The instructor has made changes to
attempt to remedy this situation. For 2010-2011, a more traditional text will be used for the Precalculus
sequence. This will be supplemented with problems and/or projects drawn from the UW textbook.
Finally, math faculty took different approaches to their assessment projects this year. Based on their
experiences this year, they plan to take a more standardized approach in future years. This approach will
include drawing data for each outcome assessed from at least three graded activities, including at least
one in-class test and the final exam.
The Science program faculty assessed generally high success rates (100%) for science outcome 2. Lower
success rates were found for outcomes 1 and 3, where only 3 out of the 9 studies met the success criteria.
69
Student difficulty with understanding atomic structure (Chemistry 121) was surprising to the science
faculty: they assume students have generally had some exposure to the basic components of atoms—
protons, electrons, and neutrons—an assumption they perhaps should not make. To address this issue they
plan on increasing the time spent on atomic structure in Chemistry 121 by including a visual and
kinesthetic approach to learning this topic through an in-class exercise where students will simulate the
placement of electrons in orbital subshells and shells, using a real-life analogy. In Earth Science, the
material on plate tectonics was covered the class period before the quiz, which did not allow time for
review. This may have adversely impacted student success; therefore, future planning will ensure
adequate time for review. It was also noted that an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for plate
motions requires a deeper conceptual understanding of the material; this lack of understanding may have
led students to score lower on this aspect than on the historical development of plate tectonics. The
science faculty believe a similar explanation applies to the generally lower success rate on outcome 3 –
the ability to analyze and evaluate data to solve problems requires a higher level of critical thinking skills
than the other outcomes, and thus this area is generally the most challenging. Unfortunately, there is no
shortcut to learning these skills – they can only be attained with substantial effort through practice. Not
surprisingly, students in Chemistry 162 who attended class and did the homework (i.e. practiced solving
problems) did well, while those who did not attend class or do the homework generally did poorly. Thus,
more effort will be put into encouraging student attendance and doing the homework. In astronomy, an
expansion of the atomic spectra exercise to include determining the composition of stars other than the
sun will improve student understanding of this difficult topic. While the biology faculty met success
criteria in all of their studies, they continue to seek ways to improve student learning through
development of hands-on activities, revision of testing strategies, and application of computer-based
technology. A secondary analysis of microbiology course data indicated one narrow area of concern about
student understanding of the Hepatitis B virus. To address this concern, the instructor has developed
graphics to help students visualize the strategy of the virus, reworded a chapter objective to clarify
instructor expectations, and written several new test questions to give students additional opportunities to
demonstrate understanding of the virus.
Data analysis in the Social Science program indicated that students were mastering the intended learning
outcomes, as measured by the assessment methods outlined above. The data analysis and instructor
recollection indicated a possible relationship with late registering students and class performance (e.g.,
academic performance and behavior). At least one instructor plans to stop signing late or overload
students into courses in the future. For the next assessment cycle, overall student mastery of various
program outcomes will be measured in addition to a qualitative assessment of regularly registered
students.
The Student Services Division has identified several opportunities for improvement in supporting
academic transfer. Again, unless otherwise noted, these suggestions apply to workforce preparation and
basic skills as well. In Admissions and Records, the achievement measures will need to be adjusted to
reflect the new scale ratings used in the Student Services Survey. Two surveys that were not completed in
2009-2010 will be accomplished in 2010-2011. In the transcript evaluation arena, which garnered the
lowest rating, changes have been made in methods of communicating with students about evaluation
results. The Athletic Department responded to low graduation rates by working with the Student
Success office to create an academic support program called ―Complete and Compete.‖ The goal of the
program is to intensify advising contacts, require participation in FYE courses, and improve tracking of
progress during the quarter. The department plans to spend another year gathering data prior to setting
firm achievement goals.
Changes planned in the Counseling & Advising Center include enhanced training of student workers,
revised class activities to ensure mastery of key skills, and improved response to the requests of entry
advisors. The rating scale for Disability Support Services proved to be imperfect, as many students who
70
did not receive services rated their satisfaction with staff. Those questions will need to be revised to
generate more accurate information about student satisfaction. It also became apparent that many students
who are served are not officially considered disabled. Some method of assessing those services needs to
be developed. Further improvements regarding both student and faculty awareness of disability services
and accommodations, particularly with respect to issues of technology and intellectual property rights, are
being undertaken. Measures were limited to just a few months for the Financial Aid indicators, so it will
be important to have measurements of progress over an entire year. This will better enable the staff to
determine needed changes. Currently, there is strong satisfaction with financial aid processes.
The Student Success program will be working with FYE faculty and mentors to revise student learning
objectives and to find ways to emphasize responsibility and motivation. In addition, the early alert
program will be expanded and a peer mentoring approach will be piloted. In conjunction with the athletic
department, this program will implement the ―Complete and Compete‖ academic success effort in 20102011. The success of the Learning Center has revealed a strong need for increased space and more hours
for writing support. Learning support options for off-campus students need to be publicized in a more
effective manner as well.
The Library notes that at this time, there is no reliable measure of authentic student learning of
information competency; improvements to such assessments will be a goal for 2010-2011, and some
limited conversations have already begun with classroom faculty whose students include centralized
groups that are representative of the entire student population. The indirect outcomes measures used
indicate that LMS is providing some information competency instruction to students, although statistics
on opportunities for skill building in media communications are inadequate to reaching conclusions. It is
clear, however, that instruction in information competency is not treated as a comprehensive learning goal
requiring sequential steps that build upon one another to a well-defined end level. Faculty discussions
need to occur in 2010-2011, with the intention of defining and implementing improvements. Only two
complaints are repeatedly received about the library facility: temperature and noise. The former is always
connected to a malfunction in the HVAC system, which is then repaired; the latter originates in several
sources. The uncontrollable origination point has been noise from the main entrance gallery, a problem
addressed over winter break 2010. Although not a cause for complaint, use of the quiet study room was so
minimal as to be an inefficient use of needed space. Minor furniture changes in spring quarter 2010
resulted in increased usage (maximum use of three increased to six, times of such maximum use increased
from 2-3 times per quarter to 3-4 times per week). Planning is underway to incorporate further changes as
indicated by the successes.
Overall, 2009-2010 was a challenging year for the Information Technology department. Decreases in
the college budget directly affected campus equipment purchases, but the department was able to
maintain replacement cycles for both students and staff through grant and technology-fee funding.
Staffing levels are typically adequate, but 2009-2010 was a difficult year for the department with health
issues affecting nearly half of the staff. The department lost one staff member to cancer mid-year; the
remaining staff were willing to step up and take on additional duties for the remainder of the year. In
2010-2011 the department intends to support the college goal of delivering a highly integrated,
technology-infused curriculum that is reflective of and responsive to the evolving learning styles of
students by investing, to the extent possible, in upgrades for classroom technology systems.
71
Section II: Core Theme 2 – Workforce Preparation
Planning for Workforce Preparation (Standards 3.B.1-3)
Grays Harbor College offers for-credit workforce education and training to prepare for new careers, to
upgrade work skills, and/or to further individual interests. Training can range from short-term
introductory courses in a workforce education discipline to a technical degree program. GHC currently
offers ten Associate in Applied Science and four Associate in Technology degree programs as well as 18
one-year professional/technical certificates.
Planning to address the workforce preparation core theme objectives ―Students display high rates of
progress and completion,‖ ―GHC professional technical programs are responsive to current market
demand,‖ and ―Students earning GHC professional/technical degrees and certificates are prepared for
employment in their field of study‖ occurs in multiple ways. Program curriculum is based on industry
standards and requirements. Programs are approved through the Instructional Council and by SBCTC
through a published process. The application process for system approval requires an analysis of need for
the program, potential career progression, availability of necessary sites for clinical instruction, labor
market projections for the field, collaboration with other colleges offering similar programs, and input
from an advisory committee indicating a commitment to employ graduates. Each program is required to
have an advisory committee of community and industry representatives; these groups have a key role in
ongoing program planning as well as in new program development.
The majority of courses in the workforce preparation programs are offered during weekdays on the main
campus in Aberdeen. However, a good number of these courses are offered in a traditional classroom
setting via the continuing education division either at the college‘s learning centers in other locations or
on the main campus in the evenings (see Table 4.2.1).
Continuing Education TRADITIONAL Courses in Workforce Preparation by Location
2007-2008
24
11
20
55
Aberdeen
Raymond
Ilwaco
Total
2008-2009
25
8
10
43
2009-2010
24
14
12
50
Table 4.2.1 49
In recent years, the college has expanded its eLearning options. While continuing to offer online courses
through Washington State‘s online learning consortium (WAOL), the college has supported GHC faculty
efforts to develop the institution‘s own courses that are offered entirely online or via hybrid or ITV
methods. As Table 4.2.2 indicates, online instruction in workforce preparation programs has grown
significantly in the past few years.
ONLINE Courses in Workforce Preparation by Venue
Washington Online
GHC privately owned
Total
2007-2008
18
0
18
2008-2009
51
7
58
Table 4.2.2 50
72
2009-2010
53
16
69
In 2008-2009, some workforce preparation faculty developed two types of hybrid courses: hybrid (H)
courses make use of reduced traditional class sessions that are supplemented by class activities using
WAOL‘s Angel online learning service; hybrid/alternative (H5) courses make use of reduced traditional
class sessions that are supplemented by alternative class activities that may or may not be online but do
not use Angel technology. Table 4.2.3 demonstrates the significant growth in these instructional methods
in recent years.
HYBRID Courses in Workforce Preparation by Method
Angel component (H)
Alternative components (H5)
Total
2007-2008
1
0
1
2008-2009
19
8
27
2009-2010
26
19
45
Table 4.2.3 51
A final method of offering workforce preparation courses to students at a distance from the main
Aberdeen campus involves ITV teleconferencing. Table 4.2.4 describes the number of ITV courses in the
past three years; overall, the number of courses via this technology has remained relatively stable.
ITV (Interactive Television) Courses in Workforce Preparation by Location
from Aberdeen to Pacific County
between locations in Pacific County
from partner institution to GHC
Total
2007-2008
5
16
3
24
2008-2009
6
12
3
21
2009-2010
9
14
3
26
Table 4.2.4 52
The dean for workforce education participates in professional organizations such as the Workforce
Development Institute, annual Energy Summit, and the statewide Workforce Education Council to keep
abreast of national, state and regional employment and training or workforce trends, issues, and
challenges. Currently, programs are adding ―green‖ components to their curricula.
Advisory committee members play a vital role in keeping programs connected to the community,
employers, and labor. A joint meeting of all the college‘s advisory committee members is held the first
Thursday of each October. Topics may include but are not limited to program goals and objectives,
curriculum updates or changes, student recruitment, program marketing, equipment and facilities, and job
placement. Members typically select one main task to work on each year. The college may suggest a
topic, such as recruitment in the event of a low enrollment trend. The results of the committees‘ work are
shared with the dean for workforce education, who incorporates that input into the year‘s planning and
budgeting cycle.
The college uses a variety of data sources for workforce preparation core theme planning. Student
progression and completion is tracked using Student Achievement Initiative (SAI) reports, the Integrated
Postsecondary Education Data system (IPEDs), SBCTC annual reports, and campus institutional
effectiveness reports. The Worksource Occupational Demand/Decline list is used to approve or
disapprove funding. Annually, the Washington Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board
conducts a performance review of the college‘s workforce programs on its Eligible Training Provider
(ETP) list. Data provided by the SBCTC are used to determine whether programs meet their standards for
program completion rates, participant employment rates, and participant earnings. If the programs meet
73
the standards, the programs remain ETP eligible, which means that eligible Workforce Investment Act
(WIA) students, Dislocated Workers, and others may use funding to enroll. The Demand/Decline List is
also reviewed for other occupations in the college‘s programs to ensure viability and responsiveness to
current and future markets. Discrepancies are noted and further researched. Workforce Explorer and
DLOA (Data Linking for Outcomes Assessment, linked with Employment Security) are researched for
employment projections and average wages. Programs supported by Worker Retraining (WRT) funds
must be medium- to high-demand and medium- to high-wage ($12-14/hour). Faculty often have anecdotal
job placement information. Student learning outcomes for workforce education courses, programs and
degrees, as well as for the Desired Student Abilities, are clearly identified and assessed annually.
Assessment of Workforce Preparation (Standards 4.A.1-6)
Objective 1: Students display high rates of progress and completion.
In 2008-2009 (the most recent year for which data are available), students in workforce preparation
programs made significant improvements in terms of progress and completion. Of the 838 students
enrolled that year as job prep students, 511 (62%) made gains compared to the system average of 56%. In
2007-2008, the average number of points earned by job prep students was 1.19 (compared to the system
average of .96); by 2008-2009, the number had increased to 1.33 points per student (compared to the
system average of 1.03). These data provide a brief preview of the achievements that will be detailed in
the following pages. 53
In assessing the specific ways in which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to
two specific outcomes:


Students achieve high rates of progress
Students achieve high rates of completion
Rates of student progress are measured through two key indicators. The first of these is the percentage
of students who have completed their programs‘ computation requirement. Table 4.2.5 shows the number
of workforce preparation students in three academic-year cohorts completing the computation
requirements for degrees. The target improvement for this indicator is a 2% increase in completion rates.
Workforce Preparation Students Completing Computation Requirement
Number in workforce cohort
# completing quantitative reasoning prior to current year
# completing quantitative reasoning in current year
Total meeting computation requirement for degree
% meeting computation requirement for degree
2006-2007
1765
318
150
468
27%
2007-2008 2008-2009
1790
1977
339
404
145
198
484
602
27%
30%
Table 4.2.5 54 - Indicator 1.1
The second means of measuring rates of student progress in workforce preparation programs is the
percentage of students who are workforce-ready according to the SBCTC definition of having earned 45
or more college-level vocational credits. The target for workforce readiness is 55%. Table 4.2.6 shows
that in the most recent class of workforce preparation students for which data are available (2007-2008),
52% met the criteria for workforce readiness by earning a certificate (13%), earning a degree (21%), or
completing 45 college-level credits (18%). Early leavers made up 48% of the group. These strong rates of
74
progress are likely due at least in part to the support provided by various grant programs such as
Opportunity Grant and IBEST as well as the college‘s decision to hire a student success coach for
workforce students.
Workforce Readiness Among Exiting 2007-2008 Cohort
Total enrolled
# and % leaving
early
# and % earning
45+ credits w/
2.0 GPA
# and %
earning a
certificate
# and %
earning a
degree
total # and %
workforce
ready
352 (100%)
168 (48%)
64 (18%)
45 (13%)
75 (21%)
184 (52%)
Table 4.2.6 55- Indicator 1.2
Rates of completion are measured via the percentage of workforce preparation students who earn a
degree or a certificate. The college is then able to assess the impact of training on future employment and
wages based on students‘ attainment levels upon exiting. Table 4.2.7 outlines completion rates for 352
students exiting 22 workforce programs in 2007-2008, the most recent year for which data are available.
Among the 2007-2008 cohort, 34% completed a degree or certificate (21% earned a degree while 13%
earned a certificate). Student completion rates in individual programs ranged from 100% in Nursing to
14% in Natural Resources (full results here). These data are used by the Instructional Management Team
(IMT) and program faculty to assess program effectiveness and viability. Overall, workforce preparation
programs are on track to achieve the targets for this indicator as presented in Table 4.2.7.
Rates of Completion (2007-2008) in Workforce Preparation
# of students
% of students
target %
Workforce students earning a degree
75
21%
25%
Workforce students earning a certificate
45
13%
15%
Table 4.2.7 56- Indicators 1.3 and 1.4
In 2009-2010, 1,647 students participated in instructional programs at the Stafford Creek Corrections
Center. Of those, 348 were enrolled in workforce preparation programs. During that year, 231 students
earned module certificates and 5 students earned one-year certificates.57
Objective 2: GHC professional technical programs are responsive to current market demand.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to a single
specific outcome: professional technical programs respond to input from relevant sources. This outcome
is measured by way of three indicators. The first is the programs‘ use of advisory committee input for
program review and improvement (Indicator 2.1). Advisory committee members play a vital role in
keeping programs connected to the community, employers, and labor. Committees are led by a layperson
chair; at the initial meeting, assignments are made and at least one future meeting is scheduled. At this
follow-up meeting, the results of the year‘s agenda are presented and forwarded to the dean for workforce
education. For example, in 2008-2009, the Automotive Technologies Committee assisted the instructor in
preparing the recertification application and supporting materials for the program by the National
Automotive Technician Education Foundation (NATEF), Inc. This involved committee members‘ making
an assessment of the program according to NATEF standards and arranging an on-site visit from
independent evaluators. The program was recertified.
75
The second indicator measures workforce programs‘ currency, relevance, and responsiveness to
demand using three different sources of information: the Worksource Occupational Demand/Decline
List, Workforce Explorer, and labor market data (Indicator 2.2). After the Labor Market and Economic
Analysis (LMEA) section of the Washington State Employment Security Department updates the
employment projections on the regional Demand/Decline List, the Pacific Mountain Workforce
Development Council (WDC) distributes this list to a variety of employment and workforce specialists to
review and validate its content. They sometimes have information that LMEA does not have. For
example, in 2009-2010, opportunities for truck drivers, both heavy and tractor trailer, were shown to be in
decline; however, the college‘s CDL instructor had job placement data that demonstrated that her
graduates were obtaining employment, primarily with out-of-state employers. The Pacific Mountain
WDC changed the occupation from decline to balanced. This permitted WIA and dislocated workers to
receive funding for this program. Occupations in carpentry were listed as being in decline, and feedback
from the college‘s advisory committee and other sources verified that the construction trades are in a
slump. The trend is not expected to continue; however, this information is used as a counseling and
advising tool for new students. The dean reviews the Demand/Decline List for other occupations within
the college‘s programs to ensure viability in and responsiveness to current and future markets.
Discrepancies are noted and further researched. As a result, all of the college‘s active programs met the
performance criteria and have been listed as Eligible Training Providers (ETPs) for 2010-2011. To
develop the annual WRT Plan and budget, the dean researches employment projections and average
wages of programs‘ occupations using Workforce Explorer and other sources. He also monitors job
placement data from Workforce Explorer as well as from employers, students and other sources.
The third indicator of programs‘ responsiveness to current market demand is sustainable enrollment in
workforce programs. The college continues to play a major role in providing workforce education and
training by providing long-term
and short-term programs in highwage/high-demand occupations
and apprenticeship training.
Workforce education programs
are experiencing high demand
throughout the community and
yechnical college system,
illustrated by the system average
increase of 36% in worker
retraining students. GHC
surpassed the system average
with enrollment growth of 51%.
Chart 4.2.1 shows enrollment in
worker retraining programs over
eight recent years.
Chart 4.2.1 58- Indicator 2.3
An additional measure of sustainability in workforce preparation programs is the relationship between
FTE allocated and FTE produced. The target for sustainable enrollment is to remain at or above the state
supported worker retraining FTE allocation each year. As Chart 4.2.2 demonstrates, over the past three
years, worker retraining programs have served increasingly higher numbers of students, particularly in
comparison to FTE funding allocation from the state. In 2009-2010, GHC achieved 165% of its
allocation.
76
As part of the instructional review process,
program enrollments are monitored. If
enrollments fall below 50% of a program‘s
stated cap for more than three consecutive
years, the program is evaluated for
viability. For example, enrollments in the
computer information systems and natural
resources programs had been below 50%
capacity for more than three years. After
attempts to revitalize the programs, the
decision was made to close CIS in 2007
and natural resources aquaculture,
geographic information systems, and
watershed restoration in 2008-2009.
Students in these programs were ―taught
out‖ to finish their degrees.
Chart 4.2.2 59- Indicator 2.3
Objective 3: Students earning GHC professional/technical degrees and certificates are prepared for
employment in their field of study.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to three
specific outcomes:



Students are prepared for employment
Employers are satisfied with GHC graduates
Students demonstrate high levels of achievement in student learning outcomes
Students’ preparation for employment is assessed through four specific indicators. The first two
indicators are measured comparatively: employment rates for students who complete workforce
preparation programs are viewed in comparison to employment rates for students who leave programs
without completing. In 2008-2009, the Washington State system average was a rate of 82% employed
after program completion and 75% employed after leaving early. As Table 4.2.8 shows, GHC‘s rates of
employment for program completers is consistent with the state average, while the rates of employment
for non-completers are somewhat lower than average, particularly in 2008-2009, the most recent year for
which data are available. The target for this indicator is to maintain the current level of completers while
lowering the number of early leavers by 2%.
Employment Rates: Completers vs. Leavers
Completers
Leavers
2006-2007
(class of 05-06)
82%
2007-2008
(class of 06-07)
81%
2008-2009
(class of 07-08)
81%
71%
72%
60%
Table 4.2.8 60- Indicators 3.1 and 3.2
The third indicator used to gauge student preparation for employment is average wage data arranged by
program. GHC‘s targets are twofold: first, to ensure that students employed in all wage fields meet or
exceed the average wage in the field; and second, to ensure that the majority of GHC workforce students
gain employment in high-wage fields. The most recent year for which these data are available is 2007-
77
2008, when the DLOA database identified 207 workforce program completers and analyzed employment,
field, and average wage. The average wage in low-wage fields was $13.49; in medium-wage fields it was
$14.59; and in high-wage fields it was $19.72. The top two fields for GHC students in the low-wage
group were administrative support and social services. The top two fields in the medium-wage group were
accounting and business administration/managerial. The top three fields in the high-wage group were
nursing, health technology, and welding. The full results of this report are available here, and a summary
of the results appears in Table 4.2.9.
Workforce Student Employment by Wage Group, 2007-2008
Low Wage Fields
Medium Wage Fields
High Wage Fields
(avg. $13.49)
(avg. $14.59)
(avg. $19.72)
24%
27%
48%
Table 4.2.9 61- Indicator 3.3
To analyze a subsection of the group outlined above, 100% of GHC‘s nursing program completers in
2007-2008 were employed in the health care professions; 47% were employed in GHC‘s service district
of Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties, 31% were employed in ―multiple counties‖; 19% were employed
in other Washington State counties; and 3% were employed in Oregon. The average annual earnings
among this group was $46,979.62
The final indicator used in measuring workforce students‘ preparation for employment is the percentage
of licensure or certification exams scored at or above regional and national averages. GHC‘s target is to
remain well above the 80% pass rates required for program approval. At this time, the only workforce
program using such exams is Nursing, which employs the NCLEX-RN exam. As Table 4.2.10 indicates,
pass rates for GHC students are very high.
Grays Harbor College Graduation & NCLEX-RN Pass Rates
# Entered
# Graduated
Male
Female
Male
Female
Graduation Rate within 3
Years of Admission to
First Nursing Class
2008
4
31
4
22
83%
88%
2009
10
24
9
20
85%
93%
2010
4
31
3
20
66%
96%
Class of
NCLEX-RN Pass
Rates for First Time
Taken
Table 4.2.10 63- Indicator 3.4
Employers’ satisfaction with GHC graduates is measured through analysis of the Employer Satisfaction
data gathered via the CLARUS Workforce Development Scan, most recently prepared for the college in
October 2008 and based on 300 interviews conducted in August of that year, representing 19,782 fulltime employees and 2,937 part-time employees. The complete results indicate that regardless of their
specific interaction with GHC, employers are highly satisfied with the educational and training activities
in which they or their employees participate. The target is to maintain this high level of satisfaction. As
78
Table 4.2.11 indicates, satisfaction with the college‘s services is consistently higher than 90%, with the
single exception of employers who served on advisory committees, only 66% of whom were satisfied
with the experience.
Employer Relationships with Grays Harbor College
Type of Relationship
% of Employers Using
% Satisfied
Hired employees from GHC
51%
91%
Sent employees to classes at GHC
72%
96%
Served on a GHC Advisory Committee
28%
66%
Used GHC as a training location
37%
96%
Used employee training developed by GHC (e.g. ECE,
computers, emergency management, soft skills, Spanish,
nurse‘s aides)
15%
90%
Conducted internships through GHC
22%
93%
Used GHC‘s conference facilities
18%
92%
Conducted apprenticeships via GHC
12%
100%
Other uses (first aid, hiring students, job shadowing,
meeting, attending theatre, work-study)
12%
100%
Table 4.2.11 64- Indicator 3.5
Student achievement of learning outcomes at the course and program levels is measured by way of
the intensive instructional review process described at the beginning of Chapter Four. Each faculty
member teaching in workforce preparation programs conducted course-level outcomes assessment
projects measuring the achievements of students with respect to individual course outcomes; faculty then
analyzed the articulation between these course outcomes and program-level outcomes as well as
articulation between course outcomes and general-education outcomes or desired student abilities
(DSAs). The lead program instructors then prepared reports that synthesized the course-level outcomes
and analyzed the results assessed.
The college website publishes program-level outcomes in all workforce preparation programs as well as
general education outcomes (DSAs). Program-level reports were prepared in the following divisions:
Business, Health Sciences, Industrial Technologies, Science, Social Science, and Stafford Creek.
Additional workforce program reports were prepared by related instruction programs in other divisions.
Complete reports for all of these program areas, as well as for programs providing non-instructional
support of workforce preparation, can be found by clicking on the names of the programs within the
summary reports that follow; the individual course-level outcomes assessment reports that led to the
program-level instructional reports can be found here.
Three programs in the Business Division prepared program-level outcomes assessment reports. In the
Accounting program, course-level assessment was carried out in a prerequisite core course in accounting.
The method of assessment was traditional testing that measured students‘ abilities in relation to two core
program outcomes: to perform basic accounting functions such as completing steps in the accounting
cycle, preparing financial statements, or documenting transactions; and to analyze individual components
of financial statements. The target for success was that 70% of students would score 75%; the actual
79
result showed 72% of students achieving the goal.65 The Business Management program assessed
student mastery of three course-level outcomes, each of which is reflected in the core program outcome
of having a working knowledge of computers and software packages necessary for basic business
communication and analysis. Assessment took the form of both authentic workplace scenarios (work
sample and case study) and traditional testing. The target for success was that 70% of students would
achieve a ―pass‖ level of 70%. The actual results showed that 100% of students achieved the goal in the
authentic scenario assessments, while 70% were successful in the traditional testing assessment.66 The
Office Technology program elected to assess outcomes related to grammar and spelling in its Business
English class. While the course outcomes did not correlate directly with any program outcomes, they
were clearly articulated with the program‘s mission statement which is, in part, ―to prepare students for
employment as receptionists and administrative assistants.‖ The target for success on this assessment,
which was carried out via traditional testing, was that 90% of students would achieve 70% or better on the
test. The average student score on the test was 85.75% (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).67
The Nursing program has 21 core program outcomes, of which seven were assessed during winter quarter
2010. The number of assessments performed on each outcome is in parentheses.
N1
N3
N4
N5
N7
M2
HR1
Demonstrate caring by treating all people with dignity and respect (1). Result: 100% of students
scored high on the empathy scale used to assess caring.
Provide nursing care through orderly collection of information from multiple sources to establish
a nursing database from which a plan of care may be developed (2). Result: Both assessments
found that students are able to appropriately use nursing process to provide care. Both found
100% of students achieved the standard. Of note, one looked at theory application and the other at
clinical application. Both are essential learning components of nursing.
Use theoretical knowledge, analysis of assessment data, and critical thinking in developing a
comprehensive plan of care and in management decisions that ensure safe, effective care (5).
Result: Five instructors assessed achievement of critical thinking/problem solving. Three of the
five instructors found that students met or exceeded the standard in critical thinking/problem
solving (100%). The other two instructors found that students did not meet the standard. The
standard for these assessments was 90%; the results were 56%, 87%, and 75%. Of note, the two
who found that students did not meet the standard were assessing critical thinking/problem
solving in specialty areas of practice (maternal newborn and care of children). Both units involve
a limited amount of clinical time to practice application.
Use concepts of teaching/learning to develop multiple teaching approaches to assist clients to
change behaviors to promote health (1). Result: Assessment of teaching/learning was assessed
via unit exam. 100% of students met the standard.
Adhere to standards of professional practice within ethical, legal, and regulatory frameworks (1).
Result: Students met the standard at 90% for legal frameworks and 91% for ethical frameworks.
Interpret mathematical, quantitative or symbolic models such as formulas, graphs, and tables,
and draw inferences from them (1). Result: One assessment examined second year students‘
ability to perform complex medication calculations in maternal newborn nursing. The standard of
90% was not met (84%).
Understand, articulate, and evaluate how various factors (e.g. social and personal/individual)
influence human behavior (1). Result: Students were assessed both via a NCLEX-style multiple
choice unit exam and completion of a Likert scale to assess empathy. All students met the
standard (90%/100%) (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).68
In writing the curriculum, faculty made the effort to link program outcomes and course outcomes. The
program outcomes for nursing are specifically addressed in each course. However, the non-nursing
80
program outcomes are not directly tied to courses. In addition, the nursing faculty team- teach nursing
theory and develop their own unit learning outcomes. These outcomes do not tie to either course or
program outcomes directly. This is a professional development issue for the nursing program faculty. One
instructor did not tie the assessment to program outcomes, more evidence of a gap in understanding the
curriculum development process.
Six programs in the Industrial Technologies Division prepared program reports: Automotive,
Carpentry, Commercial Driver’s License, Diesel, Industrial Control Systems, and Welding. All six
programs assessed the same two outcomes, which appear as core outcomes in all programs across the
division. The two outcomes involve demonstrating appropriate or exemplary workplace behaviors, and
recognizing and avoiding potentially hazardous situations related to the program field. The criteria for
success were nearly identical across the six program reviews. For the workplace behavior outcome, the
objective was deemed met if 60% of students who earned a C grade or higher achieved a Work Point
Sheet score of 90%-94%, and if 90% of students with a C or better completed the course without a written
reprimand. For the hazardous situations outcome, the objective was deemed met if 90% of students
earning a C or better completed the course without a written safety-related reprimand or reportable
accident. Additional standards (such as OSHA requirements) and additional reliability tests (such as
comparing lower Work Point Sheet scores with lower overall performance indicators) tend to validate all
six programs‘ reported results: all goals were achieved in all programs (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).69
Assessment was conducted in the Natural Resources program during winter quarter 2010 when only two
classes in the natural resource program were taught. The assessment focused on three course outcomes
from the GIS and Remote Sensing class related to program outcome 5 (Identify and solve problems in
natural resources through the application of mensuration and/or remote sensing techniques while
utilizing appropriate equipment): the use of industry standard tools and equipment in natural resources by
technicians as an expectation of employers; acquisition of data, analysis and use of information in the
form of maps, photographs, legal land descriptions and ownership deeds; and understanding and proper
use of industry specific terminology for communication in the workplace. Assessment via tests, labs and
assignments demonstrated successful achievement in two of three course outcomes. The target for success
was that 80% of students would achieve minimum standards. Results indicated student achievement of
86% on the first two assessments and 57% on the third (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).70 Natural resource
technology students need to be ready for the workplace when they graduate. Employers have an
expectation that students will be competent in basic skills and at least exposed to advanced skills when
they graduate. The course outcomes evaluated were part of an extensive list developed by the Society of
American Foresters (SAF), a guiding body for professional and technical education in forestry.
Two programs in the Social Science Division engaged in instructional review for workforce preparation
programs. The Criminal Justice program assessed three course outcomes. To varying degrees, the three
course outcomes relate to the seven program outcomes in that they provide students with an overall
understanding of the complexities and interactions of the criminal justice system; give students
knowledge in preparing themselves for a career in criminal justice; and ensure that students will have both
the mental and physical abilities to function within the criminal justice system. Student learning was
measured by objective assessment questions that gauged students‘ mastery of the outcomes. The target for
success was that 75% of students would demonstrate 75% mastery. Data analysis revealed that 90% of
students demonstrated 75% mastery or higher (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).71 Thus, the target was achieved.
The selected assessments are directly linked to coursework in the criminal justice program that provides
students the fundamentals necessary to enter their selected field; the program was developed to ensure
that students receive information and learning for all aspects of the criminal justice system, including
police, courts, corrections, and juvenile services. Completion of the criminal justice degree is indicative of
a student‘s preparation for a career in the profession. The degree documents the preparation and abilities
of the graduating student.
81
The Human Services program measured student learning via objective assessment questions in the Crisis
Intervention course. Question mastery ranged from 100% to 43%. Clearly some concepts or questions
were more difficult than others. Course outcome mastery, as measured by sets of questions, ranged from
89% to 67%. Combined mastery for the three outcomes under analysis was 80%. A combined mastery
average of 80% and class test averages of 80% and 79% were above the 75% ―minimum overall score‖
that served as the general benchmark for this analysis (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).72 The goal was achieved.
The Crisis Intervention course is imperative for human service workers. It determines the skill an
individual can bring to crisis situations. Students recognize in this course their ability to work under
pressure and to think quickly. These skills are essential in working with others and also in determining
personal limits of human service workers. Without having a grasp of the intense situations presented in
crisis intervention, students often believe that they can handle all situations, and in believing this, they
could possibly do harm to future clients.
Three programs in the educational program at Stafford Creek Corrections Center engaged in workforce
preparation program review. The Building Maintenance program assessed two program outcomes by
measuring student performance in three course-level outcomes; both program outcomes address students‘
hands-on abilities, with the first focusing on tools and equipment and the second on training. The specific
course outcome relevant to the first program outcome calls upon students to understand the use and
interpretation of multimeters to test electrical circuits; results showed that students achieved the targeted
goal of an 80-90% pass rate for the written and hands-on tests, with 85-95% of students succeeding. The
specific course outcomes relevant to the second program outcome expect students to have basic
understanding of plumbing practices as well as tools and safety practices. Results indicate that students
achieved the target of nearly 100% passing the hands-on test (90-100% passed) and 90% of students
passing the written test (100% passed) (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).73 The specific course outcomes identified
in this assessment project were clearly articulated in course syllabi. Within the syllabi, these outcomes are
also linked to the state certification standard. The Building Maintenance Technologies program has a
standardized curriculum approved by the SBCTC. After finishing the program, the students are awarded
credits along with two certificates for both Module 1 and Module 2. They are also given the opportunity
to access and receive copies of their official college transcripts.
The Information Technology Core program assessed two program outcomes: understanding and
properly defining computer and Microsoft Office terminology; and demonstrating the ability to perform
proficiencies in Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel, Outlook, and PowerPoint. At the completion of
ITC 100 (Introductory Microcomputers) students were given a 25-question terminology exam. The
expected result was that students would achieve an accuracy rate of 85%. At the end of the evaluation
period, the average score was 82.2%. This was slightly lower than expected. At the completion of ITC
120 (Introductory Word) and ITC 130 (Introductory Excel), students were given a hands-on assessment.
Expected results for the exams were that students would achieve an accuracy rate of 80% graded by a
predetermined matrix. At the end of the evaluation period, the student average for the assessments in
Word was 82.4%. This average was slightly higher than the expected. The student average for Excel was
85.8%. This was also slightly higher than the expected results (Indicators 3.6 and 3.7).74 The ITC
program is an SBCTC standardized computer literacy program used at all correctional facilities within the
state. The assessments link to all of the requirements set forth in the standardized program. Students who
complete this program earn a certificate through Grays Harbor College.
The Welding program at SCCC assessed three course outcomes that all link directly to a single program
outcome: apply basic welding and technology skills to meet industry standards (WABO certification) for
employment. The three specific outcomes called upon students to identify the American Welding Society
abbreviations and symbols, to interpret welding blueprints, and to solve measurement, fraction, and
decimal problems. For each of these outcomes, the target rate for success was that 90% of students would
score 80% or higher; in all three assessments, 100% of students scored at the target rate (Indicators 3.6
82
and 3.7).75 The specific course outcomes identified in this assessment project were clearly articulated in
course syllabi. Within the syllabi, these outcomes are also linked to the WABO certification standards.
The entire curriculum is the standardized state curriculum adopted by the Department of Corrections for
welding programs statewide. Each student will receive a certificate of completion for each module and a
state certificate upon completion of the program. The testing used to evaluate the student abilities is based
on industry standards.
Three Related Instruction programs in non-workforce divisions engaged in workforce preparation
program review. The Communications program has two core outcomes: demonstrate literal and
inferential comprehension, and communicate clearly and effectively in appropriate contexts. Relevant
course-level outcomes were assessed in five courses required or recommended for students in workforce
preparation: three writing skills courses, one speech course, and one information literacy course. In
assessments relevant to core outcome #1, the results showed that students are approaching achievement of
the targeted outcomes (see Table 4.2.12).
Assessment of Communications Program Outcome #1:
Demonstrating Literal and Inferential Comprehension
Targeted Success Rate
Actual Success Rate
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
Speech
75%
65%
Information Resources
80%
77%
Table 4.2.12 76- Indicators 3.6 and 3.7
In assessments relevant to core outcome #2, the results showed that students are approaching, and in some
cases achieving, the targeted outcomes (see Table 4.2.13).
Assessment of Communications Program Outcome #2:
Communicating Clearly and Effectively in Appropriate Contexts
Targeted Success Rate
Actual Success Rate
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
(percent of students scoring 80% or higher)
English Composition
90%
85%, 86%, 91%
Speech
75%
65%
Information Resources
80%
77%
Table 4.2.13 77- Indicators 3.6 and 3.7
The specific course outcomes identified in all of these assessment projects are clearly articulated in course
syllabi. Within the syllabi, these outcomes are also linked to general-education outcomes (desired student
abilities) – in the case of the Communications program outcomes, both 1 and 2 are directly linked to the
literacy component of the general-education/DSA outcomes. Key required courses for students in
workforce preparation rely heavily on assignment and assessment of work, such as the work analyzed in
winter 2010, that demonstrates achievement of both Communications program outcomes. These key
courses offered through the Communications program therefore provide a means for ensuring that
students completing certificates and degrees in workforce preparation achieve the identified outcomes in
communication skills.
83
In addition to being an integral part of the Associate in Arts degree, the Social Science program offers
four courses (SOC& 101, PSYC& 100, PSYC& 200, PSYCH 106) that fulfill human relations
requirements for Associate in Applied Science and Associate in Technology degrees and various
certificate programs. In many cases, only one social science course is required for completion of the
human relations requirement for vocational degrees and certificates. Students completing the human
relations requirement will complete from one to three social science courses resulting in limited exposure
to the social sciences and attainment of program outcomes two and three (Human Relations program
outcomes 1 and 2). Because students completing the AA degree are exposed to a variety of social science
courses (at least three), they have ample opportunities to develop proficiency in the four program
outcomes. Conversely, students completing vocational degrees or certificates are required to take
considerably fewer social sciences courses. Thus, they are provided with the opportunity to develop
mastery in program goals one and two. Data analysis indicated that students were mastering the intended
learning outcomes, as measured by the assessment methods outlined in Section I of this chapter.
In addition to the assessments of Admissions and Records, Counseling and Advising, and Financial Aid,
which were analyzed in Section I of this chapter, the Student Services area analyzed two outcomes of
particular importance to workforce preparation: Friends of TRiO (which serves all students but focuses
on non-transfer oriented students) has a state mandated persistence rate of 65% and a good academic
standing rate of 75%. A 92% rate was achieved in both areas. In the Opportunity Grant program, which
serves workforce students, 25% are required to reach a 45-credit tipping point; to date, 28% of these
students have done so.
GHC partners with Employment Security, the state Department of Social and Health Services, and the
Coastal Community Action Program to provide WorkFirst, Washington State‘s welfare reform program
designed to help low-income parents find jobs, keep their jobs, move up the wage ladder, and become
self-sufficient. The WorkFirst program provides vocational counseling, customized job skills training and
vocational training. In 2006-2007, WorkFirst provided funding for 394 people; 18 low-income students
were served on campus, and 78 new on-campus students attended customized job skills training (CJST),
high-wage high-demand (HWHD), and vocational training. At WorkSource Grays Harbor, 502 attended
classes such as Steps to Success, Basic Skills, and Job Club. Twenty of these students also participated in
work study at the college and 149 participated in the Families That Work component of the program.
The Carpentry Technology program partners with NeighborWorks of Grays Harbor to build custom,
quality homes designed to help revitalize neighborhoods throughout the area. Students learn all phases of
carpentry through this practical hands-on training program. The partnership has recently completed its
eighth home. Proceeds from the sale of these homes provide funding that helps support NeighborWorks‘
other community service projects. The Carpentry program is also currently partnering with Habitat for
Humanity Grays Harbor and has recently begun construction of its second home through this program.
Beyond the assessments of facilities that were analyzed in Section I of this chapter, the Administrative
Services program assessed financial and physical needs in workforce preparation programs, resulting in
the following actions in the past three years:
 Automotive and Welding Building construction (21,750 square feet, $5.2 million)
 Carpentry area remodel (updated classrooms and faculty office space, safety upgrades)
 Sand Shed construction (in conjunction with students in the Carpentry program)
Students enrolled in the Carpentry Technology program were involved in both planning and execution of
the carpentry area remodel and the sand shed construction.
84
The general assessments for Library and Media Services discussed in Section I of this chapter apply
broadly to workforce preparation programs as well. Of the 25 faculty who incorporate information
competency into their curricula, 11 teach in workforce preparation programs; only one faculty member in
workforce preparation incorporates media assignments into the curriculum. Of the 559 books and media
programs purchased by the library in 2009-2010, 30 were obtained specifically for support of workforce
preparation programs; six of the 17 databases purchased during that time period are targeted to workforce
preparation students. It should be noted that many of the materials purchased for academic transfer, and
all of the materials purchased for general use, are also used to support students in workforce preparation
programs.
The Information Technology assessments discussed in Section I of this chapter apply as well to the
workforce preparation core theme. Beyond those assessments, the IT department assessed its objective to
use technology resources effectively and efficiently in support of the professional/ technical learning
environment, resulting in the acquisition and installation of an updated version of Medisoft software for
Office Technology classes.
The Grays Harbor College Foundation evaluated its support of workforce preparation programs in a
variety of ways. The Hughes Tool Scholarships, entering their seventh year, have provided more than
$530,000 in funding for workforce students‘ required equipment; additional Hughes support included a
major equipment donation to the heavy duty diesel mechanics program. In scholarship support, World
Class Scholars‘ partial tuition awards can be used for workforce programs, and the Kelsey Foundation has
contributed $190,000 since 2003 not only for workforce scholarships but also equipment for both
workforce programs and the fitness lab. Recent purchases and contributions have been made based on
positive assessments of past purchases/contributions including Lincoln welders, nursing software, a
dynamometer for automotive technology, a bus for the automotive program and a motor home for the
diesel program.
The Public Relations office assessed its support of workforce preparation programs in several specific
ways, including the creation of specialized ads and features promoting under-enrolled programs such as
GIS, Natural Resources and CDL, as well as evening and online options.
Improvements in Workforce Preparation (4.B.1-2)
Workforce preparation programs are currently operating at or near – and in some cases beyond – capacity.
Enrollments are robust, with both recent high-school graduates and returning non-traditional students
filling classrooms both real and, where available, virtual. Student-faculty ratios have achieved their most
efficient in the history of the college, and graduates continue to rate their experiences at the college
―excellent‖ in high numbers. Rates of student success as demonstrated through course and program
outcomes assessment are strong, although some areas for improvement have been identified, and
workforce program completers achieve high rates of successful employment. Across the workforce
preparation programs, the area most in need of improvement appears to be in the rates of specific goal
achievement, including workforce readiness and certificate/degree completion.
Objective 1. Students display high rates of progress and completion.
The college has instituted several changes designed to increase the rates of progress and completion for
workforce preparation students. Faculty have adopted early intervention practices for students
experiencing academic difficulties; these interventions include referrals to the Learning Center and
encouragement to form and/or join study groups. Students re-entering a program after more than one year
away often have difficulty regaining skill levels to resume their training; as a result, they immediately fall
behind. Therefore, the college has adopted a policy allowing returning students to retake classes to
85
practice those skills before continuing their education. The Carpentry program increased its quarterly
credits from 12 to 16, affording students more time on task. Additional hours allow for higher skill
attainment and rates of progress. I-BEST classes help students to improve their computation requirements
(see Core Theme 3 for details). Additional work is needed to increase the rates of work-ready students
and those who complete certificates/degrees.
Objective 2. GHC professional/technical programs are responsive to current market demand.
In maintaining their professional/technical certifications, faculty engage in professional development
experiences to keep current with developments and technologies in their fields. Nursing and Office
Technology faculty recently participated in industry based professional development (―Back to Industry‖)
experiences. Perkins and Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) grants
were used to purchase equipment to maintain current technology in programs. For example, in 2009-2010
the Automotive program purchased a hybrid vehicle, allowing faculty to teach current, in-demand skills.
Objective 3. Students earning GHC professional/technical degrees and certificates are prepared for
employment in their field of study.
The college would like to expand and enhance job development and placement activities for its students;
determining the best means of achieving these goals will be a focus of the workforce dean. Additionally, a
need has been identified to survey graduates of all workforce preparation programs, preferably a year
after completion. The existing graduate survey isn‘t workforce specific and is administered too soon to
assess whether students are prepared for employment. To date the only available workforce graduate
information is anecdotal or the result of CLARUS surveys. The only program currently conducting a
formal survey of graduates is Nursing; in addition, Nursing students began using the Assessment
Technical Institute (ATI) program in 2007 to improve pass rates on the NCLEX exam. Students began
preparing for the exam and, if needed, sought remediation during their first quarter rather than waiting
until the last quarter to prepare.
Several improvements are indicated in the programs of the Business Division. In the Accounting
program, changes to be implemented to improve student performance include greater emphasis on
attendance in the syllabus; more frequent verbal reinforcement in class regarding attendance and good
homework; and replacing some lecture with more activities, such as group work, drills, and pop quizzes.
No additional budget or training is required beyond the normal ongoing professional activities, such as
conferences; considerable updating of knowledge and skills is done by independent web research. In the
Business Management program, not all students are prepared for college level work in general, nor do
they have an adequate computer background. Examining and enforcing class prerequisites could help
address this problem. Traditional exams presented the most problems. Additional exercises on vocabulary
training (and discussions of its importance) will be needed. It is not unusual for new users to have
working computer knowledge but lack terminology and context. This limits their ability to progress in the
field. Since they have a limited understanding of the entire field, the importance of vocabulary isn‘t
readily apparent to the average student. Planned improvements include emphasizing the importance of
terminology and reducing the number of traditional exams, substituting more problem-based case work
and analysis. Changes in course objectives may also be desirable, focusing more on application than
recognition. In the Office Technology program, a number of students lack basic computer skills,
particularly file management. An addition of the CIS 100 Introduction to Personal Computers course to
the OFTC degree requirements is under consideration. Planned improvements include an emphasis on file
management skills in daily homework for all CIS core courses in the degree. Another weakness in the
program is lack of proficient proofreading skills. Additional proofreading exercises and instruction in
86
BA 140 Business English and additional writing assignments in OFTC 220 Office Procedures have been
added to the 2010-2011 curriculum.
In the Nursing program, several instructors noted that the measurement tools need to be improved. This
includes adopting a clinical rubric that more specifically details achievement of clinical outcomes. The
current process is too subjective to be a reliable measure of competency. The writing rubric which was
adopted by all faculty members and has been consistently used needs to be explained better to students.
Its purpose and value to them in the writing process needs to be reinforced regularly when the quarterly
scholarly paper is assigned. While none of the faculty indicated a program-wide change, the director of
nursing intends to look seriously at the computation outcome and develop a process to assess
systematically throughout the program. A curriculum revision that increases the math requirement from
MATH 95 to MATH& 146 may have significant implications for the pool of students that meet the
qualifications for selection to the program but should also improve students‘ ability to meet the
computation outcomes. None of these changes involve budget implications. One instructor noted that
specifically in specialty nursing, more time in the skills lab with a full-time lab assistant and more high
tech models would enhance the students‘ abilities to meet the learning outcomes of the courses and
consequently the program outcomes. The program director agrees with this change, believing it would
benefit all aspects of the program. The lab is not used well because of a lack of personnel. Of course, this
change would pose a significant impact on the budget in a time of severe budget restraints.
In the Industrial Technologies Division, several programs identified potential improvements. The
Automotive program observed that the method of assessing “Show exemplary behaviors while at work,
following the protocol of a professional technician” in support of program outcome 3 could be
improved. In order to better assess student learning (as opposed to assessing student performance) of this
specific outcome, tracking individual students‘ Work Habit Point Sheet scores as they progress through
the 2-year program should replace basing the evaluation on performance in one particular course. This
would more likely show whether improvements in behavior are actually being learned within the
Automotive program curriculum, or whether those who enter the program with poor work habits are
simply being weeded out when they fail to meet minimum course requirements. Several other Industrial
Technologies programs echoed this proposed improvement. The CDL program discovered that the
method of assessing “demonstrate social and personal responsibility necessary for success in the
workplace” in support of program outcome 9 could be improved. To do this, the instructor would
require that students evaluate the work-based learning portion of CDL. This change would make students
responsible for weekly reports; failure to complete would result in points lost and possibly a lower grade.
The Natural Resources program notes that the curriculum has been radically changed in the last two
years with the addition of forest technology as an option and elimination of the fisheries, watershed and
GIS options. The forestry curriculum is currently based on national standards set by the Society of
American Foresters (SAF). The SAF will recognize programs that meet all the standards set forth in its
report ―Standards and Procedures for Recognizing Educational Programs in Forest Technology‖
(12/2007). The benefits of recognition through SAF are many. Generally speaking, all the standards of the
report are currently achievable except for Standard III: Faculty. This requires that two full-time
instructors be dedicated primarily to the success of the natural resource/forest technology program. The
benefits of a second instructor are obvious in terms of expanding technical expertise, backup, and
flexibility. Such an expansion of the program would be difficult to achieve in the current budget climate.
Programs in the Social Sciences Division have noted improvements already instituted as well as proposed
changes for the future. The Criminal Justice program recommends continuing the use of PowerPoint
presentations, which allow students to access information at any time, retaining the new levels of testing
that have enhanced both understanding and achievement among students, and maintaining the revised
instructional presentations formatted to a four-day week. The Human Services program is finding it more
87
and more difficult to meet the needs of students when class size is larger than 30. Allowing students to
enter the program based primarily on the fact that it is one of a few certificate programs will lead to
continued difficulty in placing graduates in the community. It is important that the students who enter the
program are truly interested in working in the human services field and therefore have the desire to grow
and learn about the field. Because of the nature of the program, as long as there is only one instructor, an
instructional assistant is a necessary and logical staffing recommendation.
At Stafford Creek, the recommendations of the ITC program faculty are that instructors undergo
training to work with learning-disabled students; that more textbooks be purchased for students to check
out of classrooms; and that instructors work more closely with students to help them understand the
terminology and software. The Welding instructor recommends that there be an assistant to help with the
various security issues that stem from operating a welding program in a prison setting so that the
instructor can spend time with the students.
The Related Instruction programs have suggestions as well. From Communications: the relatively high
achievement rate in the composition courses reflects an ongoing effort at assessment-based improvement
in the English department; in the one course that surpassed the target goal for student success in this
project (English 101), that achievement was directly tied to the instructor‘s recent implementation of a
new unit of instruction in response to an earlier outcomes assessment project. In the remaining courses, all
of which showed that students are approaching but not yet achieving the targeted success rates, the
recommendations for improvement share a similar theme: time. Instructors in these courses indicated a
need for additional time for students to revise their written work, increased devotion of in-class time to
activities such as peer review, and increased instruction time for specific topics. Faculty also indicate a
need to develop innovative ways to address student commitment (variously described as attendance,
participation, work ethic, apathy). Beyond these observations, a change in how program faculty carry out
assessment activities is indicated: the tendency is toward assessing creative communication skills
(speaking/writing) rather than receptive communication skills (listening/reading). As a result, the
Communications program has far more data relevant to program outcome 2 than program outcome 1.
The next round of assessment activities will address this disparity.
In the Student Services area, adjustments will be made to the New Student Calling Program directed by
Friends of TRiO personnel to eliminate duplication of information that has occurred as a result of the
mandatory FYE courses being implemented. In the Opportunity Grant program, all goals have been met
or exceeded. Some of the data collected for the Opportunity Grant needs to be adjusted and reviewed so
that the college can better focus on the need for additional funding from the SBCTC.
Based on the results of its recent promotion of under-enrolled workforce programs, the Public Relations
office intends to publish ―reminder‖ features in area press outlets to encourage potential students to
consider particular workforce programs.
88
Section III: Core Theme 3 – Basic Skills
Planning for Basic Skills (Standards 3.B.1-3)
Basic skills at Grays Harbor College are addressed in three distinct ways.
Adult Basic Education: The college provides adult basic education (ABE) and English as a second
language (ESL) classes for students seeking a GED certificate or who wish to improve their skills in
reading writing, mathematics, and English language. These courses are provided to adult students in the
community through the Transitions Division as well as to offenders housed at the Stafford Creek
Corrections Center (SCCC) through GHC‘s educational program at Stafford Creek.
Developmental Education: The college provides math, reading and writing classes meant to directly
assist students making the transition into college-level transfer and workforce courses. All reading courses
as well as lower-level math and composition courses are provided by the Transitions Division. Higherlevel developmental courses in composition and mathematics are provided by the Humanities/
Communications and Math/Science divisions and are not included in this core theme.
Student Success: The college provides I-BEST courses meant to improve the basic reading , writing, and
mathematics skills of students enrolled in workforce preparation programs, as well as courses in human
development and freshman year experience offered through GHC‘s Counseling department.
Planning to address the basic skills core theme objectives ―Students display high rates of persistence and
progress‖ and ―Students attain the necessary skills in reading, writing, arithmetic and English language
to pursue and achieve their goals‖ occurs in multiple ways. Developmental Education curricula are
planned to align with college-level transfer and workforce program requirements to assure smooth
progression. Adult Basic Education curricula follow the standards-based system for adult education in
Washington State, which includes the Learning Standards that broadly define abilities, indicators and
dimensions of performance, and curriculum frameworks. Student success coursework is coordinated with
the faculty teaching in the academic transfer and workforce preparation programs.
The majority of courses in the Adult Basic Education programs are offered during weekdays on the main
campus in Aberdeen and at the Whiteside Center in Aberdeen. However, a good number of these courses
are offered in a traditional classroom setting at educational centers throughout Grays Harbor and Pacific
counties, as well as at the Stafford Creek Corrections Center (see Table 4.3.1).
Traditional Courses in Adult Basic Education by Location
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
Aberdeen
299
283
246
Raymond
79
81
54
Ilwaco
126
116
91
Elma
60
60
42
SCCC
200
190
180
Total
764
730
613
Table 4.3.1 78
89
In recent years, the college has expanded its eLearning options. While continuing to offer online courses
through Washington State‘s online learning consortium (WAOL), the college has supported GHC faculty
efforts to develop the institution‘s own courses that are offered entirely online or via hybrid or ITV
methods. Online instruction in developmental education programs has shifted significantly in the past few
years toward GHC-owned courses, which have replaced some WAOL offerings. As WAOL offerings in
developmental education have decreased, faculty in the Transitions Division have developed hybrid
courses: these make use of reduced traditional class sessions that are supplemented by class activities
using WAOL‘s Angel online learning service. Table 4.3.2 presents numbers of online and hybrid courses
in developmental education over the past three years.
Online and Hybrid Courses in Developmental Education by Type
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
Washington Online
12
9
8
GHC privately owned online
0
3
4
Hybrid
2
6
34
Total
14
18
46
Table 4.3.2 79
A final method of offering developmental education courses to students at a distance from the main
Aberdeen campus involves ITV teleconferencing. Table 4.3.3 describes the number of ITV courses in the
past three years; overall, the number of courses offered via this technology has remained relatively low.
ITV (Interactive Television) Courses in Developmental Education by Location
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
from Aberdeen to Pacific County
1
0
1
between locations in Pacific County
1
5
3
Total
2
5
4
Table 4.3.3 80
The dean for transitions programs represents the college at statewide Council for Basic Skills (CBS)
meetings. CBS comprises all basic skills providers funded through Adult Basic Education at SBCTC. Its
purpose is to assist and report to the Instruction Commission on issues affecting state, local, or federally
funded adult and family literacy programs and basic skills education issues, and to promote student
success by improving and coordinating basic skills instruction in accordance with state and federal
guidelines. The dean brings information back to faculty, the Division Chairs group, and the Instructional
Management Team. No statewide organization currently represents developmental education programs.
However, there is renewed interest in pre-college preparation and it is a topic for discussion at meetings
of the Instruction Commission, Articulation and Transfer Council, and Council for Basic Skills.
90
The college uses a variety of data sources for basic skills core theme planning. Student progression and
completion is tracked using Student Achievement Initiative (SAI) reports, IPEDs, SBCTC annual reports,
and campus institutional effectiveness reports. Student learning outcomes are based on Washington
Learning Standards and Performance Indicators. Assessment results are tracked in the Web-Based Adult
Basic Education Reporting System (WABERS) database for all students and can be accessed for local
reporting as well as for required reporting to SBCTC.
Assessment of Basic Skills (Standards 4.A.1-6)
Objective 1: Students display high rates of persistence and progress.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to two
specific outcomes:


Students display high rates of persistence
Students achieve high rates of progress
Federally Reportable Students in Adult Basic Education
A baseline for assessing these
objectives is established first by
determining the percentage of
students making use of adult basic
education programs who are
federally reportable: to be
reportable, students need to attend
class for more than 12 hours, and
their complete demographic data
needs to be recorded in the
system. Chart 4.3.1 81 (right)
shows the rates of reportable
students over the past six years;
aside from a dip in 2007-2008, the
percentage has steadily increased
in each of those years. In 20072008, of 1,225 students, 1,003
were reportable. In 2008-2009, of
1,138 total students, 988 were
reportable. And in 2009-2010,
901 of the college‘s 956 adult
basic education students were
reportable.
In measuring rates of persistence in adult basic education, the college examines percentages of
Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (CASAS) pre-test and post-test rates. At intake,
students are pre-tested and placed in classes based on their lowest placement level; after 45 hours of
instruction, they are post-tested for point and level gains. Currently, the college‘s adult basic education
program has a pre-test target rate of 100% and a post-test target rate of 65%. As Table 4.3.4 indicates, the
actual rates for the most recent year available indicate that the college is approaching its goal in both pretesting (actual rate 94%; 95% at SCCC) and post-testing (62%; 59% at SCCC).
91
ABE/ESL Pre-Testing and Post-Testing Rates
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
# enrolled
# tested
%
# enrolled
# tested
%
# enrolled
# tested
%
Pre-testing
1,225
1,003
82%
1,138
988
87%
956
901
94%
@ SCCC
1212
1036
85%
1274
1217
96%
1133
1075
95%
N/A
524
52%
N/A
569
58%
N/A
557
62%
1038
427
41%
1217
670
55%
1075
635
59%
Post-testing
of those pre-tested
@ SCCC
Table 4.3.4 82- Indicator 1.1
Students‘ rates of progress in basic skills are measured through a variety of indicators. For students in
adult basic education (ABE/ESL) programs, progress is assessed through the percentage of students
making level gains through CASAS testing. A level gain is achieved when a student scores high enough
on the CASAS test to advance to the next level of instruction. The current target for ABE level gains is
45%, while the target for ESL level gains is 53%. Rates in level gains in both ABE and ESL are shown in
Table 4.3.5.
Students Achieving Level Gains in ABE and ESL
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
# post-tested
# gain
%
# post-tested
# gain
%
# post-tested
# gain
%
377
196
52%
391
183
47%
368
143
39%
359
217
60%
563
364
65%
558
360
65%
147
103
70%
178
114
64%
189
88
47%
45
25
56%
107
49
46%
77
36
47%
ABE
@ SCCC
ESL
@ SCCC
Table 4.3.5 83- Indicators 1.2 and 1.3
Table 4.3.6 shows the numbers of students enrolled in ABE/ESL/GED courses who achieved a significant
point gain during the year. The target is 46%.
Adult Basic Education Students' Significant Point Gains
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
All students
1,164
1,003
982
@ SCCC
1,036
1,217
1,075
435
388
434
534
539
526
37%
39%
44%
52%
44%
49%
# Achieving Gain
@ SCCC
% Achieving Gain
@ SCCC
Table 4.3.6 84 – Indicators 1.4 and 1.5
92
Overall, the college measures student
progress in adult basic education
programs through achievement
points, which are earned through
what Washington State terms
―significant gains‖ (3-5 point gains
on CASAS post-testing) and through
achievement of GED. The college
has maintained a steady increase in
achievement points with a slight dip
in 2009-2010 due to decreased
enrollment. The college‘s record
regarding achievement points for
ABE/ESL/GED is illustrated in
Chart 4.3.2 85 (left); the target for
achievement points is 1,660 for
ABE/ESL, a 3% increase.
The college‘s record
regarding achievement
points in developmental
education is illustrated
in Chart 4.3.3 86(right)
which tracks collegeready achievement
points; the target for
achievement points is
1,130 for college-ready,
a 1% increase.
A final indicator of basic skills students‘ rates of progress is the percentage of Integrated Basic Education
and Skills Training (IBEST) students making level gains. Table 4.3.7 shows the combined level gains
for all IBEST programs (Welding, Carpentry, Automotive, and Human Services) for the past two years.
The target for students making level gains is 45%.
IBEST Students Making Level Gains
2008-2009
2009-2010
Number of Students Enrolled
58
56
Number Making Level Gains
27
19
47%
34%
Percentage Making Level Gains
Table 4.3.7 87 - Indicator 1.6
93
Objective 2: Students attain the necessary skills in reading, writing, arithmetic and English
language to pursue and achieve their goals.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to two
specific outcomes:
 Students attain skills necessary to pursue and achieve their goals
 Students demonstrate high levels of achievement in student learning outcomes
In determining basic skills students‘ attainment of the skills necessary to pursue and achieve their goals,
the college looks at three specific indicators. First, the percentage of students making the transition
from adult basic education courses to developmental or college-level courses is examined. Table 4.3.8
shows the rates of transition from ABE levels 3 & 4 and GED levels 1 & 2. The college is approaching
the target rate of 22%, while the SCCC program exceeds the target, in part owing to institutional realities
such as mandatory attendance, longer periods of instruction, and the absence of competing options.
Students Making the Transition from ABE 3 & 4 and GED 1 & 2
Enrollment in ABE 3 & 4 and GED 1 & 2
@SCCC
# of students making the transition
@SCCC
% of students making the transition
@SCCC
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
674
542
543
638
964
894
58
74
101
164
285
251
9%
14%
19%
26%
30%
28%
Table 4.3.8 88- Indicator 2.1
The college also tracks the percentage of students successfully making the transition from developmental
to college-level essential skills courses. For recent data regarding student transitions from pre-college to
college-level math, see Table 4.3.9. The target rate for transition to college-level math is 73%.
Student Transitions Through Pre-College Math and Into College-Level Math
2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009
Number of students completing a pre-college math course
369
359
510
Number of students making the transition to college-level math
254
242
350
Percent making the transition to college-level math
69%
67%
69%
Percent making the transition after
1 pre-college math class
85%
80%
63%
2 pre-college math classes
13%
19%
32%
3 pre-college math classes
2%
0%
5%
Table 4.3.9 89 - Indicator 2.1
As enrollment has increased, the number of students taking at least two pre-college math courses has
more than doubled, in part due to the number of nontraditional students who had been away from school
for a long time. Although the initial placement of these students in math is lower than that of other
94
students, the percentage of students making the transition to college-level math has remained consistent
and relatively high.
The second essential skills area tracked by the college is writing. For recent data regarding student
transitions from pre-college to college-level writing, see Table 4.3.10 below. The target rate for transition
to college-level writing is 81%.
Student Transitions Through Pre-College Writing and Into College-Level Writing
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
Number of students attempting pre-college writing
363
365
515
Number of students making the transition to college-level writing
288
290
396
Percent making the transition to college-level writing
79%
79%
77%
Table 4.3.10 90 - Indicator 2.1
The same effects of increased enrollment that exist in math exist in writing: the slightly lower transition
rate in 2008-2009 is likely due at least in part to the 41% increase in enrollment over the previous year.
Although the college does not formally track success rates in college-level writing among students who
have completed pre-college writing courses, some data have been gathered for descriptive purposes. In
2007-2008, a total of 290 students qualified to make the transition from developmental to college-level
writing (by earning a C- or better in English 095). Of those 290, 129 (44%) made the transition and
successfully completed college-level writing either the same year or in 2008-2009. In 2008-2009, 242
students (the equivalent of 61% of that year‘s transition cohort) who had completed pre-college writing
successfully at any time in the preceding three years completed college-level writing (Indicator 2.1).91
Another indicator of student attainment of skills necessary to pursue and achieve goals is the percentage
of students who complete the IBEST program. Table 4.3.11 shows completion rates for IBEST
programs from 2007-2008 through 2009-2010. The target is that 80% of all students in each IBEST
program will complete the program.
Completion of IBEST programs
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
Total
#
completing
%
completing
Total
#
completing
%
completing
Total
#
completing
%
completing
Welding
4
2
50.0%
30
20
67%
13
10
77%
Carpentry
---
---
---
13
8
62%
---
---
---
HUST
---
---
---
---
---
---
20
18
90%
Automotive
---
---
---
14
8
57%
---
---
---
Program
Table 4.3.11 92 - Indicator 2.2
95
The final measure used in examining students‘ attainment of skills needed in pursuing and achieving
goals is the percentage of students earning GED certificates or achieving post-secondary education. As
Table 4.3.12 shows, the college has shown significant improvement in the most recent year for which data
have been collected. The goal is to maintain 81% achieving a GED and 85% achieving post-secondary
education (defined as enrollment in a GHC course or courses at the developmental or college level).
Achievement for Students with GED or Post-Secondary Education Goal
2007-2008
GED
@SCCC
Post-Secondary
2008-2009
2009-2010
total
# achieved
%
total
# achieved
%
total
# achieved
%
92
53
58%
99
58
59%
119
104
87%
286
115
40%
299
116
39%
524
93
37%
172
149
87%
164
121
74%
136
132
97%
Table 4.3.12 93- Indicator 2.3
The college website publishes program-level outcomes in all basic skills programs as well as general
education outcomes (DSAs). Program-level reports were prepared in both the Transitions and Stafford
Creek divisions. Complete reports for all of these program areas, as well as for programs providing noninstructional support of workforce preparation, can be found by clicking on the names of the programs
within the summary reports that follow; the individual course-level outcomes assessment reports that led
to the program-level instructional reports can be found here.
The outcomes projects completed by faculty in adult basic education (the on-campus and Whiteside
Adult Basic Education and English as a Second Language areas of the Transitions program) focused
on levels of achievement on the state-standardized CASAS test. The core outcomes measured were:
 ABE program outcome 2: Reading with Understanding
 ESL program outcome 1: Listening to Others
 ESL program outcome 4: Reading with Understanding
The projects examined level gains and significant gains as defined by the state and discussed earlier in
this section. For ABE Outcome #2: Reading with understanding, the results showed that students were
making significant gains as well as level gains. The ABE instructor had a goal of 75% of students making
these gains; 88% showed a significant gain, while 50% achieved a complete level gain. For ESL Outcome
#1: Listening to others, the results showed that students made significant gains as well as level gains. The
ESL instructor had a goal of 75% of students making these gains; 78% showed a significant gain, while
44% achieved a complete Level Gain. For ESL Outcome #4: Reading with understanding, the results
showed that students were making both significant gains as well as level gains. The ESL instructor had a
goal of 50% of students making these gains; 56% showed a significant gain, while 56% accomplished a
complete level gain (Indicators 2.4 and 2.5).94
The standardized CASAS tests have incorporated these outcomes into the test questions. The CASAS is a
primary measure to determine whether students in ESL and ABE are making progress toward basic skills
and level gains. Results can help ABE and ESL instructors determine if adult basic education students
have made sufficient progress to be prepared for GED testing and/or developmental course work. The test
is based on a series of state standards with which the course and program outcomes are closely aligned.
96
Table 4.3.13 shows the numbers of students enrolled in adult basic education courses who achieved a
level gain during the year. The steadily increasing rate demonstrates progress toward the goal of 50% of
students achieving level gains.
Adult Basic Education Students Achieving Level Gains by Year
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
1,164
1,003
982
# Achieving Gain
462
417
461
% Achieving Gain
40%
42%
47%
All students
Table 4.3.13 95- Indicators 2.4 and 2.5
The Transitions—Developmental Education program has three outcomes:
1. Write clearly and effectively (develops toward Communications program outcome 2)
2. Demonstrate skills in mathematical reasoning and application (develops toward
Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning [QSR] program outcomes 1-3)
3. Demonstrate literal and inferential reading and listening skills for comprehension and vocabulary
development (develops toward Communications program outcome 1)
Developmental education courses serve as preparation for students who will take courses toward
academic transfer and workforce preparation. The program outcomes are ultimately to prepare students to
be successful as they make the transition into their college-level communications and quantitative
reasoning courses. Program outcome 1 (write clearly and effectively) develops toward Communications
outcome 1, discussed in Section II of this chapter. The results for outcome 1 showed that students are
approaching the targeted outcomes. In the developmental composition course, the criterion for success in
this outcome was that 80% of students meet the stated outcome; the results showed that 73% achieved
that goal. Program outcome 2 (demonstrate skills in mathematical reasoning and application) develops
toward QSR outcomes 1-3, discussed in Section I of this chapter. The results for outcome 2 showed that
students are approaching, and in some cases achieving, the targeted outcomes. In the developmental
mathematics course, the criterion for success was that 75% of students would demonstrate success; the
results showed that in simplifying, 80% had met the outcome; in operations, 73%; and in reasoning, 75%.
Program outcome 3 (demonstrate literal and inferential reading and listening skills for comprehension
and vocabulary development) develops toward Communications outcome 1. The results for outcome 3
showed that students are achieving the targeted outcomes. In the developmental reading course, the
criterion for success in this outcome was that 75% of students would show mastery; the results showed
that 96% achieved that goal (Indicators 2.4 and 2.5).96
The specific course outcomes identified in all of these assessment projects are clearly articulated in course
syllabi. Within the syllabi, these outcomes are also linked to general-education outcomes (DSAs) – all of
these Transitions program outcomes are directly linked to the literacy component of the generaleducation/DSA outcomes. All degrees and certificates in the workforce education area require proficiency
in these outcomes to be demonstrated, either by placement testing or by successful completion of
coursework through developmental education.
Nine faculty in the ABE/ESL/GED programs at Stafford Creek Corrections Center conducted
instructional program review in 2010. Seven of the nine instructors focused on ABE/GED classes. One
97
focused on an ESL class, and one focused on a Vocational Writing class. They covered four of the six
program level outcomes.
The ABE/GED program level outcomes are:
1. Read with understanding.
2. Communicate relevant, accurate, and complete information in a concise and clear manner in
writing, at a level necessary for successful employment.
3. Use math to solve problems and communicate results.
4. Demonstrate accountability for personal actions and behaviors to achieve individualized goals.
5. Demonstrate skills necessary to progress toward individual goals.
The ESL program level outcomes are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Listen actively.
Speak so others can understand.
Convey ideas in writing.
Read with understanding.
Prepare students to function effectively in US culture/society.
Achieve English skills for students‘ next step.
Results from assessments of ABE outcome 1 showed that students are achieving the targeted outcomes.
The criterion for success was that 50% of the target group will make at least a five-point gain in CASAS
testing. The results showed that 100% of the target group remaining in class had a point gain of ten or
more. Results from assessments of ABE outcome 2 showed that students are achieving the targeted
outcomes. The criterion for success was that students would have a 90% success rate and a minimum
acceptable score of 75% on essays, multiple choice, portfolio, and short answer. The results showed that
90% of the remaining target group had scores of more than 75%. Results from assessments of ABE
outcome 3 showed that students are approaching the targeted outcomes. Of the 19 student learning
outcomes that were covered in math, only one failed to meet its criterion for success, but it was within
one percentage point (Indicators 2.4 and 2.5).97
Results from assessments of ESL outcome 4 showed that students are approaching the targeted
outcomes. The criterion for success was that 80% of the ESL students would pass CASAS competencies
4.1.3, 4.1.2 and 4.1.6. The results showed that 58% of the remaining target group, at the time the class
ended, made a grade level change in their CASAS scores (Indicators 2.4 and 2.5). Assessment results were
affected by a change in instructors mid-quarter.98
The specific course outcomes identified in all of these assessment projects are clearly articulated in course
syllabi. Within the syllabi, these outcomes are also linked to the Washington State Adult Learning
Standards (WSALS) as well as the college‘s general education outcomes/DSAs. The CASAS
competencies are subsets of the WSALS and link to them directly. Each student is assessed quarterly via
CASAS testing. Formal printouts are given to each instructor showing the strengths and weaknesses of
each student on each problem, which is directly linked to a CASAS competency. The Department of
Corrections also uses these scores to determine whether inmates qualify for ABE/GED instruction.
Faculty in the Counseling Center teach courses in Human Development that contribute to the student
success area of the basic skills program. In 2010, three faculty engaged in instructional program review
that assessed all three program outcomes for Human Development/Freshman Year Experience:
Program Outcome A: Students will develop personal responsibility, recognizing the role of their
choices in shaping their outcomes and experiences.
98
Program Outcome B: Students will discover self-motivation, finding purpose through the
identification of meaningful goals.
Program Outcome C: Students will develop self-management skills, learning to plan and carry out
tasks that lead to success.
One course in personal development assessed all three program outcomes; a second course, in stress
management and wellness, examined outcomes A and C; the third course, focusing on interpersonal
skills, evaluated achievement of outcome A. Students achieved high rates of success on outcome A in all
three courses, with 100% of students achieving 100% on two of three indicators and 62% achieving 100%
on the third in the human development course;99 87.5% of students achieved the target of 80% mastery in
the stress management and wellness class,100 and most students in the human development course
correctly identified key terms related to the outcome.101 Results for outcomes B and C were somewhat
lower than those for outcome A, perhaps in part because outcome A focuses on recognition and
identification while outcomes B and C focus on higher level learning (discovery, goal-setting, selfmanagement). Perhaps also owing to the nature of the skills assessed for outcomes B and C, the results of
the assessments for these outcomes tended to be less quantitative.
Faculty across the programs and departments teach courses in Freshman Year Experience that
contribute to the overall outcomes of the student success area of the basic skills program. The college
received a two-year College Spark grant to pilot a required FYE course during the 2009-2010 and 20102011 academic years. The assessment completed during the first year was determined by the grant
objectives and included student evaluations of all sections fall quarter, evaluation of common student
learning outcomes determined collaboratively by all FYE instructors, and compilation of data tracking the
retention and college-level credit completion rates of FYE students. The assessment of common student
learning outcomes was accomplished through faculty meetings at the end of fall quarter and again at the
end of spring quarter, during which faculty agreed to emphasize six student learning outcomes in all FYE
courses for the second year of the pilot. Those outcomes focus on responsibility, motivation, educational
planning, college resources, GHC website resources, and critical thinking. The student evaluations
completed in fall 2009 for all sections of the FYE classes indicated that 62% of students believed the class
contributed to their academic development and 79% agreed or somewhat agreed they would recommend
the course to another student. The retention and college-level credit completion data indicate that next
quarter retention rates are higher for those taking the FYE course than the established baseline of 67%. Of
the 280 fall 2009 FYE students, 80% returned for their next quarter; of the 192 winter quarter FYE
students, 64% returned for their next quarter, and of the spring FYE students, 70% had enrolled for
summer and/or fall classes with one month of registration remaining. The overall three-quarter persistence
rate for FYE students in 2009-2010 was 51% compared to the baseline rate of 40%. College-wide
averages for completing college-level credits have been reported earlier in this report. As of the end of
spring 2010, of the 280 students who took FYE in fall 2009, 55% had completed 15 college-level credits
and 28% had completed 30 college-level credits. Of the 192 winter 2010 FYE students, 30% had
completed 15 college-level credits.102
Much of the instruction in basic skills, particularly in the adult basic education (ABE/ESL/GED) areas, is
performed by part-time faculty. In the Human Resources area, the staff have worked closely with the
dean and division chair in Transitions to ensure that a qualified pool of part-time instructors is available
for staffing the many sections not covered by full-time faculty. In 2009-2010, six new part-time faculty
were hired to teach in this program.
In the Student Services area, two of the specific program outcomes discussed in Section I of this chapter
are also instrumental in supporting the basic skills core theme. These outcomes are described in the
passages of Section I of this chapter related to the Student Success program and the Learning Center. In
99
addition to these support outcomes, the Counseling Center supports students through academic advising,
personal counseling and GED testing. Counselors regularly visit basic skills classes to inform students
about college programs and financial aid. Additionally, students are brought to the college from the sites
to tour the campus and meet with counselors. The WorkFirst program also supports basic skills students
with funding and wrap-around services including tutoring and mentoring. The Opportunity Grant
provides funding for qualifying students.
The Title III program supports basic skills students in a variety of ways, including providing access to
the quarterly Student Success Conference through special transportation arrangements from the Whiteside
center to campus and publicity targeted to ABE/ESL instructors and students. Recent Title III grant
funding was used to purchase Rosetta Stone software for the ESL program and new teaching materials for
ESL and ABE instructors, as well as technology – computers, document cameras and projectors – at
several satellite sites (discussed in the Information Technology section below). Grant funding was also
used by several ABE/ESL faculty to complete projects to develop course materials; to create, implement
and analyze an ESL survey; and to revise curriculum. Title III supported faculty development for ABE,
ESL and developmental education instructors by funding participation at national conferences, including
the International Reading conference as well as conferences sponsored by WAESOL, the Commission on
Adult Basic Education (COABE), the National Association for Developmental Education (NADE), and
the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA). Five developmental education and ABE faculty
also attended the prestigious Kellogg Institute, sponsored by the National Center for Developmental
Education, and received certification. Training brought to the GHC campus for developmental education
and ABE/ESL faculty included On Course training and a series of five workshops held for ABE
instructors on topics such as math, use of new materials, and ABE learning standards. Five workshops
were also provided for ESL faculty, including topics such as ESL Civics training, curriculum
development, and ESL learning standards. Faculty from SCCC were sent to the national COABE
conference and to CASAS training. To enhance communication and understanding between
developmental education and ABE faculty, Title III sponsored a meeting for ABE instructors and those
who teach developmental math courses. This productive meeting provided a greater appreciation for the
similarities and differences in teaching the levels of math. Additional support was provided to basic skills
through the creation of an ABE/ESL faculty resources website and the development of a GED Testing
Resource Guide. In addition, webpages were created in Spanish to provide much needed information to
students in ESL classes and the larger Hispanic population in the community. Developmental education
and adult basic education faculty were also supported with Title III funding to develop new curricula and
teaching materials and to revise existing curricula. Projects included the creation of a new online
curriculum for developmental English and new Work Readiness curriculum.
The Library and Media Services assessments discussed in Section I of this chapter apply as well to the
basic skills area. Of the 25 faculty who incorporate information competency into their curricula, three
teach in basic skills; no faculty in basic skills incorporate media assignments into the curriculum. Of the
559 books and media programs purchased by the library in 2009-2010, 19 were obtained specifically for
support of basic skills programs; none of the databases purchased in 2009-2010 were specifically targeted
to basic skills. It should be noted, however, that a good number of materials purchased for academic
transfer and workforce preparation, as well as all materials purchased for general use, support students in
basic skills programs.
The Administrative Services area assessed its effectiveness in supporting the basic skills programs by
examining two initiatives undertaken in 2009-2010 to meet the objective of providing facilities and
infrastructure to promote the safety, comfort and learning of students in light of significant under-funding
through both state and tuition revenues. The first initiative involved replacing the carpeting in the
Whiteside facility, which houses the off-campus ABE/ESL/GED programs in Aberdeen. The second
100
project, also undertaken at Whiteside, fenced the back entry for enhanced safety. Both projects have been
highly successful in achieving their goals.
The Grays Harbor College Foundation measured its support of the basic skills core theme by
examining recent commitments to students in basic skills programs. These commitments include support
of the new child care center, book loans, GED testing, and instructional equipment, as well as funding
high school completions.
The Public Relations office assessed its efforts to support basic skills and determined that conventional
means of publicizing programs were not as effective for basic skills as for other areas of the college. As a
result, PR brainstormed alternate means of communicating with potential GED and ESL students and
promoted features in the local media about IBEST, ESL success stories, transitions, and graduations.
The Information Technology department gauged its support of basic skills programs by examining the
technology available to said programs at off-campus sites. The result of this assessment was the setup and
deployment of three mobile carts funded through Title III grants – each with six notebooks, a data
projector and a document camera – to serve ABE/ESL classes at the Whiteside Center, the Hopkins
building, Hoquiam Middle School, and the Long Beach center.
Improvements in Basic Skills (4.B.1-2)
Basic skills programs are operating very efficiently, with student-faculty ratios running very high.
Enrollments in traditional and eLearning developmental education courses are strong. Rates of student
success as demonstrated through course and program outcomes assessment are positive, although some
areas for improvement have been identified. Across the basic skills core theme, the area most in need of
improvement appears to be the rate of specific goal achievement, including making transitions between
ABE and developmental skills courses and between developmental and college-level skills courses.
Increasing numbers of underprepared students enrolling in basic skills programs have proven to be a
challenge, and attrition rates continue to be an issue.
Objective 1: Students display high rates of persistence and progress.
To continue its increased rates of persistence and progress in adult basic education, the program will align
curriculum for each level to the Washington State Standards. Standardized rubrics will be developed for
assessing student work, and a standard writing assessment will be implemented throughout the program.
Standardization of curriculum and assessment will facilitate transition from level to level. Setting goals at
intake will establish a focus for students and progress on the goals will be regularly assessed by faculty
for each student.
The college has received a grant to create and implement an IBEST program for developmental
education. Curriculum for Math 100 (Vocational Technical Mathematics) and English 150 (Vocational/
Technical and Business Writing) will integrate additional industrial/technical content with the goal of
increasing the number of students mastering basic skills outcomes in their workforce programs.
Objective 2: Students attain the necessary skills in reading, writing, arithmetic and English
language to pursue and achieve their goals.
The Transitions-ABE/ESL/GED program examined its results in the context of similar programs
elsewhere. Based on comparable courses across the state, achievement rates recorded at GHC are
relatively high. This reflects efforts on the campus to focus on and to assess these skills. In both ABE and
101
ESL, there is a desire for greater improvement of these success rates. In both areas, more time will be
devoted to developing writing skills, and the ESL course will begin using CD-supported listening
assignments.
The relatively high achievement rates recorded in the Transitions-Developmental Education program
are the result of ongoing work within the Transitions Division to assess and modify teaching and course
emphasis. In all cases, instructors described course revisions that they hope will enhance the success rates
for students. For example, in the developmental composition course, assignment steps will be modified to
allow more time between the start and the finish of the assignment. In developmental mathematics,
additional class time will be spent developing the skills necessary to complete multi-step problems. In
developmental reading, the rubric used to assess skill achievement will change from being a static rubric
with all criteria stated at the start of the term to a growing rubric which will add criteria as they are
developed in the class space.
The ABE/ESL/GED program at Stafford Creek has several focused suggestions for improving on the
results gathered in this assessment cycle. First, further teaching-assistant training, targeting support to
small groups of low-level readers, would be beneficial. Second, a placement test for entry into vocational
writing courses is recommended. Finally, increased use of computer software, which has already been
purchased, would likely improve student success in math.
The Counseling Center staff have identified two areas for improvement of student skills in human
development courses: more course time devoted to specific skills such as listening and taking essay
examinations and more opportunities for hands-on authentic practice with newly acquired skills. Due to
the results of the assessments completed during the first year of the Freshman Year Experience classes,
improvements made for the second year include increasing the number of sections of the course being
offered each quarter, offering a section at the Riverview Educational Center, and piloting a hybrid version
of course. Also, all FYE faculty have agreed that having a common assessment tool and assignment with
a common scoring rubric will provide an important process for measuring achievement of the student
learning outcomes focusing on responsibility and motivation. The pre/post self-assessment assignment
and scoring rubric were finalized before fall quarter 2010; outcome targets are currently being
established.
102
Section IV: Core Theme 4 – Service to Community
Planning for Service to Community (Standards 3.B.1-3)
The final component of Grays Harbor College‘s mission is service to community. In this core theme, the
college manifests its commitments to providing opportunities for professional growth, cultural enrichment
and personal development, as well as to being an exemplar of service, stewardship and citizenship within
the community.
Planning to address the service to community core theme objectives ―GHC provides general and
customized professional development opportunities in response to demand,‖ ―GHC provides a wide
variety of opportunities for cultural enrichment,‖ ―GHC provides lifelong learning opportunities for all
ages in response to community interest,‖ and ―GHC serves as a resource for the community at large,
exemplifying service, stewardship, and good citizenship‖ occurs in multiple ways.
Short-term job skills training opportunities include flagger training, early childhood education, and
emergency medical training, and are developed in response to community need or demand. Customized
training courses are developed in conjunction with employers and provide targeted skill development to a
group of employees, often on-site at the workplace.
Cultural enrichment occurs in credit classes in art, creative writing, music, theatre and film, which are
developed and offered via the annual instructional planning process. Each year, Grays Harbor College
sponsors a performing arts series, combining student productions and performances with nationally
recognized stage acts. These events take place in the Bishop Center for Performing Arts on the Aberdeen
campus and offer numerous opportunities for students, staff and community members to be involved on
stage or behind the scenes. These events are planned by the Bishop Center Events Committee, chaired by
the vice president for student services. The Gallery at the Spellman Library hosts an array of annual art
exhibits. In addition, the campus hosts numerous local, regional and national speakers planned and
sponsored by the college‘s Speakers Committee or local organizations.
College courses are available to pre-college-aged students on a regular basis through the Running Start
and Tech Prep programs; the college also offers specialized courses designed for K-12 students in the
service district. Personal enrichment courses are designed to provide educational experiences around a
wide range of topics such as health and wellness, arts and crafts, and computers at home. Courses are
developed in response to recognized demand, through input from past participants, via instructor
availability, and/or community suggestions. Community interest courses are self-supporting.
Planning ways to serve the broader community involves engaging in continuous, open communication
with the various constituencies within the college‘s district in order to observe and predict trends to which
the college can be responsive. Planning for efficiency and sustainability in the use of the college‘s
resources is a communal effort, but one key resource for guidance in that planning is the campus
Sustainability Committee, which keeps an eye on the college‘s environmental impact; planning for future
generations is likewise a group effort, guided by the GHC Foundation and its World Class Scholars
program.
The college uses a variety of data sources for planning its service to community. Enrollment data, class
cancellations, and student evaluations provide planning information for both personal enrichment and
short-term training. Employer demand and satisfaction as well as completion rates are used in planning
customized training opportunities. Many areas of the college work collaboratively with community
groups to sponsor cultural events and activities.
103
Assessment of Service to Community (Standards 4.A.1-6)
Objective 1: GHC provides general and customized professional development opportunities in
response to demand.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to two
specific outcomes:


GHC provides quality professional development opportunities
Professional development opportunities are effective
In 2009-2010, GHC provided training through contracts with four area organizations. For the
Emergency Medical Services of Grays Harbor & Pacific County, the college provided one EMT course;
28 students were pre-certified by local area fire departments. For the Regional Education Training Center
(RETC)/Pacific Mountain Workforce Development Council, the college provided construction industry
readiness certification for 18 students. Additionally, nine courses in flagger training were provided for
incumbent and prospective employment; 188 students participated. Finally, for the Grays Harbor Paper
Co., the college offered 12 courses in Job Skills Program (JSP) training for 237 students (Indicator 1.1).
To assess the effectiveness of professional development opportunities, the college measures both
employee and employer satisfaction through responses to qualitative survey questions (Indicator 1.2).
Sample responses from the Grays Harbor Paper Co. indicate a high degree of satisfaction with contract
training opportunities:103
Employee satisfaction:
Employer Satisfaction:
―Using a training approach to ISO 14001
implementation (versus a consulting
approach) provided the cultural change
necessary to make employees aware of
and to understand our company‘s
sustainability policies and goals, and their
role to achieve these goals. Before this
training people were not aware that all
jobs include energy and compliance
implications associated with paper
manufacturing. We learned that to achieve
our goals, managers must understand how
to implement and manage corrective
actions; to achieve our sustainability goals
ISO 14001 certification is mandatory.‖
―The ISO 14001 training made me more aware how
other jobs in our facility impact the environment.
This will make all of us, collectively, better equipped
to manage environmental and other impacts from our
part of production.‖ ~ Environmental Operator
―Demystified what 14001 was and how it would help
and not hurt the company.‖ ~ Information Systems
Manager
―This ISO 14001 training was a good experience for
me. It taught me a lot about how our processes affect
the environment. The training brought out points that
I would never have thought about before.‖
~Purchasing Agent
―The realization of even minor tasks and their
impacts along with the need to document procedures
was a result of this training.‖ ~ Boiler Operator
Objective 2: GHC provides a wide variety of opportunities for cultural enrichment.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to two
specific outcomes:
 GHC offers courses in the creative and performing arts
 GHC offers cultural events for the community
104
In assessing the college‘s commitment to offering courses in the creative and performing arts, both
numbers of courses and sustainable enrollments in those courses are examined. Table 4.4.1 shows the
number of studio (creative/performing arts) courses offered through the college‘s Humanities program in
a typical academic year. The target in this area is one studio course per discipline area per quarter as well
as one performance course per performance group per quarter. Based on the table below, the college is
meeting this objective in creative writing, music and theatre, and exceeding it in art.
Creative and Performing Arts Courses Offered Annually
# of
courses/sections
Credits
per course
Art
3/7
5
English/Creative Writing
3/3
2
Music
4/12
1-2
Theatre
3/6
1-4
Specific course subjects
Drawing, Design, Painting, Printmaking
Fiction Writing, Poetry Writing,
Playwriting
Symphony Orchestra, Civic Choir, Jazz
Band, Jazz Choir
Theatre Workshop, Acting, Directing,
Stagecraft, Lighting, Makeup
Table 4.4.1 104- Indicator 2.1
Many of the college‘s creative and performing arts courses serve three distinct constituencies: academic
transfer students who enroll for college credit, community members who participate with or without
enrolling in order to pursue enrichment and lifelong learning, and community members who make up the
audiences for exhibitions and shows that grow out of work in the courses. To a large extent, the courses
across the creative and performing arts have a harmonic and mutually supportive relationship: students in
the music courses, for example, populate the casts and orchestras of the musical theatre productions,
while students in the art courses often participate in the creation of sets for the theatre. One particularly
remarkable partnership exists between the creative writing courses and the theatre courses: GHC is the
only community college in the Pacific Northwest (and one of very few higher education institutions of
any sort) to produce each year plays that are written by students in the playwriting class, performed by
students in the acting class, and designed in part by students in the technical theatre classes. This original
student theatre program has existed for 15 years; recently participation has increased dramatically, driving
not only increased enrollments in other creative writing and theatre courses but increased audiences as
well. Sustainable enrollment in these courses (demonstrated in Table 4.4.2) is therefore a synergetic
balancing act. The target in this area is that all performing arts courses (music and theatre) will enroll at
60% capacity or higher. All creative arts courses (art and creative writing) will enroll at 80% or higher.
While the college has not consistently met these goals in the past, the most recent year‘s data indicate the
target being approached or achieved in all areas.
Enrollments in Creative and Performing Arts Courses
Enrollment
cap
2007-2008
enrollment
% of
cap
2008-2009
enrollment
% of cap
2009-2010
enrollment
% of cap
Art
118
77
65%
63
53%
100
85%
Creative Writing
56
39
70%
44
79%
54
96%
Music
90
47
52%
51
57%
57
63%
Theatre
115
27
23%
39
34%
64
56%
Table 4.4.2
105
- Indicator 2.2
105
In measuring the degree to which the college offers cultural events for the community, two core indicators
are used. The first is the number of musical and theatre events the college presents or hosts and the
extent of community involvement in those events. Although other campus locations, such as the HUB, are
sometimes used for cultural events, the primary venue for such activities on campus is the Bishop Center
for Performing Arts. The college has a goal of providing at least 17 musical and/or theatre events each
year with an overall yearly attendance of 7,500. As Table 4.4.3 indicates, the Bishop Center has met that
goal for the past four years in number of events, both home-grown (as discussed above in the creative/
performing arts section) and booked from elsewhere. The Bishop Center‘s audience attendance numbers
are consistently strong, and have even increased in the face of the economic downturn of the past two
years, demonstrating the importance of cultural and artistic community during difficult times. As a result,
the college has significantly surpassed its attendance target in recent years. Target rates for participation
in Bishop Center productions by non-matriculated community members varies; however, the goal is that
at least 50 will participate in the musicals, 45 in symphony and 40 in civic choir. As Table 4.4.3
demonstrates, target numbers for events and attendance are consistently met or exceeded; target goals for
participation are consistently achieved for the musical, achieved or nearly achieved for symphony, and
achieved in the past two years for civic choir.
Bishop Center Events, Attendance and Community Participation
2006-2007
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
18
19
19
18
7,776
8,022
8,761
8,544
Community Participation: Musicals
53
52
62
56
Community Participation: Symphony
44
40
43
49
Community Participation: Civic Choir
38
36
55
44
Total number of events
Total audience attendance
Table 4.4.3 106 - Indicators 2.3 and 2.4
In an effort to continue and enhance support of cultural events at GHC, the Administrative Services
program undertook two projects during 2009-2010 that responded directly to needs gleaned through
feedback from college and community members participating in those events: repair of the Bishop Center
roof and refurbishment of the Bishop Center stage. In addition, the Public Relations office took on the
goal of increasing attendance at Bishop Center events while achieving efficiency in the promotion budget.
In meeting this goal, the office reallocated resources, spending less on newspaper ads, about the same on
radio, and more on web-based venues (email, Facebook). The results of these changes were very positive,
as the Bishop Center experienced more full houses and sold out shows than in previous years. Opening
night performances of both the summer and spring musicals saw increased attendance, as did the Sneak
Preview, which generated more sponsors and season donors.
The second indicator used in measuring the college‘s cultural offerings for the community is the number
of art exhibits and events produced or hosted on campus. The Spellman Library has as one of its five
core objectives the mission to provide opportunities for cultural enrichment to the wider community as
well as the campus community. The library measures its achievement of that objective by the number of
art shows displayed in the library‘s exhibit space. For 2009-2010, the library mounted six shows: two in
fall, one in winter, two in spring, and one in summer (Indicator 2.5).
106
Objective 3: GHC provides lifelong learning opportunities for all ages in response to community
interest.
In assessing the degree to which this objective is met, the college examines indicators relevant to a single
specific outcome: the college provides opportunities for lifelong learners of all ages. This outcome is
measured through a variety of indicators, the first of which is sustainable enrollment in classes offered
for lifelong learning. The college offers community service and community interest courses on the main
campus in Aberdeen as well as at the Riverview Education Center in Raymond, the Columbia Education
Center in Ilwaco, and locations in Westport and Ocean Shores. Table 4.4.4 breaks down the numbers of
lifelong learning courses and students by quarter for the 2009-2010 academic year. The college has
experienced a noticeable decline in lifelong learning enrollment from 2008-2009 to 2009-2010. While
specific causes are not known, it is likely that this drop is directly related to the depressed economy. To
maintain sustainable enrollment and meet the target to increase enrollment by 2%, the college needs to
ensure that course offerings are relevant and affordable.
Lifelong Learning Offerings
Summer
2009
Fall
2009
Winter
2010
Spring
2010
Total
Average per
Quarter
Number of Courses Offered
20
33
40
30
123
31
Number of Students Enrolled
314
416
457
351
1,538
385
Table 4.4.4 107- Indicator 3.1
The majority of courses offered for community service and community special interest areas are
scheduled in a traditional classroom setting via the continuing education division either at one of the
college‘s several learning centers in locations throughout the two-county service district or on the main
Aberdeen campus in the evenings (see Table 4.4.5). There are currently no community service or
community special interest courses offered via alternate delivery methods such as online, hybrid, or ITV.
Continuing Education Traditional Courses in Community Service by Location
2007-2008
2008-2009
2009-2010
Aberdeen
84
104
78
Raymond
34
22
25
Ilwaco
36
31
26
Ocean Shores
1
10
6
Westport
16
18
17
Elma
9
12
0
Total
180
197
152
Table 4.4.5 108
107
The second indicator used in measuring this objective is the number of pre-college-age students
participating in GHC learning opportunities. One such number gauges participation in college classes
among students in Washington State‘s dual-enrollment program for high school juniors and seniors
pursuing higher education, Running Start (see Chart 4.4.1). The target for Running Start enrollment is
155 annual headcount and 115 annualized FTE. The data indicate that both the total headcount and FTE
numbers of Running Start students have decreased over the past few years. Longer-term data suggest that
GHC‘s Running Start enrollments fluctuate with the sizes of the junior and senior classes at high schools
within the college‘s service district. Another circumstance that sometimes decreases Running Start
enrollment is increased college enrollment overall: when the classes they are most interested in fill before
they‘ve had a chance to enroll,
Running Start students opt to
stay at the high school. One
final issue which may have
depressed Running Start
enrollment most recently is the
legislature‘s action requiring
these students to pay college
fees. While Running Start
enrollment has decreased
somewhat, retention among
Running Start students is
strong, with the percentage of
students returning as Running
Start students, returning as nonRunning Start GHC students, or
earning a degree or certificate
increasing from 57% to 65%
over the past three years.
Chart 4.4.1 109- Indicator 3.2
The college also keeps data on participation in college classes among students in Tech Prep, the dualenrollment program for high school juniors and seniors pursuing workforce preparation (see Chart 4.4.2).
Grays Harbor College is the
centerpiece for the Twin
County Tech Prep
Consortium. GHC works in
partnership with 12-13 area
high schools to promote
articulation and provide
smooth transitions for
students completing
vocational-technical
coursework while still in
high school. The target for
Tech Prep participation is
550 students (headcount)
enrolling in 2,550 credits.
Chart 4.4.2 110- Indicator 3.2
108
The consortium has its own
advisory committee including
representatives from secondary
and post-secondary education,
business, labor, and professional
and trade associations. In 20082009, articulation agreements
were in place with eleven high
schools in Grays Harbor and
Pacific counties and one out-ofdistrict high school. These
schools offered 25 different tech
prep courses in 11 program areas
(see Chart 4.4.3). On average,
each student completed 4.77
credits and saved $403.00 in
tuition costs. The total savings to
students through the Tech Prep
program at GHC were $193,359 in 2008-2009.
Chart 4.4.3 111- Indicator 3.2
Another source of data relevant to this objective is the College-High School Relations office. Targets for
CHSR achievements include 10 college fairs, 12 high school visits, 8 Tech Prep presentations and 10
World Class Scholar presentations at local high schools, and 15 sponsored on-campus events for highschool students. The CHSR reported the following achievements during 2009-2010:









participated in 8 college fairs in various locations throughout Western Washington
made 11 visits to high school seniors at area high schools
made presentations to Tech Prep students at seven area high schools
made presentations to World Class Scholars (grades 7 -12) at 9 area schools
sponsored 14 on-campus events for area high school students including:
 Transfer Fair that involved 5 local high schools
 Knowledge Bowl competitions for 4 middle schools and 2 two high schools
 ―Try a Professional Trade‖ Event that involved 8 high schools (70 students)
 Counselor Exchange with high-school guidance counselors and GHC counselors
 Tours of GHC professional/technical programs (3 tours for Montesano HS students)
 ―World Class Scholar Day‖ that involved 10 schools (65 students).
College-High School Relations Office, Counseling Center, and Admissions Office conducted campus
tours throughout the year
GHC involvement with Business Week at 4 local high schools
participated in HS Senior Boards
held a ―Husky Promise‖ Event (Indicator 3.2)
During the 2009-2010 year alone, the Coastal Resource Learning Center worked directly with more
than 2,100 K-12 students. The targeted goal for CRLC is to work with 2,500 students in 10 events. The
2009-2010 events included the following:


More than 1,000 students received education about salmon and invitations to the Chehalis
Watershed Festival in collaboration with the Chehalis Basin Partnership.
32 classes (more than 750 students) participated in watershed education.
109





14 classes (300 students) completed projects on schoolyard biodiversity and/or invasive species.
4 classes received help with water quality testing in collaboration with the Chehalis Basin
Educational Consortium.
Over 220 students attended the Chehalis Basin Educational Consortium‘s 9 th Annual Student
Congress at GHC.
150-200 K-12 students attended an Earth Day celebration, sharing their project-based learning and
participating in a Sustainability Fair and a trail service learning project.
700 students attended Spring Field Studies at GHC, conducting field investigations in the GHC
Model Watershed. (Indicator 3.2)
Beyond these opportunities, the CRLC hosts two summer programs for area children. First, the Summer
Watershed Leadership program involves a partnership with the Educational Service District and uses
federal stimulus money to serve eight participants in Grays Harbor and Pacific counties. Second, the
CRLC hosts a series of elementary school day camps focusing on watersheds and middle school day
camps focusing on oceanography and marine biology. The CRLC has also worked with more than 50
teachers to provide training in Classroom to Coastlines workshops. Elementary teachers were trained for
field investigations and ocean literacy while middle school and high school teachers focused on using
GPS and GIS in their classrooms and field investigations. Additionally, during summer term 2010, the
college offered five courses for 100 local school children: Space Camp, Crazy Chemistry, Robots,
Shutterbugs, and Scene of the Crime (Indicator 3.2).
The final indicator employed in assessing this outcome is the number of speakers or forums the college
hosts for both the college community and the community at large. The target for campus speakers is 15
events on topics relevant to the community. Events typically include informational seminars presented by
campus committees such as the wellness committee and the safety committee; meetings of state agencies
and legislators, including the Washington Coastal Caucus; and presentations public health and safety
officials on such issues as search and rescue, the H1N1 vaccine, and earthquake/tsunami preparedness. In
addition to these presentations, during the 2007-2008 through 2009-2010 academic years, the college
hosted the following notable speakers (Indicator 3.3):














Governor Christine Gregoire – keynote speaker at graduation
The Honorable Dennis Kucinich, member of the United States Congress
Alexander Cockburn, political journalist, CounterPunch, The Nation and The Los Angeles Times
Angela Davis, political activist, candidate, author and scholar
Mike Farrell, actor and progressive political activist
Krist Novoselic, musician, political activist and founder of Joint Artists & Musicians Political
Action Committee
Dr. Orrin Pilkey, professor emeritus at Duke University, on the future of Washington beaches
Harriet Hall, M.D., on myths about vaccinations
Rick Shenkman, Emmy-award winning journalist, on investigative reporting
Jeff Salz, explorer and anthropologist, on work/life effectiveness
Lyle Quasim, secretary of Washington DSHS (ret.), in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Burton Hamner, president of Puget Sound Tidal Power, on sustainability
John Simpson, photojournalist, on war and war photography
―Wetlands‖ art exhibit in the Spellman Library, coordinated with a speakers‘ series including
Lou Messmer, botanist and GHC emeritus faculty; Birdie Davenport, environmentalist; and Brian
Blake, Washington State representative
110
Objective 4: GHC serves as a resource for the community at large, exemplifying service,
stewardship, and good citizenship.
Grays Harbor College is an integral part of its community. In 2008, the SBCTC calculated participation
rates by county for the community and yechnical college system. From 2006 to 2008, the statewide
average increased from 3.69 to 4.41 enrolled students per 1,000 population. Within GHC‘s service
district, the Grays Harbor County participation rate increased significantly from 3.90 in 2006 to 5.39 in
2008. Grays Harbor ranks fifth out of 39 counties in community college participation. The Pacific County
participation rate also improved from 3.52 in 2006 to 4.18 per 1000 in 2008. Though Pacific County
remains below the state average, participation rates have improved considerably from the 2002 rate of
2.54. Pacific County ranks 20th out of 39 counties. In assessing the degree to which objective #4 is met,
the college examines indicators relevant to a single specific outcome: the college exemplifies service,
stewardship, and good citizenship.112
Serving the Broader Community (Indicator 4.1)
A key player in assessing the college‘s service to the larger local community is the college‘s office of
Institutional Research, Assessment and Planning, which had as one of its 2009-2010 objectives
maintaining professional standards including exercising autonomy, independent of internal and external
affiliations and/or organizational structure, by adhering to the Code of Ethics adopted by the Association
of Institutional Research. This goal – which was met through training, conferences, workshops,
collaboration, and increased expertise in federal reporting requirements – served the community in that it
ensured that the only institution of higher learning in the two-county area not only maintain high
standards of performance, but provide information of equally high standards. The IR office works with
the Public Relations office to provide the broader community the most accurate and useful information
possible. As a result, and as the data from the 2008 CLARUS community scan in Table 4.4.6
demonstrate, those district residents who are aware of the college‘s programs tend to view them
positively. The college needs to put more effort into ensuring that all district residents, especially those in
Pacific County, are aware of how the college can best serve them; the college‘s goal in this respect is to
increase the Good/Excellent ratings by 2% in each category. Full scan results are available here.
Community Ratings of Grays Harbor College
Grays Harbor County
No
opinion
Among those with an
opinion
Good,
Excellent
Poor,
Fair, Avg.
35%
78%
22%
High-Quality Instruction
36.5%
77%
Overall Quality of
Education
32.7%
83%
Preparing the
Unemployed for Work
38.4%
Developmental Skills
Job Training
Academic Reputation
Pacific County
No
opinion
Two Counties Combined
Among those with an
opinion
Good,
Excellent
Poor,
Fair, Avg.
52.9%
73%
27%
23%
57.5%
73%
17%
54%
85%
78%
22%
58.6%
53.2%
75.5%
24.5%
38.4%
76.5%
23.5%
No
opinion
Among those with an
opinion
Good,
Excellent
Poor,
Fair, Avg.
39.4%
77%
23%
27%
41.7%
76%
24%
15%
38%
85%
15%
67%
33%
43.4%
76%
24%
71.3%
88%
12%
57.7%
77%
23%
52.9%
75.5%
24.5
42%
76%
24%
Table 4.4.6 113
Another key source of information about ways in which the college serves the broader community is the
Human Resource office, which adopted as one of its objectives the college‘s employment of a diverse
111
staff reflective of district demographics. Measurement of this objective involved looking at employment
percentages for diversity and tracking responses from targeted ad placements. Analysis of this objective
indicated that the percentage of students of color has increased significantly in recent years while the
ethnic diversity rate of the community as a whole has remained fairly low; the college‘s percentage of
staff of color has increased, but not by the same rate as the students or, to a lesser degree, the community.
Table 4.4.7 describes the diversity of GHC students and employees in comparison to the general
population of the service district. The college‘s goal is to increase the diversity of faculty and staff to
match the combined county averages of population diversity.
Race/Ethnic
GH College
Background
Students
GH College
Employees
Grays Harbor
Pacific
GH/Pacific
County
County
Combined
Latino/Hispanic
557
12.5%
8
3.0%
3,258
4.8%
1,052
5%
4,310
5%
Asian/Pacific Islander
143
3.2%
2
0.8%
891
1.3%
455
2%
1,346
2%
African American
72
1.6%
3
1.1%
226
0.3%
42
0.2%
268
0.3%
Native American
315
7.1%
3
1.1%
3,132
4.7%
513
2%
3,645
4%
Other/ Multi-Racial
22
0.5%
0
0.0%
3,610
5.4%
976
5%
4,586
5%
3,353
75%
248
94%
59,335
88%
18,998
91%
78,333
88%
White
Total Reporting Race
4,462
264
67,194
20,984
88,178
% of Color
25%
6%
12%
9%
12%
Table 4.4.7 114
In an effort to support initiatives that serve the broader community, the Administrative Services program
undertook several projects during 2009-2010 that responded directly to needs gleaned through feedback
from college and community members: creating a banquet facility in the HUB, opening the Riverview
Greenhouse in Raymond, engaging in Emergency Response partnerships throughout the community, and
perhaps most notably, constructing a new Childcare Center on campus. Chart 4.4.4115 (left) provides an
overview of childcare
attendance over the years.
GHC partners with
Wunderland Childcare to
provide quality, affordable,
on-site daytime and evening
childcare for students, staff
and the community. In 20082009 the college began
construction on a new
childcare facility which was
completed in 2010. The
square footage of the facility
increased from its previous
3,900 sq. ft. to its current
6,413 sq. ft. The center is up
to code in all areas. Total
enrollment in Wunderland
Child Care Center has
112
decreased since 2006-2007 when it served its highest number of children. In 2007-2008 enrollment
decreased by 30% and in 2008-2009 by 8%. The average enrollment over the seven-year period is 261
children annually. In 2008-2009, 197 children attended the daytime program and 51 children attended the
evening childcare program. The average quarterly enrollment was 83 children per quarter. Of the 248
children who attended in 2008-2009, there was a 25% increase in the number of children of GHC
students; 142 of the children enrolled in the daytime childcare program (72%) were children of GHC
students and 43 of the children enrolled in the evening program (84%) were children of GHC students. It
is expected that attendance will increase with the availability of the new facility.116 The target is to
increase the rate of participation for children of GHC students by 5% for daytime attendance and 2% for
evening.
In addition to providing funding ($150,000) to support the construction of the new Child Care Center, the
Grays Harbor College Foundation maintains its focus on college/community relations in other ways,
including establishing a partnership with Grays Harbor Community Hospital to provide a simulation lab
for training of both GHC nursing students and hospital staff.
The Information Technology department was involved with all of the above college efforts to be
responsive to the broader community through consultation on all renovation and construction projects
(including the child care center and the kitchen) as well as through installing 25 additional laptops in
various locations, for individual and lab use, in connection with Title III and TRiO, and deploying new
student email provided in partnership with [email protected], supported and hosted by Microsoft. The
IT department has also partnered with the Public Relations department to improve the college website in
ways that make it possible for the broader community to gain easy access to information about
educational programs, cultural events, and other activities sponsored by the college.
Stewardship (Indicator 4.2)
The second indicator used to measure the extent of the college‘s commitment to service, stewardship, and
good citizenship focuses on stewardship: specifically, the number of initiatives that achieve efficiencies
and sustainability. Many areas of the campus
have been instrumental in articulating and
assessing objectives that speak to the broad goal
of stewardship. In addition to the specific
initiatives described below, countless groups
across the campus involving both students and
staff participate in organized, college-supported
service activities including the annual AIDS walk
and Cancer Relay for Life (college-wide teams),
Habitat for Humanity (Carpentry program),
Christmas Toy Drive (Human Services Club),
Community Action Program fundraiser (student
government), NeighborWorks ―painting the
corridor‖ project, and a campus clothing bank.
In the Public Relations office, major changes
have been made to enhance efficiency and
sustainability through the ―GHC Goes Green‖
initiative. The first objective related to this
initiative involved continuing to promote the
college within the constraints of a reduced institutional budget. Indicators of success with this objective
included reallocation of advertising resources away from print sources and into more sustainable
113
electronic sources as well as pursuing cost-neutral promotion through the college president‘s writing
editorials and appearing on local television and radio programs. The larger objective was to exchange
unsustainable past practices for more sustainable options, most notably stopping the decades-long practice
of printing thousands of paper course schedules and mailing them to households as well as printing paper
catalogs every two years. In place of these necessary but unsustainable materials, the college has moved
the information onto the internet, making these materials fully web-based for the first time. To ease the
transition for students and community members, reminders are distributed via postcards, posters and
brochures. The Public Relations office is in the midst of surveying constituents to determine the success
of ―GHC Goes Green.‖
Within Instruction, several initiatives have responded to demands for sustainability. The Automotive
Technology program now trains students in the repair of hybrid vehicles, while other programs in the
industrial technologies (Welding, Diesel, Carpentry) orient their curricula, in part, toward sustainable
products and processes. The Forestry Technician program has curriculum designed to meet the Forest
Stewardship Council‘s standards for forestry management, a sustainability standard for the industry. A
cohort of students have enrolled in Energy Technology, a program offered in collaboration with Centralia
College that trains students for the energy field, including clean energies. The college‘s target in this
respect is to increase by 10% the amount of integration of green technology in instructional programs.
Another sustainability initiative in Instruction involved the creation, in 2008-2009, of an alternate
teaching schedule that would allow students and faculty to create schedules that reduced by one day per
week the number of trips to campus required. While some programs and courses have maintained the
traditional five-day school week, many others have adopted alternate instructional methods (often webbased) that allow for reduced in-class time and reduced energy expenditure for both travel and campus
overhead while providing the same services and meeting the same standards at the heart of the college‘s
mission. The college has set a target of reducing its energy use by 10%.
The Administrative Services area has been very active in promoting efficiency and sustainability. As an
example of efficient use of financial resources, Grays Harbor College actively pursues grant funding to
support and enhance programs and services available to students and district residents. In 2008-2009,
grant and contract funding exceeded $4.7 million. Included in this total were four federal grants totaling
$897,890; seven state grants totaling $2,876,272; and 11 grants with private industry and other education
partners totaling $998,947.117 The goal for grant funding improvement is a 25% increase.
Additional initiatives undertaken by Administrative Services include the construction of the college‘s new
Childcare Center, which was recently certified by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
(LEED) as LEED gold standard. The highly sustainable construction made use of recycled beams from a
classroom building that had recently been demolished.
In other efficiencies, the college made the switch to 100% recycled paper for all departments and
programs two years ago while also instituting a reduce & recycle policy. As a result, the college reduced
its purchase of paper by 33% in a single year (from 4,800 reams in 2008-2009 to 3,200 reams in 20092010).118 This efficiency has been achieved through a combination of frugal paper use (for example,
double-sided copying) and a conscious move to more electronic communication of both instructional and
non-instructional content. Many faculty, for example, have moved their syllabi, assignments, handouts
and other course materials to the web, while meeting agendas and minutes are distributed via email. At
the same time, the college initiated a new recycling program by convincing the local waste collection
company to allow single-container recycling for the campus – previously allowed only for residences.
Working to organize, document and encourage many of the college‘s sustainability efforts is the newly
formed Sustainability Committee, which maintains a blog of its activities. The committee‘s mission is to
114
detail efforts the college has made to be more sustainable and to suggest ways to work toward greater
sustainability in the future, such as integrating service learning into the curriculum and using an intensive
sustainability auditing program. The committee is also currently working on developing a carbon
footprint for the college, which will likely show carbon neutrality, given the forested areas the college
manages.
In the Information Technology department, recent changes resulting in a decrease in the number of
computers, such as the closing of the Simpson Education Center in Elma and the discontinuation of the
CIS degree program, have allowed for the recycling of machines into replacements and upgrades for
existing labs as well as for faculty and staff. Additional efforts that speak to efficiency and sustainability
include increasing the percentage of faculty and staff who self-report computing problems and request
assistance as well as presenting a highly successful second annual Technology Day on Campus,
introducing the college community to available technology. Another initiative begun in 2009-2010 was
TGIF (Teaching Good Information Fridays): short sessions, ranging from 20 minutes to an hour and a
half, offered on Fridays for faculty and staff. Topics included changes to expect in the newest Office
Suite, use of Word templates and forms; borders, tabs and columns; and Excel pivot tables. Topics are
developed for these sessions based on user feedback.
The Institutional Research, Assessment and Planning office has articulated four focused objectives
that promote efficiency and sustainability:
1. Collaborate with others to transform data into information that is meaningful, understandable, and
of value at the course, program, and institutional level.
2. Enhance understanding throughout the college community about the nature and meaning of data
and its use in planning and decision making.
3. Encourage all college units to use the resources of the office for ad hoc requests designed to
facilitate assessment and decision-making based on objective data.
4. Enhance awareness of the office of Research, Assessment & Planning and services available by
creating a dynamic, up-to-date web presence and a quarterly electronic newsletter.
5. Institute electronic surveying methods for course/employee evaluations and student services
satisfaction surveys.
The past academic year (2009-2010) saw success in achieving these objectives. Objective #1 was met
through collaboration with faculty, staff and administration to determine the type and quality of data
required as well as through working to align various reporting systems for efficiency, including the
increased/enhanced use of electronic data sources to improve the quality of information and minimize
time spent on gathering information. Objective #2 was met through focused communication on
individual, small-group and large-group bases as well as through surveying constituent groups. Objective
#3 was met through ad hoc requests for information and then providing the information requested in a
timely manner. Ad hoc questions make up roughly 33% of the office‘s information requests, and the
information gleaned through those requests is used to assess effectiveness and shape the decision-making
process. The only objective that was not met in 2009-2010 was #4, which could not be accomplished due
to various time constraints and priority commitments. Therefore, this objective is addressed in the
improvements portion of this section.
Options and Stability for Future Generations (Indicator 4.3)
The third indicator used to measure the college‘s commitment to exemplifying service, stewardship, and
good citizenship is the number of initiatives that provide options and stability for future generations. In
addition to the many college activities created for local K-12 students outlined under Objective 3 of this
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section, the college engages in initiatives designed specifically to foster civic responsibility and promote a
positive view of the future among college and pre-college students. In the Student Services area, the
Student Activities and Leadership Program established five goals: communication and collaboration,
event and program management, self-management and appraisal, problem solving and critical thinking,
and civic engagement and responsibility. The first three goals were substantially achieved while the last
two approached achievement. The goals established represent a significant shift in assessing the true
purpose of Student Activities and Leadership and are strong measures for this program. Intentional
student dialogue, evaluation, training and observation have been implemented.
The Grays Harbor College Foundation assesses its success in providing options and stability to future
generations by examining the indicators of success it garners in pursuit of its objective #1: endowing the
World Class Scholars (WCS). The WCS program started in 1993 to form a partnership between students,
parents, and the college. This partnership brings the promise of a college education to families throughout
Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties. Students are invited to sign a contract committing to several
scholastic, leadership and community service goals to be met before their high school graduation. The
college offers the commitment of entrance to GHC along with a $1,500 scholarship award from the GHC
Foundation to each World Class Scholar for the first year at GHC. Since its inception, 837 students have
been recognized as World Class Scholars; 453 students (54%) chose to attend GHC and received funding
(see Table 4.4.8). Those students have received more than $575,000 in scholarship awards. Efforts to
expand program participation include improved promotional materials, increased presentations to middleand high-school students, and greater involvement of parents and school officials in the administration of
the program.119 Targets for improvement in this program include securing endowment of the first-year
World Class Scholars funding and providing second-year support through fundraising activities of the
foundation.
Enrollment of World Class Scholars at GHC
HS Graduating Year
HS Seniors Graduating as
World Class Scholars
World Class Scholars
Enrolled w/Funding at GHC
Percent Enrolled
1999
64
41
64%
2000
68
36
53%
2001
68
42
62%
2002
73
43
59%
2003
67
43
64%
2004
66
36
55%
2005
57
32
56%
2006
85
36
42%
2007
67
24
36%
2008
112
70
63%
2009
108
50
46%
Table 4.4.8 120
116
Recent indicators of the Foundation‘s success in meeting its objectives include:



Applying for three federal earmark grants to permanently endow the program
Applying for, and receiving, a $2,000 grant from Washington State‘s Higher Education Board to
be matched by the foundation (over the years the foundation has received nine such grants to
bring the permanently restricted account to $36,000, which allows the foundation to use the
interest to award WCS scholarships annually)
Organizing the second annual Mystery Get-Away event, which raised over $12,000 and doubled
the number of participants – and dollars raised – from the previous year‘s event
In 2009-2010, 1,647 students participated in instructional programs at the Stafford Creek Corrections
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Center. Of those students, 172 (10.4%) enrolled in courses designed to improve their parenting skills.
Improvements in Service to Community (4.B.1-2)
The college‘s commitment to service in all its forms, as articulated in this section, has never been
stronger. As the only institution of higher learning in the two-county service district, the college takes
very seriously its mission to provide training and professional development, cultural enrichment and
lifelong learning opportunities, as well as to serve as an exemplar of service, stewardship and good
citizenship. Recent years have seen the college making great strides in these endeavors despite – and in
some cases in response to – economic hardship for both college and community. Participation rates
throughout the community are healthy, and satisfaction rates are consistently high. Recent and current
efforts to improve efficiency and sustainability have been remarkably successful. Two specific areas for
improvement that have been identified with respect to this core theme are the percentage of district
residents who have full awareness of the college‘s programs, and participation and satisfaction rates of
constituent groups in regard to issues of diversity.
Objective 1: GHC provides general and customized professional development opportunities in
response to demand.
The Continuing Education division accomplishes EMT training planning annually with Grays Harbor
EMS & Trauma Care Council. Planning for Flagger Training is accomplished during the yearly schedule
development and approved by the vice president for instruction based on current year enrollment.
CLARUS market research led to planning for business training in Pacific County. Business groups (such
as the Ocean Shores Tourism Council and local and regional workforce and employment developers like
Pacific Mountain Workforce Development Council and Worksource Grays Harbor and Pacific County)
make contact with GHC directly, and GHC participation in organizations like Grays Harbor Vision 2020,
the Grays Harbor Economic Development Council and local chambers of commerce create contacts that
lead to understanding of training needs. These contacts lead to surveys and planning with those groups to
facilitate incumbent worker training opportunities. Workforce Washington promotes business and
professional training statewide through its website, linking to GHC and other system colleges. Needs
regarding professional and business development are also communicated from county economic
development councils and community development groups. Outcomes reporting requirements, participant
surveys, and actual enrollment rates are used, and will continue to be used for effective planning. Based
on all of the above assessments, continuing education plans to offer 10 contract training opportunities in
2010-2011 including one EMT training, six flagger classes (decreased due to a downturn in construction),
two RETC training projects for a total of 70 students, and one training related to JSP or B&O tax credit.
117
Objective 2: GHC provides a wide variety of opportunities for cultural enrichment.
In the Public Relations department, proposed changes include continuing to create more and more ways
to maintain and increase awareness of the college in the community, in part by expanding programming
and attendance at the Bishop Center.
Within the Humanities program, several recent initiatives have proven successful in broadening both
cultural enrichment opportunities and the audience for those opportunities. Recently, funding has been set
aside for students to attend the annual spring musical for free, allowing for those who otherwise might not
be able to afford tickets a chance to see such shows as 42nd Street and Thoroughly Modern Millie. The
Grays Harbor Symphony has recently broadened its offerings to meet the needs of the community –
specifically, by inviting more soloists to perform with the orchestra (including a Native American flautist,
with whom the Grays Harbor conductor collaborated on a new symphonic piece) and by incorporating
technology into performances (such as in the fall 2009 concert, ―Symphony Goes to the Movies,‖ which
made use of multimedia and big-screen projection). The Humanities program also recently allocated
resources to purchasing new equipment, including stage lighting, to enhance the quality of performances.
Overall, the performing arts programs at the college intend to continue employing these innovations while
pursuing even greater breadth of events with heightened cultural diversity.
Objective 3: GHC provides lifelong learning opportunities for all ages in response to community
interest.
Continuing Education‘s planning for lifelong learning occurs as part of the yearly schedule development
process. The college receives input about desired lifelong learning experiences from potential students
and instructors as well as from sister colleges through membership in system councils for continuing
education. These inputs develop into yearly plan proposals and quarterly offerings. Class surveys and
actual enrollment are used and will continue to be used for effective planning.
Objective 4: GHC serves as a resource for the community at large, exemplifying service,
stewardship, and good citizenship.
The office of Institutional Research, Assessment and Planning has a list of plans for improvement:






Administer the Community College Survey of Student Engagement as part of the college‘s three
year cycle for measuring student satisfaction using a nationally normed instrument.
Expand the ―Who We Serve‖ document to a more comprehensive document providing ―at a
glance‖ statistics of Grays Harbor College that are easily accessible on the GHC website.
Improve data collection methodology for student outcomes by establishing cohorts for
longitudinal tracking of student retention and progression.
Collaborate with others to align the Strategic Plan with Accreditation core themes, outcomes and
measures so that Strategic Planning, Institutional Effectiveness and Accreditation can be
integrated and better understood by the campus community.
Improve work flow and reduce scheduling conflicts at peak times by developing an annual
calendar for planned research activities.
Enhance awareness of services available by creating a dynamic web presence and electronic
newsletter.
The Public Relations office plans a widespread campaign to ease the continuing transition away from
print media and into electronic media. The campaign will be evaluated as well as the success of the new
online delivery method. The PR office will work with the Information Technology department to enhance
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the college website‘s functions and features. Improving GHC‘s presence on the web is one area that
should be addressed in the coming year. Although it is not specifically considered a public relations
function at this time, the GHC website is an important public relations tool, and the office of Public
Relations collaborates and offers suggestions about revisions and updates. One stated goal of these
initiatives is to increase the number of district residents with knowledge and good opinion of GHC.
The Human Resources office plans to expand the college recruiting efforts to ensure that increasing
numbers of qualified staff of color be present in the applicant pool to be considered for college positions
to increase diversity among college staff. Additionally, the HR office plans to join the college‘s ―Go
Green‖ movement by pursuing electronic recruiting to improve the efficiency and accuracy of the college
recruiting system, establishing electronic timecard and leave reporting systems, and transferring as many
records as possible to the Document Imaging program to free up file space and ensure easier access to
records.
The Grays Harbor College Foundation plans to endow the World Class Scholars program at $1 million.
This goal is achievable if the foundation can increase funding by 10% through grants, launch a major
fundraising campaign for new and existing donors, and increase giving by 20% at the Get-Away event.
The foundation also intends to increase scholarships on an annual basis by 5% by soliciting new
scholarships from donors, increasing communication with current donors, and promoting the GHC 80 th
Anniversary (2010) with a push to increase alumni giving by 10%.
The Information Technology department has a number of plans designed to increase efficiency and
sustainability, the first of which is to develop a proposal for reducing printing costs that will complement
the copy-cost reduction already achieved. Beyond this, the IT staff intend to support increasing demands
for off-campus access to intranet resources securely; expand implementation of electronic document
imaging to Human Resources, allowing for a more paper-free work environment; redesign and promote
the use of the college website, including developing regularly updated web pages for each campus
department; and assist the admissions and public relations offices with the effective implementation of the
online general college catalog and quarterly class schedules.
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Section V: Chapter Four Summary
The data, analysis and evaluation presented in this chapter, while lengthy, represent just an overview of
the many levels upon which the college plans, assesses and improves fulfillment of its mission through
upholding its commitments to the core themes and institutional values that sustain the college community.
College programs are consistently designed, examined, and enhanced with an eye toward intended
outcomes at the course, program, degree and institutional levels.
Discussion in the preceding pages highlights the extent to which faculty, staff and administrators work to
collect, analyze and judge data relevant to each of the four core themes of academic transfer, workforce
preparation, basic skills, and service to community. When viewed in conjunction with the previous
chapters of this report, the analysis in Chapter Four demonstrates the college‘s systematic approach to
honoring the relationships among mission/vision/values, institutional planning, allocation of resources,
use of capacity, outcomes assessment, and continuous improvement.
The data contained herein are consistently meaningful, assessable, and verifiable, whether qualitative or
quantitative in nature. Data sources are included in an appendix at the end of this report. At the heart of
this collection of data are the course- and program-based assessments undertaken by the faculty; no less
important are the many program assessments of non-instructional units of the college. All programs,
instructional and otherwise, work together to ensure that students who complete courses, programs and
degrees achieve the identified learning outcomes – just as all areas of the college work together to ensure
that the broader community, present and future, be well served by the institution.
As evidenced throughout this chapter, Grays Harbor College is presently serving both students and
community at a high rate of engagement: enrollments are up significantly, as are participation rates.
Programs are running near, at, and even beyond capacity with exceptional efficiency. Students across the
core themes exhibit substantial persistence and progress while demonstrating their acquisition of genuine
skill and knowledge through consistent and meaningful assessment of learning objectives. Feedback from
both students and community members indicates that the college‘s constituents place a high value on the
services they are provided.
Looking ahead, the college community – faculty, staff, administration and students – has identified a
multitude of specific innovations and enhancements designed to enrich student learning, brighten
economic prospects, inspire greater awareness, and make good on obligations to the next generation and
beyond.
120
Chapter Five: Mission Fulfillment, Adaptation, Sustainability
Section I: Mission Fulfillment (Standard 5A)
As demonstrated throughout this report but particularly in Chapter Four, Grays Harbor College engages in
regular, systematic, participatory, self-reflective, and evidence-based assessment of its accomplishments
(5.A.1). For this self-study, all college constituency groups – trustees, administrators, faculty, staff,
students, community members – took part both formally and informally in examining the extent to which
college programs and services succeed in their mission. Throughout this process, college employees have
engaged in assessment activities and discussions of outcomes widely regarded as more meaningful than in
any past self-study. The revised accreditation standards and reporting system have resulted not only in a
clear realization, but also an embrace, of the ongoing nature of planning, assessment and improvement.
Grays Harbor College defines mission fulfillment by examining the degree to which the institution‘s core
values are upheld in service of each of the four core themes that anchor the mission. This report has
demonstrated in detail the ways in which the college uses its available resources; plans, implements, and
assesses its programs; and works toward continuous improvement and sustainability. The holistic
evaluation of mission fulfillment that follows has been informed by the results of analysis of the college‘s
accomplishments of its four core themes‘ objectives, as presented earlier in this report. These findings are
without exception based on the extent to which the hard evidence of core theme achievement discussed in
these pages upholds the institution‘s core values of access, success, excellence, respect for diversity, and
efficiency. The evidence presented in this report comprises quantitative and qualitative indicators from
multiple sources both inside and outside the institution, from classroom-level assessments to perception
surveys, from progression and completion rates to measures of external success from such sources as
employers and receiving institutions. These results will be used for future planning as the college engages
in a systematic process of continuous assessment and improvement of its mission, core themes, programs
and services. In short, these results will be used to guide the college through its efforts to maintain
excellence, grow, and respond to the emerging needs, trends and influences that can challenge
institutional relevance, productivity, viability, and sustainability.
Based on the above definition of mission fulfillment, the college uses analysis of its assessment results to
make determinations of quality and effectiveness (5.A.2). Evidence in support of each score in the
Mission Fulfillment rubric that follows (Tables 5.1-5.4) is briefly described beneath each evaluation
criterion and referenced by the locations in this report of the indicators of achievement or other data
points that correlate specifically to each criterion. For the purposes of this evaluation:
5
4
3
2
1
Substantially Achieved: Available resources are used effectively, planning and implementation are carried
out systematically, assessments indicate significant levels of success, and improvements are ongoing.
Approaching Achievement: Serious attempts are being made to use available resources effectively and to
plan and implement systematically, assessments indicate some success, and serious efforts at
improvement are being made.
Progress Toward Achievement: Measurable efforts at effective resource allocation and systematic
planning and implementation are observed, assessments indicate movement toward success, and the need
for improvement is recognized.
Minimally Addressed: Resource allocation, planning and implementation have not been a priority,
meaningful assessment needs to be developed, and areas for improvement need to be identified and
addressed.
Not Addressed: The college does not address this criterion meaningfully.
121
Mission Fulfillment for Core Theme 1: Academic Transfer
Evidence
Values and Achievement Indicators
(chapter.section)
Score
Access to educational opportunities
Extensive range of transfer options (5)
2.3
Remarkable increases in distance and eLearning opportunities (5)
4.0; 4.1
Significant increases in participation rates (5)
2.3; 4.0; 4.1
5
Success for students, faculty and staff
Strong achievement rates in essential academic skills (5)
4.1
Healthy achievement of targeted course and program outcomes (5)
4.1
Success of transfer graduates at receiving institutions (4)
4.1
4.67
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
Impressively high ratings on graduate surveys (5)
4.0
Effective educational policies consistently followed (5)
2.1; 2.3
Holistic system of assessment to measure excellence (5)
4.1
5
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture, and the environment
Range of culturally diverse liberal arts offerings (4)
2.3
Increasing diversity in cultural programs and events (4)
4.4
Strong creative and performing arts programs (5)
2.3; 4.1; 4.4
Areas of concern regarding population diversity being addressed (3)
4.0; 4.4
4
Effective and efficient use of resources
Strong and increasing transfer enrollments (5)
4.0
Transfer courses and programs operating at/near capacity (5)
4.0
Student/faculty ratios higher than ever before (5)
4.0
Percentage of Criteria Rated 80% or Higher (Fulfillment = 90%)
Mission Fulfillment Score for Core Theme 1: Academic Transfer
Table 5.1
122
5
100%
94.6%
Mission Fulfillment for Core Theme 2: Workforce Preparation
Evidence
Values and Achievement Indicators
(chapter.section)
Score
Access to educational opportunities
Solid range of workforce options (4)
2.3
Programs operating at capacity with wait lists (4)
4.0; 2.3
Movement toward distance and eLearning opportunities (4)
4.0; 4.2
Significant increases in participation rates (5)
2.3; 4.0; 4.2
4.25
Success for students, faculty and staff
Students consistently well prepared for employment (5)
4.2
Wage data indicate efficacy of programs (5)
4.2
Healthy achievement of targeted course and program outcomes (5)
4.2
5
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
Employer satisfaction surveys consistently strong (5)
4.2
Impressively high rates on graduate satisfaction surveys (5)
4.0; 4.2
Effective educational policies consistently followed (5)
2.1; 2.3
5
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture, and the environment
Program development shows responsiveness to change (5)
4.0
Beginning to incorporate new green technologies (4)
4.2; 4.4
Areas of concern regarding population diversity being addressed (3)
4.0; 4.4
4
Effective and efficient use of resources
Strong and increasing workforce enrollments (5)
4.0
Workforce courses and programs operating at/beyond capacity (5)
4.0
Student/faculty ratios higher than ever before (5)
4.0
5
Percentage of Criteria Rated 80% or Higher (Fulfillment = 90%)
100%
Mission Fulfillment Score for Core Theme 2: Workforce Preparation
93%
Table 5.2
123
Mission Fulfillment for Core Theme 3: Basic Skills
Evidence
Values and Achievement Indicators
(chapter.section)
Score
Access to educational opportunities
Maintaining comprehensive offerings (5)
2.3
Open door policy (5)
2.3; 4.3
Responsiveness to budgetary constraints (4)
4.0; 4.3
4.67
Success for students, faculty and staff
Healthy rates of persistence and progress (4)
4.3
Meaningful gains in skill levels and transitions (4)
4.3
Significant achievement of course and program outcomes (5)
4.3
New programs designed for student success (5)
4.3
4.5
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
Accountability to state reporting agencies (5)
2.3; 4.3
Accountability to federal reporting agencies (5)
2.3; 4.3
Alignment of levels – ABE, developmental, college-level (4)
4.3; 4.1
4.67
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture, and the environment
Service to nontraditional students (5)
2.3; 4.3; 4.4
Service to non-native English speakers (5)
2.3; 4.3; 4.4
Areas of concern regarding population diversity being addressed (3)
4.0; 4.4
4.33
Effective and efficient use of resources
Maintaining basic skills enrollment in light of budget cuts (4)
4.0; 4.3
Basic skills courses/programs operating near capacity (4)
4.0; 4.3
Student/faculty ratios continue to be strong (5)
4.0; 4.3
4.33
Percentage of Criteria Rated 80% or Higher (Fulfillment = 90%)
100%
Mission Fulfillment Score for Core Theme 3: Basic Skills
90%
Table 5.3
124
Mission Fulfillment for Core Theme 4: Service to Community
Evidence
Values and Achievement Indicators
(chapter.section)
Score
Access to educational opportunities
Lifelong learning opportunities for all ages and interests (5)
2.3; 4.4
GHC is the premier cultural resource in the service district (5)
4.1; 4.4
GHC is the premier training resource in the service district (5)
4.2; 4.4
5
Success for students, faculty and staff
Participation/satisfaction rates in community interest courses (4)
4.4
Participation/satisfaction rates in cultural events programs (5)
4.4
Participation/satisfaction rates in training programs (5)
4.4
4.67
Excellence in programs, practices and principles
Participants repeatedly engage in community programs (5)
4.4
Positive feedback and repeat attendance from audiences (5)
4.4
Positive feedback from community partners (5)
4.4
5
Respect for diversity of people, ideas, culture, and the environment
Increasing diversity of cultural, artistic and civic offerings (4)
2.3; 4.1; 4.4
Beginning to incorporate green initiatives (4)
4.4
Areas of concern regarding population diversity being addressed (3)
4.0; 4.4
3.67
Effective and efficient use of resources
Sustainability efforts show remarkable improvement (5)
4.4
Consistent and meaningful planning for the collective future (5)
4.4
5
Percentage of Criteria Rated 80% or Higher (Fulfillment = 90%)
Mission Fulfillment Score for Core Theme 4: Service to Community
80%
93.4%
Table 5.4
Overall Percentage of Criteria Rated 80% or Higher: 95%
Overall Institutional Score for Mission Fulfillment: 92.75%
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Section II: Adaptation and Sustainability (Standard 5.B, Eligibility Requirement 24)
Adaptation and sustainability have been much on the minds of the Grays Harbor College community in
recent years. Aside from the extent to which an institution of higher education is always mindful of
moving forward in a changing world, recent events in the community, the state, the region, the nation, and
the world have necessitated careful consideration of available resources both local and global. This
consideration has led members of the college community to work together creatively and progressively to
assess and address the adequacy of those resources as well as capacity and effectiveness of operations.
The documentation contained in this report has described faithfully the college‘s ongoing potential to
fulfill its mission, accomplish its core theme objectives, and achieve the goals and intended outcomes of
its programs and services, even in the face of challenges (5.B.1).
The college has always documented and regularly evaluated its cycle of planning, practices, resource
allocation, application of institutional capacity, and assessment of results to ensure effectiveness. But the
Accreditation Steering Committee, and indeed the entire college community, has found that the new
reporting process makes the ongoing cycle of planning, assessment and improvement more integral to the
daily life of the college and therefore more meaningful for all involved. The proposed changes,
enhancements and improvements described throughout Chapter Four of this report are a testament to the
college‘s commitment to using the results of evaluation as a guide to adaptation and growth (5.B.2).
Throughout the process of examination, assessment, analysis and reflection that led to the creation of this
report, the college has monitored its internal and external environments to identify and evaluate the
impacts of emerging patterns, trends and expectations. Through its holistic approach to governance,
which involves students, staff, faculty, administrators and trustees, the college has used its findings to
assess its strategic position and define its future directions. As a result, the college has reviewed and
revised its mission, core themes, objectives, outcomes and indicators of achievement. Based on this
experience, the college expects that, going forward, this process of review and revision will be more
cyclical and less episodic than in the past (5.B.3).
Lake Swano Trail on GHC’s Campus
126
Conclusion
The evaluation of Grays Harbor College presented in the Mission Fulfillment rubric in Chapter Five and
supported by the data and analysis throughout this comprehensive self-study no doubt reveals a great deal
about the institution to those who read the report. But it reveals even more to those who have worked on
its creation: the trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, students and members of the broader community
whose engagement in the life of the college provides the raw material from which this portrait has come
into focus.
Throughout the process of developing this document, the members of the Accreditation Steering
Committee have been struck by how much their activities – and the countless supporting activities of all
faculty and staff at the college – have shown them about the institution‘s strengths, challenges, trends, and
opportunities for continuous improvement.
A sweeping look at such things can be daunting. It can be tempting either to focus on the uncontrollable
trends that affect the institution – economic troubles, shifting demographics, increased demands – or to
become lost in the minutiae of individual pieces of data. It can be a challenge to sort through all that lays
itself out for examination and choose to consider that which is significant.
This process – this new means of engaging in self-study – has led the college community to a refreshing
place where neither the forest nor the trees have blocked each other from view. Each individual piece of
information gathered, observed, considered, analyzed, evaluated, and used for improvement has meaning.
More important, it has the potential to serve as the impetus for positive movement forward – adaptation
and change – either by choosing to do things differently or by continuing to do what‘s working well, but
doing it better.
Grays Harbor College‘s vision is to be a catalyst for positive change, which it pursues through fulfilling
its mission of providing meaningful education and cultural enrichment through academic transfer,
workforce preparation, basic skills, and service to community.
It is hoped that this report has served its purpose of demonstrating the significant degree to which the
institution fulfills its mission. But this report has served another, perhaps more meaningful, purpose:
through holding itself up to the mirror of self-study, the college community has seen reflected a vision of
Grays Harbor College as a catalyst for its own positive change.
127
Appendix A: Data Sources
1
Enrollment data from the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges‘ (SBCTC) Academic Year Report
(2008-2009)
2
GHC demographic information from SBCTC Academic Year Report (2008-2009); county demographic data from
the U.S. Census (2000)
3
Enrollment by purpose for attending figures (student disclosure) from SBCTC Fall Quarter Reports (2004-2009)
4
High school capture rates from SBCTC Recent High School Graduates Reports (2002-2009)
5
Extended Learning enrollment data from MIS Data Report (2008-2009)
6
Financial Aid default rates GHC Financial Aid office (2003-2007)
7
General education ratings from the GHC Assessment Database (updated 2008-2009, 2009-2010)
8
Student feedback from GHC Graduate Surveys (2007, 2008, 2009)
9
Student feedback from GHC Graduate Surveys (2007, 2008, 2009)
10
Student demographic data from SBCTC Data Warehouse (2009)
11
Student perception data from CCSSE surveys (2002, 2008)
12
Fall enrollment data from SBCTC Fall Quarter Reports (2001-2009)
13
Enrollment data by category from SBCTC Enrollment Monitoring Report (2009-2010)
14
Continuing Education course data from Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
15
eLearning course data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
16
eLearning and instructional methods data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
17
eLearning and instructional methods data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
18
Progress toward degree figures (academic transfer students) from SBCTC SAI database (2006-2007, 2007-2008,
2008-2009)
19
Substantial progress figures from SBCTC Academic Year Reports (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
20
Quantitative Reasoning requirement figures from SBCTC SAI database (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
21
Quantitative Points data from SBCTC SAI database (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
22
Writing Skills completion data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
23
Transfer readiness figures from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
24
Earned associate degree data from SBCTC SAI database (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
25
Transfer student completion data from SBCTC DLOA database (external match with Employment Security and
national Student Clearinghouse, 2007-2008 cohort)
26
Receiving institutions‘ transfer student data as available from Central Washington University (2010), Eastern
Washington University (2004), the University of Washington (2009), Washington State University – Pullman,
Vancouver, and distance (2007), Western Washington University (2009)
27
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Business DTA Program Review Report (2010),
author Dr. Mark Zerr
28
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Business DTA Program Review Report (2010),
author Dr. Mark Zerr
29
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Health and Physical Education Program Review
Report (2010), author Gary Arthur
30
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Humanities Program Review Report (2010), author
Lynne Lerych; course outcomes reports written by Dr. Darby Cavin, Allison DeBoer, Brad Duffy, Adrienne Roush,
Erik Sandgren
128
31
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Humanities Program Review Report (2010), author
Lynne Lerych; course outcomes reports written by Dr. Darby Cavin, Allison DeBoer, Jacek Lerych, Lynne Lerych,
Dr. James Neiworth, Bob Richardson, Erik Sandgren
32
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Mathematics Program Review Report (2010),
author Jeff Koskela; course outcomes reports written by Jeff Koskela, Tom Kuester, Lynn Siedenstrang
33
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Science Program Review Report (2010), author
Diane Carter; course outcomes reports written by Diane Carter, Dr. John Hillier, Mohammed Ibrahim, Dr. Russ
Jones, Julie Nelson
34
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Social Science Program Review Report (2010),
author Dr. Chris Portmann; course outcomes reports written by Dr. Gary Murrell, Dr. Chris Portmann
35
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson
36
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; Admissions and Records report data from Nancy DeVerse
37
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; Athletic Department report data from Wes Peterson
38
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; Counseling Center report data from Melissa Barnes
39
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; Disabled Student Services report data from John Rajcich
40
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; Financial Aid report data from Ben Beus
41
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; Student Success program report data from Diane Smith
42
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; Learning Center report data from Laura Ratcliffe
43
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Student Services Program Review Report (2010), author Dr. Arlene
Torgerson; TRiO program report data from JEB Thornton
44
TRiO persistence data from TRiO Student Support Services grant, author JEB Thornton
45
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Library Media Services Program Review Report (2010), author Stan
Horton
46
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Library Media Services Program Review Report (2010), author Stan
Horton
47
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Foundation Program Review Report (2010), author Wes Peterson
48
Outcomes assessment data from the GHC Information Technology Program Review Report (2010), author Sandy
Lloyd
49
Continuing Education course data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
50
eLearning course data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
51
eLearning and instructional methods data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
52
eLearning and instructional methods data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
53
Job Prep gains data from SBCTC SAI Report (2007-2008, 2008-2009)
54
Quantitative Points data from the SBCTC SAI database (2008-2009)
55
Workforce readiness data from SBCTC DLOA database, which matches former students with Employment
Security records (2007-2008)
56
Rates of completion from SBCTC DLOA/Employment Security (2007-2008)
57
SCCC progress data from SBCTC Academic Year Report (2009-2010)
129
58
Worker Retraining enrollment data from SBCTC Academic Year Reports (2001-2002 through 2008-2009)
59
Worker Retraining FTE allocation data from SBCTC Enrollment Report (2008-2009)
60
Data on completers vs. leavers from SBCTC Academic Year Reports (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
61
Wage group data from DLOA, a cooperative venture with SBCTC and the Washington State Employment
Security Department (2008)
62
Nursing employment and salary data from DLOA, a cooperative venture with SBCTC and the Washington State
Employment Security Department (2008)
63
NCLEX exam rates from Washington State Department of Health (2010)
64
Employer satisfaction data from CLARUS Workforce Development Scan (2008)
65
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Accounting Program Review Report (2010), author
Ron Deaton
66
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Business Management Program Review Report
(2010), author Doug Jones
67
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Office Technology Program Review Report (2010),
author Scott Blankenship
68
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Nursing Program Review Report (2010), author
Penny Woodruff
69
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Automotive Technology Program Review Report
(2010), author Denis Samson; from the GHC Carpentry Technology Program Review Report (2010), author Adam
Pratt; from the GHC Commercial Truck Driving Program Review Report (2010), author LaDonna Scott; from the
GHC Diesel Technology Program Review Report (2010), author Brion Buisman; from the GHC Industrial Control
Systems Technology Program Review Report (2010), author Fred Hennige; from the GHC Welding Technology
Program Review Report (2010), author Rod McDonald
70
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Natural Resources Program Review Report (2010),
author Todd Bates
71
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Criminal Justice Program Review Report (2010),
author Ron Bradbury
72
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Human Services Program Review Report (2010),
author Brenda Rolfe-Maloney
73
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the SCCC Building Maintenance Program Review Report
(2010), author Donny Betts
74
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the SCCC Information Technology Core Program Review
Report (2010), author Jeff Farnam
75
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the SCCC Welding Program Review Report (2010), author
John Clary
76
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Communications Program Review Report (2010),
author Lynne Lerych; course outcomes reports written by Brad Duffy, Adrienne Roush
77
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Communications Program Review Report (2010),
author Lynne Lerych; course outcomes reports written by Dr. Darby Cavin, Allison DeBoer, Brad Duffy, Dr. James
Neiworth, Adrienne Roush
78
Continuing Education course data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
79
eLearning course data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
80
eLearning and instructional methods data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2010)
81
Basic Skills reporting data from SBCTC WABERS database (2004-2005 through 2009-2010)
82
Pre- and post-testing data from CASAS reports (2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010)
130
83
Level gains data from SBCTC WABERS database and SBCTC Academic Year Reports (2007-2008, 2008-2009,
2009-2010)
84
Basic Skills students‘ significant point gains data from SBCTC database (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
85
Achievement Points data from SBCTC Academic Year Reports (2004-2005 through 2009-2010)
86
Achievement Points data from SBCTC Academic Year Reports (2005-2006 through 2008-2009)
87
IBEST level gains data from SBCTC SAI database (2008-2009, 2009-2010)
88
Basic skills gains by year data from SBCTC WABERS database and SBCTC Academic Year Reports (20072008, 2008-2009)
89
Math transition figures from SBCTC SAI database (2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
90
Pre-college English student follow-up data from Transcripts Database (2006-2007)
91
Writing Skills requirement figures from SBCTC SAI database (2007-2008 & 2008-2009)
92
IBEST completion rates from SBCTC SAI database (2007-2008, 2008-2009)
93
GED and post-secondary figures from SBCTC WABERS database and SBCTC Academic Year Reports (20062007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009)
94
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Transitions Program Review Report (2010), author
Shiloh Winsor; course outcomes reports written by Sarah Aiken, Jennifer Barber
95
Basic skills level gains information from SBCTC WABERS database (2005-2006 through 2008-2009)
96
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the GHC Transitions Program Review Report (2010), author
Shiloh Winsor; course outcomes reports written by Kathy Barker, Taya Do, Shiloh Winsor
97
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the SCCC Basic Skills Program Review Report (2010),
author Shelley Benson; course outcomes reports written by Greg Adamski, Randy Bale, Shelley Benson, Pauline
Geraci, Guy Slover
98
Course and program outcomes assessment data from the SCCC Basic Skills Program Review Report (2010),
author Shelley Benson; course outcomes reports written by Greg Adamski, Randy Bale, Shelley Benson, Pauline
Geraci, Guy Slover
99
Human Development, Interpersonal Skills course outcomes report (2010) written by Brian Shook
100
Human Development, Stress Management and Wellness course outcomes report (2010) written by Melissa
Barnes
101
Human Development, Personal Development course outcomes report (2010) written by Vivian Kaylor
102
Freshman Year Experience course outcomes data and retention/completion statistics from the Student Success
Annual Report (2009-2010)
103
Survey responses from the CLARUS Workforce Development Scan (2008)
104
Course offerings data from the GHC annual schedule (2009-2010)
105
Enrollment data from SBCTC Data Warehouse database (2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010)
106
Bishop Center data from the GHC Student Services office and event programs (2006-2007 through 2009-2010)
107
Lifelong learning participation data from the GHC Continuing Education office via GHC Institutional Research
108
Continuing Education course data from Data Query of GHC course offerings (2007-2010)
109
Running Start headcount/FTE figures from SBCTC Academic Year Reports (2001-2002 through 2008-2009)
110
Tech Prep credit and enrollment data from institutional research via the College-High School Relations office
111
Tech Prep credits by program area from institutional research via the College-High School Relations office
112
Community participation rates from SBCTC Academic Year Report (2008-2009)
113
Community ratings from the CLARUS Community Scan (2008)
114
Race and ethnicity data from SBCTC Academic Year Report (2008-2009), IPEDS Report (2008-2009), and the
U.S. Census (2000)
131
115
Childcare Center attendance figures from Student Services Annual Reports (2002-2009)
116
Childcare Center attendance figures from Student Services Annual Report (2008-2009)
117
Grant figures from GHC Financial Budget (2008-2009)
118
Paper reduction figures from GHC Purchasing Office (2010)
119
Financial data from the GHC Foundation Program Review Report (2010), author Wes Peterson
120
World Class Scholar enrollment data from the College-High School Relations office
121
Data on Stafford Creek enrollment by area from SBCTC Academic Year Report (2009-2010)
132
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