A Web-based Model Built Environment + Public Health Course Curriculum

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A Web-based Model Built
Environment + Public Health
Course Curriculum
Nisha D. Botchwey, PhD, MCP, Departments of Urban and Environmental Planning
and Public Health Sciences, UVA
Susan E. Hobson, MPH, Department of Urban Planning and Policy, UIC
Andrew L. Dannenberg, MD, MPH, National Center for Environmental Health,
CDC
Karen G. Mumford, PhD, University of Minnesota
Cheryl K. Contant, PhD, University of Minnesota
Tracey E. McMillan, PhD, PPH Partners, Flagstaff, Arizona
Richard J. Jackson, MD, UCLA
Russell Lopez, PhD, Department of Environmental Health, BU
Curtis Winkle, PhD, Department of Urban Planning and Public Affairs, UIC
Presentation Learning Objectives:
  Describe a model built environment and public health
course curriculum for training an interdisciplinary
workforce.
  Design a built environment and public health
curriculum that fits the context of one's institution and
audience.
From the silos to the center
  Growing evidence of the direct and indirect effects of
the built environment on public health
  Public health and planning practitioners rarely interact
  Need to bring these professions together on common
ground and in preparation of our next generation of
professionals
Built Environment Institute II:
“Teaching the Built Environment Health Connection”
Environment Section Program; 2006
Nov 7; Boston, MA.
APHA 134th Annual Meeting &
Exposition: Public Health and Human
Rights.
Related Articles
A Model Curriculum for a Course on the Built
Environment and Public Health
Training for an Interdisciplinary Workforce
Nisha D. Botchwey, PhD, Susan E. Hobson, MPH, Andrew L. Dannenberg, MD, MPH, Karen G. Mumford, PhD,
Cheryl K. Contant, PhD, Tracy E. McMillan, PhD, MPH, Richard J. Jackson, MD, MPH, Russell Lopez, PhD,
Curtis Winkle, PhD
Abstract:
Despite growing evidence of the direct and indirect effects of the built environment on
public health, planners, who shape the built environment, and public health professionals,
who protect the public’s health, rarely interact. Most public health professionals have little
experience with urban planners, zoning boards, city councils, and others who make
decisions about the built environment. Likewise, few planners understand the health
implications of design, land use, or transportation decisions. One strategy for bridging this
divide is the development of interdisciplinary courses in planning and public health that
address the health implications of the built environment. Professional networking and
Internet-based searches in 2007 led to the identification of six primarily graduate-level
courses in the U.S. that address the links between the built environment and public health.
Common content areas in most of the identified courses included planning and public
health histories, health disparities, interdisciplinary approaches, air and water quality,
physical activity, social capital, and mental health.
Instructors of these courses collaborated on course content, assignments, and evaluations
to develop a model curriculum that follows an active learning-centered approach to course
design. The proposed model curriculum is adaptable by both planning and public health
departments to promote interdisciplinary learning. Results show that students gain
planning and public health perspectives through this instruction, benefiting from activelearning opportunities. Faculty implementation of the proposed interdisciplinary model
curriculum will help bridge the divide between the built environment and public health
and enable both planners and public health professionals to value, create, and promote
healthy environments.
(Am J Prev Med 2009;36(2S):S63–S71) © 2009 American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Introduction
A
century ago, planning and public health professionals worked together to protect the public’s health and prevent the spread of disease by
developing zoning laws to influence the built environ1,2
ment. However, the disciplines soon diverged; public
health followed a clinical model, and planning focused
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
2009
From the Departments of Urban and Environmental Planning and
Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia (Botchwey), Charlottesville, Virginia; the Department of Urban Planning and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago (Hobson, Winkle), Chicago, Illinois; the
National Center for Environmental Health (Dannenberg), CDC, the
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health (Mumford),
Emory University, the Department of City and Regional Planning
Program (Contant), Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia; PPH Partners (McMillan), Flagstaff, Arizona; School of Public
Health, University of California Berkeley (Jackson), Berkeley, California; and the Department of Environmental Health, Boston University (Lopez), Boston, Massachusetts
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Nisha D. Botchwey, PhD, University of Virginia, Campbell Hall, P.O. Box 400122,
Charlottesville VA 22904-4122. E-mail: [email protected]
Am J Prev Med 2009;36(2S)
© 2009 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.
on policy development and physical form. These two
fields are re-converging because many chronic diseases
are associated with both the built environment and the
individual behaviors that cumulatively lead to negative
health outcomes.3–5
Traditionally, planning and public health are
taught and practiced with little coordination. Most
community-design and transportation-planning decisions are made by urban planners, zoning-board
members, and city councilors—seldom by public
health professionals. Most public health professionals have little contact with planning professionals,
except in relatively narrow domains such as waterand sewer-infrastructure–review processes. The model
of social determinants of health and environmental
health promotion describes health and disease outcomes resulting from the built environment and
social context as well as community-level factors.
These include infant and child health, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, injuries and
0749-3797/09/$–see front matter
doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2008.10.003
S63
The aim of the course is to provide understanding of
the interactions between the built environment and
health, and skills to engage these issues as
professional planners, public health practitioners and
other related professionals.
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Course Curriculum Welcome
11/9/09 11:23 PM
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
On-line resource covers four broad
topics over a fifteen-week semester
Unit 1: Planning and Public Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural and Built
Environments
Unit 3: Vulnerable Populations and
Health Disparities
Unit 4: Health Policy and Global
Impacts
Course Curriculum Welcome ...
Welcome
10.14.09 | It is
impressive that you
were able to provide
a well-rounded
overview of the
topics for those who
are new to the
subject matter while
also generating
discussion points for others looking to further examine
the topics. The website is well-organized, and the links
to the articles are greatly appreciated. Thank you for
putting so much thought into the design of the website! - S. Mak
More Curriculum News + Comments
In the early 1900s, planning and public health professionals worked
together to protect public health and prevent the spread of disease by
developing zoning laws to influence the built environment. However,
the disciplines followed different paths with public health focusing on a
clinical model, and planning on policy development and physical form.
These two fields are re-connecting now as many chronic diseases are
associated with the built environment and the individual behaviors that
cumulatively lead to negative health outcomes.
Course
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Final Learning and Reflection
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Additional website resources:
Course Offerings and Joint Programs
Readings
Course Assignments
Additional Resources
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
Final Learning and
Reflection
Course Offerings
+ Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
Course
Assignments
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/…se%20Curriculum%20%7C%20Course%20Curriculum%20Welcome.webarchive
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A Self-Directed
Guide
to
INITIAL DESIGN PHASE: Build Strong Primary
The Key Components Of INTEGRATED COURSE DESIGN
Components
Step 1. Identify important situational factors
Step 2. Identify important learning goals
Step 3. Formulate appropriate feedback and assessment
procedures
Step 4. Select effective teaching/learning activities
Step 5. Make sure the primary components are integrated
Designing Courses for Significant Learning
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INTERMEDIATE DESIGN PHASE: Assemble the
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6. Create a thematic structure for the course
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Step 8. Integrate the course structure and the instructional
Instructional
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strategy
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FINAL
Author
of:DESIGN PHASE: Finish Important Remaining
Creating SignificantTasks
Learning Experiences:
Step 9. Develop the grading system
An Integrated Approach to
Designing College Courses
Step 10. De-Bug possible problems
11. Write the2003)
course syllabus
(San Francisco:Step
Jossey-Bass,
Step 12. Plan an evaluation of the course and of your
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teaching
BE+PH Course Learning Goals
① 
Understand public health and planning history, evolution and significant movements to the
present, and historical and current theories on the relationship between the built
environment and public health.
② 
Identify contemporary features of the built environment such as patterns of development,
parks, public works projects, houses, and transportation systems that reflect past efforts to
influence health, and use methods developed by architects, urban planners, public health
professionals, sociologists and anthropologists to address current health impacts of the built
environment.
③ 
Learn about oneself and the context in which others operate to better integrate that
understanding when evaluating differing built environments, socioeconomic positions, social
and cultural backgrounds, and health status.
④ 
Adopt new feelings, interests or values based on issues addressed throughout the semester.
⑤ 
Develop skills to identify studies and engage communities, critique methods and findings,
and apply lessons from planning and public health research to current and future problems.
⑥ 
Integrate current evidence regarding the impacts of the built environment on health with
information and perspectives from other courses and/or personal experiences.
Assessment Techniques:
Align Exams, Final Papers with
how practitioners will be assessed
in the field.
Table 3. Selected Learning Objectives and Assignments in Six Built Environment and Public
Health Courses, 2007 a
Local
Neighborhood
Case Study (BU)
Learning Objectives
To illustrate how building practices
are influenced and to evaluate the
effectiveness and sustainability of
design innovations.
Assignment
Tour a local neighborhood and answer essay
questions concerning the community’s urban
revitalization plan, using analytic techniques
presented in class.
Campus and
Neighborhood
Walkability
(EU/GT)
To assess the walkability of
residential and campus settings as
part of physical activity
environment at home or school
Service Learning
Group Project
(UT, Austin and
UVa)
Activity Diary
(UT)
To become familiar with community
organizations and their process to
improve the welfare of
communities.
To increase awareness of how
choices, constraints, and design
affect movement patterns and
physical activity.
To understand opportunities and
barriers for alternative
transportation systems relying on
mass transit
To write persuasively about
contemporary social issues,
integrate information and ideas,
and present ideas in a succinct,
clear way in a public forum.
To gain appreciation for
contemporary issues related to
topics presented in class.
Using existing or newly-developed
instruments, collect field data on two or more
settings either in a residential or campus
environment. Gain data collection experience
and reflect on daily settings and their
walkability, including sidewalks, barriers,
traffic, destinations, and presence of others.
Semester-long work with a group of service
providers, such as assisting hurricane
evacuees in Austin, TX or developing a
resource book for an urban farm.
Week-long travel diary of pedometer readings
and travel patterns with critique of how built
environment influenced travel.
Transit Use
(EU/GT)
Newspaper Op-Ed
or Radio
Perspective (UCB
and UVa)
Debates (UIC)
Policy Memos
(UT and EU/GT)
Photovoiceb
Report (UVa)
Teaching & Learning Activities:
Build from simple to more
complex
Healthy
Communities
Portfolio (UVa)
To construct critical arguments and
present succinct positions to
educate decision-makers.
To collect community perspectives
on the feasibility of built
environment approaches to remedy
social capital and mental health
disparities or other topics.
To engage students in reflective
thinking about their learning over
the semester.
Follow a round-trip circuit of 8–10 segments
on bus, heavy rail, walk, and trolley while
monitoring waiting times, ridership numbers,
wayfinding, and relative safety.
Oral “perspective” or Op-Ed on the built
environment and health related to policy and
ethics of popular interest. Read aloud and
distributed to the class for discussion and
critique. Submit for broadcast or publication.
Students debate on a topic assigned at
beginning of semester. Students present pro
and con positions followed by 2-minute
rebuttals each.
Two policy memos on built environment
issues directed to decision makers at the local
and state levels.
Recommendations developed through inclass Photovoice exercise. Evaluate
feasibility of recommendations based on
reflections and assigned readings.
Portfolio representing the evolution of the
student’s thinking about healthy communities
over the course of the term, with narrative
discussing lessons and future applications of
the work.
a. Abbreviations in column 1 correspond to universities listed in Table 1.
b. Photovoice is an approach developed by Caroline Wang (1994) to enable economically and politically
disenfranchised populations to express themselves with greater voice. Photovoice is a method where
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Table 4. Learning Activities in Proposed 15 Week Built Environment and Public Health Model Course
Units
Learning Goals
Unit 1:
Planning and Public
Health Foundations
(2 weeks)
Foundational Knowledge:
Understand public health and planning history,
evolution and significant movements to present,
and historical and current theories on the
relationship between the built environment and
public health.
Application:
Identify contemporary features of the built
environment such as patterns of development,
parks, public works projects, houses, and
transportation systems, and use methods
developed by sociologists, anthropologists,
public health leaders, urban planners and
architects to address chronic illnesses and
impacts of the built environment.
Human Dimensions:
Learn about oneself and the context in which
others operate to better integrate that
understanding when evaluating differing builtenvironments, socioeconomic positions, social
and cultural backgrounds, and health status.
Caring:
Adopt new feelings, interests or values based
on issues addressed throughout the semester.
Learning-How-to-Learn:
Develop skills to identify studies and engage
communities, critique methods and findings, and
apply lessons from planning and public health
research to current and future problems.
Unit 2:
Natural and Built
Environment
(6 weeks)
Unit 3:
Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
(3 weeks)
Unit 4:
Health Policy and
Global Impacts
(3 weeks)
Final
(1 week)
Integration:
Integrate current evidence regarding the
impacts of the built environment on health with
information and perspectives from other courses
and/or personal experiences.
Session Topics
Planning History
Public Health History
Interdisciplinary Applications
Supplemental
Readingsa
Dannenberg (2003)12
Northridge (2003)4
Peterson (1979)29
Malizia (2005)30
Suggested
Assignmentsb
(1) Local
Neighborhood
Case Study
(2) Campus and
Neighborhood
Walkability
(1) Service
Learning Group
Project
(2) Activity Diary
(3) Transit Use
Land Use and Transportation
Planning Design Approaches
Health Impact Assessments
Environmental Impact
Assessments
Indoor and Outdoor Air Quality
Water Quality
Food Security
Giles-Corti (2003)31
Evans (2003)32
Friedman (2001)33
Twiss (2003)34
Dannenberg (2008)35
CDC (2002)36
Pucher (2003)37
Lucy (2003)38
Vulnerable Populations (the
poor, children, women,
elderly, disabled, and ,
minorities) and Health
Disparities
Mental Health
Social Capital
Environmental Justice
McMillan (2005)39
ICMA (2003)40
Evans (2003)41
CDC (2000)42
Leyden (2003)43
(1) Newspaper OpEd or Radio
Perspective
(2) Debates
Health Policy
Sustainable Planning and Global
Warming
Healthy Housing
Librett (2003)44
McMichael (2000)45
Saegert (2003)46
Geller (2003)47
Younger (2008)48
(1) Policy Memos
(2) Photovoice
Report
Final Portfolio
Healthy
Communities
Portfolio
Built Environment + Public Health
Course Curriculum rE-source
  Welcome
  Course Introduction & Design
  Unit 1: Planning and Public Health Foundations
  Unit 2: Natural and Built Environments
  Unit 3: Vulnerable Populations and Health Disparities
  Unit 4: Health Policy and Global Impacts
  Final Learning and Reflection
  Course Offerings + Joint Degree Programs
  Readings
  Course Assignments
  Additional Resources
  Curriculum News + Comments
  Contact
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 1 Planning and Public Health Foundations
11/10/09
Built Environment
9:59 AM and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 1 Planning and Public Health Foundations
Public Health History
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
Interdisciplinary Applications
11/10/09 9:59 AM
Course
Assignments
Additional
Resources
Suggested Readings
Books (select chapters)
Frumkin H, Frank L, Jackson R. Urban sprawl and public health:
Curriculum News
+ Comments
Contact
designing, planning, and building for healthy communities. Washington
DC: Island Press, 2004.
Kawachi I, Berkman LF. Neighborhoods and health. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2003.
Morris M, Duncan R, Hannaford K, et al. Integrating planning and
public health. Chicago: APA Planning Advisory Service, 2006.
Articles
Unit 1: Planning and Public Health
Foundations
Learning Goal | Unit Topics | Suggested Readings | In- and Out-ofclass Assignments
The first unit, Planning and Public Health Foundations, provides
students with an overview of both fields, from their origins to the
present. Emphasizing the first learning goal, foundational knowledge,
this unit orients students to core values and histories of both fields and
interdisciplinary connections. Two weeks are devoted to teaching this
unit.
Welcome
Course
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public
Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Learning Goal
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Foundational Knowledge. Understand public health and planning
Unit 4: Health
history, evolution and significant movements to the present, and
historical and current theories on the relationship between the built
environment and public health.
Policy and Global
Impacts
Dannenberg AL, Jackson RJ, Frumkin H, Schieber RA, Pratt M,
Kochitzky C, Tilson HH. The impact of community design and land-use
choices on public health: a scientific research agenda. Am J Public
Health 2003;93(9):1500-8.
Malizia EE. Planning and Public Health: Research Options for an
Emerging Field. Journal of Planning Education and Research
2006;25:428-432.
Northridge ME, Sclar ED, Biswas P. Sorting out the connections
between the built environment and health: a conceptual framework for
navigating pathways and planning healthy cities. J Urban Health
2003;80(4):556-68.
Peterson J. The impact of sanitary reform upon American urban
planning, 1840-1990. J Soc Hist 1979;13(1):83-103.
In- and Out-of-class Assignments
Local neighborhood case study
Campus and neighborhood walkability assessment
Final Learning and
Reflection
Unit Topics
Planning History
Course Offerings
+ Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
Public Health History
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Or…t%201%20Planning%20and%20Public%20Health%20Foundations.webarchive file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Or…t%201%20Planning%20and%20Public%20Health%20Foundations.webarchive
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Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 2 Natural and Built Environments
11/10/09Built
9:59Environment
AM
and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 2 Natural and Built Environments
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
11/10/09 9:59 AM
Land Use and Transportation
Assignments
Planning Design Approaches
Additional
Environmental Impact Assessments
Health Impact Assessments
Indoor and Outdoor Air Quality
Resources
Curriculum News
+ Comments
Contact
Water Quality
Food Security
Suggested Readings
Unit 2: Natural and Built
Environments
Learning Goal | Unit Topics | Suggested Readings | In- and Out-ofclass Assignments
The second unit, Natural and Built Environments, provides students
with instruction on important dimensions of the natural environment
and the human impact on these systems through application of tools
from planning to shape the built environment and from public health
to address health. A highlight of this unit is a service learning group
project where students apply lessons from environmental planning,
transportation planning and environmental health to a local issue. Six
weeks are devoted to teaching this unit.
Learning Goal
Application. Identify contemporary features of the built environment
such as patterns of development, parks, public works projects, houses,
and transportation systems that reflect past efforts to influence health,
and use methods developed by architects, urban planners, public
health professionals, sociologists and anthropologists to address
current health impacts of the built environment.
Unit Topics
Books (select chapters)
Frumkin H, Frank L, Jackson R. Urban sprawl and public health:
designing, planning, and building for healthy communities. Washington
DC: Island Press, 2004.
Kawachi I, Berkman LF. Neighborhoods and health. Oxford: Oxford
Welcome
University Press, 2003.
Course
Morris M, Duncan R, Hannaford K, et al. Integrating planning and
public health. Chicago: APA Planning Advisory Service, 2006.
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
Final Learning and
Reflection
Articles
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Barriers to walking and
bicycling to school: United States, 2004. MMWR. 2005;54(38):949-52.
Dannenberg AL, Bhatia R, Cole BL, Heaton SK, Feldman JD, Rutt CD.
Use of Health Impact Assessment in the United States: 27 Case
Studies, 1999–2007. Am J Prev Med 2008;34(3):241-56.
Evans L. A new traffic safety vision for the United States. Am J Public
Health 2003;93(9): 1384-5.
Friedman MS, Powell KE, Hutwagner L, Graham LM, Teague WG.
Impact of changes in transportation and commuting behaviors during
the 1996 summer Olympic Games in Atlanta on air quality and
childhood asthma. JAMA2001;285(7):897-905.
Giles-Corti B, Donovan RJ. Relative influences of individual, social
environmental and physical environmental correlates of walking. Am J
Public Health 2003;93(9):1583-9.
Course Offerings +
Joint Degree
Programs
Lucy WH. Mortality risk associated with leaving home: recognizing the
Readings
Pucher J, Dijkstra L. Promoting safe walking and cycling to improve
public health: lessons from the Netherlands and Germany. Am J Public
Health. 2003;93(9):1509-16.
Course
Assignments
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/O…0%7C%20Unit%202%20Natural%20and%20Built%20Environments.webarchive
relevance of the built environment. Am J Public Health 2003;
93(9):1564-1569.
Page
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Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 3 Vulnerable Populations and Health Disparities
11/10/09
AM
Built9:59
Environment
and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 3 Vulnerable Populations and Health Disparities
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
Unit Topics
Vulnerable Populations (the poor, children, women, the elderly,
the disabled, and minorities) and Health Disparities
Mental Health
11/10/09 9:59 AM
Course
Assignments
Additional
Resources
Social Capital
Curriculum News
+ Comments
Environmental Justice
Contact
Suggested Readings
Books (select chapters)
Unit 3: Vulnerable Populations and
Health Disparities
Learning Goals | Unit Topics | Suggested Readings | In- and Outof-class Assignments
The third unit, Vulnerable Populations and Health Disparities,
emphasizes a diversity of populations, their environments, and
associated health issues. This unit allows students to understand the
historical, socioeconomic and cultural dimensions of these groups, to
speak persuasively about their human dimension, and to care about
particular issues related to the natural and built environment from
which to craft health prevention and intervention approaches. Three
weeks are devoted to teaching this unit.
Learning Goals
Human Dimensions. Learn about oneself and the context in which
others operate to better integrate that understanding when evaluating
differing built environments, socioeconomic positions, social and
cultural backgrounds, and health status.
Caring. Adopt new feelings, interests or values based on issues
addressed throughout the semester.
Frumkin H, Frank L, Jackson R. Urban sprawl and public health:
designing, planning, and building for healthy communities. Washington
DC: Island Press, 2004.
Welcome
Kawachi I, Berkman LF. Neighborhoods and health. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2003.
Course
Morris M, Duncan R, Hannaford K, et al. Integrating planning and
Introduction &
Design
public health. Chicago: APA Planning Advisory Service, 2006.
and Public Health
Foundations
Articles
Committee on Environmental Health, American Academy of Pediatrics.
The Built Environment: Designing Communities to Promote Physical
Activity in Children. Pediatrics 2009; 123:1591-1598.
Unit 2: Natural
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Blood lead levels in young
and Built
Environments
children—United States and selected states, 1996–1999. Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report 2000;49(50):1133-7.
Unit 3:
Evans G. The built environment and mental health. J Urban Health
2003;80(4): 536-55.
Unit 1: Planning
Vulnerable
Populations and
Health
Disparities
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
Final Learning and
Reflection
Course Offerings
+ Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Org…20Vulnerable%20Populations%20and%20Health%20Disparities.webarchive
International City/County Management Association. Active living for
older adults: Management strategies for healthy and livable
communities (2003) (E-43140).
Leyden KM. Social capital and the built environment: the importance of
walkable neighborhoods. Am J Public Health 2003;93(9):1546 –51.
McMillan TE. Urban form and a child’s trip to school: the current
literature and a model for future research. J Planning Literature 2005;
19(4):440 –56.
Martin M, Leonard M, Allen S, Botchwey N, Carney M. Commentary:
Using Culturally Competent Strategies to Improve Traffic Safety in the
Black Community. Annals of Emergency Medicine 2004;44(4): 414418.
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Built Environment
11/10/09
9:58 AM and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 4 Health Policy and Global Impacts
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Unit 4 Health Policy and Global Impacts
Suggested Readings
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
Books (select chapters)
Frumkin H, Frank L, Jackson R. Urban sprawl and public health:
11/10/09 9:58
+ Comments
Contact
designing, planning, and building for healthy communities. Washington
DC: Island Press, 2004.
Kawachi I, Berkman LF. Neighborhoods and health. Oxford: Oxford
University Press, 2003.
Morris M, Duncan R, Hannaford K, et al. Integrating planning and
public health. Chicago: APA Planning Advisory Service, 2006.
Articles
Geller A. Smart growth: a prescription for livable cities. Am J Public
Health 2003;93(9):1410-5.
Librett JJ, Yore MM, Schmid TL. Local ordinances that promote physical
activity: a survey of municipal policies. Am J Public Health
2003;93(9):1399-403.
Unit 4: Health Policy and Global
Impacts
McMichael AJ. The urban environment and health in a world of
increasing globalization: issues for developing countries. Bulletin of the
World Health Organization 2000;78(9):1117-26.
Welcome
Learning Goal | Unit Topics | Suggested Readings | In- and Out-ofclass Assignments
Course
Introduction &
Design
The final unit, Health, Policy and Global Impacts, emphasizes health
policies, and the impacts of policies and practices on the health of the
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
planet. Students gain greater awareness of the ethical considerations
in decision-making, and an understanding of how these decisions
influence systems socially and physically. Three weeks are devoted to
teaching this unit.
Learning Goal
Learning How to Learn. Develop skills to identify studies and engage
communities, critique methods and findings, and apply lessons from
planning and public health research to current and future problems.
Unit Topics
Health Policy
Sustainable Planning and Global Warming
Healthy Housing
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Saegert SC, Klitzman S, Freudenberg N, Cooperman-Mroczek J, Nassar
S. Healthy housing: a structured review of published evaluations of
U.S. interventions to improve health by modifying housing in the
United States, 1990-2001. Am J Public Health 2003;93(9):1471-7.
Younger M, Morrow-Almeida HR, Vindigni SM, Dannenberg AL. The
built environment, climate change, and health: opportunities for cobenefits. Amer J Prev Med, in press, October 2008.
In- and Out-of-class Assignments
Policy memos
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Photovoice report
Unit 4: Health
Policy and
Global Impacts
Final Learning and
Reflection
Back to top
Header image by Dav Banks.
Course Offerings
+ Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
Course
Assignments
Additional
Resources
Suggested Readings
Curriculum News
+ Comments
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Or…%20Unit%204%20Health%20Policy%20and%20Global%20Impacts.webarchive
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Or…%20Unit%204%20Health%20Policy%20and%20Global%20Impacts.webarchive
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Page 2
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Final Learning and Reflection
11/10/09 10:01 AM
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
Final Learning and Reflection
Learning Goal | Out-of-class Assignments
To complete the course, students submit a cumulative learning
portfolio that highlights the final learning goal, integration of
information with the student’s academic and personal experiences.
This assignment reflects the evolution of the student’s thinking about
the subject and the student’s view on the future of planning and public
health disciplines. One week is devoted to completion of this task,
which is framed to take the place of the final exam.
Welcome
Course
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Learning Goal
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Integration. Integrate current evidence regarding the impacts of the
built environment on health with information and perspectives from
other courses and/or personal experiences.
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
Final Learning
and Reflection
Out-of-class Assignments
Healthy communities portfolio
Course Offerings
+ Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
Course
Assignments
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Or…0Curriculum%20%7C%20Final%20Learning%20and%20Reflection.webarchive
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Built 10:18
Environment
11/10/09
AM and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Contact
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Contact
ACSP Planning Programs.
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
11/10/09 10:18
Course
Assignments
Tier 1: University Faculty with Built
Environment and Health Teaching
and Research (more schools listed
every day!)
Additional
Resources
Curriculum News
+ Comments
Contact
Arizona State University
Ball State University
California State University at Northridge
Clemson University
Eastern Washington University
Georgia Institute of Technology
Hunter college of the City University of New York
Course Offerings and Joint Degree
Programs
Welcome
Tier 1. University Faculty with Built Environment and Health
Interests | Tier 2. Coursework and Crosslistings | Tier 3. Certificate
Programs | Tier 4. Joint Degrees
Course
Introduction &
Design
The degree to which ACSP Planning Programs engage the intersection
of Planning and Public Health varies widely. These planning programs
are divided into four tiers, following their order described above. Tier 1
includes Colleges and Universities whose faculty have a teaching and
or research interest in built environment and health. Tier 2 includes
planning programs that offer a course connecting planning and public
health disciplinary topics and in most cases cross-listed between both
school units. Tier 3 includes planning programs that offer such a course
and opportunities for students to concentrate at this intersection and
or earn a certificate upon completition of an approved curriculum. And,
Tier 4 includes planning programs that offer items from Tiers 1, 2 and
3 in addition to an opportunity for students to earn a joint degree in
planning and public health.
Below is a list of planning programs in each of these tiers with links to
the respective school or department website, class descriptions and
syllabi, and descriptions of their joint degree offerings if available
electronically.
This list was generated in fall 2009 through a compilation of
information available in the ACSP Guide to Planning Schools (14th
Edition), the Planetizen Guide to Planning Schools and the webages of
ACSP Planning Programs.
Kansas State University
New School for Management and Urban Policy
Northern Arizona University
Ohio State University
San Diego State University
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
San Francisco State University
State University of New York at Albany
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
State University of New York at Buffalo
Tufts University
University of British Columbia
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
University of California at Los Angeles
University of Cincinnati
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
University of Florida
Christopher Coutts, Assistant Professor - Specializations:
Community Health and Health Behavior
Rebecca Miles, Professor - Specializations: Community
Final Learning and
Reflection
Health Planning
University of Southern California
Course
Offerings +
Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/O…20Course%20Offerings%20and%20Joint%20Degree%20Programs.webarchive
University of Washington
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/O…20Course%20Offerings%20and%20Joint%20Degree%20Programs.webarchive
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Page 2 o
Built
Environment
and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Contact
11/10/09
10:18
AM
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Contact
University of Wisconsin-Madison
11/10/09 10:18
University of Michigan
Back to top
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
University of Toronto
Tier 2: Joint Classwork
Boston University
Cornell University
Florida State University
Back to top
University of California at Irvine
University of Colorado at Denver
Header image by Dav Banks.
University of Illiinois at Chicago
University of Louisville
University of Minnesota
University of Oregon
University of Southern Maine
University of Texas, Austin
University of Virginia
University of West Florida
Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Back to top
Tier 3: Certificate Programs
Texas A&M University
Back to top
Tier 4: Joint Degrees
Columbia University
Rutgers University
University of Arizona
University of California at Berkeley
University of Iowa
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/O…20Course%20Offerings%20and%20Joint%20Degree%20Programs.webarchive
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/O…20Course%20Offerings%20and%20Joint%20Degree%20Programs.webarchive
Page 3 of 4
Page 4 o
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Tier 2. University of Virginia
11/10/09 10:00 AM
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
University of Virginia
Welcome
Contact | Credits
UVA, Schools of Architecture and Medicine, Healthy Communities
Seminar (3 credits), Professor Nisha Botchwey, PhD MCP
The Healthy Communities Seminar is an elective planning course that
explores the interconnections between the fields of planning and public
health. These fields emerged together with the common goal of
preventing outbreaks of infectious disease. Since that time, the two
disciplines have diverged in their focus; public health following a
clinical model and planning focusing on urban design and physical
form. However, as the intimate connections between the built
environment and disease continue to be revealed, the planning and
public health fields are reconnecting once again. This course begins
with an evaluation of the respective histories of the planning and public
health fields through to the present. Subsequent discussions include
analysis of: (1) the natural environment (air, water, food), (2)
Course
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
and Built
Environments
Populations and
Health Disparities
health and relationships (social capital, parish nursing, neighborhood
context), (4) health disparities (children, elderly, minorities,
Impacts
download full syllabus
UVA, Schools of Architecture and Medicine, Built Environment and
Community Health (1 credit), Professor Nisha Botchwey, PhD MCP
The Built Environment & Community Health Course is an
interdisciplinary Public Health and Planning Health course that explores
health, medicine, urban planning, engineering, education and
economics will lead sessions that address current built environment
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
HIAs, individual rights versus population health).
interdisciplinary Public Health and Planning Health course that explores
the connections between the built environment and community health.
Faculty members from across the University with expertise in public
Unit 2: Natural
manmade environment (sprawl, sidewalks, schools, parks, traffic and
cul-de-sacs) and resultant physical activity and injury, (3) mental
environmental justice), and (5) health, policy and ethics (sustainable
planning and consumption patterns, housing, social policy, EIAs and
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Tier 2. University of Virginia
11/10/09 10:00 AM
Course
Assignments
Additional
Resources
and community health topics in partnership with local community
leaders. Discussion topics will include physical activity promotion,
Curriculum News
+ Comments
mobility, transportation safety, land use, school health, health
disparities, mental health, and chronic disease prevention.
Contact
download full syllabus
Final Learning and
Reflection
Course
Offerings +
Joint Degree
Back to top
Programs
Header image by Dav Banks.
Readings
Course
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Org…rriculum%20%7C%20Tier%202.%20University%20of%20Virginia.webarchive
Page 1 of 2
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Tier 3. Texas A&M University
11/10/09 10:00 AM
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
Texas A&M University
Department of Landscape Architecture & Urban Planning
Health Systems and Design Certificate Program
This interdisciplinary certification program was created by the colleges
of Architecture and Medicine to promote research, innovation, and
communication focusing on health facility planning and design. The
program is available to students pursuing any graduate degree within
the College of Architecture. Though the program emphasizes a crossdisciplinary perspective, it also ensures that students develop in-depth
understanding and ability within the field of health systems design.
Welcome
Course
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
Final Learning and
Reflection
Course
Offerings +
Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/O…urriculum%20%7C%20Tier%203.%20Texas%20A&M%20University.webarchive
Page 1 of 2
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Tier 4. University of California at Berkeley
11/10/09 10:00 AM
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
University of California at Berkeley
Department of City & Regional Planning
Planning and Public Health Dual Degree
The concurrent degree program with the UC Berkeley School of Public
Health program meets the demand for health planners looking to
broaden their skills, expertise, and areas of interest. Each program
normally takes two years to complete, but through the concurrent
degree program, time-to-degrees can be reduced to as little as three
years (as experience and coursework overlap between the two
departments). Such decisions are made on a case-by-case basis. At
the conclusion of their studies, students receive both the M.C.P. and
Master of Public Health degrees.
Welcome
Course
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
Final Learning and
Reflection
Course
Offerings +
Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/Org…Tier%204.%20University%20of%20California%20at%20Berkeley.webarchive
Page 1 of 2
Environment
and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Readings
11/10/09Built
10:01
AM
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Readings
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
Frumkin H, Frank L, Jackson R. Urban Sprawl and Public Health:
Designing, Planning, and Building for Healthy Communities.
Washington, DC: Island Press; 2004.
Kawachi I, Berkman LF. Neighborhoods and health. Oxford(UK):
Oxford University Press; 2003.
Morris M, Duncan R, Hannaford K, Kochtitzky C, Rogers V, Roof K,
Solomon J. Integrating planning and public health. Chicago: APA
Planning Advisory Service; 2006.
11/10/09 10:01 AM
Assignments
Additional
Resources
Curriculum News
+ Comments
Contact
Articles and Proceedings
Barredo J, Demichell L. Urban sustainability in developing countries’
megacities: modeling and predicting future urban growth in Lagos.
Cities 2003;20(5):297-310.
Bernheim, R, Botchwey N, Dillingham R. Intentionality and Integration
in Undergraduate Global Public Health Education. Peer Review 2008;
Readings
Books | Articles and Proceedings
Textbooks commonly used in the courses are Urban Sprawl and Public
Health by H Frumkin, L Frank and R. Jackson, Neighborhoods and
Health by I Kawachi and L Berkman, and Integrating Planning and
Public Health by M Morris, R Duncan, K Hannaford, et.al. In addition,
instructors drew journal readings most frequently from the public
health field (American Journal of Public Health, American Journal of
Preventive Medicine, Journal of Urban Health)and from planning
related publications and organizations (Cities, Transportation Research
Board). Public health journals were drawn on more than planningrelated publications because public health journals have published the
majority of research in this area and supported special issues on this
topic; planning-related journals have begun to do so recently. These
readings spanned a variety of topics from history of the two disciplines,
transportation planning and safety to health care policy. The readings
also included overview and commentary articles, theory papers and
technical research reports.
Books
Fink LD. Creating significant learning experiences: an integrated
approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass;
2003.
10(4): 16-19.
Welcome
Course
Introduction &
Design
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
Boarnet M, Anderson C, Day K, McMillan T, Alfonzo M. Evaluation of
the California Safe Route school legislation: Urban form changes and
children’s active transportation to school. Am J Prev Med 2005;28(2):
134-140.
Botchwey N, Hobson S, Dannenberg A, Mumford K, Contant C,
McMillan T, Jackson R, Lopez R, Winkle C. Built Environment and
Health Model Curriculum. Am J Prev Med 2009; 36(2, Supplement):
S63-S71.
Built Environment Institute II: “Teaching the Built Environment Health Connection” APHA 134th Annual Meeting and Exposition: Public
Health and Human Rights. Environment Section Program; 2006 Nov 7;
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
Boston, MA.
Unit 4: Health
Washington, DC; 2000.
Policy and Global
Impacts
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Barriers to walking and
Final Learning and
Reflection
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Blood lead levels in young
Course Offerings
+ Joint Degree
Programs
Readings
Course
Assignments
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/…20Health%20%7C%20Course%20Curriculum%20%7C%20Readings.webarchive
Burden D. Street design guidelines for healthy neighborhoods.
Conference proceedings 27. Transportation Research Board:
bicycling to school: United States, 2004. MMWR. 2005;54(38):949-52.
children—United States and selected states, 1996–1999. Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report 2000;49(50):1133-7.
Colantonio A, Potter R. City profile: Havana. Cities 2005;23(1):63-78.
Committee on Environmental Health, American Academy of Pediatrics.
The Built Environment: Designing Communities to Promote Physical
Activity in Children. Pediatrics 2009; 123:1591-1598.
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/…20Health%20%7C%20Course%20Curriculum%20%7C%20Readings.webarchive
Page 1 of 5
Page 2 of 5
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Additional Resources
11/10/09 10:02 AM
Built Environment + Public Health : Course Curriculum
Built Environment and Public Health | Course Curriculum | Additional Resources
11/10/09 10:02 AM
Health
Assignments
National Association of County and City Health Officials. Land
Additional
Resources
Use Planning, Local Public Health Agency Topics
PolicyLink
Prevention Institute
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Active Living Research. Tools
& Resources
Curriculum News
+ Comments
Contact
University of Minnesota. Design for Health
University of Virginia. Built Environment and Health Research
Group
Conferences
Additional Resources
Web Resources |Organizations | Conferences | Videos | Other
Teaching Resources by Topic
Web Resources
Walk Score. This website ranks the walkability of neighborhoods
in the largest 40 U.S. cities.
Health and Safety Information on Household Products. Provides
information on cleaning products that have low health-risk
scores as compiled by the National Institutes of Health, ranking
products from 0 (minimal health risk) through 4 (severe for
health risk).
Organizations
American Planning Association. Healthy Communities Through
Collaboration
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for
Environmental Health. Designing and Building Healthy Places,
CDC
Harvard School of Public Health. ICUPPH Web Resources—
Interdisciplinary Consortium on Urban Planning and Public
Health
National Environmental Public Health Conference, October 2628, 2009
Welcome
American Planning Association
Course
Introduction &
Design
American Public Health Association
New Partners for Smart Growth
Unit 1: Planning
and Public Health
Foundations
Videos
Unit 2: Natural
and Built
Environments
California Newsreel. UnNatural Causes: Is inequality making us
sick?
This seven-part documentary series explores racial and
socioeconomic inequalities in health. The episodes
include:
Unit 3: Vulnerable
Populations and
Health Disparities
In Sickness and In Wealth (56 minutes)
When the Bough Breaks (29 minutes)
Unit 4: Health
Policy and Global
Impacts
Becoming American (29 minutes)
Bad Sugar (29 minutes)
Final Learning and
Reflection
Place Matters (29 minutes)
Collateral Damage (29 minutes)
Course Offerings
+ Joint Degree
Programs
Not Just a Paycheck (30 minutes)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Healthy places
leading to healthy people: Community engagement improves
health for all
Readings
Course
Assignments
file:///Users/nhb3b/Documents/files%20from%20old%20computer/Nia/O…C%20Course%20Curriculum%20%7C%20Additional%20Resources.webarchive
"This program will illustrate how the PACE-EH community
engagement tool has helped communities clearly identify
Page 1 of 3
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Built Environment + Public Health : Course Cu
Leave A Comment
Please share your built environment and public health
curriculum news and comments on this website with us through
this Leave a Comment link. Consider posting powerpoints for
different units, readings, assignments, and other resources or
amendments to those items currently posted.
Contact
Back to top
Contact | Credits
For additional information, please contact:
Header image by Dav Banks.
Google: Built Environment and
Health Curriculum
- or –
Nisha Botchwey
319 Campbell Hall
School of Architecture
University of Virginia
P.O. Box 400122
Charlottesville VA 22904-4122
tel: (434) 924-6444
[email protected]
www.people.virginia.edu/~nhb3b
http://faculty.virginia.edu/nbotchwey/BuiltEnvironmentandHealthCurriculum.htm
Credits
Special thanks to Susan Hobson, Andrew Dannenberg, Karen Mumford,
Cheryl Contant, Tracy McMillan, Richard Jackson, Russell Lopez, and
Welcom
Course
Introdu
Design
Unit 1:
and Pu
Founda
Unit 2:
and Bu
Enviro
Unit 3:
Popula
Health
Unit 4:
Policy
Impact
Final L
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