COMPREHENSIVE PROGRAM REVIEW & PLANNING

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COMPREHENSIVE
PROGRAM REVIEW &
PLANNING
Form Approved 9/2/2008:
Governing Council
Revised: 2/21/2010
The Program Review process should serve as a mechanism for the assessment of performance that
recognizes and acknowledges good performance and academic excellence, improves the
quality of instruction and services, updates programs and services, and fosters self-renewal and
self-study. Further, it should provide for the identification of weak performance and assist programs
in achieving needed improvement. Finally, program review should be seen as a component of
campus planning that will not only lead to better utilization of existing resources, but also lead to
increased quality of instruction and service. A major function of program review should be to
monitor and pursue the congruence between the goals and priorities of the college and the
actual practices in the program or service.
~Academic Senate for California Community Colleges
INSTRUCTIONS
For information about cycles for Comprehensive Program Review and Planning, see Instructional
and Student Services program review rotation schedules posted online in their respective
sections of the program review webpage:
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/program_review/program_review.php)
Resources for Supporting Documentation:
A listing of resources and documents which provide data or information for each section is
included at the end of this document, after the final signature page. These resources are posted
online and their URLs are listed at the end of this document.
(You may delete this section, when you submit your final program review.)
Next Steps:
Program Review and Planning reports are due March 25, 2010. This date is aligned with CSM’s
Integrated Planning Calendar.
(See: http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/institutional_documents.php)
Upon its completion, please email this Program Review and Planning report to the Vice President
of Instruction, the Vice President of Student Services, the appropriate division dean, the CSM
Academic Senate President, and the Dean of Planning, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness
(PRIE).
Diana Bennett, Academic Senate President, [email protected]
Susan Estes, Vice President of Instruction, [email protected]
Jennifer Hughes, Vice Prsident of Student Services, [email protected]
John Sewart, Dean (PRIE), [email protected]
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
DEPARTMENT OR PROGRAM: Physical Education/Athletics/Dance
DIVISION: Physical Education/Athletics/Dance
I.
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM
The Physical Education/Athletics/Dance division consists of approximately 80 sections per
semester and serves the needs of the physical well-being and skill development of students
through a diverse, comprehensive curriculum. A reflective sample of the indicators are
shown in the tables below for fall 2009 and spring 2010.
Fall
ADAP
2009
FTE
1.4
FTES
39.0
WSCH
1,171
Actual 361
Load
836
*Pools offline
DANCE
FITN
INDV
PE
TEAM
VARS
1.2
4.6
0.3
40.7
138.1
7.2
1,220
4,144
217
304
951
52
1,017
905
868
so department not identified
1.0
15.7
471
164
471
2.9
50.3
1,508
238
524
3.1
87.4
2,623
220
844
SP
ADAP
AQUA
DANCE
FITN
2010
FTE
1.6
0.1
1.2
4.9
FTES
41.3
2.9
46.0
144.4
WSCH
1,240
86*
1,379
4,333
Actual 397
35
377
1089
Load
800
1,146
1,150
878
*Pools only available for 2 short courses
INDV
PE
TEAM
VARS
0.6
13.7
410
95
683
0.4
5.4
162
58
392
1.4
23.2
696
187
510
3.8
41.6
1,248
237
332
While sometimes mistakenly referred to as “lifelong learning”, the division offers a transfer
curriculum and continues to support the philosophical values integral to a Liberal Arts
Institution by adopting the concept of “a healthy mind in a healthy body” (mens sana in
capore sano) and has recently incorporated a division-wide physical fitness test by which to
engage the healthy body. This test has been implemented to assess the physiological changes
brought about by engaging in a healthy lifestyle and provides both faculty and students with
objective data by which to analyze these adaptations. Each student engages in a pre and post
physical assessment battery of tests which includes body composition, flexibility, blood
pressure, resting heart rate, post-exercise recovery heart rate, height and weight and each
student receives a print out of their results at the end of the semester. The Fitness Test also
serves as a common SLO for each of our courses so that students not only understand what
changes can be made through participating in an active lifestyle, but how these changes are
quantified. Faculty use this data to analyze their courses and make changes where
appropriate. Every course offered through the division is transfer oriented and the
curriculum has been modified to meet the needs of our diverse student body. The division is
now embarking on curricula designed in the form of degree and certificate programs to
provide students with workforce training (Pilates certificate passed COI in spring, 2010 and
Personal Training Certificate passed COI in fall, 2009). The division will continue work on a
Physical Education Degree program, Sports Management certificate, Dance Degree and is now
working on an online course which should be finalized and offered in spring, 2011.
II.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES (SLOs)
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College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
a. Briefly describe the department’s assessment of SLOs. Which courses or programs were
assessed? How were they assessed? What are the findings of the assessments?
The division has ramped up its efforts to complete the assessment cycle. SLO’s
developed for courses have recently been reviewed and the assessment tool(s)
identified. The division is currently engaging in the assessment component and at the
end of the semester, will have data by which to evaluate SLO’s.
b. Briefly evaluate the department’s assessment of SLOs. If applicable, based on past SLO
assessments, 1) what changes will the department consider or implement in future
assessment cycles; and 2) what, if any, resources will the department or program
require to implement these changes? (Please itemize these resources in section VII of
this document.)See above
c. Below please update the program’s SLO Alignment Grid below. The column headings
identify the General Education (GE) SLOs. In the row headings (down the left-most
column), input the course numbers (e.g. ENGL 100); add or remove rows as necessary.
Then mark the corresponding boxes for each GE-SLO with which each course aligns.
If this Program Review and Planning report refers to a vocational program or a
certificate program that aligns with alternative institutional-level SLOs, please replace
the GE-SLOs with the appropriate corresponding SLOs.
GE-SLOs→
Program
Courses ↓
Aqua 109
AQUA 127
Aqua 133
Danc 117
Danc 121
Danc
131/2
Danc
141/3
Danc
151/3
Danc 161
Danc 167
Danc 195
Danc 400
Fitn 116
Fitn 195
Fitn 220
Fitn 225
Fitn 235
Fitn 237
Fitn 301
Fitn 312
Fitn 334
Fitn 335
Indv 120
Indv 160
Effective
Communication
Quantitative
Skills

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Critical
Thinking
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Social
Awareness
and Diversity
Ethical
Responsibility
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Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Indv
251/2/4
Team 105
Team 110
Team 118
Team 135
Team 148
Team 150
Team 158
Team
171/3/5
PE 101
PE 102
PE 103
PE 104
PE 120
PE 135
PE 301
Vars 100
Vars 105
Vars 120
Vars 130
Vars 133
Vars 134
Vars 160
Vars 310
Vars 320
Vars 400
Vars 300
III.
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DATA EVALUATION
a. Referring to the Enrollment and WSCH data, evaluate the current data and projections.
If applicable, what programmatic, course offering or scheduling changes do trends in
these areas suggest? Will any major changes being implemented in the program (e.g.
changes in prerequisites, hours by arrangement, lab components) require significant
adjustments to the Enrollment and WSCH projections? As part of the direction taken by
the Academic Senate regarding cost reductions, the division rather than isolate
specific courses or programs settled on a reduction of 2.53 total FTEF. This essentially
translates in to a reduction in sections offered by our adjunct faculty. While the data
shows enrollment, wsch, FTES and load continually increasing over the next three years,
the total FTEF has decreased by .53. In total, we will have decreased almost 3.0 FTEF. It
is therefore our conclusion that unless FTEF increases, these numbers should go against
the projections, and we should experience a decline in enrollment, load and wsch. It is
unrealistic to project increases in wsch and load unless an increase in FTEF were also
projected.
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Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Indicator
Enroll
WSCH
Load
FTEF
2006-07
4838
20367.07
701
19.59
Academic Year
2007-08
2008-09
5462
5192
21828.5
21940.16
752
762
19.6
19.06
2009-10
5518
22951.66
800
Projections
2010-11
5695
23738.2
830
2011-12
5872
24524.75
861
Additionally, a few changes to the curriculum have recently occurred which will impact
these indicators. First, the division submitted to the COI all course outlines in which HBA
were removed. Essentially, any course that is not related to a varsity athletic program no
longer has HBA’s associated with it (approximately 85% of the curriculum). Second, to
comply with Title V, each varsity course can only have 175 hours claimed for
apportionment. The varsity courses had in excess of 248 hours associated with each class
which therefore required a course outline modification to reduce them to the mandated
175 hours. These two factors alone will have a substantial impact on the division’s wsch and
will exacerbate the reduction in FTEF with regard to the projections.
b. Referring to the Classroom Teaching FTEF data, evaluate the current data and
projections. If applicable, how does the full-time and part-time FTE affect program
action steps and outcomes? What programmatic changes do trends in this area
suggest? Over the past few years, the division has lost full-time faculty which have not
been replaced. In 2007, our full-time dance instructor took another position at a
university and she has yet to be replaced. In 2008, our head football coach stepped
down and we now have a program that requires a minimum staffing level of 2 full-time
faculty with only 1. While the majority of our FTEF is taught by Full-time faculty, we still
have a small allocation as compared with the rest of the college. Additionally, there
are a few critical full-time staffing positions that have yet to be filled. The football
program alone generates about 120 full-time students per year (approximately 280
FTES), yet only has one full-time position. In past years, the division has decided to
forego any position requests until this one critical position was filled. This proposal was
brought forth to the Instructional Administrators and the Academic Senate with support,
but was not forwarded beyond that due to the uncertain economic crisis we were
about to face. With only one coach assigned full-time to the program, all of the
important academic components that are critical to the success of our students
become secondary to the on-field assignment of the coach – a problem that needs to
be addressed. Unless this position gets filled immediately, the academic success of our
student-athletes (primarily composed of underrepresented groups) will be jeopardized,
and the entire program could ultimately fail.
The dance position was an important addition to our division and was hired in 2004. This
position provided stability to a flourishing program that did not have direction and one
that provided students with an avenue by which to express themselves, appreciate the
art of dance, and pursue transfer opportunities in dance. Since the faculty member’s
departure, the program has once again been reduced to floundering, and yet it still
thrives in terms of enrollment and student interest. It is extremely discouraging to see a
flourishing program with high student demand get dismantled because the college has
not reinstated the commitment to re-hire the position. The expectation regarding
projections is for the load to continually increase over the next three years’, however,
all other indicators are expected to decline. This again is contradictory and cannot be
a realistic expectation. As all other indicators continue to decline, the load continues to
increase – a sure sign that the program is healthy and replacement of the full-time
position justified (see table below).
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College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Indicator
Enrollments
WSCH
FTES
Load
FTEF
Academic Year
2006-07
2007-08
850
905
2769.26
2791.39
92.3
93
907
1139
3.05
2.45
2008-09
692
2390.6
79.7
1181
2.03
Projections
2009-10
2010-11
658
579
2271.76
2082.43
75.7
69.4
1349
1486
2011-12
500
1893.1
63.1
1623
c. Referring to the Productivity [LOAD] data, discuss and evaluate the program’s
productivity relative to its target number. If applicable, what programmatic changes or
other measures will the department consider or implement in order to reach its
productivity target? If the productivity target needs to be adjusted, please provide a
rationale. While load continues to be the primary driving force for efficiency, the
influences of legislated curricular modifications (reduction in HBA, Title V) will have an
adverse effect on the indicators and could suppress load gains. These modifications
will be enacted upon and the data available to analyze in fall, 2010. Until that data is
available, it is safe to say the projections will not come to fruition and we anticipate
more of a stabilization of load rather than a projected increase. If FTEF were to stabilize
by either minimizing the overall reduction in FTEF or the division could hire a full-time
faculty member, these reductions in projected load and growth could be decreased.
Overall, the division continues to exceed the college load (762-563) which, in part,
enables the college to support less-efficient but critical programs.
IV. STUDENT SUCCESS EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS
a. Considering the overall “Success” and “Retention” data, briefly discuss how effectively
the program addresses students’ needs relative to current, past, and projected
program and college student success rates. If applicable, identify unmet student
needs related to student success and describe programmatic changes or other
measures the department will consider or implement in order to improve student
success. (Note that item IV b, below, specifically addresses equity, diversity, age, and
gender.) Along with load and other important measures of success, the division
continues to maintain a healthy success and retention rate; a true indication that
students value the importance of our discipline. The division has maintained a
consistent 87% retention rate and an 81% success rate while the college retention rate
was 84% and success was 70%. The division continues to update and modify curricular
offerings to meet the demands of our students. Recent additions include courses such
as Spinning, yoga, Pilates, Circuit Weight Training, and a Pilates Certificate Program. As
the division continues to modify our curricular offerings, it is understood that we remain
within our allocated FTEF, however, as we diversify and add certificate programs and
degree programs to align with the Board goals (workforce training), our FTEF allocation
should be increased to not jeopardize the health goals of our students. The success and
retention rates the division continually experiences are measures that the curricular
modifications have been successful and that the needs of our diverse student body are
met. Faculty in the division have remained current with regard to trends in health, and
curricular offerings continue to modify as a result.
b. Briefly discuss how effectively the program addresses students’ needs specifically
relative to equity, diversity, age, and gender. If applicable, identify unmet student
needs and describe programmatic changes or other measures the department will
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College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
consider or implement in order to improve student success with specific regard to
equity, diversity, age, and gender. Curricular offerings have been modified with the
intent to accommodate the variety of needs of our diverse student body. No longer are
the traditional “team, ball and weight training” courses the core of our offerings,
primarily catered to the needs of traditional college-age men. The inclusion of a
diverse curriculum has generated high demand and interest, and the net result is a high
rate of success and retention. A full-time football coach is a need that requires
immediate attention for the sake of the success of a large amount of underrepresented
students. The success of “Writing in the End Zone” is an attribute to the dedication of our
coaching staff and English faculty and unless the position is filled, the program could
be devastated. A full-time dance faculty is still a huge void that students’ desire but has
been unfulfilled by the college. The dance position brings about a multi-cultural
component providing students with an opportunity to explore their roots and
experience their native culture. It has been four years since we lost this position.
Normally, it is the understanding that retirements or vacancies are not automatically
replaced, however, with a high demand program, it goes without saying that this is a
vacancy that the college should prioritize. Additionally, the division is preparing to
“morph” itself to align with Board goals and offer workforce training
certificates/degrees. We currently have implemented a Pilates Certificate Program, A
Personal Training Certification Program, are in the process of developing a Physical
Education Degree, and are also in the process of creating an online course so that
students will be able to complete all of their degree requirements via a distance ed
mode.
V.
REFLECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL FACTORS AND
PROGRAM/STUDENT
a. Using the matrix provided below and reflecting on the program relative to students’
needs, briefly analyze the program’s strengths and weaknesses and identify
opportunities for and possible threats to the program (SWOT). Consider both external
and internal factors. For example, if applicable, consider changes in our community
and beyond (demographic, educational, social, economic, workforce, and, perhaps,
global trends); look at the demand for the program; program review links to other
campus and District programs and services; look at similar programs at other area
colleges; and investigate auxiliary funding.
Strengths
Weaknesses
Opportunities
INTERNAL FACTORS
Consistent professional development
activities engaged in by faculty. In
athletics, a large percentage of our
student-athletes matriculate and
generate hundreds of thousands of
dollars in scholarships.
Lack of full-time faculty in critical
positions; football, dance and
general P.E. Lack of faculty to serve
on committees.
Continued curricular expansion and
modification; as our faculty continues
EXTERNAL FACTORS
A strong emphasis on health and
exercise. Currently, 34% of the adult
population is obese, the rate of
obesity in children tripled to17% and
the trend continues to show an
increase.
Lack of support by the college
community for our discipline especially
with the advent of the new Fitness
Center which has been perceived to
be an extreme increase in Physical
Education offerings.
Success of our programs; data that
objectively shows the physiological
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College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Threats
to deal with threats to our discipline,
it becomes an opportunity to expose
the campus community to the value
of what we do for students through
objective data.
The COI has generated an attack on
Physical Education by considering
moving the graduation requirement
to area E5d without any data to
substantiate the move.
gains made by our students by
engaging in an active lifestyle.
State legislature considering
“defunding” Physical Education or
reducing the funding without
understanding the financial impact it
will have on the already broken health
care system.
b. If applicable, discuss how new positions, other resources, and equipment granted in
previous years have contributed towards reaching program action steps and towards
overall programmatic health. If new positions have been requested but not granted,
discuss how this has impacted overall programmatic health. (You might reflect on data
from Core Program and Student Success Indicators for this section.) For four years now,
the division has requested two critical positions – a full-time football coach and a fulltime dance instructor to replace the faculty member that left. Last year, our head
football coach stepped down after 18 years serving in that capacity and was left to
one faculty member. Our motivation was to be proactive and replace a position that
we anticipated losing. The minimum staffing levels for this position is two full-time
dedicated faculty members. We are now once again in a position of extreme
vulnerability with only one full-time faculty member assigned to the program. While the
program achieved a great degree of success, the amount of work one faculty member
had to do to maintain the integrity of the program affected his personal life. He can no
longer do this by himself and unless a full-time assistant is hired, the program will
degenerate. His total load for last fall was 1.73 FTE. The program serves primarily
underrepresented groups (African American males and Pacific Islanders) and their
degree of academic success through the W.E.Z program has been astonishing. The
data on W.E.Z. is identified below:
Data and findings:
English 828 (lowest level English):
• Success: WEZ students outperformed non-WEZ students 74.3% vs. 37.0% respectively.
o African American WEZ students (60.6% of the class)
Success rate for African American males in WEZ (70.0% vs. 37.5%)
• Ethnic make-up: 97% non-white students in English 828
English 838:
• Success: 66% success rate of WEZ students vs. 55.8% non-WEZ
• Ethnic make-up:
o 50% African American males in WEZ vs. 4.9% non-WEZ
o 22.7% Pacific Islander males in WEZ vs. 5.2% non-WEZ
o African American success rate in WEZ (77.3%) vs. non-WEZ (66.7%)
o Pacific Islander success rate in WEZ (60%) vs. non-WEZ (56.3%)
• Persistence (English 828 to English 838):
o 54.3% persistence rate of WEZ students vs. 10.1% non-WEZ
Additionally, the dance department lost a valued member of the faculty in 2007 which has
yet to be replaced. This position was hired in 2004 based on the high load and student
demand generated by the department. The department continues to generate substantial
loads of 907 (2006/07), 1139 (2007/08) and 1181 (2008/09) even while sections have been
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College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
dropped due to a lack of full-time faculty (23, 21, 17) and while enrollments continue to
dwindle due to the elimination of sections (850, 905, 692). The internal perception is that the
department is being substantially dismantled even though student demand is high. This
department presents an opportunity for our diverse students to understand and engage in
multi-cultural dance forms, something that has been consistently increased in our
curriculum and affords students an opportunity to experience their heritage. While there is
an understanding that replacing faculty that leave the district is not automatic, all of the
important indicators would lead the college to support replacement of this position. A
degree in dance was being worked on while the full-time faculty member was here but
since her departure, that proposal has stalled. The inclusion of a degree in dance will
ultimately allow students the vehicle by which to matriculate to four-year universities.
VI. Goals, Action Steps, and Outcomes
a. Identify the program’s goals. Goals should be broad issues and concerns that
incorporate some sort of measurable action and should connect to CSM’s Institutional
Priorities 2008-2011, Educational Master Plan, 2008, the Division work plan, and GE- or
certificate SLOs. Development of a Physical Education degree, development of a Yoga
Certification Program, development of a Dance degree, development of a Sports
Management certificate (degree). All of these have been in response to the Board
Goals of developing programs for workforce training and identified in the division work
plan. The division is also working on online courses to complement our current
curriculum and will be finalized and presented to the COI for implementation in spring,
2011.
b. Identify the action steps your program will undertake to meet the goals you have
identified. We have currently just passed through the COI the Pilates Certificate
Program which will be offered in fall, 2010. The faculty have engaged in conversation
about a Physical Education degree (a Personal Training Certificate class was passed as
well) and the courses for the core identified. The Dance, yoga and Sports Management
certificate/degrees will require full-time faculty positions to engage in the process.
c. Briefly explain, specifically, how the program’s goals and their actions steps relate to
the Educational Master Plan. All of these endeavors are geared towards workforce
development. Graduates with these certificates and degrees will have substantial
career opportunities.
d. Identify and explain the program’s outcomes, the measurable “mileposts” which will
allow you to determine when the goals are reached. Degrees and certificate programs
completed and offered.
VII. SUMMARY OF RESOURCES NEEDED TO REACH PROGRAM ACTION STEPS
a. In the matrices below, itemize the resources needed to reach program action steps
and describe the expected outcomes for program improvement.* Specifically,
describe the potential outcomes of receiving these resources and the programmatic
impact if the requested resources cannot be granted.
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Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
* Note: Whenever possible, requests should stem from assessment of SLOs and the
resulting program changes or plans. Ideally, SLOs are assessed, the assessments lead to
planning, and the resources requested link directly to those plans.
Full-Time Faculty Positions
Requested
1. Full-time Assistant
Football Coach
2. Full-time Dance
Position
Expected Outcomes if Granted
and Expected Impact if Not
Granted
1. Continued academic
success of
underrepresented
groups participating in
the football program.
Engaging
approximately 120
student-athletes is
extremely difficult with
regard to success on
the field and in the
classroom. The program
is a model of success
from recruitment,
retention, persistence,
success and
matriculation. If this
position is not granted,
all of the important
academic attributes
that compliment the
program will be lost in
lieu of the faculty
member having only
the capability to deal
with the courses directly
related to on-field
success. Matriculation
numbers will
substantially be
reduced.
2. The dance position was
vacated three years
ago and has yet to be
replaced. If it gets
replaced, the program
can look forward to a
degree (many of our
students matriculate to
study dance at the
university level),
continued inclusion of
If applicable, briefly indicate
how the requested resources
will link to achieving
department action steps based
on SLO assessment.
1. Success in the
classroom is a critical
component of our
athletic programs. If the
position is not granted,
the faculty member
assigned to the program
will need to concentrate
his entire efforts on the
success of the
competitive element at
the expense of the
academic success.
Athletic Programs are
real-life labs in a
practical setting and
include such SLO’s as
leadership, teamwork,
appreciation of diverse
ideas and opinions and
cooperation.
2. A full-time faculty
member with the
expertise and
understanding of dance
as an art form can
provide the glue and
consistency to develop
a comprehensive
dance program for our
diverse student body.
The two major SLO’s
linked to all dance
forms include (1)
defending a broad
appreciation of dance
as an art form and (2)
the ability to evaluate
and discuss the
performance as an art
form.
Page 10
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
multi-cultural dance
forms for our diverse
student body
developed, the dance
concerts reinstated at a
greater level (previously
the dance concerts
were formal and held to
three consecutive soldout performances in the
theater), and a greater
community exposure to
our institution. If not
granted, the program
will continue to be
reduced to a fraction of
what it once was,
students will pursue
these career and multicultural awareness
opportunities at nearby
institutions that have
dance programs and
full-time faculty, and the
comprehensive
curriculum that the
college embraces
reduced and minimized
to cater to a smaller
group.
Classified Positions Requested
Expected Outcomes if Granted
and Expected Impact if Not
Granted
None
N/A
If applicable, briefly indicate
how the requested resources
will link to achieving
department action steps based
on SLO assessment.
N/A
b. For instructional resources including equipment and materials, please list the exact
items you want to acquire and the total costs, including tax, shipping, and handling.
Include items used for instruction (such as computers, furniture for labs and centers)
and all materials designed for use by students and instructors as a learning resource
(such as lab equipment, books, CDs, technology-based materials, educational
software, tests, non-printed materials). Add rows to the tables as necessary. If you have
questions as to the specificity required, please consult with your division dean. Please
list by priority.
Resources Requested
Expected Outcomes if Granted
and Expected Impact if Not
Granted
If applicable, briefly indicate
how the requested resources
will link to achieving
Page 11
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Item: Input text here.
Number: Input text here.
Vendor: Input text here.
Unit price: Input text here.
Total Cost: Input text here.
Status*: Input text here.
Input text here.
department action steps based
on SLO assessment.
Input text here.
*Status = New, Upgrade, Replacement, Maintenance or Repair.
VIII. Course Outlines
a. By course number (e.g. CHEM 210), please list all department or program courses
included in the most recent college catalog, the date of the current Course Outline for
each course, and the due date of each course’s next update.
Course Number
APE 100
APE 110
APE 130
APE 140
APE 155
APE 165
Aqua 109
Aqua 127
Aqua 133
Aqua 135
Danc 117
Danc 121
Danc 131/132
Danc 141/143
Danc 151
Danc 152
Danc 153
Danc 161
Danc 167
Danc 195
Danc 400
Fitn 116
Fitn 195
Fitn 201/202
Fitn 206
Fitn 215
Fitn 220
Fitn 225
Fitn 235
Fitn 237
Fitn 301
Fitn 312
Fitn 334
Fitn 335
Last Update Date
12/20/2006
2/10/2010
Six-year Update Due Date
Input text here.
12/20/2012
2/10/2016
Recommended to be banked
2/10/2010
2/10/2010
2/10/2010
8/15/2007
8/15/2009
unknown
2/10/2016
2/10/2016
2/10/2016
8/15/2013
8/15/2015
1/23/2007
2/10/2010
2/10/2010
3/4/2007
2/10/2010
3/26/2007
9/12/2007
8/17/2009
3/23/2007
9/24/2008
10/31/2008
Recommended to be banked
3/21/2007
1/23/2013
2/10/2016
2/10/2016
3/4/2013
2/10/2016
3/26/2013
9/12/2013
8/17/2015
3/23/2013
9/24/2014
10/31/2014
3/15/2007
4/28/2008
3/15/2007
4/28/2008
3/26/2007
9/12/2007
3/15/2013
4/28/2014
3/15/2013
4/28/2014
3/26/2013
9/12/2013
3/21/2013
Page 12
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Fitn 337
Indv 120
Indv 160
Indv 251/252/254
Team 105
Team 110
Team 118
Team 119
Team 135
Team 148
Team 150
Team 158
Team 165
Team 171/173/175
Vars 100
Vars 105
Vars 120
Vars 130
Vars 133
Vars 134
Vars 160
Vars 185
Vars 300
Vars 310
Vars 320
Vars 330
Vars 340
Vars 400
PE 101
PE 102
PE 103
PE 104
PE 106
PE 120
PE 135
PE 301
IX.
11/25/2008
11/25/2014
11/20/2009
11/20/2015
Recommended to be banked
3/20/2007
3/20/2013
6/30/2008
7/20/2009
3/23/2007
Banked for Vars 172
1/20/2010
1/20/2010
1/20/2010
11/20/2009
2/10/2010
11/2/2009
Banked for Vars 172
11/20/2009
Banked
6/30/2008
2/10/2010
6/30/2014
7/20/2015
3/23/2013
3/22/2007
3/22/2007
2/1/2007
9/26/2008
3/22/2013
3/22/2013
2/1/2013
9/26/2014
12/14/2004
8/17/2009
12/14/2010
8/17/2014
1/20/2016
1/20/2016
1/20/2016
11/20/2010
2/10/2016
11/2/2015
11/20/2015
6/30/2014
2/10/2016
Advisory and Consultation Team (ACT)
a. Please list non-program faculty who have participated on the program’s Advisory and
Consultation Team. Their charge is to review the Program Review and Planning report
before its submission and to provide a brief written report with comments,
commendations, and suggestions to the Program Review team. Provided that they
come from outside the program’s department, ACT members may be solicited from
faculty at CSM, our two sister colleges, other community colleges, colleges or
universities, and professionals in relevant fields. The ACT report should be attached to
this document upon submission.
Page 13
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
The Physical Education/Athletics/Dance Division at College of San Mateo does not
officially utilize the services of an established advisory committee. Rather, most of the
faculty which includes the coaching staff, physical education instructors and dance faculty,
relies on a more unofficial means by which to ascertain and share information with their
colleagues. The faculty in the division have relationships with other community college
faculty, high school faculty, experts in the field outside of academia and university faculty.
Many of our faculty engage in professional development opportunities including
conferences and seminars by which to remain current in their field. Many have attended
seminars by which to obtain specific certifications, i.e. Spinning, yoga and Pilates.
Recently, we have had faculty in the division attend BBU (Balanced Body University),
NSCA (National Strength and Conditioning Association), Madd Dogg (Spinning) and
many others. The coaching staff often attends national conventions held to bring together
four-year coaches, high school coaches, professional coaches and community college
coaches. Dance faculty have close connections with their four-year counterparts as well as
some of the instructors teaching in non-academic dance studios.
Attach or paste ACT report here.
b.
Briefly describe the program’s response to and intended incorporation of the ACT
report recommendations.
Page 14
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
X.
PROGRAM REVIEW PARTICIPANTS AND SIGNATURES
Date of Program Review evaluation:
Please list the department’s Program Review and Planning report team:
Primary program contact person: Mikel Schmidt
Phone and email address: x6447 [email protected]
Full-time faculty: Mikel Schmidt, Nicole Borg, Bret Pollack, Michelle Warner
Part-time faculty: Sarah Bolton
Administrators: Andreas Wolf - Dean
Classified staff:
Students:
Primary Program Contact Person’s Signature
Date
Full-time Faculty’s Signature
Date
Part-time Faculty’s Signature
Date
Administrator’s Signature
Date
Classified Staff Person’s Signature
Date
Student’s Signature
Date
Dean’s Signature
Date
Page 15
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Comprehensive Program Review
RESOURCES FOR SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION
Section 1
This section contains a listing of sources for data and key documents referred to in Section 2
along with other resources. Contact information for relevant people is also included.
Academic Senate
http://www.collegeofsanmateo.edu/academicsenate/
Contact: [email protected]
Diana Bennett, President, [email protected], (650) 358-6769
College Catalogs and College Class Schedules are archived online:
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/schedule/archive.asp
Course Outlines are found at:
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/articulation/outlines.asp
Committee on Instruction
http://www.smccd.net/accounts/csmcoi
Contact: Laura Demsetz, Chair, [email protected], (650) 574-6617.
Program Review Resources (includes forms, data, and completed program reviews for both
instructional and student services program review)
Core Program and Student Success Indicators (see links for “Quantitative Data for Instructional
Programs”)
Distance Education Program Review Data
Glossary of Terms for Program Review
Listing of Programs Receiving Program Review Data from PRIE
Rotation Schedule for Instructional Program Review, 2008-2014
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/program_review/program_review.php
Office of Planning, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness (PRIE)
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/
Contact: John Sewart, Dean, [email protected], (650) 574-6196
Contact: Milla McConnell-Tuite, Coordinator, [email protected], (650)574-6699
At PRIE Website:
College Index, 2009-2010, http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/institutional_documents.php
Comprehensive Listing of Indicators and Measures, 2009-2010
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/institutional_documents.php
Division/Department Workplans, Spring 2009 (only)
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/institutional_documents.php
Educational Master Plan, 2008, http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/emp.php
Institutional Priorities, 2008-2011
http://collegeofsanmateo.edu/prie/institutional_documents.php
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) website:
http://www.collegeofsanmateo.edu/sloac/
Contact: Frederick Gaines, Interim SLO Coordinator, [email protected], (650)574-6183
Page 16
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning
Section 2
This section contains the references that serve as data sources for the individual sections of the
Comprehensive Program Review Form. Explanatory notes are included.
DEPARTMENT OR PROGRAM:
To identify programs on the comprehensive program review cycle, see Rotation Schedule for
Instructional Program Review, 2008-2014 at PRIE website at page for Instructional Program
Review.
Also see Listing of Programs Receiving Program Review Data from PRIE.
I.
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM
“Number of Sections” data from Core Program and Student Success Indicators
(published by PRIE for each program)
 CSM Course Catalog
 Department records

II.




STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
SLO records maintained by the department
CSM SLO Coordinator
SLO Website
The definitions for the General Education (GE) SLOs can be found on the CSM SLOAC
website.

DATA EVALUATION
Enrollment, WSCH, FTEF, and productivity data for each program can be found in Core
Program and Student Success Indicators. (Published by PRIE.)
III.
IV.

Productivity is also commonly known as “LOAD.” See Glossary of Terms for Program
Review for definitions of key terms.

Faculty Load: the ratio of the weekly contact hours (WSCH) of enrolled students and a
faculty’s hours of instruction per week. In other words, WSCH divided by FTE. ?

The College’s general target productivity will be recommended by the Budget Planning
Committee.
STUDENT SUCCESS EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS
Educational Master Plan, 2008
College Index, 2009-2010
Institutional Priorities, 2008-2011
Student Success (course completion and retention) data from the “Core Program and
Student Success Indicators”;
 Other reports published by PRIE regarding student success
 Previous Program Review and Planning reports
 other department records




V.

REFLECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL FACTORS AND
PROGRAM/STUDENT SUCCESS
Educational Master Plan, 2008
Page 17
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
College of San Mateo
Comprehensive Program Review and Planning






Institutional Priorities, 2008-2011
College Index, 2009-2010
Student Success (course completion and retention) data from the “Core Program and
Student Success Indicators;
Other reports published by PRIE regarding student success
Previous Program Review and Planning reports
Other department records
a. About SWOT Analysis:
SWOT Analysis is a strategic planning tool used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities, and Threats involved in a project or initiative. It involves specifying the objective of
the venture or project and identifying the internal and external factors that are favorable and
unfavorable to achieving that objective. SWOT analysis considers both internal and external
conditions.
Strengths: attributes of the organization that are helpful to achieving the objective.
Weaknesses: attributes of the organization or that are harmful to achieving the objective.
Opportunities: external conditions that are helpful to achieving the objective.
Threats: external conditions that are harmful to achieving the objective
b. Reflect on data from “Core Program and Student Success Indicators”
VI.









Action Steps and Outcomes
Educational Master Plan, 2008
Institutional Priorities, 2008-2011
GE- or Certificate SLOs
College Index, 2009-2010
Course SLOs
Department records
Core Program and Student Success Indicators
Previous Program Review and Planning reports
Division work plan








SUMMARY OF RESOURCES NEEDED TO REACH PROGRAM ACTION STEPS
Educational Master Plan, 2008
Institutional Priorities, 2008-2011
College Index, 2009-2010
GE- or Certificate SLOs
Course SLOs
Department records
Core Program and Student Success Indicators
previous Program Review and Planning reports
VII.
VIII. Course Outlines
 Department records
 College Catalog
 Committee On Instruction
 Course Outlines (online)
 Office of the Vice President of Instruction
 Division Dean
Page 18
Form Revised: 2/21/2010
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