Community and Student Engagement Accountability System

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New Perspectives on School District Accountability
Community and Student
Engagement Accountability
System
2014 – 2015 District Level Diagnostic Indicators
Plano ISD Assessment and Accountability
CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem(CSEAS)
GuideforDistrictLeaders
Background–HB5andCSEAS
House Bill 5, adopted in the 83rd Legislative Session (2013), added a new type of accountability rating
and reporting, Community and Student Engagement Accountability (CSEAS). The intent of the legislation
was to give each district and campus an opportunity to identify areas of performance that are not
measured in traditional ways. The program and performance factors evaluated are important because:
• they are valued in the community
• identify strengths within each campus and district
• provide information for growth and improvement
The law empowers each district with the flexibility to define the methods and criteria for evaluating
each of the following performance areas or factors.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fine arts
Wellness and physical education
Community and parental involvement
21st Century Workforce Development
Second language acquisition
Digital learning environment
Dropout prevention strategies
Gifted and talented programs
Compliance with statutory compliance and policy requirements
MeasuringPerformance–FactorsandIndicators
Plano ISD established committees for each factor to lead the development of measurement methods.
Each committee included central staff personnel whose positions or experience were related to the
performance area, and selected principals who represented each campus level. The committees did an
exploration of research literature and measurement methods to identify several key concepts that were
most important to the discussion and understanding of the engagement of the community or the
engagement of students in each performance factor.
These key concepts were refined to become the indicators used in a structured self-diagnostic format
that was common across all areas. For each indicator, the self-diagnostic rubric described a continuum
of professional practice across a five-point scale; the lower end (1) suggesting a developing level of
practice, the middle (3) representing the district's expected level of practice, and the high end (5)
indicating practice that exceeds district expectations.
The committee for each of the nine performance factors developed several indicators to describe levels
of practice. Some indicators were defined as directly related to engagement, for example, numbers or
percentages of participants or activities. Other indicators were developed as indirectly associated with
engagement but fundamentally essential to attract, retain, or serve students or the community.
Examples of the indirect indicators were quality or variety of programs and services. A draft version of
the rubrics was reviewed by all campus leaders and their comments were considered in creating the
final version.
SelfDiagnosticMethod–AnalysisandImprovement
The intention of using a self-diagnostic approach was to encourage focused conversations between
staff, campus and district leadership, and community members that will lead to continuous
improvement. In evaluating the levels of practice in each area, school principals identified small teams
to assess each area. The teams were comprised of staff whose duties are directly related to the factor,
classroom teacher(s), and where possible a community member. Each member of the team completed
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CSEAS Guide for District Leaders
the self-diagnostic independently, and then the team met to discuss the evidence offered to support the
level of practice for each indicator. After the team reached a consensus about the level of practice for
each indicator, the team discussed the results with the principal (or designee). The objective was to
improve professional practice through evidence supported discussion and action, not to achieve a score.
The evidence and discussion were intended to become the foundations for communicating with the
community.
Teams were asked to consider the type, quality, and weight of evidence that supported the
determination of levels of practice. The type of evidence or data could be qualitative or quantitative
information. Ideally there were several sources of evidence that were used to "triangulate" toward a
decision. Documenting and retaining the evidence was a campus choice, but if maintained, would
provide reference information for improving practices in the future.
District Performance Area Committees
District level committees will evaluate how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs
that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in all the program areas. Each committee will include
central staff personnel whose positions or experience are related to the performance area, and selected
principals that represent each campus level.
Each committee should review the campus evaluation documents in the performance area to identify
general strengths and weaknesses across campuses. The committees may also identify specific
campuses that demonstrate more or less developed levels of practice. The committee should use these
observations combined with additional data and program information as the foundation for the
evaluations of district practices in Leadership and Capacity Building, Monitoring Performance and
Progress, and Intervention and Adjustment.
Leadership and Capacity Building
Leadership development and support requires that campus leaders have the capacity and skills to
continuously improve professional practice. Capacity building is a concept that encompasses human
resource development processes, organizational development, and institutional or legal frameworks. At
an operational level district leaders build capacity by addressing campus needs related to budget, time,
training, processes, and supporting resources needed to enable the effective work of campus personnel.
District leaders should also build the skills of campus leaders and staff, that is, develop the
demonstrated ability to exercise the professional practices to meet the objectives of the performance
area.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
Monitoring performance and progress in each factor is dependent on the available data and the point of
view represented by that data. District committees should attempt to identify comprehensive sources
and types of data that describe the aggregate performance of the district while avoiding simple
averaged numeric scores across campuses.
Intervention and Adjustment
District level practices in this area should focus on the type, quality, and weight of the evidence available
to make decisions about programs. In the initial implementation of CSEAS, there may be much variation
in the availability and type of evidence, therefore, the expected practice indicates a process based on
"limited evidence." Ideally, the expected level would be based on a "preponderance of evidence
standard;" a standard that may be applied in coming years.
Reporting CSEAS Evaluations
The district must report the campus and district level evaluation results to TEA by June 26, 2014.
Campus level evaluations must be completed by end of the current school year. District level
committees will be established by May 1, 2014, and should complete the district level evaluations by
June 16, 2014.
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CSEAS Guide for District Leaders
Determining District Level Ratings
The nine factor areas have different numbers of indicators, which are linked to the categories identified on the campus level self-assessments rubrics. The
number of indicators for district level accountability is shown in the following table.
CSEAS Factors
Indicators
Fine Arts
13
Wellness and P.E.
6
Community and Parental Involvement
15
21st Century Workforce Development Program
18
Second Language Acquisition Program
9
Digital Learning Environment
18
Dropout Prevention Strategies
9
Educational Programs for Gifted and Talented Students
9
Record of District and Campus Compliance with Statutory Reporting and Policy Requirements
12
Each district committee should determine the factor area rating based on the following table.
Performance
Rating
Rating System
(6 indicators)
Rating System
(9 indicators)
Rating System
(12 indicators)
Rating System
(13 indicators)
Rating System
(15 indicators)
Rating System
(18 indicators)
Exemplary
~90%
6/6 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
8/9 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
11/12 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
12/13 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
14/15 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
16/18 All Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
Recognized
~80%
5/6 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
7/9 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
10/12 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
10/13 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
12/15 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
14/18 Indicators
3 or Higher
+
At Least 1 Indicator
Above 3
4/6 Indicators
3 or Higher
6/9 Indicators
3 or Higher
8/12 Indicators
3 or Higher
9/13 Indicators
3 or higher
11/15 Indicators
3 or higher
13/18 Indicators
3 or higher
3/6 or More
Indicators Below 3
4/9 or More
Indicators Below 3
5/12 or More
Indicators Below 3
5/13 or More
Indicators Below 3
5/15 or More
Indicators Below 3
6/18 or More
Indicators Below 3
Acceptable
~70%
Unacceptable
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CSEAS Guide for District Leaders
The overall district rating is determined by combining the nine factor ratings. The factor "District and Campus Compliance with Statutory Reporting and Policy
Requirements" is rated as Met/Not Met, all other eight factors are rated Exemplary, Recognized, Acceptable, and Unacceptable. The following table is used to
determine the overall district rating.
Campus
Performance Rating
Factor Ratings
Exemplary
All Factors are Acceptable/Met or Higher
+ 3/8 Factors Exemplary
Recognized
All Factors are Acceptable/Met or Higher
+ 3/8 Factors Recognized or Higher
Acceptable
8/9 Factors are Acceptable/Met or Higher
Unacceptable
Two or More Factors Not Acceptable/Not Met
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CSEAS Guide for District Leaders
Measurement
Implementation of Fine Arts programming across all school levels and at all campuses.
Mode of Measurement
District Team uses this instrument to measure the level of participation of students and parents in Fine Arts programming in the district. The five-point Likert
scale allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in this performance
area. Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
Item Category
Exhibits, Performances and Contests
Enrollment
Parent and Community Involvement
Curricular and Instructional Support
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System – Plano ISD
Fine Arts – District Level
Exhibits, Performances and Contests
Plano ISD students have a variety of opportunities to perform or exhibit work through group and individual activities in Art, Band, Choir, Dance, Music Theory,
Orchestra, Speech, Theatre, and JROTC.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to
encourage, develop, and
deliver a variety of fine arts
performance/exhibit
opportunities for all campuses.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
encourage, develop, and
deliver a variety of fine arts
performance and exhibit
opportunities for all campuses.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to encourage,
develop, and deliver a variety
of fine arts performance and
exhibit opportunities that best
meet the needs of all
campuses.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
performance and exhibit
participation to determine
effective outcomes and
efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel performance and exhibit
participation to determine
effective outcomes and
efficient use of resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide performance and exhibit
participation to determine
effective outcomes and
efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
the availability, quality, and
support of fine arts
performance/exhibit
opportunities.
2
3
District leaders establish a
process based on limited
evidence to evaluate the
availability, quality, and
support of fine arts
performance/exhibit
opportunities.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess programs
and practices.
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4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate the
availability, quality, and
support of fine arts
performance/exhibit
opportunities based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using district wide
data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess programs
and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
FineArts–DistrictLevel
Enrollment
Participation in fine arts programs is a direct indicator of student engagement in the programs and activities available to students in Plano ISD.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to
encourage and support
student enrollment in fine arts
opportunities at all campuses.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
encourage and support
student enrollment in fine arts
opportunities at all campuses.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to encourage and
support student enrollment in
fine arts opportunities at all
campuses that best meet the
needs of all students.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
enrollment data to determine
effective outcomes and
efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel enrollment data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide enrollment data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to assist
campuses in providing an
appropriate variety of fine arts
offerings to meet the needs of
students.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process based on limited
evidence to assist campuses in
providing an appropriate
variety of fine arts offerings to
meet the needs of most
students.
District leaders establish a
process based on clear
evidence to assist campuses in
providing an appropriate
variety of fine arts offerings to
meet the needs of all
students.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
FineArts–DistrictLevel
ParentandCommunityInvolvement
Parent and community involvement in fine arts is demonstrated through attendance at exhibits and performances, through volunteer support, and through
funding support.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to
collaborate with and engage
the community in supporting a
variety of fine arts
opportunities for all campuses.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
collaborate with and engage
the community in supporting a
variety of fine arts
opportunities for all campuses.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to collaborate with
and engage the community in
supporting a variety of fine
arts opportunities that best
meet the needs of all
campuses.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
community engagement in
support of fine arts to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel community engagement
in support of fine arts to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide community engagement
in support of fine arts to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to
collaborate with and engage
the community in support for
fine arts programs.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process based on limited
evidence to collaborate with
and engage the community in
support for fine arts programs.
District leaders establish a
process based on clear
evidence to collaborate with
and engage the community in
support for fine arts programs.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
FineArts–DistrictLevel
CurricularandInstructionalSupport
Development of curriculum and professional development, and support for staffing selection to ensure the delivery of engaging fine arts course content across
the district.
Leadership and Capacity Building – Curriculum and Instruction
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to ensure
that the district’s written fine
arts curriculum is taught
across the district.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
ensure that the district’s
written fine arts curriculum is
taught across the district.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to ensure that the
district’s written fine arts
curriculum is taught across the
district.
Leadership and Capacity Building – Teacher Selection
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to engage
in a collaborative and rigorous
teacher-selection process for
fine arts positions.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
engage in a collaborative and
rigorous teacher-selection
process for fine arts positions.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to engage in a
collaborative and rigorous
teacher-selection process for
fine arts positions.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
District leaders do not review
relevant data to determine
effective curriculum
implementation and efficient
use of resources.
2
3
District leaders review
relevant school-level data to
determine effective curriculum
implementation and efficient
use of resources.
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4
5
District leaders review
relevant district-wide data to
determine effective curriculum
implementation and efficient
use of resources.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
FineArts–DistrictLevel
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to
collaborate with campus
leadership regarding effective
curriculum delivery and
staffing.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process based on limited
evidence to collaborate with
campus leadership regarding
effective curriculum delivery
and staffing.
District leaders establish a
process based on clear
evidence to collaborate with
campus leadership regarding
effective curriculum delivery
and staffing.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
WellnessandPhysicalEducation–DistrictLevel
Measurement
Implementation of Wellness and Physical Education across all school levels and at all campuses.
ModeofMeasurement
District team uses this self-diagnostic instrument to measure implementation of policies, programs, and strategies for wellness and physical education. The fivepoint Likert scale allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in this
performance area. Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
ItemCategory
Wellness
PhysicalEducation
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
WellnessandPhysicalEducation–DistrictLevel
Wellness
The wellness program, in conjunction with physical education program, encompasses the components of the Coordinated School Health Model. This systemic
approach addresses the complete physical, mental, and social well-being of students. The wellness program includes curriculum content, instructional practices
and activities, and health services provided to students and staff.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
ensure the implementation of
a comprehensive wellness
program.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to ensure the
implementation of a
comprehensive wellness
program.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to ensure
the implementation of a
comprehensive wellness
program.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review
district-wide program
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
WellnessandPhysicalEducation–DistrictLevel
PhysicalEducation
Physical education is a school-based instructional opportunity for students to gain the necessary skills and knowledge for lifelong participation in physical
activity.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
ensure the implementation of
a physical education program
that provides cognitive
content and learning
experiences in a variety of
activity areas.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to ensure the
implementation of a physical
education program that
provides cognitive content and
learning experiences in a
variety of activity areas.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to ensure
the implementation of a
physical education program
that provides cognitive
content and learning
experiences in a variety of
activity areas.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review
district-wide program
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
CommunityandParentalInvolvement–DistrictLevel
Measurement
Implementation of Parent Engagement and Community Partnerships across all school levels and at all campuses.
ModeofMeasurement
District team uses this self-diagnostic instrument to measure implementation of policies, programs, and strategies for parent and community involvement. The
five-point Likert scale allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in
this performance area. Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
ItemCategory
PTAMembershipandOrganization
WelcomingAllFamilies
CommunicatingEffectively
SupportingStudentSuccess
CommunityandBusinessPartnerships
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
CommunityandParentalInvolvement–DistrictLevel
PTAMembershipandOrganization
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
support the goals and
effectiveness of PTA chapters.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to support the goals and
effectiveness of PTA chapters.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to support
the goals and effectiveness of
PTA chapters.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
CommunityandParentalInvolvement–DistrictLevel
WelcomingAllFamilies
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
develop the active
participation of all families in
the life of the school.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to develop the active
participation of all families in
the life of the school.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to develop
the active participation of all
families in the life of the
school.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
CommunityandParentalInvolvement–DistrictLevel
CommunicatingEffectively
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
engage the community in
meaningful and timely
communication about student
learning.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to engage the
community in meaningful and
timely communication about
student learning.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to engage
the community in meaningful
and timely communication
about student learning.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
CommunityandParentalInvolvement–DistrictLevel
SupportingStudentSuccess
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
collaborate with families in
supporting student learning
and success.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to collaborate with
families in supporting student
learning and success.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
collaborate with families in
supporting student learning
and success.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
CommunityandParentalInvolvement–DistrictLevel
CommunityandBusinessPartnerships
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
develop community and
business partnerships.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to develop community
and business partnerships.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to develop
community and business
partnerships.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
21stCenturyWorkforceDevelopment–DistrictLevel
Measurement
Implementation of 21st Century Workforce Development program across all school levels and at all campuses.
Mode of Measurement
District team uses this self-diagnostic instrument to measure implementation of policies, programs, and strategies for 21st Century Workforce Development. The
five-point Likert scale allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in
this performance area. Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
ItemCategory
GuidanceandAdvisement
CareerExplorationsandServiceOrganizations
WorkforceCurriculumandCourseOpportunities
Work-BasedLearningExperiences
WorkforceSkillDevelopment
Marketing,PublicRelationsandCommunityOutreach
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
21stCenturyWorkforceDevelopment–DistrictLevel
GuidanceandAdvisement
Guidance and advisement programs provide information and support to students and parents regarding the variety of curriculum activities, career courses,
workforce opportunities, and career options.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
ensure all students are
provided opportunities to
explore activities, career
course, and workforce options.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to ensure all students are
provided opportunities to
explore activities, career
course, and workforce options.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to ensure
all students are provided
opportunities to explore
activities, career course, and
workforce options.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
21stCenturyWorkforceDevelopment–DistrictLevel
CareerExplorationsandServiceOrganizations
Career exploration and investigation is essential toward successful college and career planning and workforce development. Explorations and investigations are
integrated in curriculum beginning in elementary and are further developed through participation in service organizations in high school and senior high school.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
develop and implement career
awareness programs and
service organizations.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to develop and
implement career awareness
programs and service
organizations.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to develop
and implement career
awareness programs and
service organizations.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
21stCenturyWorkforceDevelopment–DistrictLevel
WorkforceCurriculumandCourseOpportunities
District support of 21st Century Workforce Development begins with curriculum content in elementary schools and progresses through each campus level
toward a variety of Career & Technical Education (CTE) and Technology Application course opportunities.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
support curriculum activities
and to promote appropriate
CTE course opportunities.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to support curriculum
activities and to promote
appropriate CTE course
opportunities.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to support
curriculum activities and to
promote appropriate CTE
course opportunities.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
21stCenturyWorkforceDevelopment–DistrictLevel
Work-BasedLearningExperiences
Work-Based Learning (WBL) is a formal, structured program linked to the CTE (Career & Technical Education) program of study; applicable to high school and
senior high school.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
support opportunities for field
trips, development of workbased learning experiences,
and communications with local
businesses.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to support opportunities
for field trips, development of
work-based learning
experiences, and
communications with local
businesses.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to support
opportunities for field trips,
development of work-based
learning experiences, and
communications with local
businesses.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
21stCenturyWorkforceDevelopment–DistrictLevel
WorkforceSkillDevelopment
Skills that are essential to life-long success in the workforce are incorporated in curriculum, activities, and programs at all campus levels. These skills are referred
to by several terms; soft skills, character traits, non-cognitive skills. These traits and skills include integrity, dependability, interpersonal skills, communication,
collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and strategies for
the development of work force
skills.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to implement and
support programs and
strategies for the development
of work force skills.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and strategies for
the development of work force
skills.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
21stCenturyWorkforceDevelopment–DistrictLevel
Marketing,PublicRelationsandCommunityOutreach
Effective communication and promotion of workforce curriculum, courses, and programs is vitally important to ensure all students and families can fully
participate in opportunities that best meet their needs.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
promote student involvement
and community understanding
in workforce curricular
activities, courses and
programs.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to promote student
involvement and community
understanding in workforce
curricular activities, courses
and programs.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
promote student involvement
and community understanding
in workforce curricular
activities, courses and
programs.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
SecondLanguageAcquisition–DistrictLevel
Measurement
Implementation of Second Language Acquisition programs and strategies across all school levels and at all campuses.
Mode of Measurement
District team uses this self-diagnostic instrument to measure implementation of policies, programs, and strategies for Second Language Acquisition. The fivepoint Likert scale allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in this
performance area. Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
Item Category
Academic Participation
School Community Participation
At Risk Participation
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System – Plano ISD
Second Language Acquisition – District Level
Academic Participation
Student engagement in Second Language Acquisition is reflected in course enrollment in Languages Other Than English (LOTE), as well as ELL student enrollment
in on-level foundation or advanced courses.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and practices that
encourage ELL student
participation in general
education classrooms and
language organizations, and
secondary student
participation in LOTE courses.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to implement and
support programs and
practices that encourage ELL
student participation in
general education classrooms
and language organizations,
and secondary student
participation in LOTE courses.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and practices that
encourage ELL student
participation in general
education classrooms and
language organizations, and
secondary student
participation in LOTE courses.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or using
informal qualitative information
to assess programs and practices.
For example, using district wide
data and using formal qualitative
and quantitative information to
assess programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
SecondLanguageAcquisition–DistrictLevel
School Community Participation
Opportunities are available for students to participate in language organizations and for ELL families to engage with the school community.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and practices that
encourage students and
families to participate in a
variety of activities and
organizations.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to implement and
support programs and
practices that encourage
students and families to
participate in a variety of
activities and organizations.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and practices that
encourage students and
families to participate in a
variety of activities and
organizations.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
SecondLanguageAcquisition–DistrictLevel
At Risk Participation
The district supports the participation and engagement of At Risk students in LOTE courses (Level I and II) and in advanced courses (honors, AP).
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and practices that
encourage participation,
engagement, and progress of
At Risk students in Level 1 and
advanced LOTE courses.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to implement and
support programs and
practices that encourage
participation, engagement,
and progress of At Risk
students in Level 1 and
advanced LOTE courses.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
implement and support
programs and practices that
encourage participation,
engagement, and progress of
At Risk students in Level 1 and
advanced LOTE courses.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
DigitalLearningEnvironment–DistrictLevel
Measurement
Implementation of Digital Learning programs and activities across all school levels and at all campuses.
ModeofMeasurement
District team uses this self-diagnostic instrument to measure implementation of policies, programs, and strategies for Digital Learning. The five-point Likert scale
allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in this performance area.
Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
ItemCategory
TechnologyforTeachingandLearning
PositiveSchoolCulturePromotingDigitalLearning
OnlineLearningEnvironments
TeacherDevelopmentandPreparation
VisionandPlanning
CommunityResources
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
DigitalLearningEnvironment–DistrictLevel
TechnologyforTeachingandLearning
Technology is integrated in authentic learning opportunities to promote student acquisition of the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to perform in the 21st
century world.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
ensure all students are
provided opportunities to
implement and support the
integration of technology in a
student-centered learning
environment.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to implement and
support the integration of
technology in a studentcentered learning
environment.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
implement and support the
integration of technology in a
student-centered learning
environment.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
DigitalLearningEnvironment–DistrictLevel
PositiveSchoolCulturePromotingDigitalLearning
Campus culture promotes the use of technology for digital learning.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
provide equitable access to
digital tools and resources,
promote digital citizenship,
model exemplary use of
technology, and promote
online collaborative tools.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to provide equitable
access to digital tools and
resources, promote digital
citizenship, model exemplary
use of technology, and
promote online collaborative
tools.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to provide
equitable access to digital
tools and resources, promote
digital citizenship, model
exemplary use of technology,
and promote online
collaborative tools.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
DigitalLearningEnvironment–DistrictLevel
OnlineLearningEnvironments
The district provides resources to support opportunities for a wide range of online learning.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
develop and support high
quality web and video-based
content, on-line training for
professional development, and
high school on-line credit
opportunities.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to develop and support
high quality web and videobased content, on-line training
for professional development,
and high school on-line credit
opportunities.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to develop
and support high quality web
and video-based content, online training for professional
development, and high school
on-line credit opportunities.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
DigitalLearningEnvironment–DistrictLevel
TeacherDevelopmentandPreparation
Training is provided for teachers on the use of technology to enhance instruction, student learning and student creativity.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
provide on-going technology
professional development
opportunities, promote a
culture of “anytime,
anywhere” learning, and
development of Professional
Learning Networks.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to provide on-going
technology professional
development opportunities,
promote a culture of “anytime,
anywhere” learning, and
development of Professional
Learning Networks.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to provide
on-going technology
professional development
opportunities, promote a
culture of “anytime,
anywhere” learning, and
development of Professional
Learning Networks.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
DigitalLearningEnvironment–DistrictLevel
VisionandPlanning
Campuses have a shared vision for the comprehensive integration of technology to promote excellence.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
ensure understanding of the
long-range Technology Plan
and technology mission,
development of technology
goals and initiatives, and
promotion of excellence in
professional practices.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to ensure understanding
of the long-range Technology
Plan and technology mission,
development of technology
goals and initiatives, and
promotion of excellence in
professional practices.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to ensure
understanding of the longrange Technology Plan and
technology mission,
development of technology
goals and initiatives, and
promotion of excellence in
professional practices.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
DigitalLearningEnvironment–DistrictLevel
CommunityResources
Technology resources are available to the community.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
promote awareness and use of
campus websites, social
media, Classroom Portal,
school-based technology
resources, and to encourage
parent and community
involvement.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to promote awareness
and use of campus websites,
social media, Classroom Portal,
school-based technology
resources, and to encourage
parent and community
involvement.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
promote awareness and use of
campus websites, social
media, Classroom Portal,
school-based technology
resources, and to encourage
parent and community
involvement.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System
Dropout Prevention Strategies – District Level
Measurement
Implementation of Dropout Prevention Strategies across all school levels and at all campuses.
Mode of Measurement
District team uses this self-diagnostic instrument to measure implementation of policies, programs, and strategies for Dropout Prevention. The five-point Likert
scale allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in this performance
area. Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
Item Category
Community / Family Engagement and Support
Student Focused Programs and Strategies
Supporting Infrastructure and Programs
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System
Dropout Prevention Strategies – District Level
Community / Family Engagement and Support
When all groups in a community provide collective support to the school, a strong infrastructure sustains a caring supportive environment where youth can
thrive and achieve.
Research consistently finds that family engagement has a direct, positive effect on children's achievement and is the most accurate predictor of a student's
success in school.
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to
collaborate with and engage
the community in creating a
supportive environment for all
families and students.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
engage the community.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to collaborate with
and engage the community.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to select
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or using
informal qualitative information
to assess programs and practices.
For example, using district wide
data and using formal qualitative
and quantitative information to
assess programs and practices.
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System
Dropout Prevention Strategies – District Level
Student Focused Programs and Strategies
A variety of programs and strategies may be implemented at campuses across the district that focus on the student, these may include:
•
•
Early Childhood Education and Literacy
Development
Mentoring/Tutoring
•
•
•
•
Service-Learning
Alternative Schooling and Extended School Day •
Student Involvement
Active Learning
Individualized Instruction
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to
collaborate with and engage
campus staff and the
community in challenging
conversations about student
programs and strategies.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
collaborate with and engage
campus staff and the
community in challenging
conversations about student
programs and strategies.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to collaborate with
and engage campus staff and
the community in challenging
conversations about student
programs and strategies.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to select
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or using
informal qualitative information
to assess programs and practices.
For example, using district wide
data and using formal qualitative
and quantitative information to
assess programs and practices.
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System
Dropout Prevention Strategies – District Level
Supporting Infrastructure and Programs
Some programs and systems are implemented at the district level which enable or support many campus-level activities. The programs and systems that most
directly affect Dropout Prevention activities are:
•
•
Safe Learning Environments
Professional Development
•
•
Educational Technology
Career and Technology Education (CTE)
•
Testing, Data Collection and Analysis
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership to
collaborate with and engage
campus staff and the
community in challenging
conversations about
supporting infrastructure and
programs.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
but do not build the skills to
collaborate with and engage
campus staff and the
community in challenging
conversations about
supporting infrastructure and
programs.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership to collaborate with
and engage campus staff and
the community in challenging
conversations about
supporting infrastructure and
programs.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program or strategy
performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to select
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or using
informal qualitative information
to assess programs and practices.
For example, using district wide
data and using formal qualitative
and quantitative information to
assess programs and practices.
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System – Plano ISD
Educational Programs for Gifted and Talented Students – District Level
Measurement
Implementation of Gifted and Talented Practices and Strategies at all school levels and at all campuses.
Mode of Measurement
District team uses this instrument to measure readiness and implementation of programs to serve Gifted and Talented students. The five-point Likert scale
allows for distinctions in how well the district designs, supports, and manages programs that enable campuses to perform satisfactorily in this performance area.
Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses the item and develops a consensus rating.
The district team uses campus level diagnostics and ratings to facilitate the district level evaluation of practices in the performance area.
Item Category
Curriculum and Instruction
Professional Development
Advanced Academics
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Community and Student Engagement Accountability System – Plano ISD
Educational Programs for Gifted and Talented Students – District Level
Curriculum and Instruction
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
ensure a comprehensive
curriculum, instructional
opportunities in the four core
areas (English Language Arts,
Science, Social Studies and
Math), and appropriate
allocation of instructional
time.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to ensure a
comprehensive curriculum,
instructional opportunities in
the four core areas, and
appropriate allocation of
instructional time.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to ensure
a comprehensive curriculum,
instructional opportunities in
the four core areas, and
appropriate allocation of
instructional time.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to select
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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4
5
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
Page 43 of 50
Community and Student Engagement Accountability System – Plano ISD
Educational Programs for Gifted and Talented Students – District Level
Professional Development
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
support and to provide for
teachers or Gifted/Talented
specialists.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to support and provide
for teachers or
Gifted/Talented specialists.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to support
and provide for teachers or
Gifted/Talented specialists.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to select
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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4
5
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
Page 44 of 50
Community and Student Engagement Accountability System – Plano ISD
Educational Programs for Gifted and Talented Students – District Level
Advanced Academics
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
ensure appropriate
instructional time, to support
participation in advanced
academic courses, or to
support participation in AP/IB
exams.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to ensure appropriate
instructional time, to support
participation in advanced
academic courses, or to
support participation in AP/IB
exams.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to ensure
appropriate instructional time,
to support participation in
advanced academic courses, or
to support participation in
AP/IB exams.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to select
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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4
5
District leaders establish a
process to select programs or
strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
Page 45 of 50
CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
ComplianceReporting–DistrictLevel
Measurement
Ensuring that staff appraisals, professional development, and special programs areas are compliant with required local, state, and federal requirements.
ModeofMeasurement
Campus team uses this self-diagnostic to measure whether various process and documentation procedures regarding staff appraisals, professional development,
and special program areas (Language Proficiency Assessment Committee, Section 504/Campus Monitoring Intervention team, and Special Education) are in
compliance. The 5 point Likert scale allows for distinctions in implementation levels. Each member assesses the item independently and then the team discusses
the item and develops a consensus rating.
ItemCategory
StaffAppraisalsandProfessionalDevelopment(PDAS)
LanguageProficiencyAssessmentCommittee(LPAC)
Section504/CampusMonitoringInterventionTeam(CMIT)
SpecialEducation
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
ComplianceReporting–DistrictLevel
StaffAppraisalsandProfessionalDevelopment(PDAS)
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
understand and support PDAS
and Learner Centered
Appraisal process, provide
quality professional
development, and provide all
training required for policy and
legal compliance.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to understand and
support PDAS and Learner
Centered Appraisal process,
provide quality professional
development, and provide all
training required for policy and
legal compliance.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
understand and support PDAS
and Learner Centered
Appraisal process, provide
quality professional
development, and provide all
training required for policy and
legal compliance.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
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CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
ComplianceReporting–DistrictLevel
LanguageProficiencyAssessmentCommittee(LPAC)
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
understand and support the
LPAC program process,
provide quality training for all
LPAC members, and ensure
proper documentation
required for policy and legal
compliance.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to understand and
support the LPAC program
process, provide quality
training for all LPAC members,
and ensure proper
documentation required for
policy and legal compliance.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
understand and support the
LPAC program process,
provide quality training for all
LPAC members, and ensure
proper documentation
required for policy and legal
compliance.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
R:\2014-2015\Projects\CSEAS\14_District Level\CSEAS Guide and Rubrics for District Leaders 2015.05.26.docx
Page 48 of 50
CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
ComplianceReporting–DistrictLevel
Section504/CampusMonitoringInterventionTeam(CMIT)
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
understand and support the
504/CMIT program process,
provide quality training for all
coordinators/specialists, and
ensure proper documentation
required for policy and legal
compliance.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to understand and
support the 504/CMIT
program process, provide
quality training for all
coordinators/specialists, and
ensure proper documentation
required for policy and legal
compliance.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
understand and support the
504/CMIT program process,
provide quality training for all
coordinators/specialists, and
ensure proper documentation
required for policy and legal
compliance.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
R:\2014-2015\Projects\CSEAS\14_District Level\CSEAS Guide and Rubrics for District Leaders 2015.05.26.docx
Page 49 of 50
CommunityandStudentEngagementAccountabilitySystem–PlanoISD
ComplianceReporting–DistrictLevel
SpecialEducation
Leadership and Capacity Building
1
2
District leaders do not build
the capacity or skills of
campus leadership and staff to
understand and support the
Special Education program
process, provide quality
training for all Special
Education department
members, and ensure proper
documentation required for
policy and legal compliance.
3
4
District leaders build the
capacity of campus leadership
and staff but do not build the
skills to understand and
support the Special Education
program process, provide
quality training for all Special
Education department
members, and ensure proper
documentation required for
policy and legal compliance.
5
District leaders build the
capacity and skills of campus
leadership and staff to
understand and support the
Special Education program
process, provide quality
training for all Special
Education department
members, and ensure proper
documentation required for
policy and legal compliance.
Monitoring Performance and Progress
1
2
District leaders do not review
program performance data to
determine effective outcomes
and efficient use of resources.
3
4
District leaders review schoollevel program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
5
District leaders review districtwide program performance
data to determine effective
outcomes and efficient use of
resources.
Intervention and Adjustment
1
District leaders do not
establish a process to evaluate
programs or strategies based
on evidence of effectiveness
and efficient use of resources.
2
3
4
5
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on limited
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
District leaders establish a
process to evaluate programs
or strategies based on clear
evidence of effectiveness and
efficient use of resources.
For example, using data from
selected cases or schools or
using informal qualitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
For example, using district
wide data and using formal
qualitative and quantitative
information to assess
programs and practices.
R:\2014-2015\Projects\CSEAS\14_District Level\CSEAS Guide and Rubrics for District Leaders 2015.05.26.docx
Page 50 of 50
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