STUDENT SERVICES

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STUDENT SERVICES
E P C C
D I V I S I O N
O F
S T U D E N T
S E R V I C E S
N E W S L E T T E R
July 2015
Vol 1. Issue 2
FIGHTING THE STIGMA
W
hat is the first thing that comes to mind when
you hear “Center for Students with Disabilities”? A high percentage of people, students
and employees think we provide medical care, which is
not the case.
Our services, accommodate students with disabilities in
the classroom; whether the disability is temporary or not.
We provide, Sign Language Interpreters, note-takers, tutors, a scribe, and the use of our Assistive Technology Lab.
The lab offers the most amazing programs such as Kurzweil, braille printing, and more. The student must make
an appointment with one of the four counselors to receive
our services at no extra cost.
)
Some may feel in order to receive services from us, the
student has to have a severe noticeable disability such
as, missing a limb or be a wheelchair user which that’s...
Continue on Page Four
Center for Students with Disabilities main office located at Valle Verde campus.
ACADEMICS AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT
A
s a Career Services department, one of our main goals is
to ensure we embark an early career development plan
onto our students. In spite of this, Career Services departments who are trying to engage students in career
exploration and development often encounter several challenges.
One of these challenges is students are rarely required to visit our office, or take a career-related course during their first year,
which can complicate their career-development process. Oftentimes, students believe Career Services is only for those students
who are graduating or have graduated, which leads to the misunderstanding of our services. Unfortunately, this results in students
not using Career Services as a main resource through their college
years.
Students who have provided feedback, have cited that some of
the reasons for not visiting Career Services is due to not having time,
the office hours are restrictive, or they don’t believe the Career Services department could help them. Some students said they knew
the services existed, but until career exploration and or job searching became a priority for them (i.e., after graduation), they did not
see the value.
While some students are using the Career Services resources to
locate experiential job opportunities, others said they wish they’d
known earlier how important internships were in developing career
interests, or making connections with employers. This indicates students underestimate the importance of early experiences, lack the
intention to actively pursue opportunities, and fail to participate
in career services activities. As a result, far too many students find
themselves less competitive and prepared than they’re expected to
be.
In a 2013 Recruiting Benchmarks Survey, by the National Association of College and Employers (NACE), found that Career Services
remains as a favored recruiting option for employers. Employers
surveyed, chose posting positions on campuses websites as the
most successful outreach option. Moreover, employers consider
their internship programs an essential recruiting tool to fill entry-level positions. NACE found that 48.4 percent of more than 1,000
employers reported that their new hires came from their internship
pool. 71 percent of employers said they preferred to hire a candidate with relevant work experience, and nearly 60 percent of employers favored related internship or co-op experiences to experiences gained through other avenues.
Nonetheless, there are also key steps that can be taken to overcome these obstacles and make valuable connections with these
students, so they can succeed on their career-development journey. The first step is to find a meaningful and sustainable way to
bridge the gap between the academic development that students
are focused on, and their neglected career development. Working
together and creating a stronger message that makes the Career
Services department more significant and approachable, can help
make a difference in students’ outcome.
CAREER CLOSET
THIS CLOSET HOLDS MORE THAN JUST CLOTHES
T
he Career Services Depart-
helping hand to land their first employ-
ment will launch the first
ment.
ever, El Paso Community
The Career Closet will be located
College Career Closet program starting
at the Valle Verde campus, but despite
January 2016.
the location, this program welcomes all
Career Closet is a program where
students across EPCC.
students who are in need of profes-
By the end of the year, Career Ser-
sional business attire for interviews,
vices’ goal is to obtain multiple new
career fairs, and networking events can
professional suits for each gender. The
have access to them for free.
team is currently soliciting department
“Being a college student can be
rough, most college students are on a
budget,” said Career Services Specialist, Kris Cullen.
stores for donations to kick-off the
program.
If you’re interested in donating to
the Career Closet program, Career Ser-
According to Career Services Di-
vices will be taking donations in the
rector, Carla Cardoza, there have been
form of currency and/or clothes. It is
times where mock interview students
asked that the donated items be new.
have commented on needing the ap-
For more information on the items or
propriate attire for that first job inter-
the program, please call Career Servic-
view. Cardoza saw this as an opportu-
es at (915)831-2636.
Career Closet will open its closet doors starting on January 2016.
nity to bring the Career Closet program
to EPCC, and give students that extra
ALUMNUS WANTED:
EPCC ALUMNS (10 YEARS +) WE WOULD LIKE TO KNOW
WHERE YOU ARE NOW! IF YOU’D LIKE TO TELL US,
PLEASE SEND US YOUR INFORMATION TO:
[email protected]
TELL US YOUR FULL NAME, MAJOR, PROFESSION, AND A
SHORT BIO ABOUT YOUR TIME AT EPCC!
CAREER CLINICS
AN ER FOR STUDENTS' CAREERS.
I
nstructors of El Paso Community College, the Career Ser-
The goal of this program is to get students started on the assign-
vices Department invites you to try our Career Clinic.
ment/s in a timely matter, and have one of our representatives guide
This program is recommended for all classes that require
a group of students; instead of student’s coming in individually a day
students to take a Career Assessment, or build a Resume.
before the assignment is due.
The Career Clinic workshop, will get students started on their
Faculty can request this presentation through our Career Corner
assignment with the help of a Career Services Specialist. During the
website (you can find the link at epcc.edu/careerservices). The only
presentation, students will be guided on how to accomplish a re-
requirements needed for this workshop will be a class period, and
sume, or career assessment step-by-step.
for the requester to secure a computer lab for their class.
There’s a possibility some students might not finish their work
If you have any questions, or would like more details on the Ca-
during the workshop, therefore, they have two weeks to come by
reer Clinics, don’t hesitate to call our office at (915)-831-2636. We
our Career Services office and meet with a specialist to finish the
hope to hear from you soon EPCC educators!
assignment (details would be discussed with faculty prior to the
workshop).
Page 2
Eight Socorro ISD students earned scholarships to help offset college expenses.
SOCORRO ISD SCHOLARSHIPS
HIGH SCHOOLERS ARE RECOGNIZED AND REWARDED FOR THEIR EFFORTS.
E
l Paso Community College and Socorro High School held a
The award is for $2000.00 per year renewable for 4 semesters with a
ceremony, Wednesday, May 20th, to award EPCC Presiden-
3.0 GPA and full-time enrollment. This year EPCC awarded 15 Barnes
tial, Barnes & Noble, and Hunt Foundation Scholarships
& Noble Scholarships.
to Socorro students.
Zeniat Lopez received the EPCC Presidential Scholarships. Lopez
Stephanie Nava and Jonathan Prieto received the Hunt Foundation Scholarship. The students met College Readiness Standards.
had a high school Grade Point Average (GPA). Requirements are a 93
The award is $1000 per semester and is renewable up to 4 semes-
or above GPA, academic excellence and demonstrated leadership
ters, they must complete 24 credits per year, maintain a minimum
qualities and/or community service. The award is for $2000.00 per
GPA of 2.5 or better and be a resident of El Paso, Las Cruces, or
year renewable for 4 semesters with a 3.0 GPA and full-time enroll-
Juarez.
ment. This year EPCC awarded 12 Presidential Scholarships countywide.
Students must complete the EPCC Foundation Scholarship Application and submit their academic transcript by April 1st for each
Hector Dominguez, Kimberly Hernandez, Ruby Silva, Stephanie
Quintero and Valeria Benavides received the Barnes & Noble Scholarship. They had a high school GPA of 89 and above and demonstrat-
school year.
For more information, contact the EPCC Scholarship Office at
(915) 831-2529.
ed leadership qualities and/or community service.
CAREER SERVICES: SUMMER JOB FAIRS
LOCK DOWN YOUR SUMMER JOB.
E
l Paso Community College’s (EPCC) Career Services De-
Job seekers were recommended to dress professionally, bring copies
partment welcomed students and the community of El
of their resume and be ready to interview on the spot.
Paso to attend two summer job fairs - each offering a va-
riety of employment opportunities.
The Career Services Department at EPCC promotes career exploration, lifelong career management, and professional develop-
The first fair took place at the EPCC Transmountain Campus mall
ment. EPCC students and graduates can visit the Career Services
area, 9570 Gateway North, on July 15th and the second fair was held
Department at their nearest EPCC Campus prior to upcoming Job
at the Northwest Campus cafeteria, 6701 South Desert Blvd., on July
Fairs for job readiness assistance.
16th. Both fairs ran from 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Some participating employers were: Texas Department of Crimi-
For more information, visit www.epcc.edu/careerservices or find
Career Services on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @HireATejano.
nal Justice, Southwest Staffing, GC Services, Sonno Sleep Center and
more. Both job fairs were free and open to the public.
Page 3
FIGHTING THE STIGMA
(CONTINUED)
often a misconception. There are times a disability can present it-
As always, speak to one of the counselors regarding your challenges
self in an unnoticed way, like being deaf, suffer from head injuries,
and they will determine which services would work best for you.
or have learning disabilities. If a student does have a disability, he
or she is NOT required to come through our office.
A student doesn’t have to acquire a permanent disability to be
eligible for our services. Temporary disabilities can happen to any-
Some students may feel intimidated to ask for help because
they might feel they’re being “labeled,” but we welcome students to
come and find out what we’re all about! Meet our Center for Students
with Disabilities staff and check out our great computer lab!
one. For example: if a student decides to go skateboarding and falls
For more information visit our web page at www.epcc.edu/csd
and breaks his dominant arm/hand, and interferes with their learn-
for office locations and phone numbers. Contact us at (915) 831-
ing, a Center for Students with Disabilities counselor could provide
2426, or drop by our main office located in C-112 – above the Book-
a note-taker or scribe for the duration of the injury.
store in the Valle Verde campus.
Again, the student would need to make an appointment with one
of the four counselors. In some extreme cases, a student may be
hospitalized and the counselor may approve a note taker service.
MILITARY STUDENTS WANTED
WORKSHOPS SPECIALIZED FOR MILITARY AFFILIATED STUDENTS.
M
ilitary Resources for Em-
the first meeting on Sept. 2. The func-
ployment (MRE), a new
tion will provide lunch and introduce
initiative
by
all the planned workshops for the fall
Career Services, will help Military af-
semester. MRE will be held at the caf-
filiated students transition back into
eteria annex at Valle Verde from 11:30
civilian life in the educational and
a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
developed
professional settings through various activities.
“Only current students should be
encouraged to attend. Once the pro-
The MRE initiative will provide
gram has become successful, then
veteran and current military students
we will look into providing alumni
the opportunity to network with oth-
with these services,” said Tanya Rico,
er military affiliated students, lunch-
Career Services Specialist. The pro-
eons, resources and workshops.
gram will run through the fall and
The workshops are planned to
happen once a month. Each workshop will go over different topics
relating
to
employment,
spring semester, if successful, MRE
will be available all year long.
According to Hunter, introducing
resume
the MRE program to El Paso Commu-
building (turning a military resume to
nity College military students, will
a civilian resume), mock interviews,
present the opportunity to improve
career exploration and more.
skills, establish connections, and
“Our goals are to convey a deep-
develop the student as an individual.
er understanding of student military
“Building the MRE program will
life, strengthen mutual military stu-
better prepare military students for
dent relationship bonds and promote
their future. We hope to achieve a
student success,” said Career Servic-
concrete platform that will encour-
es Specialist, Cherylanne Hunter.
age current students to return and
All enrolled military affiliated
to strike the interest of newcomers.”
Workshops will be heald on a monthly basis.
"Our goals are to convey a deeper understanding
of student military life, strengthen mutual military
student relationship bonds, and promote student
success."
students are encouraged to attend
Page 4
TEJANOS SCORE BIG
MLB DRAFTS TWO TEJANO BASEBALL PLAYERS.
Ryan Vega, drafted by Los Angeles Angels, played as an outfielder for EPCC.
E
Gregory Popylisen, drafted by The Minnesota Twins, is also a New Mexico State signee.
l Paso Community College, is proud to announce the
Tejanos baseball team held an open tryout on Saturday, June 27th
drafting of two EPCC Tejano Baseball players.
at the EPCC Baseball Field, Valle Verde campus, 919 Hunter. Check-in
The players were chosen on Wednesday, June 10th during
started at 7 a.m. The tryout fee was $20 and included a t-shirt. All
the third and final day of the Major League Baseball Draft. Ryan Vega
players had to bring a copy of a complete physical exam within the
was selected in the 14th round (435th overall pick) by the Los Ange-
past 12 months and their own equipment.
les Angels, and Gregory Popylisen was selected in the 30th round
(890th overall pick) by the Minnesota Twins.
Tejanas softball team also held two different tryout camps on
June 23rd and July 11th at the EPCC Softball Field, Valle Verde cam-
Popylisen a sophomore, and a New Mexico State signee, had a
pus, 919 Hunter. On both dates, registration for position players
.364 batting average with 16 runs batted in this season. Vega, is a
started at 7:15 a.m., and tryouts at 8:15 a.m. Registration for pitchers
freshman outfielder with a .400 batting average with three home
and catchers were at noon, and tryouts started at 1 p.m.
runs, 39 runs batted in and 44 runs scored.
The tryout fee was $15. For additional information, please con-
This is the second year in a row EPCC Tejanos have been selected
to play in the major league baseball. Last year, Eudor Garcia was
tact the baseball office at (915) 831-3131 or email [email protected]
edu.
drafted by the New York Mets, and Jeremy Rivera was selected by
the Boston Red Sox.
THE DIVISION OF STUDENT SERVICES
Admissions and Registration:
College Readiness:
Office of Recruitment and School Relations:
Phone: (915) 831-2579
Phone: (915) 831-4701
Phone: (915) 831-2575
Athletics:
Dual Credit/Early College High School:
Student Leadership and Campus Life:
Phone: (915) 831-2623
Phone: (915) 831-2404
Phone: (915) 831-2712
Career Services:
Financial Aid/Veterans Affair:
Testing Services:
Phone: (915) 831-2636
Financial Aid-phone: (915) 831-2565
Phone: (915) 831-7836
Center for Students with Disabilities:
Veterans Affair-phone: (915) 831-2162
Texas Completes:
Phone: (915) 831-2426
Police:
Phone: (915) 831-7836
Phone: (915) 831-2200
Page 5
The El Paso County Community College District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, disability, veteran status, sexual orientation, or gender identity.
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