sports w Union Pops Booters' Bubble Goals By Selea and Rolando For

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Uctobai 3 1 , 1973
Slate UnWanlty of New York at Albany
Union Pops Booters' Bubble
Goals By Selea and Rolando For
Naught As Danes Bow 2-0 Lead
by Nathan Salem Craig Jeffries scored off a John
Denio pass with 44 seconds left in the
game to break a 2-2 tie and send the
Albany State varsity team down to
its second defeat of the season, 3-2.
The Booters, now 8-2-1, took a 2-0
lead in the first ten minutes of the
game on goals by Frank Selca (his
16th, tying him for the all time single
season scoring mark) and John
Rolando. But Denio broke the ice
for Union midway through the first
half, and Jeffries tied matters at
35:00.
"Our' defense kept backing into
the penalty area," said Albany's
coach Bill Schieffelin. "When wedid
take control of the ball we generally
overhandled it, enabling them to
keep the pressure on us."
Both teams missed several scoring
opportunities in the second half as
Albany's Henry Obwald and the
visitor's Mark Ruczinski were outstanding in the nets.
With 30 minutes left in the game, a
centering pass by Simon Curanovic
was headed just over the crossbar by
Rolando. Minutes later, a shot by
Paul Schicscl squirmed loose from a
sprawled Ruczinski and rolled ever
so slowly towards the right corner of
the Union goal, but Ruczinski jackknifed off the ground and managed
to tip the ball just wide of the post
before it crossed the goal line.
Denio and Jeffries each missed excellent scoring opportunities.
Denio's came at 30:15 when, after
Obwald made two consecutive saves,
the Albany defense did not clear the
ball out of the penalty area, and
Denio had an open 15-yard shot at
the Booters' net. The shot hit the
post and was kicked clear by Ricardo Rose.
Jeffries was stopped twice in the
next ten minutes on diving saves by
Obwald, before the game winner was
put in off the right post at 44:16.
"It was just a matter of time," Jeffries later said. "We knew we were
better than they (Albany) were."
Schieffelin, though disappointed,
said Albany played fairly well.
"We had two very line teams out
there," Schieffelin said. "Thingsjust
went the wrong way from our
Hartley: New Students May
Have To Find Own Housing
Union's John Denio (14) sets up for downfleld pass.
perspective. We certainly had our
chances on those shots by Rolando
and Schicsel, and with Henry playing his best game of the year, we were
in it."
"Obviously a lot of the guys are
very disappointed." Schieffelin continued, "but we were, and very much
arc, in the thick of things for an
NCAA Tournament bid. Had we
won against Union, we pretty much
would have solidified that bid. Now,
we've got to go out and do some winning this weekend in Buffalo,"
"This could be very good for us in
a way," Schieffelin summarized.
"Alter all, if you want a hid you have
to go out and get it."
Albany is lop-seeded in this year's
edition of the University Center
Championship which pits the
Booters against Buffalo, and
Binghamton against Stony Brook, in
the first round. Schieffelin has
elected to play at 12 noon, Friday
(thetop-seed always getsits choice of
the curly or 2:30 game).
Albany: Tourney Favorite
Albany is the pre-tournament
favorite. The Booters have scored six
less goals than the combined total of
Stony Brook. Binghamton,und Buffalo.
"If we win the tournament we
should be in a solid position for an
NCAA bid," said Schieffelin, "and
I here is no reason why we should not
win it. Going in we'll be healthy
(Arthur Bedford and Murk Wenzcl
sal out most ol'the Union game with
injuries). It's just u mutter of going
out thcrcand making the right plays
at the right time, something wejust
did not do against Union."
Danes: Can They Cage Lions?
hale
Danes' Frank Satca (toraground) watches as ball scoots by In second
hall. Satca scored club-tying sixteenth goal In losing cause.
Ruggers 'Scrum'tious;
Shut Out Union, 10-0
by Ken Kurtz
The Albany State Rugby Club
defeated their Union counterpart,
10-0, Saturday.
The game was played as a result of
the scheduling difficulties experienced by both teams. State was
scheduled to play powerful Boston
College, while Union was to oppose
Cortland, but because of a scheduling conflict, neithcrtcam's opponent
was able to show. Hence, State and
Union decided to play each other.
The field was a quagmire, and it
rained throughout the game, with
sloppy play by both teams resulting.
A lew minutes inlothe game; the Union hooker had to leave the game
because of a head injury. The rest of
the half consisted of each team
trading numerous punts. Neither
team scored, even though Albany
had a one man advantage. Union
had a scoring opportunity shortly
before the end of the half, but failed
to convert when Union's kicker, Bill
Fellows, missed a twenty yard field
goal attempt,
"Thai kick would have made quite
a difference," said Albany coach
Chuck Rappazzo. "If Union scored
lirsl, lhey would have had the
momentum, which is vital, especially
in the rain."
Second half action was much the
same as the first hall's. Both teams
jockeyed for position via punt exchanges.
"With conditions as they were,
punting was the only strategy,
because it might result in a fumble by
Union's fullback, giving us the needed break," explained Rappazzo.
Albany's first score was a result of
this strategy. Union fumbled a punt
deep in their own territory, giving
Albany their first break in the game.
The scrum managed to push the ball
over the goal line and Wcnccs
Rodriguez downed the ball in the
end/one for lour points. Steve
Goldberg added the conversion,
making it 6-0.
Albany's final score of the afternoon was again the result of the kicking game. Rappazzo punted the ball
out of bounds inside Union's ten
yard line. State went into its set
scrum formation, and I'ete Rizzo
scrambled in for the score. The conversion attempt wus missed.
"The scrum was all important, as
Ihcy beat Union in all phases of line
play", said Rappazzo. "Offensively it
was the scrum, and defensively, the
game belonged to the bucks." The
ruggers, next contest will be Saturday at Siena College.
by Craig Bell
When the Albany Great Dane
football team takes the field Saturday against Albright College,
number four ranked Albany will be
pitted against the number six ranked
Lions.
Both teams will gointo Saturday's
contest with 5-1 records, and Dane
coach Bob Ford thinks it will be a
hell of a game.
"They arc a lough, hard nosed
football team whose only loss hus
come at the hands of Gettysburgh. a
division II school," said Ford.
Offensively the Lions are it big
play football team.
"They don't have the capability to
just drive on you," said Ford,
"because of their lack of size in the
backficld."
Their backfield will be made up of
fullback Dan Daley, and halfbacks
Iran Franks and Bill Gallen. The
quarterback will be I'at Sharp.
Franks is the team's leading
ground gainer with 370-yardson l()4
carries.
Sharp has completed 19 of 31
passes ol'the year I or 229 yards, most
ol litem to split end Joe Yahone.
Defensively the Danes will have to
keep the Lions' quick backs from
getting outside, us well us protecting
ugainst the big play.
"We'll be in our base defenses,"
explained Ford, "that way our
defense won't be stretched." We
hope that our offense doesn't cough
up the ball and we'll have to curtail
1 heir kickoff und punt return game."
Offensively the Danes will be dealing with a defense Ford likens to
Ithaca.
"They arc big and strong and love
to hit. In addition they don't seem to
have any particular weakness."
They operate out of a 5-2 slant
defense which means they will be
keying to the wide side of the field
"We will have to use all facets of
our offense," said Ford. "We must be
able to run inside, outside and pass
the ball. If we do these things and do
them well, I believe we can beat
Albright."
"This is u big gume for both
squuds because the winner could
possibly receive u post season bid,"
Ford concluded.
Skip Scurry being brought down alter tine punt return In second quarter of last week's game
J
by Marc Leve
Despite a SUNY-wide construction moratorium, the student population at Albany is still projectedto
climb, according to Vice President
for Management and Planning,
John Hartley. "Students will simply
have to live off campus," he said.
Hartley indicated that there is a
growth of 350 students projected for
nexl year (assuming the requested
funding is approved). By 1980 the
population is to increase to 13,500
from the present 12,500student population.
One of the proposed solutions to
the housing problem at SUNYA is
that Mohawk Tower be reconverted
into a dormitory facility. This would
now have to be postponed until the
termination of the moratorium,
because it was to be state funded.
Hartley commented that the university is not immune to the state's
financial problems, und thut "there
may be a time t hat we will have to suy
to students, 'if you wunt housing,—
you can't come.' "
Director of Housing John Welty
suggested that "if the enrollment
growth occurs at the gruduute level,
it will not affect housing; more
graduates would enroll und only a
small percentage would request oncampus housing." But with graduate
programs being dropped and
suspended. Welty agreed that this is
unlikely to occur immediately.
Tremendous Effort
struction on the SUNYA campus is
the Alumni House. It's construction
will not be affected however, since
it's funding comes from Alumni
Association.
"The administration is more
worried ubout temporary solutions,"
says Meckler, "their big game is temporary crisis—wail till it's a crisis
and then get money from l he government. 'This year's solution is the
Wellington; nexl year something
new. Until they use long term vision,
at least two of three, we will continue
to be hit by these problems.'
late Confrontation
Meckler wants to insure that
prospective si udents know about the
housing situation early and are not
confronted with the problem at the
last minute.
Among affected SUNY schools is
SUNY Buffalo where construction
of their new suburban Amherst
campus will be delayed about a year.
A spokesman from SUNYB said
thai there is anxiety because the
Amherst campus, originully projected for completion in 1972. will
not be finished until 1980, Stony
Brook is also hit by the moratorium.
Construction of parts of their new
Health Sciences Center, will be postponed.
In a recent issue of Stony Brook's
student newspaper, the Statesman,
Acting University Prcsidcni T. Alexander Pond was quoted as saying
that, "it is especially unfortunate for
Long Island, where Stale University's devclpmcnl has lagged ten
years behind the resl of l he state, that
the moratorium catches us too far
below the capacity for provision of
higher education thut has been
achieved elsewhere in the state."
SUNY Binghamton, which has
tripled rooms and is putting people
Stunted Growth: The original plan lor SUNY A t uptown campus, shown above In its early stages ol
construction, called for eastern and western podium extensions, a research building, a Held house
and married student apartments. Lack ol lunds caused these plans to be dropped in 1970, and the
new SUNY construction moratorium makes It even more unlikely that they will ever be built.
up at the Colonial Motor Inn,is now
looking for private donations to
fund their housing needs. Although
they received approval for graduate
housing, an addition to their Fine
Arls building and a Greenhouse,
their construction has since been
scrapped. Binghamton's school for
advance Technology will he completed and furnished, hut they will
nol be able to buy equipment.
A spokesperson from Binghamton said, "Despite enrollment projection by the Hoard of Regents that
there be a decrease in sludent population tit SUNY Binghamton,there
will he a 4,000 sludent increase; and
without dorms, there will be no place
for them."
What's in store lor the future'.'"We
don't really have any recourse." says
Hartley, "I understand the financial
condition of the state, and the cutbacks are needed. You can't spend
the money if you haven't got it.
SA Vice President Rick Meckler
said, "The university will huve to
make a tremendous effort to rebuild
the graduate department, and I think
that will solve a lot of problems."
Meckler suggested thut the universily pursue the development and expansion of the "Student Dwellings
Corporation," which would build
apartments for students.
*WK
"We would get a contractor thai
would build apartments," said
Meckler, "and then rent thefucilities
out to students to pay I he mortgage."
The original funding would come
from "outside sources," accordingto
Meckler.
Another solution still under consideration is the construction of
prefabricated housing. Despitesome
of its problems, Welty said that the
construction of this housing "wasn't
intended to use stale funds, so it is
not eliminated."
Also affected by the moratorium
is the downtown campus, whose
badly needed
rehabilitation
(estimuled cost: $1,000,000) will be
delayed. "We're terribly disappointed; the healing, plumbing, and
electrical facilities are all in need of
rebuilding." said Hartley, "but we'll
keep the project open and I hope
that lime comes thai we can make
the downtown space usable. Addilionul physical education facilities
are also needed; we presently have
about half the necessary spuce."
The original overall plan for
SUNYA called for an enrollment of
25,000 students, eastern and western
podium extensions, a research
building, a field house and married Housing Director John Welty says that despite the unlverslty-wlde
student apartments. But a fiscal moratorium on construction, SUNYA's housing shortage may be
crunchin I970cuusedplunstofullby eased "II the enrollment growth occurs at the graduate level." He
the wayside. The only present conadmits, however, that this in not likely to occur.
New PaltzSGA Starts
Own Daily Publication
Claim Present Paper Inadequate
by Cynthia llacinli
The S t u d e n t
Government
Association (SGA) at New Paltz
Stale College has created a new
publication, the Wind-Sun News, to
compete with the school's existing
newspaper. They claimed the Orachwas not reporting enough oncampus news.
The newly established Wind-Sun
News was originally intended by
SGA officials to function as a house
organ for thai body. According to
Editor David Levin, the paper has
become an instrument in the reporting of campus-wide news.
Appearing daily, the Wind-Sun
News began publication about ihree
weeks ago. lis two pages were
devoted to news and a schedule of
events. Although SGA had committed itself to supplying the pnpci
with press released about its clubs.
none were submitted, reported
Levin.
The staff never consisted of more
than live people at one time, who
were responsible lor the gathering
and writing of news, editing, typing,
and layout of the paper. Levin says,
"We spent days und nighls pulling
out the paper. I spent about a hundred hours a week on it."
Two surveys were laken to find
out how students reacted to the
Wind-Sun News,The first one, taken
after two days of publication, showed students to be somewhat pleased
with it, though the vast majority had
not read it. The number of copies was
increased from 1200 to 2000. A few
days later, a second survey was taken
and the results were overwhelmingly
in favor of the newspaper. Levin
hoped that eventually the publication would grow to four pages or
more.
After twelve issues, SGAwilhdrew
funds for the paper. Levin said,
"This was because we didn't do what
they wanted us to do. They weren't
pleased with the style or content—in
csscnce.its editorial policy. Their
argument lor cutting our funds was
that i hey wanted a newsletter and we
put out a newspaper."
A presentation made by a media
review board and Wind-Sun staff
members persuaded the SGA to
restore funding to the paper. Accordingto Levin, the Wind-SunNewsis
to resume publication by the end of
this week.
Levin says thai the Wind-Sun
News was valuable because it instigated The Oraclela focus more on
campus news and initiated the
orgunization of campus action to
work against SUNY budget cuts.
" The Oracle wasn't doinga goodjob
of communicating to students. Now
there's been a change in the posture
of the Oracle's news. In yesterday's
issue the front page is devoted entirely to student news.
Levin justifies the continued existence of the Wind-Sun News with
ihis statement; "A newspaper that
comes out once a week can't do
anything in terms of mobilization.
With a daily source of information
on cutbacks and relevant campus
issues we can win if we organize. My
biggest aspiration is to sec a daily
newspaper on a statewide level."
INDEX
Arts.
Classified
Editorials
Graffiti
Letters
News
Newsbriefs.
Sports
«€lH**wfCsftlfet
17
11
13
10
12
1-9
2
11-20
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ACT: Punehholea
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Voter Apathy May Kill ERA
AL1ANY, N.Y. (AP) An Equal
Righto Amendment heeds the list of
referendum questions and local election contests which New York voters
will decide on Tuesday.
Some 7.9 million citizens are
registered to vote in the state, but
turnouts in off-year elections
traditionally are low, and supporters
of some of the ballot questions being
decided fear that voter apathy will
doom them.
This is particularly true for
backers of the ERA, who fear it has
aroused enough controversy to draw
a significant "ami" turnout. Both
supporters and opponents of the
ERA believethe New York vote on it
could have important impact on the
nationwide drive to end legal sex discrimination.
Eyes Of The Law
The ERA on the state ballot is
supposed to make men and women
equal in the eyes of the law. It would
amend the state constitution "equality of rights under the law shall not be
denied or abridged by the state of
New York or any subdivision
thereof." The drive for ratification of
a similarly worded amendment to
the federal constitution has bogged
down in the past two years.
Opponents of the ERA argue that
it could undermine the legal structures which buttress family life, such
as the legal obligation of a man to
support his family. Supporters say it
would not, but that it would remove
legal barriers which have held back
women in some cases and disriminated against men in others.
The ERA and seven other
statewide questions will top a ballot
that, throughout the state, will be
peppered with local contests. In addition, in New York City, 10
amendments to the city charter are
up for decision. Here is a review of
the eight statewide referendum
questions:
Proposition Number One. A $250
million bond issue to construct some
8,000 new housing units for the
elderly at subsidized rents. Supports
say the state needs the housing, opponents say it already has too much
debt.
Amendment Number One. The
ERA.
Amendment Number Two. It
would establish a permanent Commission on Judicial Conduct to investigate complaints against judges.
Supporters say current procedures
are inadequate and too lenient on
errant judges. Critics, including
Chief Judge Charles Breitel, criticize
it as a piecemeal reform.
Amendment Number Three. It
would allow a statewide chief administrator for the courts to preside
over the assignment of judicial personnel and budgeting. Supporters
say it will allow more efficient use of
the state's judicial resources to clear
backlogs and cut costs. Critics say a
new centralized bureaucracy would
be unwieldy.
Amendment Number Four. This
would allow the legislature, upon a
petition signed by two-thirds of the
members of each house, to call itself
back into special session. Supporters
say it would improve legislative independence and allow a "veto session" to override vetoes the governor
makes after the legislature adjourns.
Critics say it would create expensive
special sessions for little purpose
other than political grand-standing
Amendment Number Five. This
would clarify the rights of local
governments to issue bonds to build
storm sewers, as well as the regular
waste-disposal sewers they can
already bond for.
Amendment Number Six. Local
governments would be allowed to
exclude from the budget ceiling imposed bytheirconstitutional property fax limits the costs of pension
benefit's for their employees. Supporters say the tax limits are unrealistically low and that without
this amendment severe service cuts
would be needed. Critics say services and pension costs should be
cut, and if that doesn't work an income tax or some othertax would be
more equitable than higher property
taxes.
Amendment Number Seven. This
would allow churches and other
non-profit organizations now allowed to conduct bingo to branch out
into other types of gambling. Supporters say it would down on illegal
gambling and the influence of
organized crime, as well as provide a
revenue source for churches. Critics
say gambling should be discouraged,
not expanded.
The New York Public Interest
Research Group, Inc. (NYPIRG)
called on state legislatures last
Wednesday "to pass legislation to
decriminalize possession of small
quantities of marijuana."
Negotiations East Lebanese Fighting
BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) Another lull in Beirut's Christian-Moslem war set
in today, with only scattered shooting reported. Broadcasts and newspapers
expressed hope that the 12thcease-fire negotiated by Premier Rashid Karami
might be successful. Security officials attributed the new lull to round-theclock negotiations by Karami, Palestinian guerilla leaders and
representatives of the right-wing Christian Phalange party. Militiamen of
both sides began to heed the repeated cease-fire calls of their leaders.
Dlnltz Against Action in Lebanon
CHICAGO (AP) Israeli Ambassador Simcha Dinitz says Israel would
seriously consider military action should any Arab nation enter the conflict
in Lebanon. At a news conference Sunday, Dinitz said his country is
concerned "that our northern border with Lebanon should not become a
border of confrontation," but he refused to speculate on what conditions
would cause Israel to confront a third party in the conflict." A minority, in
this case Christian, is being slaughtered by a Moslem majority and the rest of
the world is apathetic," said Dinitz, here for the American Jewish Council
convention.
Peron Faces Impeachment and Surgery
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) President Isabel Peron. lacing
impeachment threats in congress, was hospitalized early today lor a gall
bladder condition, the government said. A reliable medical source said she
may have to undergo an operation. Mrs. Peron's condition was not serious, a
medical bulletin said. But the source said the recovery period from such an
operation ranged from three weeks to more than a month. Senate President
Italo Luder, who filled in recently as acting president and is Mrs. Peron's
constitutional successor, told newsmen he did not plan to change his schedule
today.
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Dissidents Rebel in Bangladesh
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NEW DELHI, India (AP) Dissident units of the Bangladesh army rebelled
Monday against the ll-week-old military-backed fovernmenl in Dacca,
diplomatic sources reported. An unconfirmed Indian report said thai
President Khondakar Mushtaque Ahmed had been replaced as head of state
in a peaceful transition of power by the garrison commander ol
Dacca.United News of India, in a dispatch approved by Indian government
censors, reported from New Delhi that a Brig. Mushraf, the No. 2 man in Ihe
Bangladesh army, had become the new president.
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Paul McCartney Comments on the Beatles
PERTH, Australia (AP)"Nothingis left of the Beatles now, only memories."
said singer Paul McCartney, a member of the disbanded rock and roll
quartet, at his first news conference in three years. His ambition now is "just
to be happy," and he said he is happy with his group "Wings." After a
performance Saturday at the Perth Entertainment Center, McCartney said
"The good thing about this group is that it is new. It's just at thesiitrt of iu
life. That's always the best time. The only worry is trying to follow thcBrallcs."
Ford Ousts Schlesinger and Colby
WASHINGTON (AP) Secretary of
Defense James R. Schlesinger and
CIA Director William E. Colby are
being ousted in a shakeup of top
national security posts, accordingto
top Pentagon officials.
President Ford scheduled a news
conference for tonight, presumably
to make it official.
Ford's news conference will be
held at 7:30 p.m. EST in the East
Room ol the White House, a
spokesman said.
The Pentagon officials also said
Henry A. Kissinger will relinquish
his job as chairman of the National
Security Council while remaining
Secretary-of-State
A high-ranking Republican
source said Schlesinger will be
replaced by Donald Rumsfeld,
White House chief of staff; Colby by
George Bush, now U.S. representative to China, and that Kissinger
will beieplaced as NSC chairman by
Air Force Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft,
Kissinger's deputy and protege.
Kissinger spent the morning at the
White House and planned to have
lunch at the Executive Office
Building nearby with Vice President
Nelson A. Rockefeller, who told
Ford today he does not want to be
considered for the vice presidential
nomination next year.
The vice president's announcement was to be another sure topic of
the news conference.
Members of the Senate In-
PAGE TWO
telligence Committee reacted sharply to the report of Colby's ouster,
linking it directly to his willingness
to cooperate with its investigation.
Chairman Frank Church, DIdaho, termed it part of "a whole
pattern developing of trying to
thwart the committee's work."
"It is clear that . . . on a broad
Court Requires Third Trial in Alioto Case
WASHINGTON (AP) The Supreme Court today let stand an order
requiring a third trial of San Fransisco Mayor Joseph Alioto's SI2. million
libel suit against the former publisher of Look magazine. The arliclecnliiled
"The Web that Links San Fransisco's Mayor Alioto and the Mafia,"
appeared in the Sept. 23, 1969, issue of Look, which has since ceased
publication. Alioto sued Cowles Communications, Ind. A I May trial in
I970endcd in mistrial when thejury could not agree ona verdict. Alicia 22day trial in 1972, a U.S. District Court jury found the article false and
delamatory, but said it could not return a verdict on the issue ol malice
front thercisnoquestioninmymind
but that concealment is the order of
the day," Church said.
Church said the pattern began
with an effort to block public
hearings and included a letter from
Ford on Friday appealing to the
committee not to make public its
report on assination.
House Committee Supports Loan to NYC
$2 Bill Makes Comeback
WASHINGTON (AP) The government officially announced today it
will issue a new $2.00 bill on April
13,1976. The date will be the birthday of Thomas Jefferson, whose
portrait will be on the bill.
Treasury Secretary William E.
Simon said he hopes Americans will
make wide use of the new bill, since it
is intended both to save the government $4 million a year in printing
costs and also to reduce the volume
of currency American carry.
The $2 bill, which dates back in
the nation's history to 1776, was
removed from circulation in 1866
because of a lack of interest by
Americans, who preferred using the
$1 bill in preference to the $2.
Jefferson, the third President of
the United States, also was on the
front of the last issue of the $2 bill,
Treasury officials said they also
considered other prominent persons,
including civil rights leader Martin
Luther King and suffragette Susan
B. Anthony, but decided Jefferson
was the most appropriate.
There will bea change in the back
of the bill. It will feature a rendition
of the signing of the Declaration of
Independence, as painted by John
Trumbull after the American
Revolution.
Althoughthe bill is beingissuedin
connection with celebration of the
nation's 200th birthday, Simon said
it is intended as an important and
continuing piece of national currency.
He said about $225 million of the
new bills will be available for circulation by banks in time for the April 13
release date, and he said annual
production will be about $400
million,
Officials said they anticipate few
problems in the retail and banking
business because of the new bill.
They said a similar bill circulates in
Canada without causing any
problems in handling by businesses.
Easing of Pot Penalties
PIRG Urges
WASHINGTON (AP) The House Banking Committee today approved a bill
authorizing the federal government to guarantee up to $7 billion in loans lor
New York City. It was $3 billion more than sought by Gov. Hugh Carey ol
New York. Before the House Committee vote, an Associated Press poll
showed that legislation aimed at averting a financial default by New York
City faces an uphill battle in the Senate where there is little likelihood that
President Ford's expected veto could be overridden.
Ross Testifies
HJfWCKBttftiT
"I'd walk a mile . . .
Academians Worry Over
The Costs of Grade Inflation
the trend is unchecked, grades will
by The College Press Service
There's more than one kind of in- no longer be a valid measurement of
flation that college administrators achievement and "the mainstay of
are complaining about. Grade infla- the cducutionalsystem will infact be
tion has drawn the criticism of ad- perverted."
Administrators doubt that grades
ministrators throughout the country
who arc beginning to question how arc going up because students are
many students deserve the grades getting smarter. They point to SAT
scores which show that, if anything,
they get.
As evidence, they point to the opposite is true.
SAT scores released this fall showScholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
scores for college-bound seniors ed that on an 800-point scale, the
which arc falling to new lows at the average score has dropped 44 points
same lime that grade point averages since 1963. Scores on the Math section ol the test have dipped 30 points
are climbing.
At the University of Oklahoma, over the same period.
The SATs are a "standardized
where the average grade in one
college is a 3.0, Dean I'nige Mul- measure of developed reasoning
hollen said recently that people hir- abilities important in college
ing graduates "are going to begin to courses." according to their
wonder, if everybody weturn out has designers.
In Oklahoma, Mulhollcnsaidthat
a high grade point but some of them
aren't very capable. They're going to there are a number of reasons why
start asking us, 'Wait a minute, what grades have edged upward over the
years.
are you doing for us?"
"Some think it has grown out of
The dean of the school of education at Arizona State University was the Vietnam war, that therearesome
alarmed enough by the high grades faculty who were unwilling to give
doled out in the school to put a ceil- bad grades that might lead to people
ing on the number of A's or H's getting drafted," he said.
He added that there arc others
awarded each quarter.
More than 85% of the school's "who think secondary education is
students received A's or B's in fall better than it has ever been before, or
quarter last year, accordingto a sur- that television has created a 'supervey. Final grades won't be ableto ex- generation.'There are a lot of
ceed a 3.0 average for all un- suggested reasons but I don't think
dergraduate students under the new anybody has much data to support
any of them," he said.
system.
Other administrators blame the
The problem is hardly confined to
Arizona and Oklahoma. A study of economy. The need to keep enroll197 institutions conducted by a ment up during hard economic times
researcher at Michigan State Un- may have led instructors to giveiversity showed that since I960, the higher grades to keep students at
average grade earned had risen by their schools.
At the University of Wisconsin in
about one half of a grade.
As ii result, accordingto the dean's Milwaukee, administrators claimed
student assistant at Johns Hopkins that policies allowing students to
University, "it is increasingly dif- drop classes they are doing poorly in
ficult lo distinguish mediocre may be part of the reason for grade
students from the truly outstanding averages jjiat have risen from 2.6 to
ones." The assistant claimed that if 2.8 there between 1969 and 1975.
FRYE
NOVEMBER 4, 1975
by A m y S. Cohen
Concerned students have brought
their dissatisfaction with Sunday
brunch hours to Peter Ii Haley,
assistant director of food service. At
present, brunch is served from 11 —
12:30 hut it seems that some
students would like to seethe hours
extended. Peter Haley explained
that these hours were chosen by
students in the past, but also conceded that students' needs do change.
lt seems that l-'.S.A. is already
working on the issue of brunch
hours. Haley states the major
problems certain to result from extension of brunch hours are
budgetary and morale. Haley feels
that if brunch were extended there
wouldn't be enough lime for dinner
preparation unless additional part
time help was employed. This would
result in an increase of F.S.A.'s
budget. Longer shifts would also
create a morale problem, especially
on a weekend meal. Despite these
and other concerns. Haley has initiated discussion of a compromise at
the Food Service Advisory Committee's meetings.
Basically the plan would work in
the following manner: Indian and
Colonial Quad would operate , on
one schedule. Dutch and Stale on
another. One set of quads would
maintainthe hours as they exist now.
brunch from II 12:30. dinner from
4 - 5:30. The other two quads would
shift all their meals to one hour later
so that brunch would be served from
12 1:30. dinner from 5 6:30. The
result would be a brunch running
c-~
Mountain Productions Presents
in Concert
from II — 1:30, and dinner running
from 4—6:30. Willi this system in
operation no one would have to
work longer shifts and there would
be no need for additional workers.
Ihe system is not however,
without its difficulties. Ihe major
problem exists on the downtown
campus where there is only one dining area between Alden and Waterbury, but perhaps something can be
worked out with Drubacher Hall.
Ihe oilier problem is students
themselves. According to Haley,
"Ihis is a system where students
must sacrifice lor other students."
I his is because people must cil her attend Sunday meals on their own
quad when meals are being served,
or walk over toa ncighboringquad.
Students can voice their approval
or disapproval of this plan by contacting a member ol their food committee which is a part of individual
quad boards. Haley says that he has
( proposed this system but nowit is up
. to students to put it into effect,
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Carey Campaigns for Federal Loans
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Students Fight the Brunch Crunch
MERCHANTS TO GENERATIONS
OF BOOT BUFFS
tiqued wallnut,
ALBANY, N.Y, (AP) With his normally bare ceremonial desk decorated
with papers and pens for a televised address, Gov. Hugh Carey began a
national publicity campaign aimed at getting support for federal loan
guarantees to help New York City avoid financial default. The new media
campaign, which is expected to dominate much of Carey's time (his week, is
being supervised by television wizard David Garth. He put together the
advertising blitz which catapulted Carey from obscurity to a landslide
election as governor just a year ago.
to monetary transactions or exchanges for value, but includes all
transfers including handing a marijuana cigarette from one person to
another at a party.
NYPIRG also presented evidence
demonstrating that "the overwhelming majority of those arrested for
marijuana offenses are 21 years old
or younger, said Ross. "More than
33 percent of those arrested were under 18 years old."
"Governor Hugh Carey and the
State Assembly are ready to change
New York's marijuana law," accordingto Ross. "If the Senate will take
action, there can be reform next
year."
NYPIRG is a non-partisan
research and advocacy organization
supported and directed by New York
State university students.
Assiatant director ol food a ervicea Paler E. Haley haa come up with a propoaal to appeaae atudenls
who are dissatisfied with brunch houra. According to Haley, It It now uptoatudentatoactuponit.
«*ljouNG SHOES****
Stratton Shocked by Shake-Up in Cabinet
WASHINGTON (AP) U.S. Rep. Samuel S. Stratton of New York, one ol
the senior Democrats on the House Armed Services Committee, said today
he was"shockedand troubled" by theshake-up in the Ford Cabinet. Straiion
said he regards theouster of the Defense Secretary James R. Schlesinger and
Central
Intelligence Agency Director William Colby as "serious
mistakes.""Secrclary Schlesinger is one of the greatest secretaries of Defense
we have ever had. He is intelligent. He is honest.
He is not palsy for ihe
Pentagon. He has done an outstanding job of selling the Congress and the
country on the fallacies of weakening our national defense."
"The present policy of marijuana
law enforcement makes no sense,"
said the director of NYPIRG,
Donald Ross, while testifying in
Syracuse before the State Senate
Codes Committee."Thousands of
hours of police time and more than
40 million dollars annually are spent
enforcing New York's marijuana
laws," said Ross. "While police are
busy with the paperwork surrounding the arrest of some 17-year-old
caught with a single joing, the mob
goes merrily on its way peddling
killer drugs."
NYPIRG argued that every major
study from the Indian Hemp Drugs
Commission Report completed in
1894 to the 4-million-dollar 1972
report of the National Commission
on Marijuana and Drug Abuse supported the propositions that marijuana use is "not addicting, does not
lead to harder drug use and has no
significant adverse health impact on
users."
Robert Voorhis, a NYPIRG
spokesperson articulated the
research groups's position. "NYPIRG favors decriminalizing possession of two ounces or less of marijuana and charging the legal definition of'sale' to exclude those who are
not actually engaged in drugtraffic."
Accordingto Voorhis, the present
legal definition of sale is not limited
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
ACT Takes Action With Their New Data System
SUNYA
by Maria Bucdfrrrn
the day care center. On the bulletin
Strange beings inhabit the base- board over the children's coat rack
ment of Pierce Hall, a freshman are sign-up sheets for the parent
dorm on Ontario Street. Though committees: Program, Finance,
they wear typical SUN VA garb —
Food, Fund Raising, Research. The
blue jeans, sweat shirts, farmer calendar of events lists programs lor
overalls, work boots -.- they're October: picnic in Thatcher Park, a
onlythrccfeet high. They prefer milk story hour and film at the library, apto heer. and their idea of an obsceni- ple picking at Heldcrlcdgc Farm, a
ty is to call their friend "poo poo."
trip to the airport; a Halloween parMidget fundamentalists?, No. ly.
Colonic Center Booth
they're the kids ol the Pierce Hall
Day Care Center.
I he Hind-Raising Committee has
Kanginginugcl'rom 18 months to
a sign-up sheet ol its own for parents
live years, the children come to the to man its booth at the Colonic
center lor morning and afternoon
Center Charities Fair, October 27
sessions, lull or part time, whilcthcir
through JO. Parents arc lurning the
parents attend classes or goto work.
apples picked the week before into
pies, breads, and jellies to sell. A
The center was started in 1972 by a
jelly-making class is listed.
group of parents as a free, voluntary
system to help them return to school.
Research Committee has a notice
It was incorporated in 197.1 and is posted also. Joanne Joseph of the
licensed to accommodate 40 children
SUNYA psychology department
a day.
will he there that night to preview her
film and discuss the study she's planFree Facilities
Pierce Hail'* day care center provides parent* with tree child mpervldon while they attend classes
SUNYA provides the free ning to do with the children.
Also posted is the parent
facilities, which include two large,
carpeted rooms and a kitchen. The volunteer clean-up schedule.
wall, consists ol freshly-made, to X0 per cent of its food budget each $2,000 during the 1971-72 school
only stipulation is that at least SO per
Besides volunteering some time, vegetarian foods. Sharon Goldberg, month, a reimbursement which year, $3,000 in 1972-7.1. and VUlllll
cent of the parents be SUNYA cither vacuuming or baking bread the cook, and mother of 18-month- began last February.
in 1973-74 from SA. Last veur.
students.
Jennifer I'osner, director ol the Pierce Hall's requests were turned
lor the children, parents pay a fee old Joshua, had on the menu that
In addition, officers of Pierce Hall determined by their income. The day home-baked bread and apples center, is glad to he receiving some down.
must be SUNYA student-parents. average cost per day. and average for snack-time, and cheddar cheese federal funds. Speaking with her
According to Sin Klein. SA conMary Hascucci, an accounting major tuition charged is $7 a full day. This pie and carrot sticks lor lunch.
British accent, she run a playschool troller, "The basic raiumiilc [tor
and mother of Brenda, three, and includes lunch.
Since Congress overran President and was vice principal of an elemen- Pierce Hall not getting SA Itinds)is
Angela, four, is the center's current
Lunch, in the sunny kitchen with Ford's veto of the Federal Nutrition tary school in England before com- that students who are resptmsihlclur
president.
red. blue, yellow, and green picnic Act last month, the day care center ingtotheUSin 1968. I'osner seemed Ihe day care and support ol a child
Parents are actively involved in tables and animal cut-outs, on the will continue to be reimbursed lor up assured about the center's financial arc not required to pa\ student las.
condition.
and receive a waiver. We would bo
"We were nearly bankrupt lust lunding a group who isn't conJanuary." said I'osner. This is when tributing to our lunds. I he people
she became director. "We were over who benefit are the ones who pay."
a thousand dollars in d e b t . . . Now
I hough not benefitting from SA.
by Marl* Abrams
although a few problems have been themselves that one of the bus we're finally becoming financially the parents and the children seem to
SUNYA students no longer have encountered due to the level of in- drivers was drunk," reports Meckler.
solvent."
he benefitting Irom the day cure
to leave their favorite bar or a "great toxication ol some students. In addi- Other problems include promptness
I he Pierce Hall Day Cart) Center center. According to I'osner. the
party" early to catch the last bus tion, "last Saturday, there were of buses, as well as the clarification
gets no funds from Student Associa- Pierce Hall center "helps students
before 1:00 a.m. on the weekends. several complaints from students ol the new prices.
tion. I he dav care center did receive
continued mi pant eight
Since the third week of school, Student Association has been funding a '
late night bus downtown on Fridays
and Saturdays, which runs from the
circle to the Hotel Wellington.
According to Rick Mecklcr, SA
Vice-President, Student Association
rents buses for $45 a night from the
Capitol District Transit Authority,
lor three hours each night. The first
bus leaves the circle at 12:30 a.m. and
stops at Ontario and Western. Lark
and Western, The Hotel Wellington,
Lark and Washington, Lark and
Madison (Lark Tavern), Partridge
and Western and Western and
Us means Greyhound, and a lot of students who
SU N Y A (Suttcrs). The last bus stops
are already on to a good thing. You leave when
at the Hotel Wellington at .1:00 a.m.
you like. Travel comfortably. Arrive refreshed
Mecklcr adds that "the bus will stop
anywhere along that route il the
and on time. You'll save money, too. But you
'f a tree falls in the forest
driver is asked, or il a student is seen
already know that. So share the ride with us on
waiting lor the bus."
and there's no one there,
weekends. Holidays. Anytime. Go Greyhound
The new weekend schedule was
who are you going to drink
originally "a seven week experiment
your Cuervo with?
in which the students with an 1.1 J. or
Greyhound announces
tax card paid 25 cents and all others
eAltamericani
lAmeripass.'
pay 50 cents," says Mcckler. "Two
weeks ago, Student Association
decided that the bus would be free
lot those with a tax card." However,
he adds that some bus drivers have
not yet acknowledged the change in
price.
"Solar, we're pleased with the way
things are running," says Mecklcr,
Weekend Late Buses are Running
mm
SHARE THE RIDE
WITH US THIS
THANKSGIVING
AND GET ON
TO A GOOD THING.
by Meg Morrow
Act has acted. No longer will they
collect their data about faculty
members and courses by means of a
computer sheet that must be filled in
with pencil. Instead, according to
ACT' (Assessment of Courses and
Teachers) data management coordinator Paul Rockwell, the evaluation will be carried out using IBM
punch-out-the-hole cards.
The new method will be instituted
this semester in an effort to avoid
some of the problems encountered
with the past system. It is hopedthat
the IBM cards will be one step
towards more efficient compilation
ol this information.
Rockwell outlined some ol the pitfalls of the method previously used.
"It got to be very time-consuming.
That was our biggest reason," he
said. Previously, Ihe responses on
the sheets were run through a computer and punched out on IBM
cards. According to Rockwell, they
frequently contained incomplete
erasures, which resulted ina"doublc
punch" for a single question. This Invalidated the response Much time
hud lo be spent manually checking
the computer sheets for these mislakcs and making sure that the student had not omitted the section
number at the top of the sheet identilying the course he was evaluating.
Answer Sheet Confusion
eliminated with the new system, says
Rockwell. The student will answer
the questionnaire directly on an IBM
punch card, thereby removing the
extra step of transferring information from the computer sheets to the
curds.
The new cards contain spaces for
all necessary information, and the
student will simply punch out theappropriatc numbered response space.
This will facilitate easy checking of
the cards to make sure that no question has been answered twice. Also
on the card is an error section where
the student can write in the number
ofa qucstionthat has been answered
incorrectly and replace it with a new
punch.
Five Per Cent Lost
"We hope to eliminate a lot oflhe
errors that have been cropping up"
Rockwell said, noting the importance of accuracy in the ACT. He
cited the live percent of responses
that were lost through the old
system's errors.
Another important I unction oft he
new cards is the space available for
written comments. If a student has
something to say. he or she can
punch a hole in the side of the card
indicating that something has been
written, and then proceed to comment on the course or teacher. The
data processors will then be able to
sort all cards with written comments.
In addition, the numbering system This is significant in that individual
used on the answer sheets was con- comments on a particular class will
fusing, since all the question sheets now he made available to students.
In the future, Rockwell hopes to
were numbered horizontally, while
the spaces on the answer sheets were see the comments computerized so
that all a student will have to do is
numbered vertically.
These problems have been type out a class code on a computer
by Administration Bldg.
If
ut-sm
after »:W P.M.
REWARD!
JOSE CUERVO*TEQUILA. W PROOF.
IMPORTED AND BOTTLED BY CIWJ. HEUBLEIN, INC., HARTFORD, CONN.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
der the present procedure a
professor's personal consent is needed before the course can be
evaluated, and some teachers refuse
to let ACT into their classrooms.
Rockwell plans to have a list of these
teachers with their reasons for not
wanting the evaluation available to
students in the ACT' office.
Says Rockwell, "Students have a
Irom SA. In terms of computer
operation. Rockwell said that the
cards will save about ten to twenty
dollars an hour.
Two Semesters' Assessment
1 he initial fee for the new cards
was six hundred dollars, which
bought forty thousand cards,
enough for two semesters' worth of
assessment. This also paid for two
changes like this one can be seen as
signs of growth in this recent addition to SUNYA. Its main purpose is
to help students find out more about
t he courses I hey are considering, and
works as an alternative to the often
contradictory word-of-mouth advice passed around about classes.
ACT is handled completely by
volunteers.
Main Ballroom in CC
or call (518) 472-4424 today
Greyhound.
NOVEMBER 4, 1975
Another lest Friday! That slime,
wail till the ACT evaluations.
Nov. 6, 1975
MOT than ever, we're Intouchwith America
PAGE FOUR
By the end of next semester it is
projected that there will be a saving*,
in the use of the new system.
"We're trying to save money and
increase accuracy," Rockwell said.
"It's not perfect yet—we're still
developing."
ACT is still in its infancy and
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in Black Case lost
one-time charges of drawing up the
card and making a tool for punching
TAKE COMMAND
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The
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and all written comments for that right to know why their professors
class will appear instantly to be read didn't want their classes done."
and evaluated. This process is only in Several departments, such as
the planning stages now, but Classics and Philosophy, are
Rockwell plans to make this currently using the ACT questionsemester's written comments naire to evaluate the faculty within
available to students in the ACT of- their own departments.
The new card system will help to
fice as soon as possible.
Some courses arc omitted from cut the cost of compiling ACT',
the ACT because the professors which receives a budget of apdecline to have them evaluated. Un- proximately ten thousand dollars
NOVEMBER 4, 1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIVE
i..^
MORRISON ALIVE
Prostitutes Come Forward for Decriminalization
bfXal
Prostilntion hi
coated by labor »
t i o a e d by the
government.
P r o o i t i a a nave denied their vocation and hid in doorways while
police-cars craned by. But now, one
prostitute b bringing the profession
out of the d o s e t a n d a s k i n g t h a l i t b c
decnminabzcd.
She was once called "the coyote
trickster" by a satisfied customer and
the name stuck. She is a hooker and
the founder o f C O Y O T E , an activist
organization for prostitutes- Margo
St- James, an attractive dark-haired
woman i n her late 30s. started
C O Y O T E (Call Off Your Old Tired
Ethics) i n San Francisco on
Mother's Day. I97A Vow she is taking the C O Y O T E message around
the courarv.
"The basic issue is the ownership
of our bodies." she asserts. ~ \ o one
really has the right t o tell me how t o
earn my Imng—unless they want t o
give me a better-paring j o b . "
With the support of the United
Nations, the American Civil Liberties Union and various public
defender groups. St. James is hoping
t o mobilize US opinion against what
she terms a "hypocritical Congress"
and eventually do away w i t h
repressive laws against prostitutes,
one of the most oppressed groups of
women in the world.
St. James makes it dear that she is anything about that."
Arrested and jailed for soliciting
working for decriminalization o f
prostitution, not across-the-board in 1962 (she maintains she was set
up). S t James finally became angry
legalization.
"Legalization would d o nothing t o enough t o take some action. In 1970
remove the stigma," she says. "The she formed W H O M (Whores.
government could still teO women Housewives and Other Mothers), a
conciousness-raising group for
what t o d o with their bodies."
Hookers, she says, are victims of hookers and customer's wives. Duran oppressive, sexist society who fall ing the next few years her increased
prey t o everyone from the govern- involvement turned into C O Y O T E
ment on down. "Every woman. The results have encouraged her
whether she's a hooker o r n o t has enough to barnstorm the US on a
been solicited on the street at some good will tour.
lime or another by an unknown
And i n her hometown of San
male." she claims. " N o one does Francisco, public defenders are
planning a civil suit on behalf of
COYOTE against the city and county for abridgement of prostitutes'
constitutional rights and use of cruel
and unusual punishment.
This fall she will attend an international conference in Paris sponsored by UNESCO.
" The conference grew out of a
n a t i o n w i d e " s t r i k e " o f the
prostitutes of France. Claiming the
right of free speech and the right l o
solicit, the French prostitutes have
taken over buildings, demonstrated
in the streets and staged sit-ins i n
many of the country's churches.
CLASSICAL ALBUMS
New laws in European countries
have been recently imposed which
allow everyone from dociors on
down t o bellboys to gel apieceofthe
economic action, St. James says. As
a result, the average hooker is lucky
i f she can take home I $% of her earnings.
The image of a prostitute making
hundreds of dollars a night and paving relatively little tax is a "total
m y t h , " she explains.
Decriminalization ol prostitution
would not result in the translocation of America into a "hooker's
paradise." she says.
1.99
COMPOSERS SUCH AS: SCHUBERT
MOZART-BRAHMS-TCHAIKOVSKY
BEETHOVm.PLUS MAM MORE
PAGE SIX
Cussclberry, who's been cashing in
on the Morrsion legend, even had his
name changed to James Douglas
Morrison, the legal name ol the late
singer w i t h The Doors.
Casscl berry claims he's not
defrauding anyone; he insists that
Morrison's spirit entered his body in
I otiisiitna about the lime (he real
Morrison succumbed lo heart failure
in I'liri.v, and thai he's simply currying on the message.
Anderson says that investigators
lor the Humane Society, for instance
have found that those happylooking cats used for Purina Cat
Food commercials are often kept in
dirty cages wit h 30 to 4(1 cats to each
cage. Anderson adds that when
Humane Society
investigators
attempted to visit Purina a month
later, the eats were gone. They were
lold by Purina handlers that the cats
had died "of some disease."
When asked about Digg's efforts
in the matter, his office conlirmed
that he opposed the bill. Said one of
his aides, .loan Willotighby. "He's
against the decriminalization of
marijuana, bless his little heart."
Willotighhy explained that Diggs
Anderson also says the Humane
Society discovered that the playful
hear who once starred in t he "Beverly Hillbillies" T.V. series is now "living in a cramped cage, with no
evidence of reward for t he thousands
of dollars it must base earned for its
owner."
A n o r g a n i z a t i o n called the
National Association for Justice has
complained lo A B C that prison isn't
a very funny place to he.
Ihe association is calling on the
network to cancel its situation comedy about prison life called " O n Ihe
Kocks."
D.C. COPS OUT
The Washington, D . C
City
Council, under the reported pressure
of Michigan Congressman Charles
Diggs. has reversed itself and decided not to decriminalize marijuana.
thought it would be awkward for
Washington
D.C.
to
have
decriminalized pot while federal
laws emanating from Washington
still defined its use as a crime.
FBI SUED
A federal appeals court in
Philadelphia has ruled that a high
school girl has the right to sue the
BASKETBALL
I MARATHON
7 p.m. Sat. Nov. 8
I to 7 p.m. Sun. Nov. 9
24 Hours
I
|
|
\
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
4
1 SPONSORS: T C a ^ a
Townhouse
| Lark Tavern Partridge Pub
NOVEMBER 4, IP'
NOVEMBER 4,
The FBI says it currently m a i n tains a list of more than 1200 persons
who are considered "security risks",
who may be picked up and detained
in the event of a national emergency.
The existence of the list was
revealed this week by FBI Director
Clarence Kelly in a letter t o Con-
Vt>
l
. /
^} :.P
Lieutenant William Calley. who is
currently on the college lecture circuit, will be paid $3000 hy Arizona
State University lor a single lecture
"•r>"
-V^C\
$$!'
gressman Robert Kastenmeier, the
chairman ol the House Civil Liberties subcommittee.
Kelley reported that the list does
not include nonviolent protestors
and dissenters, but "only those i n dividuals who pose a realistic, direct
and current danger t o the national
security.
Congressional authority for the
detention ol Americans who are considered a possible security threat expired in 1171. At that time, the FBI
reported that the list of Americans
on the detention list had grown t o at
least 15.000 persons. Ihe current list
contains only 1294 people. Kelley
stated.
GLASSES OF '76 and
7 9 GALA!
fTlusic by Pearl
Place: CC Ballroom
DOTE: November 8 1975
Time: 9Pffl -l-.OOAfT.
RDmiSSION: 91.25 with I.D.
$ .75 with claw of 76 or 79 tax card
ARTISTS SUCH AS: KINKS
JEFFERSON AIRHLA\E.BEE GEES
DR. JOH\.ELTO\I JOHN
STEPHEN STILLS.PLUS MANY MOREmmm
•oonwiw
EMERGENCY RISKS
Assorted Cheese Wheels
Cheese Dips
Crackers Potato Chips
Pretzels
LABELS SUCH AS: COLUMBIA
WARNER BROS..ATLANTIC-RCA
j g w «» torn**
mmlSSmlniS! **
MORBID CURIOSITY
I
VAL,
6.'Ill
Jfe°SJ**2gP«» at Super Discount Prices
According to the group. "On The
Kocks" portrays a place where "no
one is going to get hurl hy guards or
inmates" when, in fact, the opposite
is usually the case. Ihe association
labels the show "a mockery of
human sullcring."
I
| See Hoopstera,
ECORD TOWN
Paton's attorney. Frank Askin,
said of t he court's decision: " W e now
have the opportunity to have a trial
ol FBI agents and their conduct."
on the My Lai Massacre.
Calley hat keen touring t he country, charging money for hit public
appearances since his release from
military, custody on appeal earlier
this year. He was convicted in 1971
of murdering "not leu than 22 Vietnamese civilians'' during a raid on
the village of My Lai.
JAIL-HOUSE JOKES
TELETHON 76 PRESENTS
SELECTED ALBUMS 1.99
FBI because the bureau compiled a
dossier on her after she wrote a letter
t o a leftist political party.
The student, Lori Paton, was 16years-old i n 1973 when, as part of a
school assignment, she wrote a letter
to the Socialist Labor Party seeking
information about its policies. The
letter was inadvertently addressed to
the Socialist Workers Party, and was
secretly intercepted hy the FBI.
F B I agents then began a
background check on the 16-yearold, and compiled a dossier on her
activities after interviewing her
friends and teachers.
Reform of Marijuana Laws reports
that the new law was scheduled t o be
routinely seconded this week when
Congressman Diggs of Detroit i n tervened.
Diggs, the chairman of Congress's
House District Committee, the committee with partial jurisdiction over
the District of Columbia, reportedly
lobbied heavily with the D.C. City
Council until three members changed their votes. Asa result, the pot bill
has been tabled l o r two years.
ANIMAL ABUSE
Boys and girts understand major
school subjects equally w d l — u n u l
about age 13. But at 13. girls heginio
decline i n educational achievement
and this continues i n t o adulthood.
Research conducted by the
National Assessment of Educational
Progress shows that of eight major
learning areas, males generally d o
hettcrinloursubjecu: math, science,
social studies and a t i / e m h i p . Girls
were show n t o have a slight edge i n
m u u c t h a l carries over to later years
and consistently out-perform males
i n writing.
The report also says thai Use
differences in lite seses' performance
on math tests was "overwhelming,"
Girls keep up until agc9, but lag l i t e r
i n measurement exercises and
geometry.
The New Orleans Times- Picayune
reports that a musician who lobs
himself oil as the dead rock star
"who never really died" is actually
28-ycar-old Billy Cassclberry of
Baton Rouge.
SAG
erable in n a l life.
A n d e r s o n r e p o r t s that i n vestigators for the Humane Society
have found Hollywood t o be guilty
of "inhumane training methods, i n cluding the withholding of food, the
use of force, and the use of dietsthat
f a i l t o meet n u t r i t i o n a l requirements."
Earlier this month, the D.C.
Council had voted 8 t n 4 i n l a v o r o l a
bill that would have treated minor
Columnist .lack Anderson reports marijuana offenses as "violations"
that those cute little animals which punishable only by lines instead of
appear so contented in movies and "crimes" punishable by jail terms.
I he National Organization for I he
on I V . commericals are often mis-
by The College Press Service
In science tests, where boys outperformed gitls. the authors guessed
that the differences might be because
high school science courses are
generally efectnes Boys choose
science courses more often than
gjris, the authors state, g m n g t b e m a
better knowledge of the physical
sciences.
But before you get too excited,
you might also note that this Jim
Morrison is not the same Jim
Morrison of The Doors who died in
France lour years ago.
w
LABELS SUCH AS: AUDIO FIDELITY
EVEREST.RCA.RED SEAL- MERCURY
Achievement
vs. Aptitude
But in reading and literature,
where gsilt excel at age 9. they fall
behind mates by the time they reach.
the ages oi 26-35.
Figures lor the governmentfinanced study were tabulated f r o m
analysts of tests given to 900.000
students and young adults in the US.
Ihe l>tn\i:r-hased National Assessment claims that it is a "strictly census like, data gathering organizat i o n " Bis the organization did offer
some evpianauon for the difference
i n educauonal ability of the sexes.
In reading, where girts outstrip
boys unul age I " , the report's
authors speculate that the reason
may be the jobs women get later in
life. "Since the majority oi higher
level jobs—where reading is an important and frequently used skill belong t o men. women generally do
not have the opportunity t o employ
reading skills that men do." the
report states
Believe if or not, rock singer Jim
Morrison is alive and well in New
Orleans. Not only that, he will be out
with a new Jim Morrison album
soon.
j_-,<.
Cosimos
Admission entitles you to 4 large beers or
4 glasses of wine punch
and all you can eatl
<
>
<
King of Clubs |
Silo Washington TaVem§
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
:
PAGE SEVEN
Day Care
Xeroxing Done by SA
continued from page four
feel comfortable about their children
learning to get along with other
children while they're studying. It's
not just a babysitting service—the
children are benefitting."
Mrs. Posner adds that a unique
thing about the center-is that "the
teachers arc very poorly paid lor
their qualifications." hive of the six
full-time teachers at at he center have
their bachelor or master degree; one
has an associate degree.
b a fine idea, but
where do you start?
Barbara Koulks, teacher of the
four-year-olds, has a master's in
curriculum
instruction from
SUN YA and is certified to teach up
to sixth grade.
As she pushedjn child on one of
the swings behind fierce Hall, she
said. "I like day care. It's tiring, but
it's fun. I used to work at the Salvation Army day care center two-anda-half years, and at St. Matthew's.
Bo | her son who's three] has been
coniine here since he wns one; I've
worked here since August."
Feminist Alliance
Our conversation was soon
interrupted- "Barbara. Allgie's
sick!" Augie was taken inside to lie
down, and his mother was called on
I he phone.
Transportation Changes
will sponsor a panel discussion on RAPE
Wed.
Submit such articles
for
to:
Magazine
Editor
Albany Student Press
CC329
1400 Washington Avenue, Albany
12222
University Speakers Forum
and
The
Sting
University Concert Board {
join to bring you
The National
Shaw
with
*£>*&., -
Paul Newman & Robert Redford
"I'm very favorably impressed. It's
nice to hear little kids."
" I he kids are crying and sereaming'Mommy. Mommy' when I try to
read in Ihe morning around 9:30 to
III."
" I here's no problem at all.
they're just there in the day."
Thursday, Friday
"No one else uses the basement,
& Saturday nights
and it's worthwhile."
"You wouldn't know it was there."
PAGE EIGHT
Magazine-type articles in these varied areas are welcome
ASPects, the A l b a n y Student Press Magazine Section.
BY NOVEMBER 5
or else!
Tower East Gnema presents
Reactions to the day care center
were tor Ihe most part favorable!
ASPects/VO VEMBEH IS ASPtct.
ASPecUASPecUASPectsASPects
ASPectlASPectiASPect»ASPtct»
ASPecUASPectiASPoctiASPecti
Other. .
ALL ARE WELCOME!
Kuls don't sit down all day.
I hey're ollen noisy and boisterous.
What about the students who live
upstairs Irom the center in Pierce
Hall'.'
"I like to see little kids running
Ihe xeroxing services are open to
all members of the universitygroups as well as individual students
and professors. Prices vary accor-
People
Feature
Fiction
Sports
Arts
8 P.M.
CC Assembly Hall
Will include:
Fraya Katz- Albany County Rape Crisis Center
Bobbi Palm- Physical Education Department (self-defense)
2 members of Campus Security
A Female Lawyer
I he large white rabbit lives in a
playpen in the junior room, lor the
18-month to three-year-olds. A sand
box. play house, toys, hooks, solas,
table, cribs and cols fill the room.
The three to five-year-olds are in a
large, blue carpeted room complete
with a stage, climbing apparatus,
plants, fish, a reading comer, an art
corner, a science corner. Blue cots
are piled by the wall lor nap lime.
Mrs. I'osner notes."Many parents
have said we have the most space of
any other center in the Iri-city area.
,uul that we have the correct proportion ol structure and flexibility
between where they're too Iree and
loo rigid, making kids sit down all
day."
around, as long as they're not in my
room."
"There's Brubaeher next door; we
can have activities there it serves
I he I unction. We don't need the basement."
But the I'ierec Hall Day Care
Center needs the basement to exist;
lolill the need for quality day care so
parents can go hack to school or
work -so their children can have a
Inn place to learn and play.
Nov. S
Tax Card Pickup
As mentioned before, tax cards
may be picked up at the SA Services office. A valid I D must be
presented in order to receive a tax
card.
Other services offered are the sale
of Greyhound bus tickets, tickets to
concerts sponsored bythe University
Concert Board, the sale of A C T I I I
and Viewpoint. Ihe office accepts
classified ads and graflitti information for t he A SP. The SA Services
office is open from 10a.m. toS p.m.
Monday through Friday. Its
telephone number is 457-3428.
Unc of the biggest services offered
by SA is xeroxing. Presently, there
arc two machines: the Xerox 7000,
used for large quantities of copies
(e.g. 300 copies of one original) and
also for the reduction of the size of
prim of the original, and the Xerox
4300 used for one to ten copies of the
same original. The 4500 has a
collator built into it which can
separate up to 20 pages of an article.
President Fields (right) met Mayor Corning here on Wednesday tor the llrat time. Corning was at
8UNVA to show Ms support lor the Telethon pumpkin sale.
In previous years, the day care
center had use of a SU N Y A bus once
a week. Now Barbara used her
Volkswagen bus to take the kids to
visit the State museum, the police
station, the lire house, or the pet
store to buy rabbit food.
ding to the number of copies made
and whether or not the individual.
has a tax card. The Student
Assistants do the xeroxing, the
customer drops it off, pays for it and
then comes back (usually in a few
hours) to pick it up. Copies may be
run in many different colors at no
additional cost. Bond paper is alio
available for those wanting copies of
theses and resumes at an increased
cost over the normal copy rate. No
checks are accepted.
by Patty Hdbock
Have you noticed the new line
next to Check Cashing? Found
yourself traipsing up to the third
floor lor your tax card and being
sent back down to the first floor?
Heard the steady beat of Xerox
machines destroy the "quiet" of the
Campus Center lobby? Well, in case
you haven't noticed, the Student
Association has branched out and
many of its services are located in the
old telephone office on tltelirst floor
of the Campus Center.
We asked the same question when we first
found ourselves in a position to make the world
a more livable place.
At Kodak, we started close to home. In
Rochester, New York. We cut river pollution with
one of the most efficient industrial waste water
treatment plants in the country. We cut air pollution with scrubbers, adsorbers and electrostatic
precipitators. We helped set up a black enterprise program in downtown Rochester,
Why? Helping to combat water pollution not
only benefits society but us as well as we need
clean water to make film, Our combustible waste
disposal facility not only reduces air pollution
but also helps pay for itself in heat and steam
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
production and silver recovery. The black enterprise program not only helps people who aren't
well off but also helps stabilize communities in
which Kodak can work and grow.
, , n short, it's simply good business. And
we re in business to make a profit. But in furthering our business interests, we also further society's interests.
After all, our business depends on society.
So we care what happens to it.
November 6,7 & 8
7:30 & 10:00 pm
LC7
Kodak.
More than a business.
$.75 with state quad card
Tickets are on sale in the CC. Cameroom {
everyday from 10 am till 2 pm
2 Shows
8:00 pm and 10:30 pm
>;
Fri. Nw. 7
-$
$1.25 without
8:00 p.in.
CC. MrMm
1
hllllllllllllllllimilHIHIIIIIIIHHIIIHimilHMWn
NOVEMBER 4, 19
PAGE NINE
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
NOVEMBER 4, 197S
•
i&&wmiiUBm&
The ftee Music Store presents Frederic R i e w i k i , pianist, W e d .
Nov. 5 at 8:30 p.m. in the Studio Theatre, PAC.
ANYTIME
There will b e a general meeting for all interested in t h e
Children's H o w C o m m i t t e e of Tefefhon, W e d . Nov. 5 a t 8 p. m.
in the State Q u a d Flag Room. Any questions, please call Craig a t
4 5 7 - 3 0 3 6 or Karen at 457-4656.
Tefef h o n '76 presents 2 4 hours of Baiketball
to Sun 7 p.m. Nov. 9.
N W M 9 m e m b e r s — t h e r e will b e o t a t t l e I a n M o o r i n g T u n .
f r o m 7-8 p . m . Please check C C 3 3 3 for ( h e location
Scuba C l u b meeting T u n . a t 7 p. m. In I C 1 2 . M a n d a t o r y for all
members. Anyone interested in joining the club Is welcome. Any
questions call Bill or M i k e 4 9 7 - 7 7 6 8 .
Tuesday, Nov. 4 a t 3:43 in C C 3*15, ftofossor Daniel Dishon will
speak o n t h e recent interim agreement b e t w e e n Egypt a n d
Israel. Professor Dishon is a n internatinally known expert a n Middle East Affairs.
*'
* *
There will b e a mandatory meeting of W.I.K.A.
ficials a t 3:45 In C C 3 5 6 ;
*
volleyball of-
* *
Students a n d faculty come together! Come to t o Cr/rcfe Francois
Pot-luck Oinmn. Sign-up In t h e French Dept. o; call Viviane 77 7 2 9 or Faith 7-4027.
*
* *
l e g a l C o m m i s s i o n of t h e SA Supreme Court a n d Judicial Boards
(Student Attorneys) mandatorymeetingTues. Nov. 4 , 6 : 3 0 p.m. In
t h e Fireside Lounge.
*
* *
There will b e a meeting of University Speakers F o r u m every
Tues. night at 7 : 3 0 p . m . inthePatroonLounge. All a r e welcome.
*
* *
An interesting class in M f s h n a , Midiath,
Cnauidic
and J e w i s h
p h i l o s o p h y is given every Tuesday evening by Rabbi Israel
LRubinat his home 122 So. M a i n Ave. 8 p.m. All a r e welcome. For
info call 4 8 2 - 5 7 8 1 .
*
*
" *
" O n Betng a Friend to Another', a one-evening p r o g r a m on
reflective understanding* Tues. Nov. 4 a t 8 p.m. in C h a p e /
House.
C o m m u n i t y Supper for anyone interested in a simple but
nutritious home-cooked m e a l — n o set f e e — e v e r y o n e welcome.
Tuesday Nov. 4 a t 5 : 3 0 p.m. C h a p e l House.
Last Chance to sign u p for NYP1RG l e g o / Research course. Must
come by CC 3 3 3 or call 4 5 7 - 2 4 4 6 TODAY.
WEDNESDAY
G a n d h i — C h a n g e — N o n v i o l e n c e — a study group on W e d .
afternoons at 2 : 1 0 p.m., HU 132, from Oct. 2 9 t h r o u g h N o v . 19.
Dutch Q u a d H o l i d a y Sing interest meeting, W e d . Oct. 5 at 7
p.m. in t h e Coffeehouse (U-Lounge). Please come along a n d bring your, ideas.
P r e - i a w Society—meeting
Nov. 5, W e d . a t 8 p.m. in LC 19.
Topic is "The Lawyer as Legislator" with Senator H o w a r d N o l a n .
All welcome.
*
* *
Dr. S a x m a n from Syracuse Univ.will be speaking on cleft palate
W e d . Nov. 5 at 7:30 p.m. In HU 3 4 5 . Sponsored by the S A O
Club.
. . .
The Feminist Alfiancewill sponsor a panel discussion on r a p e ,
which will include a speaker on self-defense, a speaker on the
legal aspect, a n d representatives of campus security. It will b e
held on W e d . Nov. 5 at 8 p.m. in t h e CC Assembly Hall a n d all
*
The D i a r y of A d a m a n d f v o — a one-act musical, written by S.
Harnick a n d J. Beck, (from The A p p l e Tree), directed by j !
DeRubo, will b e presented .November' 7,8,9 in the Lob Theatre.
Performance times will b e 7 : 3 0 p.m., a n d 9 : 3 0 p . m . eachniqht
You a r e invited to a lecture a n d discussion on the subject of the
Role of the Czecholovak Artists and Writers in 1975, by Dr. Jarka
Burton, Professor of Theatre, SUNYA, on Thurs. Nov. 6 at 7:30
p.m. in FA 114. Sponsored by the Czechoslovak Society of Arts
and Sciences.
Students for Fred Harris for President will be holding a meeting
on Thurs. Nov. 6 at 7:30 p.m. in HU 137. They will be showing the
slide show for Fred Harris.
Audtion for Tom Stoppard's The Real Inspector Hound, Thurs.
Nov. 6 from 7-10 p.m., andFri. 4-6 p.m. in the Green Room of the
PAC Experimental Theatre. Jolly Good Showl
Israeli Dance Club every Thurs. night from 9 to 10:30 p.m. Intermediate to advanced. Held in the Phys. Ed. dance studio.
Everyone welcome. Any questions, call Tania, 7-7748.
*
CLASSIFIED
*
*
The beginning a n d a d v a n c e d c o n d i t i o n i n g courses scheduled
for Tuesday-Thursdays a t 7:10-8 p.m. during spirng semester in
the Spring C a t a l o g should r e a d 7 : 1 0 8 a.m.
Community
Service R e g i s t r a t i o n for Spring 7 6 will take place
from Nov. 3 t h r o u g h N o v . 7 f r o m 9 a . m . until 4 p , m . betweenLC3
a n d LC 4.
C o m m u n i t y Service Evaluation
sessions a r e now going o n —
Community Service students m u s t attend
one—check your
schedule for time a n d location of session or call 7-4801.
Want to b e a L e g i s l a t i v e A c t i v i s t ? SASU is offering internships
next semseter in : Communications, Legislative Affairs, Information & Research, Student Services, a n d Administrative Affairs.
Work in Albany a n d e a r n up t o 15 credits in your field of study.
For more info see Dianne Piche in the SA Office (CC 346i o< call
4 5 7 - 6 5 4 2 by Nov. 5.
. . .
G r i e v a n c e forms concerning complaints of sexism are now
available in CC & Tower Offices. Call Jill lor further info at 4384260.
Career Day, all d a y Thurs. Nov. 6 in the CC Ballroom. Representatives of almost 5 0 enterprises will be present with displays a n d
available to answer questions. Sponsored by Delta Sigma Pi,
Professional Business Fraternity.
ATTENTION
Community Service Registration
The Department
of Slavic Languages and literatures,
presents
the first in a series of Linguistics Lectures. The topic is "Remarks on
the Category of Person in Russian." To be presented by Prof.
Lawrence N e w m a n (Ohio State) on Thurs. Nov. 6 at 4:10 in HU
354. Coffee hour with Prof. N e w m a n at 3:15 in HU 354.
Tuesday, Nov. 4 thru Friday, Nov. 7
LC 3 & 1 X 4
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
FOR
SALE
House in t h e campus a r e a . Comfort a b l e 3 BR Dutch Colonial; quiet, d e a d e n d st. Ends, porch, firepl. In LR, DR,
1 Vi baths, w-w carpet, hardwood firs.,
fenced y d . , appli. $ 3 1 , 5 0 0 . Call 4828714.
Cadillac ' 7 4 C o u p e DeVille. Excellent
condition. Very clean. 2 2 , 0 0 0 mi.
S5795. Call 3 7 7 - 6 0 8 7 or 370-3046.
' 7 1 M a v e r i c k , automatic, air, snows,
runs well. $ 7 0 0 . Call 2 7 2 - 7 0 7 7 from 1-5
p.m.
1969 Country-squire w a g o n . Clean,
excellent
mechanical
condition.
W i n t e r i z e d , good tires. $595. Call 4392646.
1965 Triumph 5 0 0 cc.
Everything n e w . C a l l
weekdays from 7-9 p.m.
I1
I
SERVICES
Psychic Development Classes, also
private readings for advice or problem
solving, by appointment. Call Ms.
Claudia Le M a r q u a n d at 372-6378.
Bruno Venturini guitar: nylon-stringed,
in excellent condition. $50. Call Ellen at
472-8737.
Typing —ltd.
Pickup/delivery,
reasonable. My home. Call Pat at 765-
Speedo Swimmer,
So you say your superb after practice. Yeah!
Italian Power.
A v o n Products. Call Joan at 4 3 8 - 0 3 8 0 .
5th SUNYA European Ski Tour Schruas,
albums. Call 7 8 5 - 4 2 5 1 .
Used
down
sleeping
bag and
rucksack. Call 4 3 6 - 8 7 6 0 for Lenore or
Marvel Comics 1961-1975. Buying in
bulk tots or individually to suit needs.
Also interested in other comics, comicr e l a t e d material, comic art, etc. Call
Charlie at 4 8 2 - 7 8 8 7 .
Typing service—term papers, etc. Call
Doris at 4 5 6 - 0 2 4 1 .
little late.
Josh McDowell, a graduate of Wheuton
College and a magna cum laucle graduate of
Talbot Theological Seminary, is a member of two
national honor societies. As a mem her of the staff
of Campus Crusade for Christ International he
has spoken al more than 500 universities in 52
countries. In the last live years he has spoken to
more than two million students and faculty.
Eft
andspecialgimk
\ *4w/hu
Check out "What's Up Josh'.'"
Colonial flagroom today al 7:00 p.m.
*6 w/out
i Tielceffs on sale in S A Contact Office
i
from 10 am till 3 pm
Ov
$33,500,000 unclaimed scholarships, grants, aids, and
fe $)wships ranging from $50 to $10,000. Current list of
these sources researched and compiled as of Sept. 15, 1975.
Bit {.ebb on sale Nw. 10,11,12
11275 Massachusetts Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90025
•
I am enclosing $9.95 plus $1.00 for postage and handling.
"
'
"
•
Donna,
And you said I never put a personal
in the paper for you. What's this?
Ellen
P. fef. a n d Bert.
Dutch Q u a d Hot Breakfast Club Standings as ol Oct. 30:
State—3.5
Dutch—3.0
Alumni—3.0
Colonial—2.9
Indian—2.8
George,
It's so nice to be a b l e to be a part of
your life.
Love Always, Leroy.
Foxy,
YOL> certainly are!
O.J.
I
KOSHER PIZZA AND
FALAFEL HOUSE
483 Washington Ave
On the bus line near Draper Hall
Israeli music
ISRAEL
Hey Doc, (year you B.D.K.)
With any luck you should be reading
this around 2:00 today. Hope my timing is right. If not it's the thought that
counts, right?
Guess who?
P.S. If you guess right you win a prize!
Dear Danny,
Mazeltov on your executive ship. I
love you a lot-lot-lot.
Always, RBT
Hillary,
Will you meet me tomorrow night
downstairs? I think you're cute.
Love, Guess Who
Michelle,
OMOW is arriving!
Is The SA Controller Toasting tonight?
Pf-ATIGNUM ITALIC S E T
„ Contains xfountainj>m,fin
Jewish Specialties
m
b;M
.•ra
H I
H I
B |
Ptalic mh, and instruction
manual alt for only ts.oo...
At art material cVftn ilwps,
colleijC kvkitora...orstni
cktii. to 'Ttmalic Corp., 132
tvi-sr 22 St., N.y, N.y won
I I Add50 ctnti for liandtinij.
AWARENESS
WEEK
Nov. 2 - 8
Informal discussion with Daniel Dishon of Shiloach Institute on Arab AffairsTues. Nov, 4
3:45 p.m. CC 375
Israeli Music Program with Ron BartourTues. Nov. 4 8:00 p.m. CC Assembly Hall
Wed. N o v . 5
7:30 p.m. C C Assembly H a l l
Dr. Edelman will speak on Arab-Israeli RelationsThurs. Nov, 6
City
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•——"——--—--•----•——---——-—••..-.—— . . - - J ^ f ^ ' l
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P.S. Are you ecstatic?
7:30 p.m. HU-26
Name
at
mt the
esev •Palace
ejoontv Theatre
IMVoHfV
•
Suitee 3.
Israeli Film Festival-
PLEASE RUSH YOUR CURRENT LIST OF
UNCLAIMED SCHOLARSHPS SOURCES TO:
Address.
-
Meryl,
Congratulations on your new carl
UNCLAIMED SCHOLARSHIPS
i Thurs. Nov. 13
8:00 fm
'
Dear Mike,
You better get well quickly—
volleyball won't be the same without
you on the floor.
Dear Mike,
You better get well quickly.
Volleyball won't be the same without
you on the floor!
Love,
"O" Ellen, "I" & the rest of Ihefamily
Tomndhyunks for 4 great months, i
Elliot Ness rides again! Thanks to all us can't wait for the 7th (two weeks)!
30' s fellows a n d gals. Thanks to all who
i love you chumo,
came.
eloine
Watch this space for grand opening date
For info 482-5781
"33300,000
Unclaimed
Scholarships
Twee
eDoe
Hubby,
You should stop b y — h o w about
tonight? Too b a d our paths didn't cross
lor a l e w more moments Sat. night. The
ceremony better last l o n g e r t h a n t h a t !
Wife-tobe.
Dial-A-Disc,
Requests! Do I really have a choice?
It seems like Springsteen was big this
week.
Your H I f a n .
Ride wanted to Albany from L I . on H . , Potato,
You have no face,
Nov. 7 and back on Sun, Nov. 9 . Cc.ll
Nancy at 4 5 7 - 5 0 1 8 .
Who is JOSH?
•
" C h i c k e n Queen,
Q u a d r u p l e company could b e controversial. But keep it upl
M a n in the next b e d .
OPENING SOON.
)1
1 1
ALBANY
PRESS
I I D I M V STUDENT
~—
Dear Ribet,
Let's see the tunrite
a n d celebrate
another great year. H a p p y 18th!
Love from you sweeties, Beth, Kathy,
M a r g i e a n d Adele.
P.S. How d e e p is the water?
Kristopher,
TDH has met his matchl
11-16. Call Jackie at 465-1314.
RIDE R I D
Hey Y o u —
Tomorrow is Nov. 5th. That means a n
AnniversarylHappy 1 month.
Greg.
$69. Ski Week. Andirons lodge, Mount
Agents wanted- -nostalgia items. Call
489-3051 eves.
Poire,
i g s g a a c B s a E a g B ^ «*<••>* g a g a X-M** s a g s g ^ =
. :11
)
PAGE
l a n e TEN
T C U
Love, Chaz.
Paul,
Have a H a p p y 18th Birthday. Just a
Keyboard player wanted for working
soul b a n d . Call Kevin at 4 5 6 - 0 2 4 1 .
love,
Love, Clown.
Happy Birthday to O .
1976. $449. all inclusive. Contact John
pool, sauna, tennis PLUS! Jan. 4-9 or
Mffco
"O", Blen, " I , " everyone.
You really knew how to make a guy
To Maiarini, CB, C r e e p a n d All M y
feel at home on his birthday. Thanks,
Friends, i
Mike
Thanks for a great birthday.
Tweedie dum,
I love you
The Fulton Falcons will rise again; 5-3 is
great!
From, G e o r g e Blanda.
Snow, Vermont. Meals, entertainment,
Sweetie,
Thanks for making my 1 9 l h a very
special one.
No fuss " Y o g i " — H a p p y Birthday!,
Love, C G Bear.
Manuscript Typing Service. Mrs. Gloria
Cecchetti, 24 Wilshire Drive, Colonie.
Call 8 6 9 - 5 2 2 5 .
Desk, bicycle rims 2 7 X 1 VA inches,
301 Mohican,
M a n y thanks for your warmth a n d
hospitality. Chess was never better.
Dear Mike,
What will I every do without your left
kneel Get it well quick!
love Judi
Used M o n t g o m e r y Wards' component
stereo. Still functional. $30. Call 4381490.
f r a m e back pack, a n d Arlo Guthrie
O n Nov. 7th,Defoncey Half celebrates
a n d you're Invited. Beer, munchiot,
i a n d musk. All for 30*.
Dear Di, M a c , a n d Fire Hydrant,
Thanks for including me in the campaign. I can't waitl
Love, Elsie.
Gold watch lost in SS 2 n d fl. Has great
sentimental
value.
Please
return.
Reward. Call Lauri a t 4 8 2 - 0 7 7 2 .
M o r g a n at 4 5 7 - 4 8 3 1 .
Congratulations t o Bonnie l e k h m o n ,
proud owner of 4 tickets t o t h e D o v e
Mason Concert) H e r guess f o r t h e
number of c a n d y corns—1313, w a s
only 3 under t h e actual amount.
LOST&FOUIMD
Classical guitar lessons all levels. Call
Mitchell at 4 6 5 - 4 1 3 0 in the morning.
Austria from J a n . 4, 1976-Jan. 14,
Unison hairculting & styling. SpodoJ:
trim a n d s h a p e scissor cut for $3.50.
Al's Hair Shop, R a m a d a Inn. Western
Avenue. Call 4 8 2 - 8 3 7 3 . O p e n t i l S p . m .
Mike,
d a d you "enjoyed" HI Nat everyone
gets to spend their birthdo, "in bod".
love, "O", Ellen, "t" j everyone.
PERSONALS
O d y s s e y Audio
offers students unb e a t a b l e prices on t o p name stereo
components. Call Lloyd at 4 5 7 - 7 7 1 5 or
Brian at 4 6 5 - 8 1 6 3 .
Urine Trouble,
Net anymore. Congrot'jioHonst
Love,
M a r s h a . Erica a n d Been
Vibrant sophomore seeking male companions for sensual ventures. Call
D e a n n a at 7-3019.
Bass trombone in black case is lost b y
the Administration Bldg. Call 4 4 9 - 5 3 5 5
after 9 p.m. Rewardl
3655.
Alone a g a i n this averting? Don't spend
another evening alone. Sand now f o r
Important f r o * information to: I N S T *
M A T ! , Box 6 1 7 3 , Albany, N.Y. 1 M 0 6 .
M a l e student n e e d e d t o complete apt.,
on busline for spring semester. $ 7 0 . —
utilities included. Call 4 4 9 - 2 8 1 3 .
M a t h Tutor; M a t 100, 106, 107,112,113. Reasonable rotes. Call Seth at
457-8956.
tretoiris
I
Female roommate n e e d e d to share 4
bedioom a p t . for spring semester.
O w n bedroom, furnished, on busline.
$75. per month, utilities included. Call
489-6542.
Photographer. Weddings, portraits,
albums, etc. All your photographic
needs. Call Joe Ingoglia at 4 5 7 - 3 0 0 2 .
WANTED
SUNYA Concert Board
|
A male off-campusstudenttotake over
a dorm contract for next semester. Call
Ron at 4 7 2 - 8 4 0 9 .
Chopped.
449-3959
Leather boots, rust color, size 6 B. New,
never w o r n . $ 3 0 . Call Linda at 4822861 in t h e eves.
I
A) i
Semi-furnished apt. near Draper for 4
or 5 students in townhouse. $335. per
month, includes utilities. Call 4 3 4 - 8 8 5 5
anytime.
Odyssey A u d i o means students offering students discount prices on brand
name stereo components. Factory
sealed, fully w a r r a n t e d a n d fast
delivery For immediate quote or service, call Uoyd a t 4 5 7 - 7 7 1 5 or Brian a t
465-8163.
Hillary.
Eft
Roommate w a n t e d l o share three
bedroom g a r d e n a p t . Full kitchen, CR,
OR. $78. monthly. Call Robin or Chris a t
472-5169.
* *
. . .
S N O Student Nursing Organization announces that on W e d .
Nov. 5 at 7 p.m. in LC 21 Christine Amyot will b e speaking on
Maternal-Child Care.
THURSDAY
*
Anyone who it interested In b e i n g a timer for the SUNYA
W o m e n ' s S w i m Team pleasecall M l n d y o r Nancy at 457-796)
Gradual*
School I n t e r v i e w s — f o r students interested in grad
school admission. Sign u p f o r a n appointment in the Placement
Office, Adm. 1 3 5 . Nov. 6, University of Rochesler, Graduate
School of M a n a g e m e n t ; Nov. 12, C a r n e g i e Mellon Unlverili.
G r a d u a t e School of Industrial Administration
The I 9 7 S I s r a e l i C h a s s i d l c f e s f i v o l i t on its wayto Albany.Monday, Nov. 17 a t 8 : 0 0 p.m. a t t h e Palace Theatre. Tickets are
available through J S C — C a l l Eric Gurvis, 7-5354 or Steve Shaw
489-7446.
are welcome.
Bett of Friends ' 7 5 are forming a Holiday Sing group. W e need
people who want to have fun. Come to our first meeting W e d .
Nov. 5 at 8 p.m. in the State Q u a d Tower Lounge.
*
last chance t o sign u p iorNYMUG
Legal Research Course **„••
come by C C 3 3 3 or call 4 5 7 - 2 4 4 6 , today, Tuesday
SUNYA Feminist Alliance's*bimonthly newsletter A T H E N A , will b e
available W e d . Nov. S i n t h e C C Lobby.
Socialist Coalition meets on W e d . a t 8 p.m. Discussion of Monthly Review April 1975 artide. For more info call Tommy a t 4728754.
p.m. Nov. j
Shore C h o n u k o h with Children of I s r a e l , instead ol giving a i |,
give t o the I s r a e l E m e r g e n c y fund on behalf of those VON U
Call M i k e 4 5 7 - 8 7 3 8 .
' M"'
Meeting of the College KapuMican C l u b on W e d . Nov. 5 a t 8:30
p. m. in HU 27. Representative from PIRG will be present. Any interested please attend.
TODAY
Sat. 7
HOUSING
"
~
^
^^^^^^^^^^
—
NOVEMBER 4, 1975
State.
-Zip-
Information table- all week in CC
/Jawish 8ludtnls' CoaiHon-Hllltl . 5
(California residents pletse' add 8 % u l e i lex.)
NOVEMBER 4, 1975
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE ELEVEN
oOoftlitDay:
This not only opens up whole Pandora's box of problem!, but alto contravenes the
istitutional principle of federalism."
Treasury Secretary William Simon
in reference to giving aid to New York City
"Section 1. Equality ofrightsunder the law shall not be denied or
abridged by the State of New York or any subdivision thereof on
account of sex.
"Section 2. This amendment shall take effect on January 1,
1976."
__
Pro
by Arthur Hidalgo
There is at the present time an amendment
pending ratification by New York State voters
on November 4, that would extend to women
in this state equal rights, equal opportunities,
and equal responsibilities under the law; and
at the same time would extend certain benefits
to men, that only women now receive. Many
people argue that women "have it made" and
that if ratified the Equal Rights Amendment
(ERA) would only destroy the institutions of
marriage and motherhood. It is interesting to
note, however, that these were the same
arguments used against the constitutional
amendment that gave women the right to vote.
Most of the arguments against the ERA
attempt to prey on one's emotions. But
because of the importance of the issue, it is
necessary to examine the amendment itself in
order to ascertain the reasons behind it, and to
see what it will in effect do or not do.
What will the ERA mean for the status of
women? Though the amendment is stated in
general terms, boiled down, it means that it
will be unconstitutional to retain laws that
treat men and women differently on the basis
of sex. It would be a constitutional impetus to
end sex discrimination. It seems to be clear
that without the amendment, all of the
progressive things that have happened over
the last few years will be setback. In general,
when you have a constitutional
amendment.the rights of the people are not
left to the disposition of the times or to the
whim of the legislature.
The passage of the State ERA would bring
numerous benefits to women. It would end
discriminatory practices in child custody, jury
selection, establishment of legal domicile and
prison sentences. But its ramifications don't
end there, the amendment would provide
equal pension benefits; strengthen laws
against sex discrimination; and provide a
strong, solid base for specific fights already
under way for such things as job equality.
As it is now, women, especially married
women, have very few rights. It is practically
impossible for a woman to get credit on her
own. She must either give her spouse's credit
rating or that of another male's.
The amendment is not solely aimed at raising the status of women, but would also
benefit men. Hrstly.it would make it easier for
»iT SAYS Heiefi TMetze A * e
men to receive alimony from former wives,
while the obligation of child support would be
based on a person's financial ability to contribute rather than on sex. Secondly, it would
equalize widows' insurance and' pension
benefits and thus be more readily available to
men (whereas before they were not "entitled"
to receive anything.)
The principal arguments against the Equal
Rights Amendment, led by"Operation WakeUp" are: I. the ERA would abolish many legal
safeguards that in the past have established
and protected the women's place in the home,
2. it would subject women to the draft, 3.
abolish rape laws, and 4. open public
restrooms to both sexes. The amendment,
these opponents say, would destroy needed
distinctions between the two sexes.
The ERA is not aimed at driving women out
of the house as is being said. It's purpose is not
to get housewives to work and contribute
equal amounts of money to a marriage. How
people finance their households is uptothem.
None of the scare tactics used by opposition
groups are logically valid. Fifteen other states
have instituted equal rights amendments and
public bathrooms have not become unisex.
Further, the argument that women will be
drafted simply isn't correct, because New
York State has nothing to do with the draft.
The passage of the New York State amendment is of vital importance. The national impact that such a victory would have would be a
big help in getting the Federal ERA moving
again in the several states where it is stalled
and before some states actually start to rescind
their approval of it. A key importance stressed
by groups backingthe ERA—New York Civil
Liberties Union, League of Women Voters,
the State AFL-CIO,—is its immediacy. Unlike the Federal ERA which takes effect two
years after ratification, the State ERA would
go into effect on the first day of 1976. Sandra
Turner, who heads the "New York Coalition
for Equal Rights," puts it this way, "It is symbolically fitting that on the 2U0th anniversary
of the founding of a democracy dedicated to
equality, that women should linally get
theirs."
The Equal Rights Amendment will be the
liberator of all injustices, such as those said
above, which have prevailed for so many
years. It will especially eliminate those injustices that have been aimcdand usedagainst
women. The ERA is a very important issue. It
corrects inequalities I or both sexes in the constitution. The Equal Rights Amendment is not
j ust for one group of people, but would benefit
everyone: men, women, and children alike.
IB
U»OPHCLWS
No More Giggling
in THE OTOM CONTROL. LAWS*
5
Student Association is in trouble. Faculty members laugh where they used to giggle,
internal relations and those with outside groups are poor, administrators have no
confidence in SA andstudents have little respect for it.
'!
11
The problems are neither new nor peculiar to SA, but they haven't been this bad in
H1U.
recent history.
The power play to take over the Faculty-Student Association (FSA) Membership
Board, a move likely to be overturned by SUNY Central, reversed the attitudes of
friendly faculty and administrators towards S A. The heavy-handed tactics used there,
and those used to convince President Fields to convert Mohawk Tower to dormitory
space, did more to reduce than to increase student power. Very often SA does not
realize when they are on the same side as the administration.
Central Council, the legislative branch, fears its own disintegration. Council
Chairperson David Coyne, while potentially one of the most effective leaders in its
history, claims continual frustration. Council has discussed its irrelevance and its
direction. "Are we here for 'politics' or 'programming'?" they ask, as if the two were
contradictory.
Council members must recognize when they are engaged in useless activity. They say
the same things many times and spend hours discussing issues unrelated to the bill in
front of lhem. The inexperience of most Council members with SA and with formal
meeting is understandable, but it is clear that the survival of Council depends on less
tolerance of irrelevant banter. They even talk of dissolving Council. But leaving
control in the hands of the SA Executive Branch would be a more tragic mistake.
It is not that the Executive Branch has been a complete failure. Surely Controller
Stuart Klein is straightening out SA finances. He is enforcing Council's Finance Policy
and doing the honest, accurate and respectable job that is usually expected only of
S20.00U-per-ycar accountants. Because of Klein SA may finally do well with its
auditors. Vice President Rick Meckler, in his role as a glorified Council member, has
worked on a number of useful projects such as late-night buses and student discounts at
some stores. But Bauman gives Meckler little real responsibility. Instead, he takes too
WIS E.K.A. tMINa MCAN SOME OF US CAN WEAR
60WMS INSWAP OF US ML WEARING TUXES?'
Con
The Equal Rights Amendment is on trial.
The evidence is silting in slowly from that
handful of states that have passed an ERA of
their own, and New Yorkers had better pay
heed to that evidence before they vote on
November 4th.
•
In Maryland, at the first legislative session
following passage of the state ERA, 83 laws
were introduced directly connected with the
amendment. These included a bill to make a
wife liable lor her husband's debts, not exempting her if she had been deserted or had
children to support; a bill to eliminate the right
of female prisoners to have separate facilities
in county jails, correctional or dctcntionul
houses. A bill was introduced to eliminate
preferential life insurance rates for women,
and bills to repeal protective labor legislation
and to equalize compulsory work laws.
•
In Colorado the law has been changed,
making a wife equally financially responsible
forthesupport of children. The legalization of
homosexual marriages was mandated by the
ERA and there have been several such
marriages to date in Colorado.
•
In California a woman security guard takes
male prisoners to and from the showers. Also
in California, women hired by the fire department were sleeping in the same quarters with
the men. Perhaps the men didn't object, but
their wives certainly did! Thc"pros" are telling
you ERA will not invade your right to privacy.
•
I he evidence is in and the Equal Rights
Amendment stands condemned on all counts.
Vote "no" on November 4th.
Editor's Note: The Albany Student Press
wishes to thank whomever submitted this
material for publication. We regret that we
lost track of your identity and were unable to
give credit where il is due.
•i <S wrMttffilfc'e-
S«10
T
°TH£
J^F-fcre^*^-
•
I he proponents of ERA deny that any such
outrages will be forced upon the American
people, but hard facts indicate that they most
assuredly will. And rest assured, this is only
the lip of the iceberg. With only a lew states
having passed an ERA and the federal amendment not yet ratified, they are not tipping their
hand so soon.
^4}
ma/rjf
::
Focus
Ford's Callous Conservatism
:::
Gradually, and indeed sadly. President
ford has moved away Irom that high and noble note of fairness lor all winch he struck litteen months ago upon his ascension to the
Presidency. He has digressed to a course ol
particular politics, concerned wilh pleasing
onl) one group in the electorate: conservative
Republicans. I he President mas led that this
strategy will assure him the Republican
nomination, closing out Ronald Reagan, bul
in the end he will lose "here il reall> count* •
the general election on November 2. Mb. Heshould be more concerned with appealing to
moderate Democrats and Republiciinsand independents, instead ol trying to slave oil the
threat Irom the Republican right.
I he handling ol both the Sew York Citv
linancial crisis and the lood-slamp program
are examples ol Ford's growing callous conservatism.
New York City just barely avoided D-Day
(Default Day) on October I7lh. When Abe
lleame called the President at 2a.m. I he officer
on duty said he'd relay his message to the
President. While New York's late hung in the
balance the President slept. He woke at
5:30a.m. This was a crisis ol nalional proportions and the President slept.
Contrary to the feelings of one Midwestern
Grange organization and other people, New
York's problems arc of a national dimension
and this cannot he overlooked. The satisfaction thill many ranking officials in the Ford
Administration and Congress lake in New
York's financial difficulties as a product ol
"wclfareism gone mad" could blind them to
the fact that a New York default could undermine the credit standi ngol all cities and slates
and shatter the Iragilc web of confidence on
which rests much ol the hope lor reviving l he
nalional economy.
A New York City default would probably
exceed the cumulaiive damage to the national
PAGE TWELVE
SOMB
editorial / comment
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
NOVEMBER 4, 1975
: : hy David Troej«er::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;.
economy ol all the defaults suflered over the
years b\ more than 6,000 other cities.
President ford proposed legislation to
assure live continuance ol police and fire
protection and oilier vittil services alter a New
York Cm default. New York Cuv doesn't
need a mechanism to manage delimit, n needs
a mechanism to avoid it. h's like idling a man
vmi'll help linn survive Hie shock alter
touching :iticketrical outlet, instead ol pulling
him .iw.ii Irom the outlet when il is aciualh
within \our power.
New York City is not the onlv area in which
President lord isliyingtoeul hack protection
under the Federal umbrella. The Administration introduced a lood-slamp hill thai it said
would sine taxpayers SI.2 billion annually by
eli m i Dating Irom I he tolls or reducing benefits
lor almost hall ol the IK.S million people now
receiving loud coupons.
President lord has renewed his anti-hunger
win in which the target seems to he hungry
Americans rather than hunger itself. Under
Mr. ford's plan 4.4 million people would be
eliminated Irom the program altogether and
the benefits received by another 6.4 million
people would he decreased. Oddly enough,
those whom this Administration proposes to
nil lire most are the working poor and workers
who have recently lost their jobs.
When it conies to political ideology,
liberalism is not inherently any better than
conservatism. Ihey are both equally good
means il Ihey achieve a goal which is
progressive in nature. Right now, though, the
President's actions clearly smack of regression. He cannot shirk the responsibilities that
have grown wiih the Executive branch since
FDR took office in 1933, responsibilities in
which live electorate expect their President to
he ai the forefront of forceful and positive action in the people's interest.
much himself.
There is tension in the Executive Branch cause by lack of tact in both internal and
external affairs and lack of confidence in other SA officials. The office still lacks a
Communications Director and most of the Executive Branch Budget Committee
resigned two weeks ago, causing it to fall way behind schedule. Even SA's student
assistants and secretaries mock the Executive Branch officials behind their backs.
Bauman and Meckler have let their egos become deeply involved in their work, and this
has often colored their judgment.
With most segments of the university turned off by SA, its viability is questionable.
Should it be dissolved and rebuilt'.' Is it in touch with the students? Unless SA can
reorient itself and regain respect, it is not providing the service or representation it is
supposed to. As most problems result primarily from the ineffectiveness of the
executives, their resignations may be enough (Meckler has already threatened).
But first they should open themselves to a fundamental re-evaluation. Then, at least,
their sincerity would be confirmed.
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
EDITORIAL BOARD
KDIIOR IN CHIEF
DANIEL GAINES
MASAI,IM, EDITOR
SISAN COLEMAN
NEWS EDITOR
STEPHEN DZI.SAN.KA
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITORS
BETTY SIEIN, DAVID WINZELRERG, RANDI TCILER
PRODUCTION MANAGER
PATRICK MCGLYNN
ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION MANAGERS
LOUISE MARKS. CAROL MCPIIERSON, ELLEN FINE
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR
ANDREA HERZHERG
ARIS EDITORS
HILLARY KELBICK, SPESCE RAGGIO
ASPECTS EDITORS
NANCY ALBAUGH, MICHAEL SENA, NAOMI ERIEDLANDER
SPORTS EDITOR
NATHAN SALANT
ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR
MICHAEL PIEKARSKT
ADVERTISING MANAGERS
JERRY ALRRECHT, LES ZUCKERMAN
CT.ASSIEIED-GRAEFITI MANAGER
KENNETH COBB
HI SISISS MANAGER
DANNY O'CONNOR
STAFF MEMBERS
A.P. Managers: Matthew Kaufman, Kim Sution
Preview: Joyce Peigenbuum
Circulation Manager: Nancy Pillet
Bitting Accountant: Susan Domres
Technical Editor: Sarah Blumenstock
Head Typist: t.eslie Eiscnstein
Composition Manager: Ellen Boisen
Production: Janet Adler, Pally Ahern, Carol Burger, Donna Burton, Joan Ellsworth, Debbie
Click, Kelly Kila, Vicki Kuruman, Judi Heitner, Kathv Lam, Michele Upton, Philip Molter,
Debbie Reiser, Jeanne Saiewitz, Karen Schlosbcrg, Joan Silverman, Tanya Levy
Advertising Production: Lisa Biundo. Dick McRobcrt, Jeff AronowiU, Heidi Bush
Assistant Editor: Marc Weigcr
Administrative Assistant: Jerelyn Kaye
Photography: supplied principally by University Photo Service and members of Camera Club
Die Album Student Press is published every l'uesda\ and Friday during the school year except
holidays. Main office. CC Sl9i telephone: 41W891. Funded by Student Association. Address
mail to: Albany Student Press. CC -<2V, 14110 Washington Avenue, Albany. A't'iv York 12122.
ra
'-':-•:!
Heads:
letters
Whip Inflation Now
T o the Editor:
Anti-Semitic Voz
Answered
It Sounds
Incredible
BUT EVELYN WOOD GRADUATES CAN READ
THE EXORCIST IN 58 MINUTES
At That Speed, The 403 Pages Come Across
With More Impact Than The Movie.
To fhe Editor:
I want t o inform Ireta Zaretsky that this article (the one she referred t o i n the A.SI' last
Friday, October 31), i n no way shows the attitude of the Puerto Rican students on this
Campus. The fact that the word "Jewish" was
written w i t h a small " j " was merely a
typographical error. I am aware of the fact
that Jewish people arc many in numbers, but
arc still considered a minority group by lire
"White-Anglo Saxon Protestants majority."
Let me b r e a k d o w n the statement to clarify
it lor you. " B y the apathetic, While, Jewish.
Male dominated majority on this campus."
Apathetic—anyone who is not concerned
about what is happening to the minority
groups in this Campus, Jewish Many of us
(meaning Puerto Ricans, Blacks. Chinese, and
other minority groups other than Jewish)
come to this University and are placed as
roommates with Jewish students which in turn
treat the mlhoritystudcntswithgreut hostility.
1 know this us a fact, I shared a suite lor three
years with Jewish students and ihey were indifferent if not hostile. Male The Feminist
Alliance, which is a member of the Coalition,
is aware of the sexism in this Campus due lo
the greater number of men than women, and
the cultural upbringing ol these males.
I hope this explanation hits clarified this for
you. As l o r " L a Vo/. Del Pueblo" being the
Voice of the Town, depending on what side ol
the coin you arc. It is the Voiceofthe I'own.
Yuu can do it, too. So far over 550,000 other people have done it. People who
have different jobs, different IQs, different interests, different educations have
completed the course. Our graduates are people from all walks of life. These
people have all taken a course developed bv Evelyn Wood, a prominent
educator. Practically all of there at least tripled their reading speed w i t h equal or
better comprehension. Most have increased it even more.
Think for s moment what that means. A l l of them-even the slowest-now read
an average novel in less than two hours. They read an entire issue of Time or
Newsweak In 35 minutes. They don't skip or skim. They read every word. They
use no midlines. Instead, they let the material they're reading determine how
fast they read. And mark this well: they actually understand more, remember
more, and enjoy more than when they read slowly. That's rightl They
understand more. They remember more. They enjoy morei You can do the same
t h i n g - t h e place to learn more about it is at a free speed reading lesson.
This is the same course President Kennedy had his Joint Chiefs of Staff take.
The staff of President Nixon completed this course in June 1970. The same one
Senators and Congressmen have taken.
Zulmii M Rivera
liditor of La Vo/. Del Pueblo
I'd like to use your paper t o talk to all those
folks out there who buy and smoke pot. As
you all may have noticed, Albany, NYC, and
maybe the rest of the world has suddenly run
dry of the weed. I've heard all thestories about
the Feds shooting down planes and getting
tough at the borders, but each year the Feds
report an astronomical incrcaseintheamount
of potsmuggledintotheU.S. And we all know
what happens during times of shortage. The
prices being charged now for pot are higher
than most ofthe pot around will get you. 1 just
bought an ounce for $30 that 2 yrs. ago I
would've paid only $15 for. Unless mom and
dad arc loaded and don't mind payingl'or your
vices, it's getting pretty hard to get high these
days. So according to the old law of supply
and demand, we've got to cut down on the demand to cut down the price.
S U N Y A , a university built on and subsidized
w i t h state taxes? If M r . Skulnick i i a S U N Y
student, I suggest t w o alternatives for Mm.
One is that he put his money where his mouth
is by paying the difference of hit actual t u i t i o n
cost and the lesser' amount (subsidized
through taxes) that he now payi. The other
alternative he has is t o admit that taxes can be
used beneficially, as exemplified by S U N Y ,
which gives New York residents of all
economic backgrounds the opportunity t o attend college.
Robert S. Budoff
What I'msuggeslingisthat everyone should
refuse to pay more than S25 lor decent Mexican, and $.15 lor commerical grade Columbian. II we all just refuse to pay more than
these prices, ihe price ol dope will comedown.
We may have l o drink beer lor awhile, but I'm
tired of being the lull guy lor some greedy
fucks,
Name Withheld
SA-Meet the Student
Beneficial Taxes
i n the l.ililor
In response to Harmon Skurnick's support tor
the'Libertarians".(ASP. Friday, October 24),
a group that opposes all laxes and all government subsidies. I have one question. How can
he justify Ins association with or support of
Come to a Mini-Lesson and find out. It is free to you and you will leave w i t h a
better understanding of why it works. One thing that might bother you about
your reading speed is that someone might find out how slow it is. The
Instructors at the Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics Free Speed Reading lesson
will let you keep your secret. It's true we practice the first step to improved
reading at a Mini-Lesson and we will increase your reading speed on the spot, but
the results will remain your secret. Plan to attend a free Mini-Lesson and learn
that it is possible to read 3-4-5 times faster, with comparable comprehension.
tion as he, would know the rules and orjtnitat i o n of that r o u p which he i i chairing. Mr.
Meckler, if 1 were you I would nuke a icriow
attempt .at familiarizing yourself with your
own organization's rules and by-lawi.
I have heard much talk about meeting the
students' needs, well Mr. Meckler, it could be
that you and SA President Bauman should
climb off your cloud i n the i k y and recognize
the student. It hat been said that the SA i i my
representative, how can you possibly represent me when you don't know what it is that I
want done. Don't answer by saving that
students have the responsibility to come to
you, because you know as well as I that we
won't. It is your responsibility t o bring out the
students' feelings and if you are as you say you
are, there should be no problem.
I am not one t o criticize without being c o n structive; my advice is t o meet the students.
Call for a meeting of R A's or better yet ask the
dorm directors t o let you sit in and meet with
the various RA classes. Then together arrange
a timetable for you and the otherexecutives t o
meet, talk, and discuss your plans and ideas at
combined dorm meetings throughout the
campus.
My solution is simple but not easy, but
through this interaction you will reach a wide
variety of goals. First you will give a chance
for students to meet their representatives. You
will be given a chance to air your views and
plans, and most importantly, you will receive
feedback from the students you represent.
Like I have already said, i l won't be easy, but if
you are as you say you arc, it can be done.
Michael Lissner
l o the Kditor:
Since I've been herethese past lewmonths, I
have heard much talk about our SA and its
operation. But on October 26, at the
Freshman Class elections. 1 had my first opportunity to see it at work. One problem, it
didn't work Rick Mcckler, SA Vice President who chaired the election was at a loss as
lo how lo run the meeting. I would expect a
person, especially one with such a high posi-
Bonnie Raitt
Home Plate
The Albany Student Press reserves lite
sole right to prim nr edit letters to the
alitor. Submit letters
TYPEWRITTEN
tfi Albany Student Press, CCJ2V. 14(1)1
Washiitgttm Avenue. The ASP will not
publish ttltsfglied letters, \ames will be
withheld mi request. Keep those eards
ami letters aiininn in. but remember:
'brevity is the soul of wit.'
»
TOM WAITS
Nighthawks at theDiner
3C torn uralt5
•SCHEDULE OF FREE MINI-LESSONS
You'll increase your reading speed
50 to 100% on the spot!
Last Week!!!
Today, tommorrow, and Thursday
4PM and 8PM at Albany Hyatt House
1375 Wash. Ave. (across from SUNYA)
On Stuyvesant Plazajust across the street
10-9 Sat. 10-6
M U S K People
Tel.-489-8346
It A l l
LITTLE FEAT
T h e Last Record Album
Includes Somebody's Leaving
nljhtkawki at the dlnet
Includes Good Enough 'Sugar Mama
Run Like a Thief/I'm Blowln'Away
Appearing Friday, Nov. 7
At the Palace
NEW SHIPMENT
ROCK FOLK
JAZZ 1 99
One Love Stand' Romance Dance
I
ea.
LIST $6.98
LINDARONSTAOT I SAVE YOUR RECORDS
Prisoner In Disguise
SI Off
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
t*m*
NOVEMBER 4, 1975
JL
»t
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
»I»M» i l H W I I M M l M t
IMMmilMMj
PAGE FIFTEEN
<000!m
oA/timtiMtis u^nuted {Tom Paxton Keeps the Faith
by D o n Sperling
Tom Paxton returned t o Saratoga Springs o n
October 29, and performed his music before a sellout
crowd. Saratoga Springs was the sight of o n e of
Paxton's first gigs back in the early sixties. He was
received well by the audience in the Great Saratoga
Music Hall, and his performance reflected his
appreciation for the people that attended.
Paxton arrived in the U.S. earlier this year, after a
three year residency in London. Since then he has made
appcarancesthroughoutthccountry. Paxton's height of
popularity came during thesixties. His f o l k s o n g s were
part of the "protest movement" during that era.
Tom Paiton, w h o M folk tonga ware an Integral part of the protest era
ol the sixties.
Tom played lor about t w o hours, mixing some ncwf
songs wilh old favorites written throughout his fifteen
year career. On many of his old songs such as "Ramblin
Boy". "Whose Garden Was This", and "The Last Thing
On My Mind" (which has been recorded by Neil
Diamond, Jose Fcliciano, and Peter, Paul and Mary),
Ihe audience provided good back up vocals on the
choruses.
There were no other musicians present. It wssjuit the
man, microphone, and guitar. However that was all h e
needed, because his lyrics are his most valuable asset.
His words reach out and touch the hearts o f many
sensitive young Americans. This was evident in his
songs about Watergate, Attica, and amnesty. S o m e
were comical but he got his point across.
Paxton realizes the times have changed, and less
people are involved in his movement. T o combat this
prevalent apathy, he did a satirical song about Capital
Punishment called "Bring back the Chair",
"Zap someone there medium rare
Let's bring back the chair
As the juice sizzles thru 'em
Howard Cosell can interview 'em
Let's bring back the chair"
Some may think artists like Tom Paxton are of a
dying breed. Theyjust might be. However, Tom Paxton
has had something to say for fifteen years, and he will
persist as long as he keeps thclaith.And forthose people
who caught the spark and dedication of Tom Paxton, I
don't feel that faith will ever die.
AvontrGorde Rhythm Studies
by David Edelstein
Through his use of several instruments and
experimentation with visual and body
rhythms, Jon Gibson provided sufficient
variety t o offset the initial frustration I fell
when listeni ng t o his music i n a concert he gave
last Wednesday afternoon in the Recital Hall.
Gibson's performance, sponsored by the
SUNYA Free Music Store, a division of
Musicouncil, included six works he has
written for s o l o soprano and alto saxophones,
flute, and piano.
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Despite the complexities his pieces pose to
the ear, an overall quality of unity is evident
through his use ol repetition and continuous
rhythms. He expands melodic fragments
through the accumulation or addition of tones
as the piece progresses. Usually Gibson adds
new material simply by instinct, as in "unJon Gibson, a native Californian, is an ac- titled" for alto flute. None of the material is
tive composer a n d performer in New York dropped, once added, and there is a gradual
City. He has performed throughout the building of a logical framework with a set sewestern world with many musicians, including quence of pitches.
It is interesting that Gibson combines
Steve Reich and Phil Glass, and groups such
as Ihe New Music Ensemble at the University logical sequences and continuity with an e x pressive quality. In "Melody I" for piano,
of California.
However, like many modern music com- because he uses the piano throughout, there is
positions, Gibson's pieces are composed upon a sustained, continuous, soft-edged haze
a foundation of strict structural procedures around the inner melodic movement. Gibson
and are difficult t o follow aurally. Moreover. also slightly alters ihe dynamic range and
Gibson's music startles t h e ear by its sudden note-emphasis ol the melody as the piece
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l i l l C t n l r i l A v « n u * / N n t to tilt Moh.wk Drlvi-ln T h M I n / 468-3234 / Men thru F r l 10AM-8PM, Sat 10AM-5:30PM
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progresses t o achieve this expressive effect.
In addition t o performing on four different
instruments. Gibson added variety by juxtaposing a tape of his music for electric organ
with drawings or grids of black shapes on a
white background. A s he explained in a
lecture-demonstration on Thursday afternoon, the slides are drawings based upon mapping out the contours of many concurrent
melodies in the organ music.
In his "Song I" for soprano saxophone,
Gibson uses a technique called circular
breathing. Basically, the player puffs out his
checks while breathing through his nose in
order to sustain sound. Gibson picked up this
technique from musicians such as Roland
Kirk and saxophonists in the Duke Ellington
band. Although such playing would seem able
to produce only one tone color.Gibsonis able
t o get various timbres through distorting his
embouchure, or position of the lips.
While he experimented by linking the visual
element wilh the aural, Gibson also investigated the nature of body rhythms through
his "Rhythm Study for Voice, Hands, and
Feet." As he explained more fully o n Thuisday, the study is an exercise in body c o ordination and deals with the interchange of a
rhythmic unit in six beats and its subdivisions
(three, two, o n e bcat(s)) between the voice,
Overall, the concert was entertainingly
hands and feel of the performance. For in- diverse as well as representative of many
stance, in one series there are handclaps tor
prelormanccs of modern music. Now, indeed,
each ol the six beats with vocalizing on two of
I look forward to going to the next in the series
the six (on the first and fourth beats) and
of modern music recitals Free Music Store will
stomping on three of the beats (the first, third
sponsor this year.
recordings
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and abrupt endings. In ".12/ II" lor soprano
saxophone he repeated .12 times an II note
chnrdal system around a .12 whole tone
melodic sequence. Once this repetition was
done, the piece was simply and suddenly over.
and fifth.) Each particular unit or module ol
six contains any number o f patterns for these
three parts of the body.
As Gibson's exercise requires that the performer move from one rhythmic relationship
t o the next without stopping, his music, which
contains lew rests, often forces musicians t o
play continuously without breaks. This style
of playing is difficult for a woodwind player
with a limited supply of air.
by Keith Graham
Phoenix is the new album Irom a
group noted for its live shows,
featuring wild costumes and loud
music, their shows lend t o excite
people. On album, though, they're
toned down and there is no visual
show.
the allium, as 11 mind nnsell waiting
for ii to end. I itbelle is weak as a
vocal group. I hey can sing ll'ain
Labelle. the lead singer, has been
singing as lone as I h a w liwd), but
thes don't work well lugcthcr. At
Icusl Nona llendij v. who composed
moM ol ihesongsaiid backs Piiui up,
ducMi'l incorporate any intricate
vocalsinlothe background. Basically, she and Saia Dash repeal what
I'alti
I.ahelle sings. Any i w o
background vocalists could do this
without laving worked wilh I'alti
bciore. Considering thai thes have
been with each oilier awhile. I lie y are
weak compared to vocal groups like
the Ihree Degrees.
Actually their music conies up
short, too, when compared to other
groups. Many other vocal groups
u s e large numbers in their
background music, wilh M I S H belabelle has been around for awhile
ing the most popular backup. The
as a vocal group, but they have only
strings and the many horns provide
just risen to popularity with "Lady
nice music to listen to on albums.
Marmalade." This cut was popular
Some vocals perform well without a
with the disco crowd and Labelle has
large backup, bill Labelle falls short
that reputation of a disco group
with their five piece band, no synalong with their live reputation.
thesizers and and lew horns.
When you think of Labelle, youlend
I he best thing lor Labelle to do is
to think of disco music. Actually, the
pul out a live album and thcyshould
rest of the group's music, at least on
albums, is considerably slower.
satisfy many people with it. Until
Labelle continues with disco wilh
Mtssin Wilh My Mini), their new
single, That's the only catchy out on
then, you might have to settle lor
NOVKMBEH 4, 1975
albums which really doesn't d o t h e m
by Murk Kline
and Doug .lacomine
I lei hie Hancock's new instrumental album Miut-Childis a display of
lunky electronic jazz. Although
some sounds on this album are e x citing and progressive, there is a
basic underlying monotony to the
inajoriiv ol the rhythm structures.
Yet fine accompanying musicianship
combined with Hancock's versatility
on the keyboards produces some interesting effects.
Hancock's keyboard sounds are
I used with a lunky bass and drum
rhythm, frequently resulting in a
confusion ol sounds. On each cut he
is deftly toying with a wide array of
keyboard instruments including: the cut.
"Sun Touch," on the other hand,
lender-Uhodes electric piano, the
Arp Pro Soloist and Arp 2600 syn- is a mellow cut, refined through the
thesizers, plus the Hohuer D 6 discreet use of the String Ensemble
clavinel. Other notable instrumen- Synthesizer. This is intertwined with
talists include Wayne Shorter, of a flowing Fender-Rhodes lead,
Weather Report on soprano sax and accented by fine work on the Arp
Stevie Wonder in one cut on har- Odyssey and Pro Soloist Synthesizers.
monica.
"Heartbeat," is a different cut
The individual cuts vary from
repetitive high-energy funk to more altogether, incorporating emphasis
mellow, perhaps more jazz-like o n boodeying, Fender-Rhodes leads
airy s y n t h e s i z e r s o u n d s
creations.
"Hang
Up Your a n d
Hangups," is characteristic of the parading with the electric piano.
funk that can be found on this This is probably the most enjoyable
album. The bopping beat combined and interesting cut o n the album
Herbie Hancock has had a,long
wilh H a n c o c k ' s riffs becomes
repetitive several minutes into the and influential career in the jazz
scene.
The new electronic-jazz
emergence is an exciting media, but
this attempt is not as stimulating or
fulfilling as Ihe work of other artists
in the field.
justice.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SEVENTEEN
$%ms»tme*fl'ft
••-':
Eddie! Eddie!
Will looters Get NCAA Bid?
continued from page twenty
Analysis: No one can throw out a
team with a record of 9-3-1, especially considering the difficulty of the
schedule Albany plays. Certainly the
Booters three losses were dose
games, and the one against Cortland
V-Ball Club Wins
The Women's Intercollegiate
Volleyball Club won their first
match against Union College two
games to one, Saturday.
The first game was won 15-2, Union having difficulty returning the
ball on serves and spikes by Albany.
In the second game, Albany lost
with the same problem of returning
serves, but came back in the third
and final game to win 15-2.
VOTE
November 4.
It's for you.
was a truly great game according to
t he numerous coaches in attendance.
Brockport is 7-5 and while the
Golden Eagles play a slightly better
schedule than Albany, they failed to
beat the "big names" like Cornell,
have been generally unimpressive,
and also lost to Buffalo, 1-0.
On Brockport's side is their slightly tougher schedule, a 2-0 win versus
Binghamton, and being the host of
the national finals.
Cortland is 6-3-1, and faces
Oneonta at Oneonta, Wednesday. A
loss there would probably knock
Cortland out of the running. A win
may get the Red Dragons a bid, or
encourage the selections committee
to include that Albany-Brockport
confrontation.
Barriers End With CD. Win
Tear-faced Giacomin
Beats Former Teammates
skating out to warm up before the
(AP)
Ed Giacomin fought back the game.
"I've never been an emotional
tears, fought back the thoughts of
retirement, fought back the man, but I couldn't hold back the
bitterness of being cut loose by the tears tonight," he said after a dazzlNew York Rangers after 10 years of ing first period that helped his new
loyal service with the National Red Wing teammates to a 6-4
Hockey League team. Then he went triumph over the Rangers. "When
the people started cheering me at the
out and beat them.
The grey-haired goalie, who looks beginning, the tears came down my
so much older than his 36 years, was face. A couple of times 1 thought I
picked up on waivers Friday by the would collapse from the emotion."
But he didn't. And neither did
Detroit Red Wings. Too suddenly,
the New York fans were robbed of Giacomi n's former teammate, goalie
their favortie netminder; but they Gilles Villcmure, who was sent by
got a chance to say 'thanks' Sunday the Rangers to the Chicago Black
night when he returned in an alien Hawks last Monday. Villcmure also
uniform to his familiar working won in his first appearance for his
new club, stopping the Vancouver
place.
to the time they started cheering me Canucks 6-1.
Mill llogaboam scored twice in a
in warmups, I had a funny dream
that after the cheering stopped I tour-goal Detroit first period which
would skate out, shake hands with carried the Red Wings past the
all the Rangers, thank the fans, and Rangers, to the delight of the
just leave the ice and retire," said Madison Square Garden fans, who
Giacomin, who cried openly when he changed their allegiance forjust one
received a standing ovation after night-to say thanks.
WIRA Hoop,Volleyball
Seasons In Offing
The Women's Intramural and
Recreational Association plans to
open its 1975-76 intramural basketball season this week.
Five teams have entered League I
(competitive); six have placed entries
in League II ("fun-league").
WIRA also revealed that seven
teams have entered the winter
volleyball program.
Championship teams in each
league will receive WIRA Champions t-shirts.
WIRA has also announced the
hiring of a second student assistant,
Claire Coulter, to assist Lynn
O'Oarrow. BothS.A.'swil! wear solid
gold t-shirts labelled "WIRA Student Assistant" I or easy on-t he-court
identification.
Want to win an
album?
STUDENTS
SAVE YOUR TICKET STUB!
-IT COULD BE VALUABLE-
continued from page twenty
fail when Cherubino put on a last
kick with the half mile to go to put
the race away.
Cherubino's winning time, 25:36,
was only nine seconds off the course
record. Coach Munsey said "if we'd
have broken him out earlier, he
would have had the record easy. But
staying in the pack may have led to
this season's most impressive finish
as Albany had the next three
finishers after Union's Jones."
Davis Third
Brian Davis was third and was
Albany's numbertwofinisherforthe
third straight week after a slow start
this season. Co-captain Chris Burns
was fourth and freshman Keith Benman was fifth. Benman was named
runner of the meet for the second
time this season (the first came versus Boston State).
Kevin Burnett, another freshman
was ninth, number five for Albany,
despite not feeling well before the
meet. Eric Jackson finished twelfth,
Tom Ryan finished fourteenth, and
Don Shraderfinishedtwenty-second
of the thirty runners in the meet.
Munsey said this was the best race
the team had run all year, and "it's
too bad that this is the end of the
season instead of the beginning."
"All the teams were keyed up
because of the local rivalry." Munsey
continued, "and they thought we
could be had this year, but the guys
ran very well."
Munsey pointed at the low one
minute-thirty second spread
between the team's first and fifth
men as an indication of how well the
team ran.
Munsey termed the season
"frustrating" as he didn't know exactly what was wrong.
"We have not had a set line up all
year with guys switching positions
all year," said Munsey. "Cherubino
as number one was about t he only set
position on the team. Chris Burns
and Brian Davis were good for second and third when Davis ran well,
and freshmen Benman and Burnett
averaged out to be Albany's fourth
and fifth although Ryan. Jackson
and Shrader all placed there in one
or more meets."
In two weeks the team will go to
Ihe ICAAAA meet in Van Cortland
Park in New York City rather than
the NCAA meet held on the same
day to end their season.
Thebesians
'•••
Tom DeBlolt It brought down In second quarter of Saturday's 28-1 lot* to Albright DeMots reInjured hit neck In the game, and taw very limited action.
Danes Eaten By Lions; 2nd Loss
continuedfrom page twenty
inside and raced up the the 30 before
apparently being stopped. But the
fleet-footed junior spun away from
two would-be tacklcrs and raced all
the way down the right sideline for a
39-yard touchdown.
Dave Duprcy then caught the entire Lion defense asleep when he
turned a fake extra-point attempt
into a two-point conversion by
sweeping in from the left to cut the
gap to 21-8. But that wastobcthe last
Dane hope for t he afternoon as they
headed for the lockerroom trailing
il
JUST A SONG" RECORDS
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PAGE EIGHTEEN
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And forthe Danes, thesecond half
was to be no Cakewalk—just more of
the usual. Ihe only score of the half
was registered by Albright and it,
too. came as a result of an Albany
miscue.
In the third quarter, with Danespunter Mike Marrin back on his own:
35, the ball was bounced up to himon the snap and could not be
handled. Seconds later, the Lions
recovered and found themselves on
the Danes' 25-yard line withagoldcn
opportunity.
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Sharp got nowhere ontwo rushing
calls, then hit Yaboud at the seven
for a first down. On the next play,
Welch took the pitchout and weaved
his way inlotheendzdneforthefinal
score of the day. Brown's kick was
good and it was all over but the
shouting.
Albany still had 20 minutes of
playing time left in the game, but
could do nothing with it. Bertuzzi's
pass-blocking brokedowntimeand
time again, allowing the Lion
defense to register more than its
share of sacks.
Coach Kord called the game "our
poorest job defensively" and pointed
to the 225 rushing yards given up—
the highest total of the season. Only
linebacker Ken Schoen stood out on
defense with his endless pursuit
while Griffin took offensive honors
wit h his 112 yards gained on only 17
carries, t-'rancks was high for
Al bright wit h 90 yards on t he ground
and 17 carries.
Saturday, the Danes host
I'lattsburgh at I p.m. in their final
home game of the campaign before
travelling to Springfield to close out
the season.
I
•
4)
WOCAWSMU, CWTM. l i f t
US! WWMRAIION
a>
spfcmisr&SJNCf ttua
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•^•••••••••••SSaV
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINETEEN
FRIDAY
"State University bt New York a* Albany
November 4, 197S
„...,
MT vn,1WYO«*TAUI/ U rY
VOLUUHO.*.
W»»UU%X™
Albany Third In UC Tournament
Selca Breaks Single Season Scoring Record
As Booters Salvage 5-2 Win Over Stony Brook
by Nathan Salant
expected to walk on the field and win
Frank Selca broke the season Friday. They looked too far ahead—
record for goals, Pasquale Petric- (to a final against Binghamton) and
cione added two goals and Edgar came up with a loss."
Martinez also scored, as the Albany
The loss to Buffalo, the Booters
State varsity soccer team salvaged a third against nine wins and a tie, cost
split at the University Center Tour- Albany the top seed in the NCAA
nament at Buffalo, Friday and Tournament, and jeopardized the
Saturday, by defeating Stony Brook, possibility of an NGAA bid period.
5-2.
Buffalo I, Albany
Albany was beaten, 1-0, by the
Brian Van Hattcn scored unhost Buffalo Bulls in the first round, assisted at 37:5.1 ol the first half, after
while Binghamton downed Stony Albany goalie Henry Obwald misBrook,3-l. Binghamton won the played a 40-yard floater pff the foot
Tournament with a 3-2 win versus of Emmanuel Kulu, and Bob
Buffalo, a game in which the losers Schmaz made nine saves to help Bufoutshot Binghamton, 48-8 and miss- falo raise its record to 8-3-1.
ed innumerable scoring oppor• Albany failed to convert on
tunities.
numerous scoring opportunities, in"We played poorly against Buf- cluding three breakaways, and was
falo," said Albany varsity soccer outshot, 14-9.
After the game Schicffelin adcoach Bill Schielfclin. "We did not
appear to nave the motivation con- ministered one of the all-time
sidering the importance of the tongue-lashings to his players.
"We played without heart,
game."
"In fact," the coach continued, "1 without pride," he said. "Peoplejust
think that too many of our players stood around watching, expecting
things to happen. Very few players
played hard, and a mere handful
played well. . ."
Albany 5, Stony Brook 2
Pasquale Pciriccione's pair of first
goals gave Albany a halftimc lead of
2-0, and Selca's record breaking 17th
at 7:48 of period two were all the
Booters needed to rebound and put
away Stony Brook.
Albany dominated play for most
of the game, allowing the Islanders
t o score twice well after the game was
out' of reach.
"If we had played like that against
Buffalo we'd have had the match
with Binghamton we wanted so badly," Schicffelin said. "I just cannot
understand why we were so bad Friday."
At 9-3-1, the Booters present the
following stats to the NCAA Tournament Selections Committee: 52
goals socored in 13 games (an
average of 4 a game): 21 goals yielded (an average of 1.6 a game); four
players with five or more goals
-fl
Frank Salea dear* bad In record-breaking game.
(Selca, l'etriccione-7, Martinez-6,
and Chepc Ruano-5); two other
players with more than seven total
points (John Rolando and Paul
Schiescl); and the second best Division 111 record in the state.
If the selections committee picks
three New York teams and one from
New Jersey, the Booters should be
in. If they split it then the committee
may elect to wait for the outcome of
this week's Albany-Brockport contest to be broadcast live on WSUA
radio 640 AM.
"It would be difficult for (he coramitteetojust throw out a team with a
9-3-1 record," said Schicffelin.
We've lost just three games by scores
of 1-0, 3-2, and 2-1 (to Buffalo, Union, and Cortland). I hope we will
receive some serious consideration."
Continued on page eighteen
Albright Upsets Albany, 28-8
Scenes from a city In crisis: SASU is working to save NYC with student lobbying in Washington.
D.C. and a massive letter-writing campaign involving many of the schools in the SUNY system.
SASU Plans Washington
Lobby For Aid To NY Gty
by Randi Tolcr
miraculously came up with it only to
find his learn back on its own eight.
The third down bust upthe middle
by Roy Phillbrnok proved fruitless
and now Albany was forced to punt
from ils own end zone. But they
never got it away. Lion defensive
standout Mark Crow hurst through
I he line and blocked the attempt, giving Albright a first-and-goal pn the
one yard line!
Halfback Bill Gallcn was stopped
short on the first try, but then Frank
Francks look a Sharp pilchoui, and
rambled into the right corner for the
score. Now, with I0:06lcftinthcfirst
quarter, the visitors led, I4-0 over a
shocked Albany squad.
But there was moretocome. Alter
The race I t on. Albany came out on tor. In the Capital District
the Danes had finally held on to the
Championships.
ball for more than two plays, later in
the quarter, they were able tomove
into Lion territory. However, witha
fourth and three onthe Lion 36,they
elected to go lor the first down and
came up inches short.
Sharp now went to work from his
by Jon Lafayette
own 33. With the help of his
history. The three wins today placed
In the final regular season him fourth behind Tom Robinson,
backficld of Francks, Ciallen, and
quadrangular meet of 1975 the Joseph Keating, and Dennis Hackett
Jeff Welch, he was able to bring the
Albany State varsity cross-country for most career wins by an Albany
ball all the way to the Dane 29
team ran "its best race of the season," runner.
without aid of a pass. Hut with third
according to Coach Bob Munscy,
and nine, he hit Regis Yaboud over
The Albany strategy for this meet
and defeated Union, RPI, and Siena was to run in a pack and try to carry
the middle for a first down at the fifin the first Annual Capital District as many guys in the front as possible.
teen connected with Dan Delehanly
Cross-Country Championships.
at the one, for another first down.
The strategy seemed to be working
The wins versus those three teams well after the mile as Cheruhino,
One play later Daley smashed his
put Albany's final season record at 6- Chris Burns, and Brian Davis shared
way up the middle for his second
4, and while this is the team's worst the lead with Fred Kitzrow close
touchdown of the afternoon, and
record in its history, it was also the behind in fourth.
with two seconds gone in the second
fourteenth consecutive winning
period, Albright led 2I-0I
Cheruhino, Burns, and Davis still
season for the harriers who have led after three miles with Keith BenThe Dunes finally gol on the
never failed to reach the .SOU or man in fourth after Kitzrow had
scoreboard with five-and-a-half
better plateau.
dropped out because ol cramps. Unminutes left in the half, thanks to an
The Final score read: Albany, 22; ion's Steve Jones began to press first
incredible individual effort by halfUnion, 65; RPI, 68; and Siena, 80. ilenman and then the front three of
back Orin Orlffin, Bertuzzi had
Albany just missed shutting out RPI Albany shortly thereafter, and'
marched his squad from its own thirand Siena, and would have beat all Chcrubino kicked out away from the
teen up to the Lion 39 with the help
three teams combined, 22-311
pack.
of a 2l-yard run by Fran Hrunelle
(replacing Tom DcBlois who reinCarlo Chcrubino won hit fifth
Over the last mile, it was only •
jured his neck). Then, with thirdand
straight meet (he alio won the question of how far Carlo could slay
Albany Invitational Ian week) to tic in front as Jones saw his best effort Dane Roy Phlllbrook eludes a tackier en route to a big 18-yard gain In six, he pitched out to (iriffin whocui
continued on page nineteen
for the third longest streak in team
continued on page nintutn
Saturday's contest.
Albany Cops District
Championships Finale
by Mike llekarski
Hit had been a baking contest, the
Albany State varsity football team
would have won; they had the most
turnovers.
But, unfortunately for the Danes,
it was a football game and the turnovers only helped the Albright
Lions walk away with a 28-8 victory
over the hosts at University Field,
Saturday.
The loss dropped the Danes'
record to 5-2 and jeopardized their
number four ranking in the Lambert
Bowl.
The Danes' seven turnovers
(including six fumbles) were extremely costly, mainly because "they
came at crucial times," said Albany
head coach Robert Ford. Two of the
fumbles were directly responsible for
Albright touchdowns, and a blocked
punt was responsible for a third.
Not that the Lions didn't play
well—they did. But not as well as the
score might indicate.
"They did the things they had to
do to win," said Ford. "When they
had to move the ball and sustain a
drive, they did. We had enough opportunities and wc didn't cash them
in."
The tone of this game was set not
only in the first quarter, but on the
first play. Alter Albany had received
the opening kick off, Danes quarterback John Bertuzzi fumbled the hall
on the initial exchange and suddenly
it was the Lions' ball onthe Dane24.
1-1 vc plays later quarterback Pat
Sharp fired a twelve yard touchdown
pass to full back Dan Daley, and with
only two minutes gone in the first
quarter, the Lions led, 6-0. Bill
Brown's kick (the first of four on the
day) was good, and it was 7-0,
On the ensuing kick off, the Danes
barely improved. This time Bertuzzi
fumbled the hall on the second offensive play, but the Danes did not lose
the ball—yet. The wild scramble for
the ball ended when Bertuzzi
The Student Association of the
State University (SASU) has begun
efforts to fight President Ford's
refusal to help New York Cily in its
financial crisis.
Robert Kiikpatriek, SASU President and .nember of the SUNY
Hoard ol Trustees, announced to the
press on Monday plans for student
lobbying in Washington, and a
massive letter writing campaign.
SASU is organizing students
across the state to goto Washington
D.C. on November 18 to talk to as
many members ol Congress as possible. "We don't need enough people
to fill the Capitol sleps." said
Kiikpatriek. "just enough to fill
some Congressmen's offices."
WcdncsdayCentral Council passed
a bill uppropriating$2.2(M)topayior
buses to Washington to allow for
SUNYA's participation in the
Washington lobbying.
Letter writing campaigns have
wong
already begun in SUNY Buffalo, as
well as several other SUNY campuses across t he slate. SU N Y A plans
to start a massive letter writing campaign early next week.
SUNYA's SASU delegates have
also arranged for a teaeh-i n and panel discussion on the City's fiscal
crisis, Sunday 8 p.m. in the Campus
Center Ballroom. Speakers from the
Governor's and the Lieutenant
Governor's office will be on hand,
along with Cily University and
SASU representatives
12110 Hal'}
Twelve hundred students rallied at
Geneseo last I hursdaylo voice their
outrage at I he plight of New York
City. Brockport is in the midst of
arranging for a one day moratorium
on classes to discuss the problem
which the stale faces and to air possible solutions.
At Purchase, 50 film students
angered at the budget cuts and
threatening to eliminate the film
department, sat in at the offices of
the campus President from Thursday morning until Friday afternoon
lasi week.
Kirkpalrick explained SASU"
great concern for the city's d.,
saying.".,, Asustatewideorgam
lion we are primarily concerned lor
the c o n t i n u e d quality and
accessibility ol the State University
ol New York; and asnstale agency it
would he directly alleeled by financial troubles in the New York Slate
government."
Kirkpatrick also reported that
several students on SUNY campuses
have become involved in the MiniMac drive. The students have been
taking around petitions to get Big
MAC bonds issued in small
denominations ol $50 and $100. so
that the average citi/en can play a
role in helping oul the Cily.
SASI1 backs Governor Carey in
:us . . .i .ind for a federal backup to
.ii\ mo stale efforts against default.
t are) supports the proposed student
lobby lor November IK saying, "1 am
delighted to heai ol ihe support ol
the students in our City and State
University syslems for a loan
guarantee plan now before the Congress ol the United Slates. Their efforts to convince members of Congress, from New York Stale as well
as the other 49 slates ol the facts of
the New York City fiscal crisis show
an understanding of the problem
and support for our leading city."
Chancellor Boycr is concerned, as
is SASU, with the fate of the SUNY
system at the default of the City.
Said Boycr, "Unless the City is supported, essential services will be
harmed, including the State University of New York."
SASU has also been working with
City University Student Senate,
chaired by Jay Hershenson. SASU is
watching the City University's situation closely, us SUNY stands to face
their same problems should a statewide default occur.
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