'•'.:'. HJl Lv.- Hunsberger Alleged to have Opened Others' Mail

advertisement
'•'.:'. HJl Lv.State University of New York at Albany
Friday, May 4, 1973
Tracksters Top Williams For Unbeaten Year
1
Page 18
I
1
Hunsberger Alleged to have Opened Others' Mail
by Glenn von Nostitz
Special to the ASP
It has recently been learned
thittwhile Dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences at the University of Massachusetts, I. Moyer
Hunsberger allegedly opened the
personal mail of some of his
subordinates.
According to Professor Ryan
Drum, who has since left the
Massachusetts School, one of the
major reasons Hunsberger was
forced to resign from U Mass is
because 'he was "caught illegally
opening • other people's mail."
Drum says that much of the
other University politics Hunsberger was engaged in was "not
totally unexpected among some
of us" but that it was "shocking
to everyone" that Hunsberger
was allegedly engaging in such
activities.
Drum says that he was one of
the "victims" of this alleged mail
opening, and that Hunsberger
had a personal vendetta against
him because of the popularity of
the courses he taught. He claims
that oftentimes his classes were
overflowing with students who
were not even enrollled in his
courses, and that "Hunsberger
did not like this." He claims that
Hunsberger "tried to shut me
up" and, in a telephone conversation yesterday, he said that
Hunsberger refused to confer
w"h him about the controversy
surrounding the courses he
taught.
Apparently, the discovery that
Hunsberger had been allegedly
opening mail came when he began to make public statements
containing information which
appeared only in the personal
letters which he supposedly
intercentM
Why Allen Resigned
There have been several other
disclosures since Monday con-
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
S t a t e University o f N e w Y o r k at A l b a n y
Vol. LX No. 24
cerning Hunsberger's activities
both here and at U Mass.
In an interview earlier this
week, former Biology Department Chairman Robert Allen explained some of his reasons for
stepping down from the chairman's post.
He says that his resignation
was prompted by a crisis regarding a National Science Foundation departmental developcontinued on page 4
Wednesday, May 9, 1973
Students Plan Sit-in at 2:30 Today in President's Office
by Hob M a y e r
Students continued to express
and
Arts and Science dean
I.
bul
a 're,11 titulary
faculty'
as
their dissatisfaction with tlte ad-
Moyer Hunsberger's position in
well. Smith added that the rea-
ministration and |heir
the university.
son that
concern
fur the victims " I a tenure system
they
feel
"discirminales
there were not
more
Chris Masierson, a membei ol
faculty members at the rally was
the steering committee asked the
because, " t h e administration and
teachers"
crowd to "get ii together." She
reactionary
Tuesday at .1 rally held between
said, " T h e students here must
duced an atmosphere of feat, an
the
believe themselves and tbeii con-
atmosphere o f i n t i m i d a t i o n . " He
against
llie
ablest
Administration
and
I ine
A i t s buildings.
The - 0 0 people attending the
told the audience t.ilii one icason Carol Waterman and himsell.
place up il we don't
allow
that we don't matter "
freedom
the
outsiders to convince us
both
condidates
not winners ol
academic
I. Moyei llunsbeiger has been
receiving the brunt ol ibis latest
because' " w e
attack but there are those who
c Ii a in p a s n e
in
third
end
consecutive
day
of
such expressed public concern.
Kick Ginsberg, member ol the
feel
he is only
Vice-President
Si 11) I k i n s
"hatchet
Hunsberger's
man."
Out-
thai award was
w o u l d not
dung
wit b
Dea n
llunsbeiger - a prerequisite for
success."
student steering committee and
Siiotkin
mediate superior
history
department
professor.
istiation
David
Goodman,
told
tacuity membei who spoke pri
I'sychology
d c p a i t m c n l . I'elton,
gathering, "We have to icmeiii
valely said. " S i i o t k i n is the one
in one
llie
bet that we pay the tuition beie.
lliey should he a l l e i . lie is one
speeches o f the das said, "We
we pay taxes in the slate, lire
ol the niajoi obstacles and be is
have to change llie priorities ol
university
lire
ibis uiiiveisily • we have to cxeil
is bete lot us - the
students. We are the employers,
the administration
.ne
piess
l be
l'oi
and I acuity
employees.
what
We
inusi
we believe 111,
what we rightfully deserve."
111 the admin-
heaurocracy
one
who
im-
the
Awards, were
a st roup supporter ol Associate
the
is
of
standing Teachet
on this campus. It was
"purge"
pro-
shake this
condemn
the allege is a
have
cerns. Qui collective energy can
tally beard faculty and students
what
faculty
and
is
one
letting
Hunsbeigci do tin d u l y w o i k . "
( tut
Smith,
one
ol
those
I lie only otbei
bei
who
was
faculty mem-
addressed the crowd
l.eioy
ol
I'elton
front
mine
the
vigorous
pressure b> closing this univeistly
down
till
they
change
whose contract is not being con-
ibmgs." He warned bis audience.
tinued, told the audience
"II
uuiveisiiy has gone agaisnt
"the
the
you
Willi
think
these
people
(admin-
staled principles o f democracy."
Istiation) you have got anolbci
generate enthusiasm for the con-
lie went on to say thai
lliing c o m i n g . "
tinuing struggle w i l l i the admini-
is not
stration over tenure procedures
that is responsible for the purge
I be purpose o f the rally was to
only
it
the administration
SUNYAs' Continuing Crisis
you can reason
The day's activity ended w i t h
continued
on page 4
demands. 10 pieseul
by Hob M a y e r
the dem-
ands which a list ol demandslo
A student
second
occupation ol the
I hull
administration
present the demands which included the suspension o f Dean
building has been called I'm 2:,'()
Iluusberget
llus afternoon by some two I11111-
ligation
do'd sludeiils who attended a
view ol
lally yesterday
system,
The rally was a
pending
the
tenure/pioinotion
lo .1 continuing con-
existing Council on
tioveisy
ovei
and Continuing
and
Appointments.
10 inlcude .1 m i n i m u m 0!
Moyei
studeul lepiesentation.
as Dean ol
llie College ol A i l s a n d Suen.es
the scene
ol
seveial 1111 idenis
Mr;
llie sit-in was staged by I >0
students
I lie Albati.) Campus lias heeu
the
Promotion
tenure and the suspension ol I
lluiisbcigei
inves-
and a revision ol
[espouse
pipiuoiioii
an
by a committee, a re-
Monday
at
noon
ies. t i l l ol dass past when offices
since Sunday evening when Ml
ol
students met in the Lee line Celt-
being occupied h) students up-
iiiuveisl>
piesidcius
weie
let to engage in a dialogue about
set over the wai and then univer-
promotion and teniue.
sity os complicity w i t h the milit-
Ai the close ol the meeting it
was decided that
the students
would
meet
office
ntonday noon a list
liene/el
in his
of
ary
same
industrial
television
complex.
The
cameras
weie
present ready lo exploit the sensationalism of an almost foiuot
continued " " pfly.
Jack Leahy Hopes For a Shot
PLEASE RECYCLE THIS PAPER
Page 19
in
bene/ei's office. Il was leiuin-
The Watergate Monster Grows Larger
*6
Im
"
Getter, Davis to Head SA
1
Last
Friday
e v e n i n g after
Gerber
grabbed
a
the
M
SA
Presidency
took
t h e Vice-
Tuesday
afternoon
1*
* * *
^i—^HI
Natansohn
election
which
ran t h r o u g h M o n d a y a n d Tuesday
of t h i s w e e k . N e i t h e r h a d
garnered
fifty
percent
vote during t h e
of
the
four-man
race
for the office last w e e k .
T h e Ballot
the
bated
y
O.iurt
proposal
Stokem.
from
candidate
foi
Ken
Centra)
Barry Davis
Steve Gerber
Council from D u a l ) Q u a d
S t o k e m claimed in a briel he
s u b m m e d t o t h e S u p r e m e C'ouri
thai
students
had
been
dis-
kem's
proposal
to e x t e n d
years, and n o students ir. tne
the
past
elections foi t w o days
Stokem
commented
"I
have
claimed
ihe
inline
procedure worked againsi '.hem
was
couraged i i o m veiling b \ a mix
not c o n c e r n e d over the o u t c o m e
S i o k e m argued thai the Housing
up in the dispersal of residency
of tiie election
Office
slips
some
must
have a
residency slip in ordei
10 vote
foi
A student
candidates
from
his
home
quad
thai
claimed
dorm
handed
in hi:
brief
direct ots sometime*
out
resident-)
slips
in
b u l k , s o m e t i m e s separate!) a n d .
in
either
case,
directors
wert-
often hard t o find
Craig J e n k i n s
for
merited
S.A
President
eon,
waiched ifif confusing
deubera
Mike
Lampert
President
iwo-houi hearing, dismissed Slo-
have
outgoing
SA
aigued against an t>.
currem
beei.
u
noi
He ar
election
force
laws
ior
four
widen.)
arid thai I he i e
ample
nominations,
tht
time
•.tic final da) Id submii li"ii*.ne
reception
the
case
which
determined
fi.t were l o b e considered "Act:
.,:'
CP 'C "
were
ir
wfietj
those
a^li'ins
conflict
with
Siudei:'
Association aclivme*
WAIT?
ORDER YOUR JOHN ROBERTS
RING THIS MONTH,SAVE $4
AND DON'T PAY FOR IT'TIL
YOU PICK IT UP THIS FALL*!
'Gel $4 0 0 off on any
personalized John Roberts Ring
ordered before J une 1 by specifying
8 15'73 Delivery
The balance is not due until the ring is delivered
Order Today'
This was the second year for
Rienow
were
the p r e s e n t a t i o n of this a w a r d ;
year's
Out-
last
ihis
was held Monday in
studeni d e m o n s t r a t o r s
After criticizing the " s t r a n g e alliance of police and
Gov Nelson A Rockefeller signed TYiursday a bill r e q u n
imprisonment or supervision for sellers of major n a r c o t . : d
"1 applaud the courage of t h e majority leaders and mem
state legislature w h o s t o o d against thai strange a l l i a n c
establishment interests, political o p p o r t u n i s t s and misg,.
liners who joined forces a n d tried unsuccessfull\ to
Program. ' Rockefeller said al the start of rarefullv . 1 .
monies for the signing of the hill
WEDNESDAY, MAY
Dr.
Rienow
received a
the A l b a n y S t a l e T e a c h e r ' s College in 1 4 3 ° .
In
lite
fall,
the
University
n o m i n a t i o n s , o f w h o m b5 were
eligible and 5l> said they w a u l e d
to
speak
lo be c o n s i d e r e d . (Eligibility re-
office all d a y .
Peak, an i n s t r u c t o r ,
was
also n a m e d o u t s t a n d i n g leachet
of
ihe
\lil2
Physics
department
in
In a c c o r d a n c e with univer-
sity policy, Ins contract will mil
he iciicweil. because he received
quirements were that
the teacher
was a regular a p p o i n t m e n t
had been
and
Then six m e m b e r s of the faculty
that
and six s t u d e n t s , lltal comprised
leaching
the
committee,
used
student
forms,
y e a t s . he has d e n i o n s l r a t e d gieat
colleagues,
i n e n . and
depaiimenl
chanlo a lessei e x t e n t .
abiliu
sludenl advisees
though he has taught only
is :i leaclici
two
lie believes
the
Rienow is a piofessoi
I'oliltcal
Science
ictogiuiion
fin
who
lii-.
ot
includes
inlv
con
vcinniy the ciiviiotiineiii .inione
ol
nonunation.
Richard
llausei.
,i
of
tuialily
"good
change"
the c o i i c e n t i a l i o n
iased
that
totally
.tudeiil
faculty
One
ihe
siiidenis.
weie joined by
a n n u s . D o i o t h y H a m s , m . w h o is
Ihe Chancellor's Screening ( .an-
cbaiipersou
tnillee.
and
in
this
is .in
iiii.iii.ucii-d
,,l il
e\i,
i n , c \ l > M s W l \ a U e d .,
siti.lenl eoieiiunji
IKc
hods
the
Ihe
leels
bei ol applicants
,,| ilns
seal
.mil icspoilsihllllK',
Us
base
I,,
i n l i in ill
Physical
ssill
, ,,, n n g
i,
M V S K A M A h o p e M . . b u n g ba
„ „ m . ,,|
p.isi
,|ie
li.uhl ions ,,|
i,, ssoik
,il
ihe giossiui' niiiieisils il
serin
veil
dl'lil
in,my
MYSKANIA stands 1,,i
ililfeienl
things
liadllton
As Ihe
I'm
this
\1>'SKAKIA a e i s a s a
I,,
ihe
some
,,is
iiieinhci,
ne\l
loi
Ihe,,
mem
sill
.lie
h ,11, ills
high
( h.iiiiii.ni
.,.
and
pcisouahsui lo llns c a m p u s and
Kalian.
menial in loiinulaling ihe amis
have
lesulled l i m n out evei ineieasing
I'loltssoiship
educalii
a
icipineinenl
degiec
,,|
al
Neu
longei
turn isaiveis will n o lougei
loi
effect as ol die same dale
a
11iv Slate
N. .i k
al
e l l e c l i v c Willi Ihe com-
Ibis change in pohes is niiisis
tent isuli lhal l e c o i n m e n d e d hs
ihe
iiieitieinenl ,,l ihe I u 7 ' 7-1 ae;
deiiu, seal
Augiisi 11. | 0 7 i
iddllion. iheiel.ue
In
loiinci poll
, ics dealing m i l l physical idiica-
hem
Sl'NYA
Mas
I luveisils
Senate
1. I ' l ' : and ssnh
action o | ihe lioaid ol
ihe
liuslees
ol Stale I ' n i v e i s l l y o l Neu > m k
on Apnl : 5 . l')7,t
Allen
Sieve
Vkc
Secie-
Allinan.
tie net.
John
Koch.
Andy
Debbie
Palley,
ha
I'edowil/ and d a i y Siissnian
si/e
kindle the ll.ime ihal lies ssilhin
sils
s I ii d e II I
e o m in il II i I s
evei) sludenl and enlighten linn
MYSKANIA's esisieiice. lollmi
MYSKANIA
also
lo lite insolvcnicul lhal llus inn
lllg II is lip I , ,
ihe
Teaching
-ml
Di tin-
Scllgsoll
.mil obiecltves of the tiiiiseisits
as
seeks lo
guished
Auaids
Chancellors
.in,I
.mil in i n l e i p i e l l n g those l o the
;uls
MYSKANIA
lire
II,ei
Wayne l l a l p e i . Dave l l u s . ' , . Bob
Naiansolin.
thai
in Teaching
I"'
to
l-xcel-
i. I,,. •. •
liialei
Bemsieiii.
ntallly
sicnliis
Sue
i.HI I le.ismei.
Jell
pieseni
and
Icnce
names
has,
a, hsilies
bids
kmieK d o w n ihe haiiieis ,,l I'm
11 is insliti
seal
Dase d.illeils
link belwecn the Alumni .mil I lie
siuileuls
ihe
Ii . l o u i i e e n
lildelil .illalis
( lianinau
svaiinlli
,,l
p.o.illcl
.i.mding
ii, student
i,,
Ailiieving lliese goals may help
hack
iiieinhci
•eiiue
liouoi it deseives
\nmp
,
.K.ideini, In
I,,I
il
all,I , le.ile gie.ilei
.iss.nelless
coinmu-
selects
for the Imu
been , h o , e n hi poplll.ll ele, linn
Hi
leg;
he
i,, lhal ,,| Sigiiuni I .null,
landing In ihe es e. ol
Iml.is
he
haclielm's
M Y S K A M \ i. .in !
,,l shulenl ,i. m
i he
il
that
tecommend
Gym Requirement Ends
I h e ,,,iiuiui
sei ais , an help him cxpci leiu e
lies
| ,,,
position
sixadministiatots lot
R e i m e i . ex|ilarned how dillicull
.mil .is .i p a n ol that oiicnl.itioi
plays .in iinpoii.ini
ihe
leacliine siill iitaiit-
i.mis in the u n i v e i s i u
Mb.ins
In Ihe c.i 11 s MMi
,hin,-,
indicate
this awaid
Iheothei nxrmhciMil liteconimiilee
(..ill
it was to naiiow down t h e mini
gu.udrans ol Ihe In lunaii J a s
esiablisluueiit
iiiuieisilN
would
i tnpi
upoilance
In Sue Seligson
• 111cs11c.n
of the c o m i n i t t e e .
si a I eil thai hopefulU
I'lmeisiis
"in
nily.
c o n s i d c t a i i o n the s t u d e n t s evalu-
MYSKANIA 74 Elected
Whai is \ n s l s \ \ l \ • I • mans
s o m e t h i n g thai
pie-
evalualioiis ( m i n u s ,ui\
of
lot
on ic-
usually
mi
lee l o o k e d
set thai person apart from the
test, a l w a y s taking into primary
u h n i l i l s t i a l i u ' |i,iiticipaIlon I
s | l a l , d ,, v , „ | , e i v
I'aculis
neiuhei on ihe c n n u n i l l e e
a
d o n u n a l e s al S.l: N Y ' A . ' I lis bc,ie) [ | u ( | , | n s | l o | ] n | s | , l u | ] j , w
to
be n o t e d thai Ihe gieaiesl em]ihasts was placed on [lie lesull
o| the slttdent evalualioiis.
is
search,
stalcinenls and
d e t e t n i i n e t h e w i n n e r s li should
cuiiintu-
lecogniliiin
fiom
from
in the importance "I trying " t o
feeling ot
letters
letters
establish
,i
David Peak a n d R o b e r t R i e n o w . after receiving a w a r d s .
teaching a lull y e a l l
evaliialion
his d o c t o r a t e l i m n Albany. Even
sei-.its
ALBANY
Kcllcy.
to
1 I came in
guardians ,,l
N E * YORK
After a three w e f t court and m e d i a b a t t l e it, ot'.n..
Mario BiacfP appear? to be left now with one Ian n . f
nearly complete disclosure of hit 1 9 " : prar.d j u n '.<•>: The Bronx Democrat has unlit Fnda> u . pel.tmr. '..' i
Court ui hear hi!, appeal of the federal court rui.nj a
of the testimony except for the n a m e of third p a r t u s
Che U S Court of Appeals,, which t u r n e d oowr. r. i
ruling last Friday, refused on M o n d a y 10 grant Biagp a
Later Monday night. Biaggl (.aid hit request lot a •
"strictly procedural ' He gave no indication o! w h e n . ,
to pursue the case t o Ihe high c o u r t
Biagp, a candidate for m a y o r , is figr.tmp newspaper rt
invokedthe Fiftl A m e n d m e n t 30 times during a p p e a r s
federal grand jury looking i n t o Congressional bills >
behalf of aliens
Dr.
Bene/el w h o had not
i
Store
were
page
iiieiuheis MI the iiiniei n \
t ' S District Court Judge Matt Byrn* : : • - . • • • •
papers trial ; ur> :"da> for tht- r e m i n d * - : ! :M -••• •
full-scale heanng into Wat-ergatt links - : r t c ^ *
The iur\ was brought m a, . '• o rr. t.nx.
rebuttal was t < >m pie ted and tne defence v*
witntss*e>
'That br.ngs u. an end the eviaenc* : :: ..• ..•..-•
:•
He told tne i u n which is r.t>t be.r.j: •-,- ,.«-t'-f .
the c o u r t r o o m Monday m o r n i n g
n u r - . i r.^. : ••» exposing themselves to an> news : lh< wist- , _• -ti'ld h\n J I m e alleged involvement •' VVai*rpat*
•''•
Whit* House aides m the burglar}
' '•'>* • --•
' psychiatrist
recipients
Awards c o m m i t t e e received 71
Di
LOS ANGELES
year's
J o h n Therrien and D r . Richard
similar a w a r d while teaching at
m t \ " in the classiooni
VOlNDEDrCNEE
The 70-day siege of W o u n d e d Knee
Indians surrendered their arms and V S
secured the historic hamlet
The federal officers t r a n s p o r t e d e^eryorc
p'-rmanent residents w h o had r e m a m e c :.'-'
be al I o wed lo r el u rn Wedn esda > i!: e •
weapons, explosives and "evidence of c-r.rn.
Interior Department Solicitor Genera
bom bs were disc,:»\er<-d in Indian bunI:e:
arrested with c weapon after t h e federa. <J
an h o n o r .
David
ident B e n e z e f s office (see s t o r y ,
I)r
National
The bill becomes effective Sept 1 Among, o t h . i thmgi
prison terms for those convicted of violent crimes ai
•econdfclony offenders, establishes penalties for giving
bribes m dangerous drug cases, provides SI 0 0 0 rev
information leading t o t h c a r r e K l a n d e o n V ) r t l o n of »
drugpusher, a n d limits bargaining
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
He views t h e award as s o m e t h i n g
w h o had been silting-in at Pres-
GUADALAJARA
"Thank G o d . " said U S . Consul General Terran-when he returned h o m e M o n d a y night and cmr.-r;i.
hours after a guerrilla band k i d n a p p e d him "r h sir<~<-:
"I am very h a p p y . " t h e 58-year-old d i p l o m a : sac.
eyes and a heavy, gray s t u b b l e o r h a c h e e h ; anc ••
brief bppearnce for p h o t o g r a p h e r * support-ed by r. ,* v
and Jack Higgins of t h e S t a t e D e p a r t m e n t on ;r.'
d o c t o r would not allow h i m t o answer n e w s m e n ? •_._*
Leonhardy was freed, tired but u n h a r m e d ':•'« *
Mexican government released 30 persons- frorr v. .•
Cuba to ransom the American
accomplishmenls.
t o be lived u p t o rather than just
During Ihe reception a b o u t 50
of
other
at
llteii h o n o r .
me poml r e f e n e d t " an earlier
WHY
PAGE TWO
as
many
not
here
s t a n d i n g Teachers. A c h a m p a g n e
Larnper 1 ji
thai actions of the Housing Of-
lias
instruction.
Peak and Robert
6el»eer
elections ar.J
p a c k e t ! ifus )rear
(. Murt
of vtitmg days
tiie
had dispensed
slip: irregular!)
was
i i'.ismg candi
"This is l a m a s ) ' ai K
lerision
C o u r l . afiei
gotten
tions of the C n u n
gued
Supreme
noi
the o p p o r t u n i t y it* vote
a
The
I was w o r r i e d
s t u d e n t s had
dait-
Stokem
exceptional
been in his
de-
leaching
thc wayside
A l b a n y S l a t e . In r e c o n g n i l i o n of
Edited b y Daniel S. R o s s
Internationa/
c o u n t i n g was de-
Supreme
in
by
President
layed i w o h o u r s Friday evening
while
fallen
BEIRUT
Lebanese President S u l e i m a n Franjieh cancelled b:r
ordered an i m m e d i a t e cease-fire b e t w e e n a r m y m>up>
nian guerrillas t o n i g h t . H e a p p e a l e d t o both side*, to ifij.oA broadcast by Beirut r a d i o said t h e cease-fire wrncn
hour-long Lebanese air force r o c k e t attack on guerrilla ;•the airport, would go i n t o effect at 8 p . m
T h e stand-down "will give j o i n t c o m m i s s i o n s a chant*
half hour t o start w o r k on e n s u r i n g t h e enforcerr.**
cease-fire/' Franjieh's o r d e r said.
were t h e sole c a n d i d a t e s in a
special t w o - d a y
cellence
designated
after a quiet run-off.
Davis a n d D e b b i e
!<f
C o n t r a r y t o p o p u l a r belief, ex-
Presidency b y a w i d e m a r g i n .
Barry Davis
by Judy Daymont
•
"
tangled Supreme C o u r t decision,
Steve
Peak, Rienow Named Outstanding Teachers
tc
I lie iiesl path loi yoin iiinsei
llle
ss ill
he
III
hs
Graduation Cards at
PEARL GRANT
RICHMAN'S
STUYVESANT PLAZA
sou
-WWV\A%VW
A t t e n t i o n June Graduates;
Tickets for Senior Week
Would you welcome the o p p o r t u n i t y of haviruj your credentials
forwarded to many of thu leading companies all over the United
States at no expense to you?
The professional counselors at Wm. P. Allen Associates are
presently screening college graduates for top notch career
opportunities in all areas of endeavor. As leading i n d u s t r i e s have
become increasingly aware of the very valuable resources a
growth conscious college graduate provides, the demand for
people like you has intensified. There are many opportunities
available; to you and our consultants will d o all that is possible to
find the right area in which to launch your career.
will be sold one last day
May 10
WEDNESDAY. MAY 9, 1973
CC Lobby
Extra tickets for "Night at the Races"
are available.
Perhaps you are planning to continue your uducation, Perhaps
your plans are somewhat nebulous al this time. Either way you
owe it to yourself to stay on top of all possible opportunities,
whether immediate or delayed and we wish to extend our services
to you. We sincerely hope that you will take advantage of this
opportunity to broaden thu horizons of your life's work, Merely
call for an appointment. The results will amaze y o u .
Very truly y o u r s ,
Wm V Allen, AHHDV (ufii-m-y)
10 Coiuin Ave. Suitf (i
Albany, NY
t'J'JOti
459-6600
11-2
No casual attire may be worn to the Race Track,
Women may
wear pants suits. M e n must wear jackets & ties.
The only event that is sold out is the
Lake George Cruise.
,,
-m
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
**
, .
tutiaud by M i l l i o n l.l»
^
PAGE THREE
Hunsberger Alleged to have Opened Others' Mail
continued from page I
ment grant of approximately •
S525,000 back in 1970. After
the grant had been definitely
approved by NSF, Allen discovered that the administration
had cut the biology department
budget considerably, expecting
the gap to be filled by the NSF
grant money.
Specifically cut were seven
teaching assistantships as well as
other new programs and general
operating funds. The administration expected these cuts to be
made up for by the NSF money.
The Biology Department, on
the other hand, expected the
grant money to be used for
certain "growth programs" and
for improving the quality of the
department.
Dr. Allen says that he complained "bitterly" to the administration about the cuts. He
claimed that department was
"digging its own grave" since the
grant lasts for only five years.
After the fifth year, he says the
department "would be in a
hole", since the grant monies
would no longer be available.
JERUSALEM
When Joshua fought the battle
of Jericho 3,000 years ago to
win the Promised Land for the
Jews, he set up headquarters at
Gilgal near the River Jordan.
Today, countless wars later, Gilgal lives again.
Associate Dean Malcolm Smiley reportedly told Allen that he
was only acting on orders from
above when he cut the biology
appropriation. Hunsberger told
him that it was a "very difficult
decision to make". Vice-President Phillip Sirotkin insisted
that he saw no reason to reverse
Hunsberger's decision, and Benezet said the same.
The long-vanished Biblical post
is a Jewish settlement on occupied Arab land, where young
Israeli soldier-farmers grow
tomatoes and guard against Arab
guerrilla infiltrators. It is tiny,
but it is symbolic.
Benezet tried to convince
Dr.Allen not to resign, but Allen
persisted. The NSF affair was
apparently not the only reason
the chairman stepped down.
Election Results
Continuing Crisis
Students Plon
Sit-In
continued from page 1
those present voting lo participate in another sit-in at the
president's office this afternoon.
Benezel is expected to present
an administration reaction to the
latest demands by students al
3 30 in the Campus Center Assembly Hall. The meeting is open
lo the university community and
will provide an opportunity lui
students and faculty to question
Uene/ei on the spiraling promotion and t e n u r e controversy.
Senate
cont'd from page one
ten student action. The same
telephones were dialed as a few
students eagerly called their
friends to casually inform them
that a sit-in was in progress. The
administrators with their same
business-as-usual faces huddled
together defensively to evaluat
this new development. The same
secretaries huddled next to each
other as they witnessed the invaders disturb the peaceful monotony of the day. Only the
issues were different.
apparent that the university has
failed to follow the principle
wupon which it has been
founded. Academic freedom
exists nominally fur the faculty
and not al all for the students.
There has been a purge on this
campus with the intent lo end
diversity f thought among the
faculty. This purge has had the
effect of closing to us, the students, the opportunity to pursue
diverse avenues of thought."
The outcome of a meeting
with Benezel lalei that afternoon was disappointingly lo
many students who waited lot
the president conclude a closed
dooi meeting Willi eight student
organizers. Whal upset studnets
nlosl was lienezefs stacinent
thai the cases of teachers already
denied tenure, peiiiianetil employment, or promotion would
not be reconsidered.
A leaflci that had been distributed by student organizers, and
which also served as an open
letter to Benezet, explained the
students' concerns.
"II is becoming increasingly
GLENDALE COLLEGE
~ OF LAW
Benezel agreed the make a
statement today explaining lilt"
administration's reactions u> lhe
students demands. Yesterday,
students were informed tahl the
statement would be made al an
open meeting with students in
Ihe Campus Cenlei Assembly
Hall this afternoon al 3:30.
> A Degree Procjiom Qualifying Groduules tor Calif. Bar Exam
• 5 Mm From Downtown lew Angeles III A Suburban Community
. Em oilmen! Now Being Accepted For September Teim
• Inquiries Arc Invited By [he Dean 01 Admissions.
G L E N O A I E COLLEGE OF LAW
220 NO. GLENDALE AVE
GLENOAIE, CA. 9 1 2 0 6
(213)247 0770
Senate Commuters:
Charles Bauer
Andrew P. Dolan
Eric Lonschein
Mitch Zoler
Janice Forde
Jay Hashmall
Sieve Gerber
Barry Z. Davis
Roderick "Kick" Reed
Alumni Senate:
David Coyne
Mark Pickering
Colonial Senate.
Angelica "Angle" Antonio
Wayne llalpei
David llnscli
Receptions - Lee-Lure Center Lobby area
(poor weather)
1 p.m.
Graduates and faculty assemble at Physical
Education Building in Caps arid Gowns
2 p.m.
Graduation Ceremony
(good weather)
football
Dutch Quad:
10:30 a . m . - J
I'd l.npatin
Colonial Quad:
Lew Barr
Wayne llalpei
Stephanie Stewaii
Dutch Quad:
Ken Slokem
Richard Guidon
Barbara Poskleusk\
Indian Quad:
Lewis I'ldlci
Jtm ICeougli
State Quad:
Randy Hieidhail
State Senate
Jell Sherman
I'elet II. Johnson
Hams I'aslich's
Km I Zoi in
f
front
I n c e p t i o n s - in f r o n t of PAC, Campus C e n t e r ,
L i b r a r y (good weather)
p.m.
David Coyne
Allan Gary Spivack
lhe
, . , „ inc— — , ,
the
-
«
^
^
"The root of the problem,"
says Premier Golda Meir, "is that
our Arab neighbors have not
reconciled themselves to our
existence." Noting the latest
threats of war from Egypt's President Anwar Sadat, Israeli
Chief of Staff Lt. Gen. David
Elazar adds, "many Arabs still
think the only solution is to
destroy Israel."
For the Arabs, destroying Israel would be an awesome task.
Willi only smuggled guns and an
improvised army 3,000 regulars, 14,000 undertrained recruits, lour cannons, no tanks
the Israelis beat the armed forces
of seven Arab nations in 1948.
That was when the Jewish stale
was born and the Arabs tried lo
wipe il out.
In 1956, wilh an organized but
untested force, Israel routed
Country Squire Motel
corner RT 20 &OT146
3 miles Thruway Exit 25
close to Schenectady & Albany
Restaurant-Lounge-Pool
Class Officers: 1M7S
President l.iuda Wc-in
VI'.: Kaudl [Siolnv.
Sec: Katie Hiedlaml
Class Officers 1974
President: Jell lleiirJ.n
V.I' :Hub Kalian
Treas.: Alan Altiu.iu
Alumni Board
Richaid Aiken
Ron Daniel
Jay Goldman
Vicki Gottlieb
Michael Lampeil
Adjoining Family Rooms
$10.00 - single
TV & Phones
$14.00 - double
3898 Carman M. 518-3SS-3J10
Schenectady, NY 12303
among its Arab neighbors.
Mrs. Meir and her government
insist that negotiations are the
only way to peace. The Arabs
insist that before a start can be
made Israel must withdraw from
every inch'. of the 26,000 square
miles of Arab land taken in the
1967 war.
Israel has never made it clear
exactly where it wants its new
borders, but it is no longer waiting for Arab agreement on a
map. Informally, it is taking over
the land it wants with concrete
and asphalt instead of the ink
and seals of a political contract.
Israel lives in peace with its
own 366,000 Arab citizens-the
families of those who stayed
instead of fleeing their homes in
the 1948 war. But the only
other signs of Arab-Jewish coexistence to appear in 25 years
have been in the captured zones,
where about one million Arabs
lived under Israeli occupation
since 1967.
More than 40,000 of them
now commute to Israel to work
on Israeli pay scales. Almost all
the apartment buildings springing up in Israel, and the new
hotels appearing in Tel Aviv, are
built by Arab labor.
The fact that 40,000 Arabs are
helping build the Jewish state
raises the troubling question of
who will replace them as
laborers if they return to Jordanian rule, and how would Israel handle the west bank population if it stays attached to
Israel?
A virtually unpublicized nuclear experiment, to be conducted by the Atomic Energy
Commission, is scheduled for a
Rocky Mountain area in northwest Colorado this spring.
The code-name of the controversial project is "Rio
Blanco." And the experiment
will involve the explosion of
three 30-kiloton
nuclear
devices- all at the same time- at
the bottom of a
6000-foot
hole. "Rio Blanco" is an attempt
by the A.E.C. to hollow out an
enormous underground chimney
which will presumably fill up
with billions of cubic feet of
natural gas.
"Rio Blanco" was given the
go-ahead by the Environmental
Protection Agency only after the
agency was reportedly pressured
into doing so by the White
House. If this initial experiment
is successful in creating natual
gas supplies, then A.E.C. proposals call for the exploding of
between 12 and 30 nuclear
bombs underground by 1975.
And if that experimenl works,
phase three of "Rio Blanco"
suggests - believe it or not - that
between 200 and 300 bombs
would be exploded together,
probably late in this decade.
Environmentalists, as might be
expected, are lining up lo oppose the Rio Blanco tests. The
A.E.C. concedes that large quantities of radio-activity will leak
into the atmosphere, even in its
small initial tests. In addition,
lhe agency confirms Ihal all of
the natural gas produced will be
made permanently radio-active
by the blast procedure, bul the
agency insists that these radioactive levels will be low. Some of
the natural gas to be produced al
first is expected to be so radioactive that the A.E.C. is already
making plans lo sell il al dirtcheap rates.
ZNS
The dilemma is philosophical
as well as practical. Morally,
most Israelis do not wish to rule
as masters over an alien population. Many feel the Israeli creed
of Jewish labor is wcakend by
relying on Arab workmen, and
Mrs. Meir admits "what worries
me is that we are gelling used lo
it so fast"
On the practical side, some
Israeli leaders warn that if the
occupied territories became pail
of Israel, Arabs would he 45 per
cent of the population hv I9K0.
The plight of the Palestinians
outside Israel is the most
troubling problem in lhe Middle
Easl, and the Arab refugees are
the fuel that keeps Ihe fires of
crisis burning.
l-awmakers in about a dozen
slates have restored the death
penally, and measures lo bring
back capital punishment are
under consideration in at least
15 more states.
An Associated Press survey
showed (hat measures reinstating
Ihe death sentence for certain
aibant Steatee sinema
1btfW*\
CH&BUK
OR
fitolttd
I
!THE ANDERSON TAPESl
i., May 11
7:30 & 10:00
SPAGHETTI
Theatre.
IN THE NATION
(The last film of the semester)
LASA0HA\
,„
Modern Israel, which celebrated its 25th anniversary May
7, still relies, like Joshua, on
armed forces to maintain a
Jewish state in the Middle East.
It has won three wars against
huge odds, and is ready for
another, if it comes.
E g y p t . And in six days in 1967,
the Israelis eviscerated the
armies of Jordan and Sovietsupplied Egypt and Syria.
Today the Israeli Defense
Forces are vastly stronger than
in 1967, and Arab strength is
questionable. Moscow still arms
the Arabs, but the Russian advisers have gone home from
Egypt and Israeli reports say
Egyptian defenses are a shambles. King Hussein of Jordan
wants peace, and the Syrian military in the past has proved less
than effective.
Israeli Finance Minister Pinhas
Sapir disclosed in April that Israel has spent $6 billion building
its defenses since the 1967 war,
and plans to spend $10 billion
more in the next six years.
Thirty per cent of this year's
$4.7 billion budget is for defense.
With its American-built Phantom Jets, Israeli-made missiles
and supcrtrained pilots, the Israeli air force rules the Mideast
skies. Foreign reports say an
Israeli-built jet is almost ready
for production. For the ground,
Israeli engineers have modified
and improved the army's American and British tanks, and designed an Israeli "Galil" assault
rifle that its designer claim outshoots anything in its class. The
Israeli navy has started to produce its own advanced gunboats.
The Arabs appear lo have none
of this self-sufficiency, and little
skill wilh sophisticated weaponry.
But as Israel turns 25 it is not
lighting but seeking peace and a
permanent, secure existence
Indian Quad:
Ken Slokem
T o u r s - A r t G a l l e r y , Computer C e n t e r ,
L i b r a r y , N u c l e a r A c c e l e r a t o r Lab, Educat i o n a l Communications C e n t e r , AtmosphericS c i e n c e Research C e n t e r
p.m.
Alumni:
Glaucn A "Tony" Pen /
Mitchell " A c e " KassolT
U n i v e r s i t y Wind Knsi-mble Concert in
o f 1JAC
10:30 a.m.
11 a . m . - I
field
Central Council
Commuter Representatives
Charles Bauer
Gwendolyn J. Dudley
Laura Grunberg
Payshonne Jones
Erie Lonschein
Josephine Lumpkuis
Gloria J. Thomas
Edward " E D " Williams
Bob Cohen
ToMMENCEMENT DAY (MAY 26) SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
11; 30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Israel At 25: An Evaluation
LC18
Take a break from a studying
50 c with tax & ID
$1.00 without
crimes have been enacted in Florida, Montana, Nebraska, Georgia, Connecticut, Nevada, Arkansas, Wyoming, Ohio and Utah.
Arkansas and Tennessee legislators also have passed capital
punishment bills that are awaiting governors' signatures.
The Supreme Court ruled last
July, in cases involving Texas
and Georgia, that the death penalty as imposed in most states
was unconstitutional.
Most of the new. laws and the
pending measures list specific
crimes for which the death penalty may be imposed-usually
the killing of a policeman or
fireman and various other types
of murder.
The most recent restoration of
the death penalty came in Connecticut and Nevada where
action was completed last week.
In both states, the conditions
leading to imposition of the
death penalty include the murder of a policeman or fireman on
duty, murder for pay and murder committed by prison inmates serving life sentences.
Arguments over just when the
death penalty should be imposed-if al all-have stalled
capital punishment bills in several slates.
In Pennsylvania, for example,
the House Law and Justice Committee combined six measures
into one bill that would have
mandated death for persons furnishing drugs Ihal cause a user's
death, for hired assassins, for
anyone convicted of a felony
Ihal results in death, for killers
of on-duty policemen or firemen
and for those who murdered a
hostage or committed a killing
during a hijacking.
After two days of healed debale, the measure wenl back to
committee for further work.
Opponents claimed lliat the bill
had too many inconsistencies.
The Mississippi legislature
passed a bill Ihal would have
made the death penalty mandatory for a convict committing a
murder and for persons convicted of premeditated murder,
aircral'l piracy, treason and rape
of a child under I 2.
Gov. Bill Waller vetoed the
bill, saying that, although he
favored restoration of capital
p u n i s h m e n t , the
measure
enacted was unclear.
AP
Thanks
To lhe residents of Dutch Quad:
I would like lo thank all those
who voled for me during my
recent campaign lor Council.
Without your support and efforts on my behalf I could not
have been elected. I can only
hope to prove myself worthy of
lhe confidence you have expressed in me and will do my
best to represent your interests
in the coming academic year. I
remain,
Sincerely.
Gloucu A Perez
Member o f Council
Dutch (Juad
t)«lpi«*>"« m*
PAGE FOUR
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, IV
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9. 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAC1E FIVE
i&?iim$
Watergate Monster Grows Larger
i WILL, wow peMoNSium
*H Bote »®T»« wsiowMtv,
THE L 6 M « . & VK fe#!_£,
T H E PfWHev OF gETTCR
I WILL BEGW W BEING
<Hu»w-6 M»D SHAKES
Under testimonial immunity, a
witness cannot be prosecuted for
what he admits. But it does nor
prevent prosecution on evidence
gathered independently of his
jommittee voted Tuesday to
grant testimonial immunity to
Dean and at least five others
should they invoke their constitutional rights against selfincrimination.
WASHINGTON
Ousted White! House counsel
John W. Dean 111 will be subpoenated and required to testify
before the Senate Watergate^
committee on his reported claim
that he can link President Nixon
to the scandal's coverup.
Dean will be granted immunity
to gain his testimony if he invokes his right against selfincrimination.
Sen. Sam J. Ervin, D-N.C, the
committee chairman, said Tuesday he will not decide whether
to call the President to testify
"until some reason to call the
President is known to exist." He
added: "So far 1 have no information the President was personally involved."
The hearings are scheduled to
begin May 17. The committee
voted to subpoena Dean, fired
April 30 as Nixon's official lawyer.
It was learned the Justice Department was asked Monday to
waive a rule requiring 10 days
notice by the committee that it
intends to ask immunity grants.
The department was given six
requests for waivers,
testimony. A tederal judge issues
the order compelling a witness
to testify after application by
the Justice Department.
White House press secretary
Ronald L. Ziegler was asked
Tuesday whether a broad White
House denial of presidential involvement in Watergate was intended to include a denial of
awareness of any coverup.
Sources close to the committee
said the leadoff witnesses will be
Bernard L. Barker, Eugenio R.
Martinez, Frank A. Sturgis, and
Virgilio R. Gonzalez, four men
from Miami who were arrested
with James W. McCord Jr. inside
Ziegler said he could not go
the Watergate offices of the
beyond the statement, but
Democratic party. The four will
added the language "was not
be interviewed by the committee
chosep to draw a distinction
staff Wednesday.
between
participation and
Also on the tentative witness
awareness."
lists are E. Howard Hunt and G.
The Watergate story continued
Gordon Liddy. The Miami men
to develop on Capitol Hill, in the
and Hunt pleaded guilly al the
Justice Department, in the Penstall of the Watergate trial to
tagon papers trial in Los
conspiracy, burglary and wireAngeles, the State Department
lapping. McCord and Liddy were
and in the federal courthouse in
convicted of the same charges
Washington.
after trial. Hunl already has been
Ziegler said Nixon was degranted immunity by Chief U.S.
voting very little time to the
District Judge John L. Sirica.
various investigations but he is
"We're going to do our thing in
"spending a good deal of time"
a
calm, orderly, and objective
on restructuring Ins While House
stall, shattered at the top by way." said Son. Howard Baker,
R-Tenn., the ranking minority
resignations,
member of the committee. The
Asked about a report that the
first .seven sessions will explore
President once had wondered
the Watergate bugging affair italoud whether he should resign,
self, he said, and that will lead
the press secretary said: "I have
the committee into the financial
never heard him wonder that out
side of the Nixon re-election
loud."
campaign and alleged sabotage.
t h e seven-member Senate
The statement, issued Monday
with Nixon's concurrence, had
said "any suggestions that the
President participated in any
coverup activity or activities is
untrue."
Congratulations
Ann
n e w
U^trw ft* THE tfcTtaatre
AC-nvmeSi
kTHlKl&S
TO COME..
J
office!
HAIL T O T H E CHIEF!
LOS ANGELES
Watergate conspirator E.
Howard Hunt has testified that
special presidential counsel
Charles W. Colson directed him
to forge cablegrams linking President John F. Kennedy to the
killing of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem.
Hunt, in a Watergate grand
jury testimony released here
Monday by the Pentagon papers
trial judge, said lie had found
enough in State Department files
to hint at Kennedy involvement
in the 1063 assassination. But he
said Colson declared that wasn't
"good enough" and ordered the
forgeries.
In Washington, Colson denied
the charge.
U.S. District Court Judge Matt
Byrne released the testimony as
part of the mounting evidence of
government involvement in the
Pentagon papers case and the
prosecution of codefendant
Daniel Ellsberg.
Hunt sais he was working on a
White House probe of the Pentagon papers leak in 1471 when he
spotted documents that might
be used to embarass the late President Kennedy's family. He said
some documents also appeared
to be missing, and he figui.'d
those would be the most damaging.
Hunt said he relayed this information to Colson, and Hunl
quoted Colson as saying, "Well,
what kind of material have you
dug up "ii the files that would
indicate Kennedy complicity?"
"...I showed him three or four
cables that indicated that they
had pretty close to pulled the
triggei against Premier Diem's
head, but il didn't say so in so
many woids." Hunt said in testimony before (he grand jury last
Wednesday
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"Inferentially. one could say
that it was a high degree of
administration complicity in the
actual assassination of Diem and
his brother."
He recalled that Colson said,
"Well, this isn't good enough.
Do you think you could improve
on them?"
"I said, 'Yes, 1 probably could,
but not without technical assistance,' Hunt testified, noting
that as a former CIA agent he
had been given training in
"Floating forged newspaper accounts, telegrams, that sort of
thing....
"So he Colson said, 'Well, we
won't be able to give you any
technical help. This is too hot.
See what you can do on your
own."
Hunt then detailed h IW III'
used a Xerox machine, O l / n l
blades and a typewriter and "I
set about creating two cables
which bore on that pai llculai
period."
Another Watergate ci iispua
tor, E. Howard Hum
granted immunity helmic the
grand jury, and is com
iideiod
safe from further prose IIOII III
the case.
Colson denied giving the mdoi
but said it was possible Hunt had
misinterpreted something Insaid. The forgeries appaicuiH
are those eventually desinnod
by L. Patrick Gray III. v. In.
resigned as acting FBI due, im
after the destruction «.i- di
closed.
yBBaWBt«aaot»BBBBwt»PBty^
i
S
ITHat
I
I
s All &
°%s>
HAVE A GOOD SUMMER
Love,
(This is the Last
the ASP Staph
ASP of the Semesterl
Girl's 2 6 " bicycle f o r sale. Best offer.
Call Sharna (evenings) 4 82-411 7.
Bl c y c l e s - Now--1,3, S.and 10 speed.
European, Japanese, A m e r i c a n . Many
brands. F o l d i n g bicycles l o o . Prices
f r o m $26 t o $ 3 0 0 . Special: 10 speed
Czech racer, 2 4 ' / ; lbs, w i t h free t o o l
kit, extra cables, a n d shoulder bag:
$105.
AM guaranteed. Free set-up.
Call David Comarow 4 6 5 - 6 8 1 4 .
Bicycle - 3 speed, good c o n d i t i o n
$25.00. 4 3 8 - 8 3 9 8 - call Chris.
Panasonic Stereo Cassette Deck originally $ 1 4 0 , asking $ 1 0 0 . Excellent
c o n d i t i o n . Call 7-4656.
For Sale. G u i l d electric guitar SC-90,
3 channel amplifier, speaker cabinet
w i t h 2 I S " . Call Laurence 41)7-4027.
SONY stereo, 4-track tape recorder.
Call 4 5 7 - 4 5 0 9 .
Used L g m o n d guitar
case - Stow 7-4693.
Friday-Saturday-Sunday
12 Noon to 6 pm
Swimming Pool*
Friday-Saturday-Sunday
12 Noon to 6 pm
$.50 Admission
$.75 Guest
•Weather permitting - Please call the Mohawk Campus at 371-6941 if you have a question
on weather.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
W E D N E S D A Y , MAY 9, 1973
Jobs Available: Middle Earth Drug
Education Program - seeking Graduate students t o ( i l l the f o l l o w i n g
positions, Fall "73: Co-ordlnator of
Training C o m p o n e n t , Co-ordlnator of
Education C o m p o n e n t , Co-ordlnator
of Counseling C o m p o n e n t . Pick u p
applications and j o b qualifications at
Middle Earth, Ten Eyck Hall, D u t c h
Quad. A p p l i c a t i o n deadline May 14
al 5:00 p m .
Someone w i t h van or truck t o help
move f u r n i t u r e . Will Pay. 4 4 9 - 8 5 2 8 .
Students full or part-time for spring
and summer. Haircut unnecessary.
Call Larry at 4 7 2 - 4 0 5 4 .
SERVICES
Si' Hng lessons at Mohawk Campus.
8/3 hr. lessons
lea son able. Call
438-1088 for more I n f o r m a t i o n .
typing
Service
439-5765.
Reasonable,
HOUSING
2 and 3 b e d r o o m apartment available
lor n o w and Fall. Very nice. Near
busline. $ 1 5 0 . Call 4 8 2 - 8 0 5 1 . Immediately.
Hou sell o l d Herns: dishes, silverware,
eleclrlc can-opener, end table, pots.
Cheap. 456-40O8.
Wanted: 2 girls for summer sublet,
own rooms, nice douse o n busline.
Call 4 5 7 - 3 0 1 9 .
Do y o u need household 11 urns lur
next year • beds, rugs, chairs, pots,
lamps, etc
Jul I 4 8 2 - 8 8 0 1
Mansion in Washington. Excellent
< o n d l t l o n . Must vacate due t o unexpected u p c o m i n g impeach men I.
Call Dick 202-456-1414.
j.O cubic t o o l t o l r l g e r a t o
nation call Rone / / 0 8 8 .
Girls t o itiare Hat, We pay u l l l l l l o s .
I V 9 - 0 / 2 5 - Allen Street. Rooms $95
or $85. Very clean.
2 b e d r o o m Mobile H o m e , 10 X 55,
Excellent c o n d i t i o n t h r o u g h o u t , 15
minutes f r o m campus. Cheapest living
possible
(furniture
available)
$3100. 37 1-2566 eves, weekends.
Medium size refrlgoralor w i t h freezer.
Good c o n d i t i o n . $ 5 0 . 4 5 / - ' J ? 1 2.
I oj rent for summer and ( a l l , 2'/*
bedroom
apt.
furnished.
Call
4/2-9838,
Excellent Coat (beige and b r o w n ) .
Acrylic f u r lining. Size ?-9. 415,
489-662/.
Largo J-bedroom Duplex, Available
lor summer and (all. 10 minutes in
Latham, $ 2 1 0 / m o n l h . 783-6652.
1 wo beds In very good u i i u i l i Ion
$15 and $ 2 0 . Call 4 36 14 2 i
Canoeing
Use y o u r skills In L a t i n A m e r i c a , F i j i ,
Jamaica, A f r i c a or here In t h e U.S.
Gain valuable experience setting up
co-ops, c o r p o r a t i o n s , credit u n i o n s .
Conduct m a r k e t i n g and labor surveys. Establish long range economic
goals at all levels of government.
Teach p r o d u c t i o n , m a r k e t i n g , e t c .
The Peace Corps and V I S T A need
y o u . C o n t a c t : Theresa M a r t i n , Division of M i n o r i t y R e c r u i t m e n t , 90
Church Street. 212 2 6 4 - 7 1 2 4 .
nponent Syste
bleu
turntable, Radio Shack
npllfler,
Fisher speakers. A l l In excellent cond i t i o n . Priced iar below new. Pertecl
for dorms or apartments. 4 8 9 - 6 6 6 1 .
Used f u r n i t u r e cheap. Plus r o d Iguralor. Call 4 6 5 - / 9 9 1 .
MOHAWK CAMPUS HOURS
T o teach English In 14 Frenchspeaking nations i n A f r i c a . The Peace
Corps. Call Denlse Harvey f o r information 2 1 2 264-7124 or see Placement O f f i c e for an a p p l i c a t i o n .
$ b ' j Including
aOBPUBBBtMBBK30BattBanwoaaBaaaB»OM8W»oat»MBww
V hf till i n P H I . I * IrnOia
HELP WANTED
Siereo: New c o n d i t i o n . Pioneer 'j?b
rucelver. Fischer speakers. Dual t u r n table. $390. 4 8 9 - 2 8 1 0 .
6 CU. I I . rofrlyoratui In good t u n d l
l i o n , $60. Call 4 5 7 - 8 9 6 9
$.75/hour/craft
PAGE SIX
CLASSIFIED
JFK Cables
May 10 to 26, 1973
Announcing the opening of the Mohawk Campus pool!
on
assuming your
AffEAfclWG "ID MTEPT TME
Hunt Forges
Oct, 1 9 7 3 . Marcla 462-2SSS nights,
4 8 2 - 6 3 1 1 days.
WiU&Jk* Gone Water
F or sale: Llvlngi o o m - t y p a fur n i l ore.
Call 4 3 8 - 4 2 0 9 .
Wedding Dress - size 10 ivory, veil
included, cost $2 50, asking $ 1 0 0 .
434-4488-
WANTED
Will buy N O R T O N A N I H O L O G Y :
Vol. I and/or V o l . I I •),», ut loss each
Call Mike 4 8 2 - 2 1 3 7 .
Wanted: Double bod and b o * springs.
Call 4 5 9 - 6 9 2 3 .
L o o k i n g ' o r musicians, organ, bass
drummer, t r u m p e t , t r o m b o n e , singer
lo f o r m band for Fail 7 3 Call l e d or
Rich at 7 8 / 4 3 .
'juwlng machine, cheap, workable.
Coll 449-6U81 after (niii) p.m
Uouks:UigdnlL Chemisti y [ 2 n d odl
Hon) M o r r i s o n and B o y d ; Science of
Biology Wols/. Call D o n : / H720"
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9,1973
For rent beginning Juno 1. 2 bedroom apt. o n busline. $ 1 0 0 per
m o n t h . Call 4 6 5 / 9 9 1 .
$160 Jay Slrout 2 bedroom apart
merit. Nicely furnished Heal and
utilities
Included.
439-924 1 ,
4 / / 7384, 869-8248.
Female needs apartment tor tall, if
you need an apartment -mate, pioaso
call 4 5 7 - 8 9 7 8 .
Need room In apt., for next year. Call
Pater 4 5 7 - 8 7 0 0 .
Female A p a r t m e n t - m a t e wanted o w n r o o m • on busline - fall a n d
spring. Call 4 5 7 - S 0 0 6 .
Need a r o o m f o r summer and/or n e x t
year? We need o n e person t o c o m plete f o u r b e d r o o m a p t . o n b u s l i n e .
Call Monica 4 8 2 - 2 2 4 1 .
Female r o o m m a t e w a n t e d . S u m m e r
and Fall. O w n r o o m - o n bus l i n e .
Call a n y t i m e : 4 5 7 - 7 8 8 6 or 4 5 7 - 7 8 9 4 .
Stuck here f o r o n e m o r e semester?
Girl w a n t e d t o share b e a u t i f u l , furnished,
busline
apartment
from
August t o December. $ 8 0 t o t a l per
m o n t h , o w n r o o m in six-room a p t .
Grad preferred b u t n o t necessary.
Call 4 3 4 - 2 6 3 7 .
R o o m m a t e w a n t e d , o w n r o o m , located on bus r o u t e . Caff Sue 4 5 7 - 8 9 7 4 .
2 people needed t o f i l l 3 b e d r o o m
apt. o n Madison and W l l l e t t St. Rent
$55 each plus utilities. Call B a r r y Z .
Davis 4 6 2 - 0 4 8 4 or 4 5 7 - 6 5 4 2 . Beginning June 1. A p t . right b y park.
One male wanted t o c o m p l e t e apartment.
Near
b u s , 62-50.
Call
482-5781.
Apartment for summer sublet (JuneAugust) on busline. Comfortable.
Four people. 8 1 6 3 per m o n t h . Call
4 5 7 - 4 0 1 9 or 4 8 2 - 3 1 7 7 .
Summer Sublet • 2 large bedrooms,
2-4 people, furnished, near bus and
Washington Park o n Morris Street.
8 1 8 0 call Bill or Rich 4 5 7 - 4 5 0 0 .
Chablbl,
H o w y o u say;
C'est dommage?
Have a good year In A r e t z .
For Summer. 2 bedrooms available.
Washington Ave between Quail a n d
Lake. $ 6 5 / m o n t h , Furnished and
u t i l i t i e s . 4 4 9 - 8 4 5 7 . Either gender.
Summer Sublet: 3 people needed t o
complete
5 bedroom
apartment.
Available June 1 , corner Washington
and Quail. 7-8937.
Summer Sublet: 2 girls, f u r n i s h e d ,
o w n rooms, rent f l e x i b l e . Washington
and Quail. Call 7-8930 or 7-8939.
Large one b e d r o o m a p t . available
I m m e d i a t e l y . Summer sublet. Immaculate. Near b u s . $ 1 3 5 / m o . Utilities
Included. 457-8770.
Summer Sublet - 2 females (near
busline) Call 4 5 7 - 4 6 8 1 or 4 7 2 - 8 7 1 7 .
Still needed f o r summer: 3 girls t o
complete a 5 b e d r o o m a p a r t m e n t back and f r o n t porches. $ 6 5 / m o n t h
Including u t i l i t i e s . Marcy 4 7 2 - 5 0 4 7 .
Sublet May 15 t o August 2 0 . $ 1 5 0
month, bedroom, llvlngroom, k i t
Chen, b a t h , elevator apt. on campus
busline, one or t w o people. N o Pets.
Call
J. R l c h t m a n
/ - 8 4 1 2 or
465-J658.
Needed: I wo men lor Madison s u m
mor sublet, Furnished, u t i l i t i e s , convenient. $ 7 5 / m o n t h . Call 4 5 7 - 4 5 0 / .
Summer sublet 3 bedrooms. 3 or 4
people. Reasonable. 4 5 7 - 4 7 7 1 .
Suminor sublet: Large 4 b e d r o o m
apartment near busline. Girls prefer
red. Call 4 57-5213 or 4 5 7-5214.
Su minor sublet 2 girls needed t o
complete 4-bedroom a p a r t m e n t , lur
nlshed. right o n busline, $60 a
m o n t h . Call 4 6 5 - 6 7 5 9 .
Summer sublel - 3 bedrooms, furnished. Call Eileen 457-8777 or Fran
457-8767.
Ideal Summer Sublet: 4 b e d r o o m
apt. noxl door t o Silo Restaurant o n
Western
A v e . F u r nlshed,
Call
457-7740Sumim r Sublets 1 girl, o w n r o o m o i l
busline, lur nlshed, $5 5 or less. Call
Diane 4 5 7 - 4 0 8 6 .
For Summer
t ooms.
On
430-1/JO,
O c c u p a n c y : 4-5 bod
busline.
Reasonable.
Female needed (or summer sublet o w n r o o m , m o d e r n a p a r t m e n t , bus
line. $ 5 0 / m o n t h . Call 4 6 2 - 1 7 9 1 .
Summer Sublet - $ 1 2 0 / m o n t h plus
utilities, 3 bedrooms, l l v l n g r o o m , dining r o o m , T V r o o m , k i t c h e n , b a t h ,
p o r c h , furnished. Call 4 3 4 - 4 8 9 3 after
Summer Sublet • furnished 4 bedr o o m apt. w i t h bath, l l v l n g r o o m and
k i t c h e n • Washington and Quail
$ 2 4 0 / m o n t h . Call Chris 4 3 6 - 8 9 3 7 .
LOST & FOUND
L o s t : 2 0 0 1 A Space Odyssey Term
Paper
Call 355-6255 ur mall Duncan, H U 286.
L o s t : A p r i c o t Poodle p u p p y - Please
Call 4 7 2 - 8 6 1 6 .
F o u n d : Men's sliver I D . bracelet
Name " R o b e r t . " Call Sue 4 5 7 - 7 7 2 7 .
RIDES/RIDERS
F R E E R I D E o f f e r e d for help w i t h
driving, A l b a n y l o C H I C A G O , May
24-25. Call Cathy, p m , Schenectady
377-4277.
Ride wanted t o N.Y.C. L i t t l e Neck.
Mori. 5/14 after 9 p . m . or Tuos
a n y t i m e . Call M i t c h 4 5 / - 8 8 1 4 .
U R G E N T - Ride needed A N Y T I M E
Frl. or Sat. or Sun. (May 1 1 , 12 or
13) t o N.Y.C. or Long Island. Call
Barry 4 5 7 - 8 7 5 / or Jean 4 5 7 - 7 8 9 6 .
Will share expenses.
PERSONALS
Need girls (or summer - May l b ,
furnished, $ 5 5 / m o n l h near bus, o w n
r o o m , call 4 8 2 - 9 2 1 7 .
Su minor sublet - 4 b i g fur nlshed
bedrooms. Facing beautiful Washing
t o n Park. Call Mike, Guy 465 9 6 6 0
Summer sublel, next l o Silo for 1 t o
5 poisons, call 4 5 7 - 5 2 3 4 , D a n or
Grog.
Summer Sublet: Western Avu o n
busline; 2 bedrooms suitable lor J ,
semi-furnished; finished basement
Available
May t h r o u g h
August,
$40/person. 4 8 2 3440
Spacious A p a r t m e n t o n busline t o .
summer sublet. Call 457 4 / J l
Larry, Beth, Jeff, Julie, Gall and
Paul,
Congratulations and G o o d L u c k .
Karen
Dear Roberta,
Well, It's that t i m e of year so...
G o o d Luck in Israellland! Be happy
always.
Love and Peace
Tha Know-Balls
Mustard Mess,
Happy I w o months (or should I say
nino weoks?)l I love y o u m o r e than
ever.
Frlsbee Failure
Dear Jackie.
Get well soon 'cos I lovo y o u .
Nood an apartment-mate starting In
June. Call b o b b y , 449-8595
Nood a fuinalo a p d ' l n i o n l - m a l o starling In June. Call Mlni.lv, 438 5453.
Wanted: 2 oi more bedroom apart
merit for Fall semester. Preferably
furnished. Call Jill 457-7739.
If y o u havo an apartment lor Seploru
bor w i t h an e m p t y b e d r u u m , I'd like
to
live
with
y o u . Call
Lenoto
45/3040.
Wanted: 3 b e d r o o m apartment o n
busline June t o Juno. Call 4 6 5 / 6 2 / Qlri
Imagine a June 25 without B.S.If
$ 4 0 per person for a 3 s t o r y b r o w n stone. Groups or singles f o r summer
sublet. F u r n i s h e d , i n c l u d i n g 3 water
beds. Corner o f Dove a n d Lancaster.
463-4092.
Female needed t o c o m p l e t e E.B. four
b e d r o o m apartment o n bus r o u t e .
Call 4 5 7 - 5 2 8 9 .
Student l o o k i n g t o sublet June 3 June 23 (presesslon). Near school or
busline. Call B o b Schiller 7-5063.
W h y Isn't
Summer S u b l e t : Female, f u r n i s h e d ,
u t i l i t i e s , on busline. 4 5 7 - 7 9 6 8 .
Summer Sublet. 472 H u d s o n . 3 singles, 1 large d o u b l e , reasonable. Call
Holly 457-5236.
House w i t h 3 apts. subletting single
rooms or whole apts. M o d e r n , carpeted, panelled, busline and park
location. Reasonable rates. 4 6 5 - 3 7 6 6 .
June 2 5 Is c o m i n g ! ! !
BRAD?
S t u d Nemllch:
Come up between the holidays.
Your pervert.
I need an apartment-mate f o r next
year, beginning Fall. I can m o v e
anywhere. Senior. Quiet. Call B i l l
457-5337 a n y t i m e .
Need female t o fill apt. preferably i n
June. Call K a t h y 4 5 7 - 6 3 9 3 .
fuck you
world f
eathy ganek
T h e A S P o w e s y o u MONHY!
Buster
B o b and Mike •
H o w about meeting us at Red Barn
In Cornwall o n J u l y 1?
A l l o u r love,
Pat a n d Dtna
Bob,
Thanks f o r m a k i n g RPI m y h o m e
away f r o m home away f r o m h o m e . I
love y o u !
Pat
MlkeThe Unlvac and I w i l l be t h i n k i n g
of y o u over t h e summer. Thanks f o r
the help - and everything else.
Love ya, cutle Dlna
Kram,
I understand what happened - tried
t o t u r n y o u Into someone y o u ' r e n o t .
A f t e r finals...Friends?
Diane
I have t h e answers t o t h e final exam
in Physics 2 0 1 If anyone wants t h e m .
Sandy,
Sleep: t h e natural periodic suspension of consciousness during w h i c h
the powers of the body aro rested.
Matt
I'm moving t o Boston Area June 1.
W o u l d like 1 or 2 females t o share
apartment. Call Pam 4 6 2 - 2 8 5 5 .
Dear Felix,
" I heard he sang a good song,
I hoard he had a style...
K i l l i n g me s o f t l y w i t h his song...
K i l l i n g me softly w i t h his s o n g . "
Felix • Thank y o u for sometimes
being m y f r i e n d .
Love,
Robin
To m y friends,
Thanks lor everything. Need I say
more.
all m y love,
Barry
Darlonei
F e l l / contpleanos! Hope y o u lake It
belter than I d i d . Here's t o alot.
R.S.
Schwartz I l l i l n k we're getting closer l o making our t o m o r r o w s today's dreams. I
Doaresl T . L .
Love y o u n o w and always.
L L
Dear LaSelle,
Listen sweetheart,
y o u ' r e real g o o d .
you're
good,
Bogle
Punim and Punlm Productions presents In Concert: Blind Melon C h i l li n, rapping about his Ding Dong.
Delalls f o r t h c o m i n g .
Dear B u n k ,
Congratulall
Hie ASP staph
Dear S a l l y , C a n d y , D e b b y , J i l l ,
Katie and Sheryl:
T h a n k s (or your
friendship
and help. Y o u made t h e office
a place w o r t h c o m i n g t o ( e x cept f o t O c t o b e r , Sally)
Love, Joel
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
earrings 2 for $1
buy 4 pair get 1 free
If y o u r name is listed b e l o w P L E A S E c o m e t o C C J 3 4
cigarettes 39c/pack
and bring identification.
Diane Kaschuk
Carol Turnei
Laurie Steinberg
Don Sehunche
Monica Keuss
Laura Freund
Bob Schwartz
Arthur Newman
Mrs, DerOhannesian
Victor Saffrin
Afro earrings
264 Central Ave.
cor. N o . Lake Ave.
Albany
needs place to live. Sept. and
ALBANY S T U D E N T P R E S S
I PAGE SEVEN
A n y individuals interested in selling
any homemade
goods (jewelry, leath-
er goods, etc.)
at Alumni
Day on
Newman
May
Mass Schedule f o r week of
14-18. Tues. (May 15J t o F r i .
(May 18): Mass at 1 1 : 1 0 A M . Tues.
Saturday May 19, please call Dennis
(May
15) and Thursday
(May
E l k i n at 7-7210 or Pam Carrington at
Mass at 1 1 : 1 0 A M and 1 2 : 1 0 P M .
Union
for Radical Political
Economics
(URPE)
meeting on Friday
M a y 1 1 , 2 P M , M o h a w k Tower, 4th
. f l o o r lounge.
a Is & letters/
17):
LC 1 -
7-8864 during the day.
8 : 3 0 PM Wed. May 9. for
an Interesting panel discussion cm sex
Any s'udent desiring transcripts in
eluding spring 1973 grades to be sent
to another institution should place
their request w i t h the Office of the
— « • • - . - — » - —*«._*•> — _ _
.
I H ' f f i
5
! ! ! ! ^
1
!
Accommodations
for
Commencement guests are available o n F r i d a y ,
^ a y 25 Reservations may be made
in
Person
a.
the
Eastman
Tower
O f f i c e , State Quad. T h e final date for
For
information
o n library
hours
all reservations is M a y 18, 1973.
Registrar,
febore
Administration
end
of
semester.
may be pick-
A Senior Mfee/r Events Calendar was
mailed to each Graduating Senior's
ed up at the Bookstore d u r i n g regular
local address or
hours f r o m May 21 u n t i l n o o n , May
local address was registered w i t h the
26
to his h o m e if
no
,0
continue
Krawl,
PARSEG
trial p o l l u t i o n and Pine Bush w i t h an
ronmental
Volunteer w i t h some coarchmg experience
needed
to coach
Well
problems.
We
Where T o Go
to set up a n e t w o r k
whereby
S U N Y A students can participate or
for CYO in
initiate projects of their o w n o n the
274-2475 evenings
campus, local, state, and federal level,
If there are any questions
Dizard,
call A n n
home-465-6516;
school-
ment
this week
Pa.sec
s free w i t h student
la*.
w i l l sponsor a class in bicycle
repair
o n Wednesday. M; f y . at 8 30 PM m
the Flagroom Bicycles welcome
Hiss,
former
official,
will
,
Cathexis w o u l d like l o express ns
thanks to all of the members of the
Psychology
Episcopal
Sunday Services .it 10 30
helped
Department
lo
make
who
our
have
programs
successful this term
welcome
to our advisor. Dr Waterman, for her
funher
information
Special
so
A M in Chapel House All Protestants
For
give
,i
pnh
Era, »• ••
F u n c t i o n R o o m of C o r t l a n d Cnile• •,.•
Corey
i n f i n i t e source of ideas and encour
Chdpel House 489 8573
anement
9.
A
H,UBS.1HHI [»•-
dent
study
Balfior
faculty
Thursday,
M,iy
Till) Early
Music
I'i
by
(
Monteverdi
C^D
in
the PAC
All the salad
Oven fresh
breads'.
tcs of the
'
Hmn.il
.'
HI Wlnte
M
Judaic
Studies
Minors
student;,
MO
•1 0<J PM
( JurjrJH
i
SlurlM",
Mi'.' rnu(tliri-j /.
I
bui i m p o r t a n t " 1
NOTICE
from 6 to 10 pm
We wish to thank you for your
Rock guitar at its best
SMKEH
785-3236
past patronageHave a safe and healthy summer
RTE 9 South of Latham Circle
I UJ< RIGHT
Majors &
thru Friday May 14 to 18
9'
A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
some
serious
funding
members. The
disagreements with
and a National
department
talented
Also
is
being
as
well
pianist, Dennis Helrich.
being
asked
as e x p e r t
The
most
professors
to
being
Robert
Science
the
Allen's
he
administration
Foundation
t o get rid o f C a r o l
literally
grant,
as
Waterman,
decimated,
to
and
an
largely
irreplaceable
leave
is t h e
popular
musicologist
Daniel
Nimetz.
visible
case
here
is C u r t
oboist.
bassoonist.
(See
Smith, who
lias d o n e
most
of
h i s s t u d i e s h e r e at
e x t r e n i e l v p o p u l a r a m o n g s t u d e n t s , as w e l l as f e l l o w
Geology:
Chairman
the administration.
Ruth
letter
from
is b e i n g
fired
S U N Y A . H e is a l s o
have
been
an
faculty.
B y r d r e s i g n e d b e c a u s e of s t r o n g d i s a g r e e m e n t s w i t h
His resignation
internationally
Geography:
KU DBUVEW
c Guitar
and
seems
led t o t h e d i s s o l u t i o n
famous
team
1:1
»*cto
Although there
of what
would
tectonics.
specifically
identifiable
controversial cases here, relations b e t w e e n tins d e p a r t m e n t and the dean are
limit one to a customer with this ad
and his M a
faculty
l a m e n t a b l e loss here w a s C h a i r m a n
music
Prnis.
McKcc.
• I
10 Beer
PLUS
MICHAEL
who
scientist a n d an e x t r e m e l y c a p a b l e a d m i n i s t r a t o r ,
of
departmental
Rene
' I'M I • " M .
W.ilii'h'Mv
^iOTICE^^TubENTS
e
because
amazingly
New Bio Chairman no. 4 Choice
1
HU
SBAKEfS
most
A noted
Music:The
Zomttii
During exam week Pizzas
will be delivered from the
Campus Center- Monday
at
most intelligent
Wheelock. w h o
Wed . M.iy <) I ' l c , i v i t i t v i
Thursday Nite
Hunsberger,
I .
mental representatives /*
ndud by studtint tax
Dean
a t t r i b u t a b l e t n t h e e f f o r t s o f D e a n H u n s b e r g e r . B e i n g f o r c e d t o l e a v e is t h e
Fields will nuil i- hi • "•
in Pool Sharks. Ihi'i. . , • • . '
ray paralyses Pans
The C w
Tree Planting Protect Mtwirty
[unsday M.iv '> H HM I '•<•>•
Western Ave. at Fuller Rd.
and
here,
... WHO ONLY EA1?N $9% 99? a n d o n l y t h e m o s t c o n c e r t e d effort b y s t u d e n t s u p p o r t e r s w i t h t h e a i d o f
m& INEQU/TY CRIES OUT
TOR TAX -REFORM AND A- ANP> PAY INCOME TAYE3 BUT t h e s t u d e n t p r e s s s a v e d h e r . L e r o y P e l t o n , a n o t h e r p o p u l a r p r o f e s s o r , is a l s o
e x p e r i e n c i n g d i f f i c u l t y . A l s o , H a r o l d M i l l e r , a n o t h e r v e r y p o p u l a r t e a c h e r is
CONCERN FOR VEOPLE LIKE SHOULDN'T HAVE TO I
MYSELF. . .
already gone.
Twenties
I'
IT
LASAGNA • CLAMS • BEER
BURGERS • SPIEDIES- ETC,ETC
applications due
before 4pm
May 11, 1973
Sciences
Psychology :The administration attempted
M.i,
F i n a l l y . Bi'l.i I mjus
PIZZA-PIZZA rw
the
English:
IN.'
foi
faculty
l a r g e l y l o r i d e o l o g i c a l r e a s o n s : H e is a M a r x i s t . A l s o b e i n g r e l e a s e d is A l a n
I,I,us Stan ..I
Applications
of
system
m u s i c s t u d e n t s in t o d a y ' s a r t s s e c t i o n . )
1,111 w i z a r d
/V/M'WC?/-/^'
and
tenure
w e l l as p h i l o s o p h i c a l d i s a g r e e m e n t s w i t h t h e u p p e r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n .
,|, : ••
16th Century Tale of Lust
welcome lo coma .>•<• " i •
fivu! tailed The Play ul India
Spanish and Porlorjusn I,.
ente Thursday evHimui M.i,
PM HU B39 II 'lit" n..•.,'•
a n d cheese I
.
SPAGHETTI
SPAGHETTI
CC 1 3 /
0 «10 0|»
resigned
In.
i n s t r u m e n t s , Sunday
CMfltik is...
see Don Bielecki
•v
numbers
the
all t h a t is w r o n g w i t h t h e s y s t e m .
Biology: T h e
/
June 4-Aug. 24,1973
£0
large
of
epitomize
resignation.
mission is tree
)
that
condition
with
over
Music
Arts
the
D e p a r t m e n t b y d e p a r t m e n t t h e s i t u a t i o n is a s f o l l o w s :
-••!-
. I I K -.• •
Free
PM
Our own Abruzze style saute.
you tail eal! Tailgy Dressings.
Creamy
Butter!
obvious
witli
especially
popular, and
Reality
B.mdi'Mj
S t u d i o Theater
upset
a x e d arc clearly t h e " c r e a m of t h e c r o p " .
and
ented by Nancy
Pending SA budget approval
for 2 full time laborers
to work on the Dippikill
Property for 12 weeks
this summer
increasingly
arc
We a r e w i t n e s s i n g n o t h i n g l e s s t h a n a p u r g e - a p u r g e o f t h e b e s t , t h e m o s t
U n i o n at 8 15 PM on -,'•!•••
nesday, M a y
lhanks
please contact the Rev Harold Baum,
Summer Jobs
Available
becomes
students
State Dei M I
address o n The McCarthy
Women-Dreams
^ S ^ ^ ™ ^ ' *
SUNYA Witnesses Purge
It
Aiger
w i l l f o l l o w his address
7-8569.
...«.
D u t c h Quad Living Lear nr i Center
TOR A VEMOCRACV, THIS 15
oVER
THE MOST PISGRACEFUL
FAWlN6-*IOQ,000 MP
W ABSOLUTELY NO INCOMEMO> 6HAMEFUL THIN6S TVE
EVER NEARP OF!
TAX WHATSOEVER?
hope, as
grammar
possible. Call Joe 457-8297 days and
CC364.
A l b a n y ' s Science F i c t i o n
Cir^i
IJISHT
this semester such as indus-
University. Those Seniors w h o d o not
M a r i n e , w i l l begin d i s t r i b u t i o n later
lecturer
- Sociology
increased emphasis o n campus envi-
receive the i n f o r m a t i o n may pick it
u p iit
Guest
Ph.D.
projects
May
T r o y . One night per week as soon as
Cap and gown orders
p|ans
pYE
started
12,
education.
C o m m . College.
Bldg B-5
1973.
school age boys in boxing
call 457-8551.
Clubs & Meetings
_ _ _ » _ - » — — ——— ———— —
campus center food staff
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 197::
r e p o r t e d to be very
Theatre: Joseph
having his c o n t r a c t
H i s t o r y :'l'he m o s t
poor.
B a l f i o r , t h e e x t r e n i e l v p o p u l a r t h e a t r e i n s t r u c t o r is n o t
renewed.
t a l k e d a b o u t c a s e h e r e is t h a t of D a v i d G o o d m a n . ( S e e
A S P , M a y 4.1
Art:Mary Roddant,
whom
chairman
Cowley
calls i r r e p l a c e a b l e
is b e i n g
takes orders from the Dean ,-, office
On M o n d a y a new chairman of tinBiology D e p a r t m e n t was chosen t o re
place R o b e r t Allen w h o is leaving because
of p r o b l e m s he e n c o u n t e r e d with the
administration.
There are m a n y professors in that dep a r t m e n t w h o are e x t r e m e l y upset over
who was chosen as well as how he was
chosen.
According t o t h r e e t e n u r e d biology
professors, the new a p p o i n t e e was toUrth
on a list of c o n t e n d e r s -meaning thai he
was t h e d e p a r t m e n t faculty's fourth pre
fere nee.
He was n o t , h o w e v e r , Dean Huns
herger's or the Associate Dean's fourth
choice. He was their first choice, and
a p p a r e n t l y t h a t is why he has the job
T h e new chairman is r e p o r t e d l y "very
scientifically visible," being well k n o w n
nationally
and
even
internationally.
Strictly as a scientist he is held in high
regard by other faculty m e m b e r s .
B u t w h a t seems to b o t h e r most people
in the d e p a r t m e n t is that the new ap
pointee shows essentially no " l e a d e r s h i p
qualities." He is merely a scientist, but
not a good " c o m m u n i c a t o r " F u r t h e r
more, he U relatively u n k n o w n to many
of t h e d e p a r t m e n t faculty o n a personal
basis, whereas it has been said t h a t the
other t h r e e c o n t e n d e r s would have inter
acted in a s m o o t h e r , m o r e productive
manner.
What also b o t h e r s t h e three professors is
that the a p p o i n t m e n t was m a d e largely
by Hunsberger alone, and essentially ig
noring t h e vote of the d e p a r t m e n t faculty. T h e faculty placed t h e new appointee in fourth place on their preference list
through a d e m o c r a t i c voting process, b u t
the faculty acts only in an advisory
capacity with t h e final decision left up to
the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n .
Why t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n w a n t e d the
n u m b e r four mun is unclear. Perhaps it is
his high scientific visibility. Or perhaps
thoy are looking for a n o t h e r administrator whose emphasis is on research
rather than teuching and w h o readily
forced t o leave b e c a u s e she lacks P h D .
Tliere was apparently inure to Huns
herger's closing of the U Mass art show
than was reported on these pages directly
before the last vacation.
It all look place the year before
Hunsberger was forced to resign from the
Massachusetts school
The exhibit in
question, by resident artist Click Close,
was taken down by Workers under orders
from Hunsberger and a few other administrators because of what was t e r m e d
'•concern uboul its appropi latness for
display in the student u n i o n . ' '
According to the head of the I! Mass art
d e p a r t m e n t , neither he nor the a/tist was
notified when Die painhngs were being
removed, of where they were being taken
Kor several days artist Close did riot know
the whereabouts of his $H,U0(J worth of
art
work.
Close strongly defended his paintings,
arguing that " t h e r e are nudes on the walls
of the Sisline Chapel " He said that
although Hunsberger and a few other
a d m i n i s t r a t o r s considered his work obscene, he did not and " n e i t h e r dues the
Ail Department
T h e closing ol the exhibit stirred up
very strong feelings on the (J Mass
campus. A special edition of the s t u d e n t
newspaper was published and petitions
were passed c o n d e m n i n g the closing as
"censorship."
There n, no much more to write about
the functioning* of the Arts and Sciences
College, but no more issues of the ASP in
which to print it all A lamentable situat
ion, indeed. Almost every day this r e p o r t
er is c o n t a c t e d by a n o t h e r professor or
s t u d e n t with tales of woe concerning his
or her treatment by the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
Suffice it to say t h a t this University is in
a bud way, and the sooner we see un
administrative s h a k e u p , the heller. G o o d
luck t o the reformers and I'll see you in
• this same spot next tall.
Slavic L a n g u a g e s a n d L i t e r a t u r e s : Nadja J e r n a k o l f
tins d e p a r t m e n t .
tenure, but
Also. Professor O b o l e n s k y
is b e i n g r e l e a s e d
from
w a s slated for p r o m o t i o n
and
h i s files h a v e m y s t e r i o u s l y b e e n " l o s t " b y C h a i r m a n S h a n e , a
" f r i e n d " of D e a n
Hunsberger.
Economics:Professor
Marvin
p r o f e s s o r in t h e d e p a r t m e n t
Sternberg
is b e i n g r e l e a s e d . H e
is t h e
only
w h o t e a c h e s tin' radical criticjue.
E n v i r o n m e n t : The p r o b a b l e l o s s ol
L o u i s I s m a v is. i n d e e d , s a d d e n i n g . H e
w a s o n e ol i In1 p r i m ipal i i r g a n i z e r s of t h e e x t r e m e l y p o p u l a r E n v i r o n m e n t a l
Forum, and
properly.
is o n e o l
I li
does
the
Dot
only
persons
have
a
w h o s e e m s c a p a b l e of r u n n i n g it
Ph.D..
and
that
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s reason lor releasing h i m .
P h i l o s o p h y : P r o l e s s o t l i y n u m is b e i n g r e l e a s e d
seems
to
be
upsetting many
the
students
here.
T h e list g o e s o n a n d o n . I t ' s f i r i n g s a r e n o t m e r e l y a r e s u l t of tin- " t e n u r e
sciUee/e"
in
positions.
It
which
too
many
contenders
is .1 p u r g e , l o r t h e
are
vying
for
too
lew
prolessors being kept are often
tenure
mediocre
teachers.
The
University
Allen, w h o
is b e i n g
seriously
is l a r g e l y r e s p o n s i b l e
for
h u r t . We are losing m e n
making the biology
like
Robert
department
the
" s u c c e s s s t o r y " it p r e s e n t l y is.
This d a n g e r o u s a c t i v i t y m u s t b e s t o p p e d .
Technical
Founded
Editor-in-Chief
ann e bunker
News
kathy
gary ncciardi
Arts
gtenn von n o s t i t /
rnindy
in 1916
Editorial Panes
alttnan
eckerle
Off Campus
bob mayei
danny ross
Preview
lestlt! davtS
andy palley
b i l l br
Sports
b i uce maygin
ken arduino
rob amlsh
b| chall
matt meyer
Circulation
ron w o o d
Exchange
mark litcolsky
Photography
jay robenbeiy
davld slawsky
funded by studuni la*
jtticeCCava
phoin i <!!,/ 71UU
ftinoridl M « y is don* i i n i n o d by the E d i t o r i a l B o a r d .
Advertising
linda mulff
linda d e s m o n d
Business
phil mark
jerry albieclit
A d Production
debbie kaemen
sheila schenkern
gaiy b u i i n u n
Classified A d s
cathy ganek
Graffili
ruth sibley
Out of the Closet
Out of the Closet ,At Last
Letters to the Editor
Nothing to Speak Of
:$
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ft
T o the Editor:
As a member o f the Language and
Culture class (Anthropology 3 2 4 ) it has
c o m e t o my attention that our professor,
Dr. Helen Ullrich, has lost her battle for
tenure.
I was shocked because I believe that she
is a fine scholar and teacher, encouraging
her students t o d o independent research
and to use the material provided in the
course as creatively as they can. The
problem does n o t s t o p there.
Dr. Ullrich's dismissal will leave the
Department o f Anthropology without an
Anthropologically oriented linguist. As
a n y o n e w h o has any contact with
Anthropology will know, that will be
leaving Anthropology students with an
academically poorer d e p rtment as Dr.
Ulltrich
full time linguist in the
e mrtment. A linguist will replace Dr.
Ullrich, b u t one whose background is not
in t h e field of A n t r h o p o l o g y . S o future
and
current
Anthropology
students
b e w a r e . . . n e x t year y o u r d e p a r t m e n t will
be seriously w e a k e n e d .
T h e A n t r h o p o l o g y d e p a r t m e n t , it s e e m s
is n o t really t o b l a m e , as they s u p p o r t e d
her case for t e n u r e , as did her s t u d e n t s
a n d t h e University Council. Melvin Bers
(Assoc. Dean of Arts a n d Science), however, has t u r n e d
her d o w n .
It is
interesting t h a t he gave no reason, which
I believe is s o m e t h i n g he o w e s the
A n t h r o . s t u d e n t s a n d faculty. It is also
interesting t h a t t h e r e has never been a
t e n u r e d w o m a n protc^sor in this departm e n t . Dr. Ullrich's firing n o w becomes
part of a t r e n d , a t r e n d t h a t violates the
Affirmative Action Plan.
It is a b o u t time t h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n
s t o p p e d dragging its feet a b o u t the Affirmative Action Plan and started desegregating this University!
Janice Pinchot
by Doug LeComte
o f a n y o n e o n this campus w h o is
suffering from the same problem as this
character. I have a m o u t h and I a m using
it t o scream t o y o u t o motivate yourselves t o the cause of the preservation of
this s c h o o l ' s superior instructors. If y o u
the s t u d e n t population c h o o s e t o shut ,
your m o u t h s in apathy instead of
screaming out in favor of these people,
then m a y b e y o u d o not deserve t o benefit
from their talent for teaching.
Marleen S. Barr ;
Torch Fizzles
To the Editor:
Again I was disappointed by this year's
TORCH. I thought for sure J o h n C h o w
and his staff would m a k e a b o o k t h a t
represented the s c h o o l a n d t h e various
groups and organizations that make
A l b a n y S t a t e w o r t h w h i l e . As I paged ;
through the book, I wondered where the ;
52 s t u d e n t association clubs were, t h e :
fraternities a n d s o r o r i t i e s , t h e m e m b e r s of :
s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t w h o labor all year t o !
provide for things s u c h as T O R C H . I :
l o o k e d t h r o u g h t h e s p o r t pages a n d saw ;
c a n d i d s h o t s of all o u r varsity t e a m s . I ;
c o u l d n ' t recognize a n y football p l a y e r s :
t h r o u g h their h e l m e t s . I n o t i c e d t h a t no :
m e n t i o n was given t o a n y A M I A w i n n e r s :
at all.
My friends have p l a y e d on varsity t e a m s
for years n o w a n d their faces have never
been r e c o g n i z e d by T O R C H y e t . I was
a s t o u n d e d t o 3 pages wasted o n o n e
f r a t e r n i t y ' s s t r i p p e r w h e r e t h o s e pages
c o u l d ' v e been given t o m a n y Greek organi z a t i o n s . Besides all this I care n o t t o be
r e m i n d e d a b o u t past historic faces or
events in m y college y e a r b o o k . If I care
t o see t h e s e faces I can go t o the library
w h e n I ' m old a n d grey a n d get o u t
microfilm.
I t h o u g h t to myself t h a t this y e a r b o o k
typifies t h e s t u d e n t s w h o a b s o l u t e l y
d o e s n ' t get involved in t h e university. It
gives t h e impression t h a t the majority of
A l b a n y s t u d e n t s go to t h e p o d i u m at d a y ,
library at night and do n o t h i n g inbetween.
% TQ the Editor:
So as I was strolling a r o u n d the p o d i u m
:•: I have the desire t o scream, I have the
lately, 1 w a t c h e d for p e o p l e w h o I sus:•:; desire to scream at m y peers at this
p e c t e d of being " u n i n v o l v e d " in t h e
*• university w h o lack t h e will a n d t h e
s c h o o l . I t a l k e d to s o m e a n d got the
:*:• m o t i v a t i o n
to d e m a n d t h a t superior
i m p r e s s i o n t h a t they c o u l d n ' t care less
:•:• teachers w h o are genuinely interested in
a b o u t t h e b o o k after t h e y t h u m b e d
:*:• s t u d e n t s
remain
at
this
institution.
t h r o u g h . I then a p p r o a c h e d p e o p l e w h o I
:•:• Sunday night t h e r e was a mass m e e t i n g t o
k n e w were involved extra-curricularly.
:•:• discuss the issue of p r o m o t i o n and
T h e i r o p i n i o n was they were slighted.
:•:* t e n u r e . T h e a p p e a r a n c e of thirty-five
With all this in m i n d , I m e t J o h n C h o w
vi people o u t of a s t u d e n t p o p u l a t i o n of
w h e n I b o u g h t m y b o o k . I had a long rap
£• fifteen t h o u s a n d d o e s n o t c o n s t i t u t e a
and c a l m l y expressed my p o i n t which
:•:• mass meeting. Where were you all? I
was, w h e r e was the b a c k b o n e of the
Q realize t h a t this is the e n d of the semester
s c h o o l in the b o o k ? " W i t h o u t t h e stu$• and t h a t your first c o n c e r n s h o u l d be
d e n t s t h a t provide movies, diversion,
:•:• directed t o w a r d y o u r a c a d e m i c pursuits.
media, g o v e r n m e n t , clubs and s p o r t s we
$; However, I did n o t notice a lack of
w o u l d have n o t h i n g here. I basically
'£ people in a t t e n d a n c e a t t h e beer parties
asked what happened.
:•:• and movies t h a t a b o u n d e d o n this c a m p u s
J o h n t h e n replied t h a t he realized all
:•:• during t h e d u r a t i o n of the w e e k e n d . If
this b u t t h a t h e c o u l d n ' t have g o t t e n all
:•:•: you have the t i m e t o d e v o t e t o entertain*
the o r g a n i z a t i o n s on c a m p u s in o n e b o o k .
^ m e n t you should have the t i m e to take an
His w h o l e premis was t h a t it w o u l d be
4 interest in the preservation of your
b e t t e r n o t t o i n c l u d e a n y g r o u p s if h e
j:-: superior teachers If you do n o t care ah
c o u l d n ' t include all. Wee I just c o u l d n ' t
'& o u t y o u r e d u c a t i o n w h a t are you doing
believe t h e logic. I said in m y o p i n i o n it
gj spending four years of y o u r life a t t e n d i n g
w o u l d be b e t t e r t o at least try t o include
£f a university?
r a t h e r t h a n t o e x c l u d e . 1 suggested h e
'••'••• I did n o t e x p e c t people w h o are n o t
c o u l d ' v e advertised p h o t o g r a p h i n g dates
%; directly involved with the professors
a n d all t h o s e groups s h o w i n g up would be
whose t e n u r e is in q u e s t i o n t o a t t e n d this
used. T h a t
could've
eliminated
the
^Km e e t i n g . David G o o d m a n teaches a b o u t
apathetic population.
^ five h u n d r e d p e o p l e . At t h e lowest estiAll in all it was his basic premiss which
:<• m a t e I a m sure t h a t at least t h r e e h u n d r e d
p r o m p t e d m e t o write this letter. In m y
& of these s t u d e t n s are in favor of seeing
o p i n i o n the s t u d e n t s w h o d o n ' t particiG o o d m a n ' s p r e s e n c e o n this c a m p u s
p a t e in t h e university events w o n ' t care
semester. I a m an English
a b o u t T O R C H . Those who have I'm sure
« again n e x t
would like a m o r e c o n v e n t i o n a l e d i t i o n . I
<•; major w h o has never heard a bad thing
d o n ' t care if m y y e a r b o o k wins an art
%\ said a b o u t the t e a c h i n g ab ility of Curt
prize for p h o t o g r a p h y , 1 want it to
;# S m i t h . Where w e r e all of Dr. G o o d m a n ' s
r e p r e s e n t this school us w h a t Albany
•8 s t u d e n t s and where were all of the people
S t a t e can offer.
•y\ w h o have such good things t o say a b o u t
I ' m n o t a d v o c u t i n g a sterile High School
% D r . S m i t h ? Dr. G o o d m a n a n d Dr. Smith
t y p e b o o k b u t as I said t o J o h n , he has
% are t h e o n l y teachers t h a t I have w h o face
e n o u g h i n g e n u i t y to c o m b i n e the conven£: dismissal from this university. Where were
tional with the m o d e r n . I h o p e by writing
£: t h e s t u d e n t s w h o s u p p o r t t h e o t h e r pro
this t h a t s o m e r e a d e r s will s t a r t t h i n k i n g
•fc feasors at this university w h o are having
a b o u t n e x t year's T O R C H S t u d e n t s w h o
^ t e n u r e p r o b l e m s ? K n o w i n g t h e value
p u t in their t i m e h e r e at Albany a n d
{£ s y s t e m of Albany State's s t u d e n t s they
m a k e this school a part of themselves
£: were p r o b a b l y c o n t e m p l a t i n g the angle of
s h o u l d n o t be r o b b e d of t h e m e m o r i e s
£** elevation of their respective frishecs.
and c r e d i t they deserve.
£
C u r t S m i t h o n c e t a u g h t me a b o u t a
H o w a r d Bernstein
ability c htaor a cscream
^'Vihave
s c i e n c et h e fiction
t e r w h obecause
does nhoet
zfdoes n o t possess a m o u t h . I d o n o t k n o w
* * *
It is time t o c o m e o u t o f the closet. It
w o u l d be very easy and painless t o sit idly
by and watch the storm waves c o m e and
go, going a b o u t business as usual, and n o t
venturing t o o far o u t i n t o the deep lest
the ship capsize.
But s o m e things need explaining, as
much has been misunderstood.
I wrote a s p o o f s o m e t i m e ago which
lambasted a certain political group on
campus. It was not meant as good-natured
fun, though I enjoyed writing it and,
others I know, regardless o f their o w n
political leanings, s e e m e d t o enjoy reading it. If I hit hard it was because this
organization's o w n actions and rhetoric
warranted it.
My c o l u m n elicited from this group an
extraordinarily malicious letter published
in the ASP. I would n o t dignity such
rubbish with a p o i n t by point rebuttal,
nor would I wish t o waste time or ink
giving the group a n y m o r e free publicity it has t o o much already. L e t it merely be
observed that t h e person who purported
t o represent this organization's v i e w p o i n t
via this dribble did n o t have the character
t o sign his name. What sort of person
writes such a n o n y m o u s hate letters? A
very small person. Very small indeed.
If y o u ask s o m e o n e t o diagram the
political scale he will probably put Communism on the e x t r e m e left and Nazism
o n the extreme right, with the middle a
kind o f vague mixture of social d e m o cracy and republicanism or whatever.
Where are anarchists o n this scale? What
about classical liberals and individualists
w h o abhor totalitarianism and statism of
the left or right? Where d o they fit o n
such a spectrum?
Of far more practical use would be a
spectrum indicating the relationship of
the individual t o his g o v e r n m e n t - a
spectrum t h a t lumps Nazism ( N a t i o n a l
Socialism) off o n the e x t r e m e left w i t h
C o m m u n i s m w h e r e i t belongs. T o t a l i t a r ianism, w h e r e individual l i b e r t y is minimal, i n c l u d i n g Caesarism, F a s c i s m , milicontlnued on next page
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
\
It was the liberals in t h e 1 9 t h c e n t u r y ,
s u c h great m i n d s as H e r b e r t S p e n c e r and
John S t u a r t Mill, w h o c o n s t a n t l y w a r n e d
of the t h r e a t t o individual liberty posed
by an e v e r g r o w i n g g o v e r n m e n t a p p a r a t u s .
S o m e w h e r e a l o n g t h e line liberals c a m e to
s u p p o r t individual liberty in a m u c h
n a r r o w e r sense, d r o p p i n g the idea of
e c o n o m i c l i b e r t y a l o n g t h e wayside. Individual l i b e r t y , of c o u r s e , is practically
meaningless w i t h o u t t h e right t o keep and
dispose of o n e ' s g o o d s a n d p r o d u c t s as
o n e pleases in a free m a r k e t .
A n d . w h a t a b o u t t h e conservatives?
They s o m e t i m e s q u i t e p r o p e r l y a c k n o w ledge t h e t h r e a t of g o v e r n m e n t t o liberty,
yet we see conservatives such as William
Buckley gloating with glee at the p a t h e t i c
sight of R a l p h G i n z b e r g being sent off to
serve a five year prison s e n t e n c e for^
printing a sex magazine. Conservatives
wish the S t a t e t o regulate morality, yet
they h y p o c r i t i c a l l y h a r p o n t h e clangers
of " b i g " g o v e r n m e n t .
T h e old right q u i t e c o r r e c t l y c o n d e m n s
those C o m m u n i s t regimes which have
practiced g e n o c i d e a n d m a d e their citizens slaves of the State, yet these socalled s u p p o r t e r s of freedom are strange
ly silent a b o u t t h e dictatorial regimes of
Greece a n d Spain.
T h e left s c r e a m s at h o m e when the right
to speak freely, assemble, vote, or protest
is t h r e a t e n e d , y e t s y m p a t h i z e s with those
" p e o p l e ' s r e p u b l i c s " a b r o a d where secret
police deal swiftly with a n y o n e w h o dares
exercise s u c h basic rights as these.
and I must scream'
PAGE TEN
Keeping such a revised s p e c t r u m in
mind is helpful in discerning t h e ambiguities and c o n t r a d i c t i o n s of m o d e r n day
conservatives a n d liberals.
T h e left q u i t e p r o p e r l y a b h o r s governm e n t laws t h a t interfere with our privacy
by in effect invading our b e d r o o m s , b u t
the left is silent when t h e g o v e r n m e n t
regulates w h a t an individual may buy and
sell.
"I have a mouth
lDr.
continued from preceding page
tary dictatorship, is o n the extreme left.
Moving t o t h e right o n such a spectrum
the progression is towards lesser govern*
ment and greater individual liberty until
one c o m e s t o n o - g o v e r n m e n t a n a r c h y o n
the extreme right.
The p o i n t is t h a t t h o s e w h o are on the
old right a n d t h e new or old left all seek
an u n w a r r a n t e d a m o u n t of g o v e r n m e n t
intervention i n t o t h e individual's life. T h e
political t r e n d is t o w a r d the left toward
a m o r e powerful g o v e r n m e n t resulting in
less freedom for the individual.
We Were Not Alone
by Mike McGuire
Ed. Note:
Upon the occasion
of his
leaving the school, the author would like
to say goodbye and at the same time take
a took at the school through the eyes of
someone seeing it for the first time.
Earrh, May 8 In a historic visit t o the
m y s t e r i o u s third planet of our solar syst e m , Plutonian e x p l o r e r s have found t h a t
t h e r e was o n c e intelligent life on t h a t
w a r m , v e r d a n t alien world. O y c z 3 7
a s t r o n a u t s t h u s c o n f i r m w h a t astronomers and science fiction writers have been
telling us: if there is any life elsewhere in
the solar s y s t e m , it w o u l d be on a planet
like Earth t h a t did n o t have t o rely o n
internal h e a t i n g s y s t e m s left by visitors
billions of years ago. But here follows the
news, which c a p p e d off w h a t world presid e n t Nicksou called " t h e greatest day in
the history of the u n i v e r s e " :
T h e explorers h a d the good fortune t o
land in t h e ruins of a city called Albany,
which m o s t a n t h r o p o l o g i s t s h e r e believe
was the world capital of the d o o m e d
planet. T h e y first u n c o v e r e d the remains
of a series of buildings, one of which was
identified
by r e m a i n s
of signs as
"Legislative Office Building". T h e buildings thus seem t o have s o m e t h i n g t o d o
with the world g o v e r n m e n t ; however,
they a p p e a r e d t o have been in an ad-
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
vanced s t a t e of collapse when the earni n g s met whatevever it was t h a t did t h e m
in. F r o m there, t h e m e n j o u r n e y e d
t h r o u g h what m a y have o n c e been s o m e
sort of housing, a n d knew they hud found
t h e true world capital when they c a m e
u p o n a huge e x p a n s e of once-beautiful
white c o n c r e t e rising n e x t t o a fairly
o r d i n a r y g r o u p of "'office buildings".
T h e capital was, of c o u r s e , a r r a n g e d
s y m m e t r i c a l l y like o u r s . T h e r e were ]'A
buildings in u central core, s u r r o u n d e d by
four m o r e clusters of 9 buildings each.
Eight of t h e buildings in t h e cluster h a d
t h r e e floors, and t h e r e was also a t o w e r in
each which had 21 floors (Earthlings h a d
a
strange
preoccupation
with
odd
n u m b e r s , which m a y have been t i e d t o
s o m e of their equally strange religious
t>eliefs, which we will look at later).
T h e r e were also t w o o t h e r buildings
o u t s i d e the central area, also of t h r e e
floors.
T h e core building wus the " n e r v e
c e n t e r " of the p l a n e t earch. In o n e were
h o u s e d the r o b o t a d m i n i s t r a t o r s for the
planet, w h o m u s t have l o o k e d h a n d s o m e
in their polished metal c a b i n e t s and reels
of t a p e strung from one side to the o t h e r
Above this c o m p l e x were plush offices
a p p a r e n t l y used by t h e h u m a n p e t t y
bureaucrats who aliened to the d a y
(.(Jilt l l l l i i i l )
On
DUX I
In past c o l u m n s I have tried to point
o u t s o m e of t h e erosions of liberty that
have taken place: t h e store keepers w h o
are forced t o close o n S u n d a y s because of
archaic blue laws, laws t h a t forbid con
sensual s e x , laws against gambling, FDA
regulations keeping life-saving drugs off
the m a r k e t , regulations c o n c e r n i n g what
cars we drive, w h a t we sec on television,
which charities we m u s t s u p p o r t , and on
and on ad nauseam.
T h e r e is a m o v e m e n t , however, mostly active o n college c a m p u s e s ,
which recognizes the hypocrisies and con
tradictions of the d o g m a e m b r a c e d by the
left and the old right.
Libertarian ism, a d o c t r i n e of individual
liberty, s e e m s t o e n c o m p a s s what is best
from the n e w left and the old tight Tinkey idea is laissez-faire. I may do as I
please so long as I do n o t infringe on vour
right to d o as y o u please Very simple
And certainly n o t a new idea Bui an idea
that seems t o be going o u t of style, as in
this c o u n t r y , as well as o t h e r s , Hie Si,idtakes over mure and m o r e of lho.se
activities which used t o he the perogalive
of the individual
We need radical changes in America to
bring a b o u t laws t h a t recognize Unit •••"h
person has a right to his life and the
p r o d u c t of his labor S o if you must cull
me names, you may if you insist fall me
un individualist, a radical capitalist, per
hups even an egoist, b u t please, of all the
epithets you hurl my way, do not call lite
u conservative.
The Making of the Budget, 1973
by Mitchell Zoler
For t h e past t w o m o n t h s , an unbelievable volume of the m o s t p r e t e n t i o u s
backstabbing, two-faced dealing a n d delicate negotiations have been taking place,
m o s t of it occurring on the third floor of
the c a m p u s center. M o s t of it also occurring u n b e k n o w n s t t o 9 5 % of the s t u d e n t
b o d y , regardless of t h e fact t h a t these
dealings involve a p p r o x i m a t e l y $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0
comprising the net assets of S t u d e n t
Assocaition. I am referring t o the melodramatic
saga of
the b u d g e t
for
1973-1974.
T h e s t o r y began t h r e e m o n t h s a g o o n
s o m e three dreary days in F e b r u a r y . At
t h a t time we s t u d e n t s were c o n f r o n t e d
with an o p i n i o n poll presented t o us
c o u r t e s y of Central Council. If you think
back to the t e m p e r of t h o s e times,
Council was getting a lot of flak over the
distribution of funds t o S.A. s p o n s o r e d
activities,
particularly
over
Concert
Board, which, at t h a t point of the year,
had yet to p r o d u c e a satisfying c o n c e r t .
T h e o u t c o m e of this poll was an apparent desire by the s t u d e n t s to give much
m o r e m o n e y to Concert Board, fund the
switch t o WSUA-FM and in general support activities such as movies, the ASP
and
t h e a t r e . Cultural and
academic
groups, speakers, periodicals and Torch
all came out as losers. With this in mind,
the budget c o m m i t t e e began work on
s u b m i t t e d budget requests at the begin-
Not Alone
continued from preceding page
to=day details of running a large planet.
They apparently had excellent internal
c o m m u n i c a t i o n s , for large c o n f e r e n c e
r o o m s were even m o r e plentiful than the
offices Although only government officials were normally allowed inside the
core, workers (most very y o u n g ) were
s o m e t i m e s allowed in t o p a r t i c i p a t e in
strange religious rites.
Traces of the old religion were eviden
all over the capital. In the middle of the
core lies a reflecting pool presided over
by what is so far the largest phallic
symbol ever found in the solar s y s t e m .
From the fountain could also be seen
hemispherical domes on top of s o m e of
the
buildings.
These domes had a
darkening near the l o p and might have
been maternity s y m b o l s . The fountain
drew h u n d r e d s of workers during the
Earth's mild seasons*-' once there they
would prance m the rejuvenating waters,
pray to the phallus, and s o m e t i m e s t h r o w
a small disc in c a d i oilier m a highly
ritualistic exercise
Upon catching the
disc, ihey would hold il close to their
hody. leading experts here to believe iL
was ;i highly evolved form of r e p r o
duct.ton Many other t o n u s of religious
n I u a Is are pictured in the only book
surviving from that era, a partially
preserved piece called ••'fordi
I!l7;f
In front of the core were two tall poles
s u r r o u n d e d by several r o u n d e d stones
placed at regular intervals. Although it
has been suggested that these were aisi
religious
symbols,
the
presence
o|
slrangely Colored spheres on the lop
indicate Ihitl il)"V wen- fantastically effi
cienl gatherers for ihe solar energy that
ran Hie capital
I'll" use ol Ihe Free .solar energy ••bun
(Kited Ihe e c o n o m i c need lor work as we
know il Tlie rulers, however, were wary
itl tin- whims <>l .i populace wiib nothing
l„ do. and I he}, used one ol the I Wo
outlying buildings to keep ihe former
workers occupied Inside wen- many van
elies ol brutal make work machines. The
low regard the ruling elite had lor Ihe
workers was shown in the fad thai the
Workers were only provided with a huge
c o m m o n cesspool on the lowest level ol
the building lor their bodily wastes A
Urge clock hung on each end ol the
cesspool, apparently to make sine thai
Ihe workers didn't linger oi c o m m i t
suicide II is believe thai a n y o n e w h o
stayed in the area m o r e than two mint una
was severely beaten
Tin- other great problem Ihe govern
ment had was with aged hureai ueraU who
ning of March.
The committee slashed through the
budgets a first, a n d then a second time,
cutting almost every group, totally eliminating others and m a k i n g s o m e fairly
o u t s p o k e n (if not outrageous) suggest i o n s . Foremost a m o n g s t t h e s e was the
e l i m i n a t i o n of s t i p e n d s (Lump-sum paym e n t s of s a l a r y ) t o various S.A. positions
(oh yes, didn't you k n o w ? S.A. president,
ASP editor, A M I A c o o r d i n a t o r , WSUA
s t a t i o n m a n a g e r t o n a m e a few all get
$ 5 0 0 a year for their services while
n u m e r o u s o t h e r positions get s o m e sort
of m o n e t a r y c o m p e n s a t i o n ) .
A d d i n g fuel t o the fires already being
s t o k e d by Budget C o m m i t t e e was the
Allman B r o t h e r s c o n c e r t controversy,
which t e n d e d t o have an effect o n the
$ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 plus allocation C o n c e r t Board
had r e q u e s t e d .
This mess was finally c o m p l e t e d and
s u b m i t t e d t o President L a m p e r t w h o used
it as a guideline for issuing his own
proposal. His version carried along the
s a m e t h e m e s of the c o m m i t t e e , namely
re-shuffled groups (in an effort t o achieve
this year's golden by word-"Mass Prog r a m i n g , " whatever that means) and
slashed budgets.
Lamport's budget
Council, w h o , after
few weeks, finally
last T u e s d a y , April
had served well b u t could n o t carry o u t
their duties any longer. T h e o t h e r outlying buildings gave t h e m a place t o go in
their old age. T h e y could rest in convenient chairs or beds while waiting for
t h e end to c o m e . If they wished, they
could read p a m p h l e t s (some of which
h ave
b ee n
m iraculously
preserved)
warning of such age o l d dangers as LSD
(considered a deadly disease by the older
earthlings) VD (believed to be a malevolent spirit), a n d " a t h l e t e ' s f o o t " (meaning
unknown).
T h e only building t h a t seemed to have a
really specilized p u r p o s e is identified by a
rusty old sign saying " C a m p u s Center".
A p p a r e n t l y , it was n a m e d hastily hecuase
the capital in no way resembles a cm pus
and the building isn't even near the
center. T h e building h o u s e d s o m e comm o n dining halls for the administrators
( c o m m u n a l i t y being a big thing on the
late great planet), as well as radio facilities which they probably used to plead
for help as the end drew near. Unfortunately for Ihein, their e q u i p m e n t was
primitive; it c o u l d n ' t even reach all parts
of the capital, let along Pluto.
A n o t h e r enigma is posed by the sign
saying " J o s e p h Henry Physics Building"
Although s o m e microfilm found in Ihe
building
mentions
Einsteinian
and
Newtonian physics (apparently named
after two scientific geniuses), lleniian
physics
wasn't
mentioned.
Perhaps
llenrian physics led to earth's doom
shortly after its invention by the wellmeaning m a n , but that the building was
n a m e d when it was still t h o u g h t of a
welcome addition to scientific knowled
A suggestion of how far Earth's science
could have gone was found in the Campus
Center. Next lo a labor saving machine in
the kitchen area of the most elegant of
ihe dining halls were two b u t t o n s One
was m a r k e d " n o r m a l " , and the oilier was
marked " t i m e d e l a y " Time travel is only
now coming within our reach, but earth
had control over ihe fourth dimension
centuries ago
'f'he bureaucrats seemed to live in one
ol Ihe lour outlying groups of buildings.
quality thai epih
nth tin
ini/.ed hie among the ruling class, all
rooms looked exactly Ihe same, as did all
ihe furniture Evening Meals were taken
in m o r e large c o m m o n dining halls, one
ol which existed in each group of resi
deuce buildings All eating was apparently
done ot of large c o m m o n howls, many of
which are still in their original place on
large tables in the middle of each dining
hall.
There are lew hints as to what sort of
loud was euten by the people of earth. By
digging deep into the basements (or what
the earthlings called "fallout shelters")
|i,H)U
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1973
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1973
was given to Central
p o o r i n g over it for a
decided t o attack it
2-1. One m u s t under-
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
stand that Council is c o m p o s e d of many
would-be politicians, each with his/her
o w n special cause which is championed in
the throes o f debate. The floor is constantly yielded t o the group's spokesp e r s o n who then pleads a case that will
invariably split the council i n t o timec o n s u m i n g debate.
T h e result was a m a r a t h o n m e e t i n g t h a t
p r o d u c e d few results o n T u e s d a y , e x c e p t
an a d j o u r n m e n t a t 2 : 0 0 A.M. Wednesday
t o s t a r t a l m o s t from scratch on T h r u s d a y
night.
It was n o w or never since Council m u s t
s u b m i t s o m e sort of b u d g e t by 12 Midnight T h u r s d a y or else face i m p e a c h m e n t
(which really w o u l d m e a n little since
guess w h o w o u l d try t h o s e i m p e a c h e d t h a t ' s right, Central Council). S o , at
1 1 : 4 4 P.M. it was decided t o go big t i m e
and s t o p the clock. This allowed t h e m t o
c o n t i n u e until 7 : 3 0 Friday morning, only
to s t o p with the i n t e n t i o n of resuming
Friday a f t e r n o o n , a n d t h e n perhaps final
ly finish.
At least progress was n o w being m a d e
C o n c e r t Board was given its increase of
$ 1 5 , 0 0 0 over this year and s t i p e n d s were
said to be a c c e p t a b l e . Calmly Central
Council forged o n . Bearing an only slightly dazed face, b u t a m i g h t y , deft sword, it
left n u m e r o u s g r o u p s lying in the wake,
b e m o a n i n g their n o w financially future.
J
o n e can find s o m e rather disagreeable
wafers called "Survival ( p r o b a b l y a brand
n a m e ) C r a c k e r s " and a beverage called
" E m e r g e n c y Drinking W a t e r " which our
explorers dared n o t sample. T h e m e n also
found cans of s o m e drink called "CocoC o l a " all over t h e capital. In the residence
areas, but strangely not elsewhere, there
were
bottle.; of
a beverage
called
" B o o n e ' s F a r m " , which was n a m e d after
a p o p u l a r performer of the day and which
m a y have been use;in rejuvenation rituals.
Our explorers were surprised t o find
miles of tunnels c o n n e c t i n g the core and
the four residence areas. Their p u r p o s e
was a m y s t e r y until s o m e o n e back here
suggested that they provided a refuge for
the b u r e a u c r a t s if the workers should
decide to riot
T h e r e was m u c h to do in the capital for
recreation T h e r e are t h r e e elevators in
each of the residence t o w e r s t h a t were
p r o b a b l y not used for t r a n s p o r t a t i o n
because
Ihe
previously
mentioned
"'Porch', hook s h o w e d m o s t earthlings
walk
up stairs and d o n ' t
rely on
m a c h i n e s . T h e r e f o r e , elevator racing must
have been an enjoyable past time. Large
numbers
of
gambling,
or
vending,
machines were found all over the c a m p u s .
T h e prize was s o m e piece of food or a can
of s o m e beverage. Due to the overflowing
cashhoxes and the still full c o l u m n s of
prizes, our scientists feel the earthlings
usually lost. T h e tunnels t h a t c o n n e c t e d
the core buildings also hosted a n o t h e r
kind of race, o n e held between small
electric carts found all t h r o u g h o u t t h e
t u n n e l s . N u m e r o u s access d o o r s t o the
tunnels testified to the p o p u l a r i t y of the
races during lunch breaks.
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n was amazingly simple on
earth. Outside the core buildings and
inside the residence areas are huge overhanging concave discs used for instant
t r a n s p o r t t o any spot o n the planet
Before this t e c h n i q u e was invented, it is
possible air cars landed on the flat roofs
of all tin' buildings. The workers rode
huge t r a n s p o r t vehicles s o m e t i m e s referred to as " s u n y b u s e s " on their way to
and from the forced labor building? one
of these is b r o k e n d o w n right in front of
the capital grounds.
Our explorers say that the majestic
a r c h i t e c t u r e p r o b a b l y impressed most
visitors to the capital at first, b u t thai
sweeping vertical lines must have looked
like jailhousc bars after Ihe visitor saw the
low regard most of the proletarians were
held in by the elite. And our explorers
c o n c l u d e d their message by saying that
a l t h o u g h there o n c e wus life, they don't
know
if
there
was
ever
any
"civilization".
PAGE ELEVEN
READERSHIP SURVEY
In an effort to plan the future of the Albany
As a token of our appreciation for your help,
Student Press in accordance with our readers' bring your completed survey up to the Albany
needs and desires, v e are asking you to fill
Student Press office, CC 334, and you will be
out the following readership survey. The
entitled to a Free CLASSIFIED AD Surveys
survey will only take 5 minutes to complete
may also be dropped off at the CC
Garcia's Funk and Some Odds St Ends
by Bill Brina
S o m e musicians add more t o a
performance or a recording than
sheer technical skill; call it what
y o u will-verve, drive, charisma,
funk: s o m e have it a n d s o m e
don't. Eric Clapton, for all his
technical skill, does n o t . Jerry
Garcia does, and his presence on
Merl Saunder's Fire Up (Fantasy
9 4 2 1 ) makes an already good
album even better. Merl is a
master of that style o f keyboard
playing
best
described as
" m e l l o w funk." It's sweet, a bit
gritty, proficient without being
ostentatious, and goes down just
fine behind s o m e equally funky
Garcia guitar work and singing.
11.
Please check the appropriate item(s) for each question.
As I listen Lo "Around the
University" for the 3 5 7 t h time, I
wistfully recall the raw beginnings of this revolutionary step
towards a multi-media yearbook....
It was a blustery Thursday in
January when the courier summoned me t o the office of J o h n
Chow. U p o n m y arrival, I was
ushered i n t o the " i n n e r chamb e r " by a 6 * 7 " m u t e entirely
bald save for t h e long braid
down his back. The " c h a m b e r "
was a myriad of tapestries and
incese. A man-servant a p p e a r e d
and, with a forceful blow s t r u c k
a huge gong. Before t h e deafening
reverbarations
ceased,
Chow e n t e r e d with his inter
preter
Jay Rosenberg.
Both
looked e x t r e m e l y u n h a p p y . I
q u a k e d with nervous a n x i e t y .
Information Desk.
How much money did you spend on records and tapes
in the past month?
1. Sex:
female-
male.
2. Age:
19-21
26-34
35-54
22-25
55& over
12.
13.
Marital status:
married
other
4a. University status:
faculty member _
staff m e m b e r
graduate student
undergraduate student
yes
14.
off-campus
more than $20
$5-$10
none
For information about weekend activities, which one
tower tribune
kite
Washington park spirit
knickerbocker news
other
times union
h. II you live off-campus, do you travel to school b y :
bus
under $5
albany student press
no
on-campus
15.
car
Which edition of the albany student press do you read
most thoroughly?
other
asp/tuesday
times union
Washington park spirit
knickerbocker news •
other
most frequently?
asp/tuesday
7a. Do you own your own car or have use o f a family car?
no
asp/friday
both
17.
b. If you answered yes, how much money d i d you spend on
What sections o f the albany student press do y o u
read regularly?
gasoline and oil in the past 30 days?
arts <& l e i s u r e s
graffiti
less than $ 1 0 .
$21-$40
classified ads
news
$ 10-$20
more than $40
e d i t o r i a l s <& l e t t e r s
sports
How many times have you gone to the movies in
18.
1 time .
4 times
arts & leisures
5 or more times
classified ads
3 times
none
19.
graffiti .
under $10
__
I at Trinity United Methodist Church,
I
|
I
•
$l.'ill mi salt' nl the dour beginning nl 7 pm
A l l pi IH I'd!'. i|o to 11 vo Miiilr.on Avenue ( o m n i u m ly
i entei Sutimiei I1' ocjr .nn
Cusforv
—
sports
OMA
graffiti
none
news
editorials & letters
sports
cult 273-lSV\
_ — — —
c o u n t r y artist attack r-and-b is in
itself a n o v e l t y , b u t Stampley
d o e s it well, particularly o n t h e
title s o n g and o n You Make Life
Easy. But the killer o f the album
is his all-out version o f / Can't
Help Myself, o n e o f the best soul
singles o f 7 or s o years a g o .
Stampley really gets d o w n with
it, shedding his polish and sacrificing all other values t o urgency. K u d o s also t o the unidentified pedal steel guitar player o n
this cut; h e manages t o impart a
generous w a l l o p f o soul with an
instrument that is hardly, if ever.
identified with the genre.
A f e w artists alone d o not
make a trend, but 1 would not
be at all surprised t o see more
attempts t o mix t h e t w o musics
that have been strongly identified with separate races: soul
and
bluegrass/country.
Both
forms have a g o o d deal more in
c o m m o n than is generally realized; s o m e rock bands (the
Dead, t h e Flying Burritos near
their e n d ) have played with
using e l e m e n t s o f both styles
together; and n o w genre performers themselves seem ready to
take t h e plunge. Both musically
and socially, this promises to be
o n e o f t h e better developments
in s o m e time.
Astonishing Absolutely astonishing. Even a long adm i r a t i o n for Ingmar Be.- ( ,man as a great master of the
cinema doesn't fully prepare one for this wondrous
accomplishment
During t h e 94 m i n u t e experience
of his newest searing personal d r a m a , y o u are virtu
ally transported into t h e inner beingsof tour w o m e n .
Bergman, showing his utter mastery, gives you his
eyes with which to see, and hib sensibilities with
whicn t o feel.
I h e acting is extraordinary Harriet
Andersson lies dying a slow, horribly painful death
in a country manor. One sister, Liv U l l m a n n , has
had an affair with the doctor, and has watched her
h u s b a n d a t t e m p t suicide. Another sister, Ingrid Thulin,
judges her own married life " a tissue of lies," and at
one point c o m m i t s a defiant act of sexual self mutilation that may jolt y o u as n o t h i n g has before. Kari
Sylwan, as the f a m i l y m a i d , h a s lost her child and extends her love, maternally a n d sexually, to t h e sis
ter w h o is dying. In exploring their lives t h r o u g h observation, conversation, i n t e r a c t i o n s , reflections,
confessions, a n d d r a m a t i c crises, t h e w r i t e r director
penetrates t o an e n o r m o u s range of psychic nerve
endings.
Pain, coping w i t h death, loss, h a t r e d , lack
of c o m m u n i c a t i o n , desire for c o n t a c t , love, and
repressed t h o u g h t s a n d feelings — t h e s e are some of
the volatile elements t h r a s h i n g with blender like effect
on your insidcs. 1 have told y o u n o t h i n g . It is the ex
perience itself that tells all. This great, b e a u t i f u l film
represents the purest possible use of cinema as an
a r t t o r m capable of probing t h e h u m a n spirit.
—WILLIAM
Are there any special features you would like to see in
the albany student press in the future?
7 or more limes .
3W
V
*" V
none .
"Vn>y, NcioVovK
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
V Y V W C . . .
U»25a*J*-30
arts & leisures
20.
CORNER OF LARK AND LANCASTER
I'lCKKTS
What o n e s e c t i o n of the a l b a n y s t u d e n t press d o y o u
classified a d s
How many times in the past month have you gone
PAGE TWELVE
JOHN bIMSON
' L A R R Y HIIOWN
with
S I E AMER
t I AROUX I NSI M i l l I
RICH 1 A R R I S
| IOI IN I M'OM I I) J A / /
|
BRIAN, Al I A N , AND I Rll Nl)
news
$40 or more
$21-$39
room. Since there was only
room for one in the machine,
my voice is the only o n e heard
on the record e x c e p t for Jay
Rosenberg's
grunts at t h e
beginning of t h e "hamburger
m a c h i n e " sequence.
Finally,
after a week o f hard-pressed
record making (pun intended),
we headed back h o m e with
4 , 0 0 0 recordings.
Back in Albany,
however,
things were not s o good. Edward
Durell Stone was filing suit
against the Torch bacause the
record was round i nstead o f
square. Security t o w e d away m y
car. And Dutch Quad sank 3
inches. A summit was held, and
following much deliberation, I
agreeded t o c u t five minutes
from the record.
Again 1 was s u m m o n e d t o
Chow's office. Goliath, expressionless as ever, ushered me in.
Much to my surprise there was
Chow...smiling.
"Moo g o o gai pan..." he cried
with tears of happiness.
"Na zdrowie." 1 responded,
bowing from the waist. We
sipped tea a n d played ping pong.
It was a pleasant afternoon...
In retrospect, my primary pur
pose in writing and performing
Around the U. was to capture, as
closely as possible, the feeling o f
life at SUNYA and, having
listened to the production .*tf>7
times, the feeling that 1 net from
if is boredom.
I think 1 have accomplished
my purpose.
is •
Wilson-Pickett-influenced
shouting m o a n . T h e band consists o f a standard soul rhythm
section, occasional brass, a n d
bluegrass-picking
banjo a n d
fiddle. H i i s o d d mixture works
best o n t h e title cust and o n t h e
nine-minute
h o e down/souls t o m p Bo Diddley.
l l i e juxtaposition o f t h e street- corner
jive, a driving Slyderived electric
bass, Bascomb's frantic pleading,
and t h e b o u n c y , bIuegrass-bright
playing o f t h e banjo a n d t h e
fiddle produces a result I'll
guarantee you've never heard
before. There are a few mistakes
and s o m e e m p t y space o n this
album, but t h e concept is sound
and these people should g o far.
Are y o u ready for black grass??
Bad Bascomb isn't t h e only
o n e trying t o create this n e w
hybrid. Working from t h e other
direction, white country singer
Joe Stampley is doing t h e same
thing. Soul Song ( O S 2 6 0 0 7 ) Dot
Records, w h o cases Stampley
with material that ranges from
pure Nashville countrypolitan,
which I assume most readers o f
this will dislike (so d o I; ya gotta
be a member o f the "Silent
Majority" t o get o f f o n that
junk) t o pleasant, rhythm and
bluesy
material. Hearing a
FOLK ROCK JAZZ CONCERT
Friday, May 11 - 8 PM
read l e a s t o f t e n ?
the past month?
4-6 times .
•—
.
editorials & letters
How much money have you spent on clothes in
off-campus t o eat?
1-3 times
We then went to the bank,
withdrew ¥2000.1)1) in change
and drove in New York City t o n
Tunes
Square
penny
arcade
where they have those " R e c o r d
Your Voice" machines Using a
record
player for
p u r able
t he cassette
the Hind effects,
track, and a few quarts of
Budweiser, Donald, .lay, and I
kept plunking tpinters into the
machine stopping only t o go to
N a t h a n ' s Katnoiis or to the bath
What o n e s e c t i o n o f the a l b a n y s t u d e n t press d o y o u
2 times
...
"You
misunderstood
your
o r d e r s / ' a d m o n i s h e d Rosenberg,
" w e w a n t a script that
lusts
t w e n t y m i n u t e s . . . n o t o n e ilia I
Lakes
twenty
minutes
to
write!!!"
Chow n o d d e d in agreement as
if h e u n d e r s t o o d every word.
The giant m u t e was expressionless. He was asleep.
"Moo
shu pork!"
snarled
Chow.
" Y e s , " said Roserhcrg in his
cruel, claeulating voice, " N o w
GO unci get it right...and r e m e m
her..this is TOP S E C R E T . "
C h o w a n d Rosenberg disappeared t h r o u g h a beaded cur
tain a n d Ape m a n eyed me
coldly. 1 s u c k e d t h e d r o p l e t s of
sweat from m y m u s t a c h e .
'' Arrghsnfwrragh,"
he said,
m o t i o n i n g t o w a r d s t h e door.
" T h a n k y o u , L u r c h . " 1 furred
a liny laugh. He remained ex
pressionless...
lie was asleep
again.
Once I was on t h e p o d i u m , the
words " t o p secret " echoed m
my brain i n t e r r u p t e d only lie
people
asking
" H o w ' s ihe
record, h e y , I hear y o u ' r e doing
a record, . y o u gonna d o an
;il hum'.'... I low's it going 1 hem'
t h e y ' r e g o n n a m a k e ;i movie ol
your r e c o r d . . . e t c . " 1 suspected a
security leak.
In my darkest h o u r I t u r n e d t o
my friends...both of them. Boh
Sugarman of the Theater Depart
ment d o n a t e d t h e use of his
sound effects records and wished
me luck on " w h a t e v e r it w a s " 1
was doing, I wanted t o tell him
but 1 c o u l d n ' t .
Donald Person is an electronic
wizard a n d former mail o r d e r
g r o o m w h o knows h o w t o make
miracles happen. He must have
put something in that cigarette 1
was smoking because, before I
knew
it, my
conversation
became a verbalization of my
stream of consciousness which
s o m e h o w became centered u p o n
university life. Donald then removed t w o batteries from bis
son's flashlight, popped t h e m
into a cassette player, a n d by
stimulatint* m y conversation
with interjections
such as ..."uhh u h ... yeah ...right.. .oh ,
really'', ( a n d ) I sec what una
m e a n . . . " recorded the entire
voice track of Around t h e 11.
read m o s t o f t e n ?
the past month?
$10-$20
.
16. Which edition of the albany student press do you read
kite .
yes
asp/friday
both
What newspapers do y o u read regularly?
albany student press
10.
How much money have y o u spent on beer, wine, and
of the f o l l o w i n g do you use most often?
5a. Do you live:
9.
In which supermarket do you shop most often?
$11-$20
b. If you arc a student, do you have a part-time job?
8.
none
liquor in the past month (exclusive o f taverns)?
single
6.
over $20
$10-$15
$16-$20
18 & under-.
3.
under $10
K S A N broadcast, Lonely
Avenue. The fidelity o n this o n e
number isn't the greatest b u t the
playing really does a s l o w burn.
A good deal bouncier but just
as funky is t h e debut album o f
Bad
Bascomb,
appropriately
titled Black Grass (Paramount
PAS 6 0 4 8 ) . The record c o m a p n y
didn't supply a n y background
information and the album itself
doesn't either, and s o I don't
know w h o these people are.
Whoever they are, they're good.
Bab Bascomb appears t o be a
mainly
black
sou I-blue grass
band. The singer (Bascomb himself, 1 think) assays a variety o f
soul styles, but what he's best at
Behind the "University"
by Bill Polchinski
and all answers will be kept confidential.
Jerry's playing here doesn't bear
much resemblance t o the style
he employs on his o w n s o n g s ;
it's closer to the r-and-b styled
playing he'd use o n Pigpen's
material.
With expertly styled backing
by bassist John Kahn, drummer
Bill Vitt, and rhythm guitarist
Tom Fogerty, Merl and Jerry
(with help from various other
assorted musicians) tackle material that ranges from J.J. Cale's
After Midnight, which is rendered in a manner more reminiscent
of JJ than Eric's version was to
the soul-smooth Charisma. The
album concludes with a nineminute scorcher from a live
W E D N E S D A Y , M A Y 9, 1973
iftskin
[exdffrt
r sGo
r
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
(Oct 22. IV?2, Cutt M * J * * H I C
WOLF
All Rlflhti Roiervctf
.{J HELLMAN
STUDENT DISCOUNT
WITH ID'S SUN.-FRI. f
SHOWN AT
7:00 9:00
PAGE THIRTEEN
fl
Entertainment for Fun —
-MOST HAPPY FELLA
"V
The folks from
i..
The Staff and Management of WSUA
albaFiY steafee QineRaa
wishes to thank the university community
wish all a pleasant, and enjoyable summer
When you return, be sure to see:
for their help and encouragement.
FRITZ THE CAT
M
It's been a pleasure serving you this year.
Friday and Saturday, September 7 and 8
coming attractions:
EASY RIDER
THE GETAWAY
EFFECT OF GAMMA RAYS ON MAN-IN-THE-MOON MARIGOLDS |
THE FILMS OF CHARLIE CHAPLIN
DIRTY HARRY
THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE
FANNY HILL
PETE 'N TILLIEJ
LADY SINGS THE BLUES
SOUNDER
FELLINI'S ROMA j
THE LAST PICTURE SHOW
PLUS MANY, MANY MORE
luiHlucI by MiKlunl U« ;;
PACK KOURTEEi
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
HAVE AN ENJOYABLE SUMMER
A
'*-! ^ . . i i m AV1NUI_
see you I
f
once again thank you
in September
WSUA 640
S
n
0>«rbmiled meaton a ikewer! .
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9. 1973
funded by sUidutit i.i
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIFTEEN
to Ebbie, Gang
Hunsberger Expected To Address Faculty Today
by Gary Ricciardi
I. Moyer Hunsberger is slated to
speak before an assembly o f the
College o f Arts and Sciences 2 : 0 0
this afternoon
in LC 1. His
scheduled appearance will be his
first public o n e since this week's
c o n f r o n t a t i o n s b e t w e e n students,
faculty and administrators began
over the question o f his possible
suspension and related issues.
The scheduled meeting o f the
College o f Arts and Sciences is
Vol. LX No. 2S
o f the College o f Arts and Sciences
at this afternoon's meeting.
The Steering C o m m i t t e e o f the
loosely organized students w h o
have held sit-ins in
President
Benezet's office and public rallies
througout the week, is encouraging
students to attend today's meeting.
ordinarily a routine affair, but the
controversy
surrounding
Dean
Hunsberger adds t o this assembly
the tension w h i c h has characterized
administrative and student relations
this past w e e k .
Last night Dean Hunsberger announced in a written statement that
he has accepted the post o f Provost
at the University o f Oklahoma's
Norman Campus. It is expected
that he will personally announce his
resignation to the assembled faculty
State University of New York at Albany
The Committee is urging students,
however, not to interrupt what is,
in formal terms, a faculty assembly.
According to Chris Masterson, a
member o f the Steering C o m m i t t e e .
"Several
faculty
members
arc
drawing up proposals concerning
Dean Hunsberger's review and that
o f the tenure and continuing appointment system. I hope that students will be there t o support these
proposals. But I think the faculty
should be allowed to dominate the
meeting. This is their issue as well
as the students'. I hope students do
not try to take over the meeting,
but help faculty at their request."
Friday. May 11, 1973
HUNSBERGER OUT
The controversial Dean announced last night
he will take a position at the U. of Oklahoma
tending a dinner in Massachusetts. There
was no comment from the Benezet residence.
I. Moyer Hunsberger lias resigned.
Hunsberger's announcement confirmed
Tire Arts & Sciences Dean, a controrumors of his imminent departure that
versial figure in numerous tenure cases at
had circulated around the univerisly
he university this year said in a written
throughout the day.
statement last night that he will accept a
The search committee that selected
provost position at the University of
Hunsberger to be Provost al the OklaOklahoma.
homa campus had been looking foi avail"I have been offered and I have acable candidates since last fall. Corcoran
cepted the position as Provost of the
said. Hunsberger was one of three names
University of Oklahoma al Norman," the
sent along to the university president
statement said in part.
"within the last week."
President Sharp, Corcoran added, seAs Provost, Hunsberger will be second
lecled Hunsberger on the basis of the
only to Oklahoma President Paul Sharp in
committee's recommendations "as well as
deciding internal academic affairs at the
personal interviews."
university. Jack Corcoran, Director of
Communication al ihe Oklahoma camCorcoran revealed that Hunsberger had
pus, said m a telephone interview
travelled to the Oklahoma campus last
yesterday that Hunsbergei will be in
week to meet with the president and
charge of "preparing the total academic
discuss contract terms.
program and budgel lui the university."
Reading from a press release issued by
Hunsberger, he added, will be "in charge ol
ihe Board of Regents yesterday, Corcoran
all faculty appointments, promotion and
quoted the Oklahoma president assaying
tenure issues." His salary will be $38,000
"I am delighted Dr. Hunsberger has
a year.
agieed to seive as Provost." The position
was characterized by the president as
In his statement last night, Hunsbergei
being "one of the most significant at the
said he made the move "with mixed
university."
emotions" because "I have truly enjoyed
my work here and am leaving because this
In the release, Hunsberger was quoted
new appointment appeals so promising."
as saying: "I look forward to my new
"I have appreciated the opportunity to
duties as provost."
work with faculty, students and adminCorcoran also revealed dial the search
istrators at Albany," Hunsberger's statecommittee and the university president at
ment continued, "and particularly the
Oklahoma bulb knew of Hunsberger's
support extended to me from many sides,
past problems at the University of Masseven when the circumstances may have
achusetts and SUNV-Albany. But he indibeen difficult."
cated that knowledge did not seriously
University President l.ouis T . Benezet
lessen Hunsberger's chances of employwas quick to offei congratulations to the
ment al the university.
departing dean. Benezet, in his public
The search committee was described as
statement, said the appointment "is a
a "faculty committee." But asencond
recongniton of his stature as an eduniversity spokesman said three students
ucational leader."
served on it and that all elements of the
Hunsberger, Benezet added, made "a
university community were included.
significant contribution" to the university
Hunsberger will assume his new duties
through his deanship.
on August 1st. It is expected that a
Both Hunsberger and Benezet were unsearch committee here will name his
available for additional comment. An
replacement as Dean of the College of
unidentified spokesman at Ihe HunsArts & Sciences sometime over the
berger residence said the Dean was atsummer.
Full text o f Dean 1. Moyer H unsberger's resignation statement
appears on Page Four.
by A l Senia
MEANWHILE...
Students continue their
day-old sit-in and
press for tenure reform
Page 3
Council demands Benezet
order an investigation of
faculty members' charges
Page 3
Benezet spurns student
demands at Wednesday's
public meeting
PAGE SIXTEEN
A L B A N Y STUDENT PRESS
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 , 1 9 7 3
Page 2
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