llliiPilll lid Danes Win Weekend Pair; Tourney Hopes Still Alive

advertisement
ASP Special:
Unlnnlty of Nay, York at Albany
Leonard Bernstein
Tuetday, February 27, 1973
-
Artist at Work
Danes Win Weekend Pair;
Tourney Hopes Still Alive
...page l a
ALBANY
PRCCC
/
Vol. LX. No. 13
State University of New York at Albany
March 2,1973
Page 19
llliiPilll lid
Allman Controversy Embroils Council
the smooth How o f the concert.
by Robert Mayer
The
Studeni
Central
Council
niglil
amidst
Association's
convened
controversy
debate ensued when
m i n o r i t y , said. " I don't feel that
The coalition's contention thai
wenl on to demand Ilia! S3500
gonna give you o n e . " Ms. Greene
Mickey Greene said that she did
Further
Council should work under the
assumption that ihe money has
nothing was being done, that
come from whetevci possible lo
not see enough guilty faces m i l
last
Central Council had failed in Us
support
there. Slokem replied, " N o l all
been
and
responsibility to answei certain
hospital bombings. Again, more
of
haven't done so."
Ihe
vicinus
of
the
us
aie
riding
the
guilty
contusion stemming from a total
questions, and that promises had
shouting
Harry
conscience you credit us w i t h . "
appropriation o f 3(>,000 dollars
been broken, led lo last night's
Sloan, member o f Council yelled.
Council then began lo discuss
I'm
stormy meeting.
"There is no money."
the
March
Brothers
3rd
concert.
Allman
Some
35
students, many members o f an
organisation
calling
itself
"Coalition."
attended
meeting
the
with
obtaining
claimed
3500
After
the
procedures,
usual
a
Council
motion
was
oeeiued
and
ways
Council Chairman Ken S l o k e m
supported
Sloan's
assertion,
in
which
because
we
*****
file issues that the concert has
could
raised are by no means over. The
possibly be raised loi Bach M a i .
money loi Bach Mai remains to
Pal
be f o u n d . Proposals ranged f r o m
Curtail,
money
committed
vice-chairman,
the
the
purpose
dollars
of
they
had been promised
lo
them by council.
li
was
the
confrontaliou
photos by magnien
who
had
niones.
fust
formal
between
those
appropriated
anil
ijiicsi uiiietl
those
ihc
the
who
had
integiity
and
legitimacy o f that appropriation.
The
controversy
followed
Ihe
council
bill
initially
January
llial
_">th
alluted
lo
University, Conceit lioard 10.300
dollais
from
SA's
Spending
Fmeigeiicy
Line.
This
appropriation depleted the line to
nothing.
What followed was an attempt
on
l-ebtuary
Isl
by
loimer
Councilman Joe Curry, to move a
motion in icpeal Ihe b i l l . After
discussion, Curry's m o t i o n was
defeated
sel
aside
until
February.
Ihe
33ud
when
introduced
Darn
a
by
of
bill
Councilman
Davis requesting UCH lo
allow the collection ol money lor
claiming llial iheie nun have been
suggested llial die Council move
Council
sonic c n o i in tabulating student
lu
noisy,
hinds and S A may possibly be
laisc inunvy
discuss
budgeting
often
Cenlial
pnonties.
disoideily
accusations
A
exchange
followed
ihen
picssuie un Cenlial Council,
issue was in I lunl ul i l l . ' u i u i k il
was
sought.
may be t i n e , " d e p e n d i n g o n how
I in.ilK
a
you o m u l i i . " and llial he was
liiliu,lined
lo
a bchayal ol an oiigtnal piomi.se
"tint going to lose,,us sl.-.-puu-i
ih.H , ailed loi the eslabltshiiu
invulviiig
lo give $35(1(1 lo speakers loi
it."
>>l .in
seals
Ions I'ci.v I
Scveial council members
Dutch
Quad It", in I
dicw
loud
piomise
quarters full for both weekend games. Albany swept the weekend
anyone
pair including Saturday's victory over Ithaca College to keep their
had
been
speaking
Cenlial Council
tourney hopes alive. Byron Miller (right) scored a career high .12
ol
points.
ollcialh
high-keyed
lo
-^3
lot
j k >
..
I31^*,",»^
Once the sum
llo.iul
ilteie
was
lliuveisily
Welchons, plctured.abovc. PLEASE COME.
('uncoil
chaitwonian, Maiguente
lli,n
Pages 18, 19
a table
loi
Aid
ol
pioivdu.es
lo
IVjMVSVIll.llUVS
question
Oil
Will
3,0011 students when ihe bombs
Indochina
allected
mail)
mole
lioard
Medical
been,
in
Wurtz,
had inloiincd all ASF lepnrici
li.ii
v
l u i n i ihe w i \
. ui n in 11 i-i-
i.-u-iiiH-
lui
continued
\ question llial has been jatsed
( nut
thv wa\ s and uiv.
i.nsing
Willi
37UO
Allman
On-
beginning is one
so. in u\
llioihcis
u-piii.nioii
I be
people
loi
Palace
and
have
dtiiwing
a
the
tine
huge
etowds. even non-tickel holdeis.
making .i donation u, |(.„ h M,n
,\ waimng submitted lo the \SP
hospital
h u m Robin Sansolo. a membei
ibv
i"
llies'e
h weui uu to slate lh.il
mice
wavs
upon
would
Inuling
ul
.ml
guidelines I'm couceil eucis.She
in
Conceit
lioaul.
suggested
3d 0(111 dull.us had been given loi
no
moue\ available loi ail\ spcakeis,
will be the last game for five graduating seniors including Dave
I. ui.I. -11111. n
Council said thai Ins quad would
lll.'ll
SID.30(1 had been given lo
Conccil
The Dunes close out the regular season tomorrow here at S 3 0 . It
made
"I
muti.ui
Cenlial
puipose ol d i i v i i K ui i i i i h i e i l h
last night's meeting Ilia! no such
Potsdam games. The crowd (pictured at top) was less than three
.id
uiwsiiv.ilv
vi , h.iiirri.
punned " i n In lite " C o a l i t i o n " at
the loyal Oane fans packed the gym for the Urockport and
demand
" C o a l i t i o n " viewed Ibis aelion as
Fund
the meiitbeis
(ieibei hioiighi up the qiiesiioiis
Mike l a m p c i i . when asked ahmii
being
expect
ol l.-.isibiluy .mil once again Ihe
Slokem's statement, said llial n
not
icasoriabl\
ul Ihe " C o a l i t i o n " lo follow up
president
Association
Mickey
ihe
Coiincilinan Sieve
cake-sales lo a telethon. One can
'M.000 dollais in the led " Laici
"Coalition"
ol
lo
Student
Greene, saying that an apology
ilieiubei.s
muttons
ol
medical aid to Indochina passed
niemhci
discuss specific
In
li.uli M.II and the Attica Delense
Where have all the people gone. It was only a few weeks ago that
Swimmers, Pups Both Falter
iiiiiodnced lo suspend the agenda
and
by a voice vole
Appaientl)
Weekend Aciion
Several Council members simultaneously ask for the floor during last night's heated exchange.
Funnel motions were
"Not all of us are i d i n g the guilty
conscience you credit us with."
Vicki Gottlieb, voiiiiiilwoiiian
Tony Perez, drew loud applause
as he spoke in behalf of the
lepiesenling
icniaiked
Stale
outside
the
would he permitted in Ihe Palace
"Coalition's" demands. Council-
meeting, "There are 3.000 people
Theater's lobby, but a pilch loi
man
w|u>
lunds before Ihe concert would
foreground.
not be allowed. I lei reason was
Councilman
t tin I such a move would interrupt
responded, shouting, "We're nol
Littlefield
is pictured in
SUppoil
the
Allman
Uiotheis, and I don't think there
File
Lonschein
are 3,000 people on this campus
who support Bach Mai "
-Ken Stokem
Quad,
council
implementing Ihe luuluigs. The
urged non-ticket holdeis lo sta>
motion was accepted. 13 yes. IS
away. Sin- also said llial
no, and I abstention.
attending the concert should not
Councilman
voicing
the
Dave
opinion
those
Galleily,
bung any alcohol as u will be
of
confiscated.
the
Students Waking Up to Politics
by HW Warwick
Alttrnttive Features Service
Berkeley. Calif./AFS--Barely
before the polls closed last
November 7. the pundits who'd
awakened America to an apocalyptic vision of a united, vindictive "Youth Vote" were choking
on their rakish new Woodstock
slouch hats.
Like newly
enfranchised
women five decades earlier. Ihe
pesky first-time voters had
proved too ornery (or simply
too many) to fit in anyone's back
pocket, and most professional
observers consigned the "Youth
Vote" to the garbage-bin of political science textbooks.
Wis., emerged, as an identifiable
voting bloc, often determining
the choice of city council members and the course of local
referenda.
Nowhere is their influence felt
more strongly than in Berkeley.
The scene of almost constant
campus upheavals since 1964,
this
polyglot
Northern
California community began to
feel the students' impact at the
polls only in 1970. In that year,
incensed by the U.S. invasion of
Cambodia,
University of
California students provided the
organization and the votes for
Ronald V. Dellums, a radical
Black anti-war spokesman on ihe
C'ily Council, to upset an entrenched liberal Congressman.
Following up the November
1970 election of Dellums lo the
Congress and of a young liberal
to the State Assembly, students
again provided Ihe margin in
Aptil 1971 for a liberal Black
Mayor and three radical City
Council candidates.
Overlooked in their rush to
greener statistical fields was Ihe
fast-growing impact of the student vole in local elections
where stale law and sometimes
capricious local officials permit
students lo register at llieir
college residences, lour million
college students might have no
palpable effect on a one-sided
Presidential election in which at
best they would constitute six or
Unlike nearby Davis, site of
seven percent of [he vote, but in
another campus of Ihe Univercollege lowns the large proporsity of California - where stution of residents who arc students conslituc 45 percent of
dents might be denied access to
Ihe people, and last year elected
the levers of local power only
a liberal majority of the Davis
because Ihev lack an awarenes.1cily council - fewer than a
ol political identity or vigorous
quarter of Berkeley's 120.000
organization.
people are students. Bill in Ihe
Then numbers swelled by Ihe April 1971 city eleclions-a year
18-year-old vole, students in before Ihe IS-year-old vole went
many college lowns across Ihe into elTecl-sludenl votes were
country have awakened In I his nonetheless decisive: wnh llieir
realm and begun 10 form alli- registry) ion nearly 400 percent
ances with left-liberal and radical highi'i Ihan Iwo yeais earlier.
forces ill hopes of changing the and llieir luriloUl on election
often sleepy course of local poll day al 75 peicenl compared to
lies In many coninuiniltes .Ann -14 perceni, sltidcnls piovuled an
estimated one-qiiailei ol the
Arbor. Mich.. C.iiubndge. Mass
Berkclev . Calil . Madison, 5 1.000 voles cast. Ami lho.se
NEWS BRIEFS
votes went preponderantly to
the candidates of the radical
April Coalition: with more than
thirty City Council candidates in
the race, students gave a clear
majority to each of the four
Coalition nominees, and more
than 60 percent of their votes to
the liberal of the two mayoral
candidates (who won by a
plurality of just 56 voles in the
cily al large.)
International
BEIRUT, Lebanon
Palestinian guerrillas, striking a t a d i p l o m a t i c n ''•eptiu 11
m Kliiirl o o m , seized t h e U.S. a m b a s s a d o r a n d colleagues Tlmiv
N'Y u hostages against a d e m a n d for t h e release of Sirhan Sir!
OIIHT.S
Broadcasts from t h e capital of S u d a n said the Mlack <
,
group d e m a n d e d t h e release within 21 h o u r s of Si rhan t!i
• Jordani
an immigrant t o t h e United S l a t e s w h o was eonvi eled ,,|
ting Sen. R o b e r t Fl K e n n e d y . T h e y also s o u g h t free (Join In
•tlwlmd
ers of an urban guerrilla g r o u p in West G e r m a n y am I hr, |l
PilliMlHI
an guerrillas arrested in J o r d a n last monLh.
Similarly, Berkeley's students
contributed heavily lo the narrow (52.5 perceni) victory of a
radical rent control measure here
lasl June and lo the overwhelming majorities in ihe 1972
general elections for Rep.
Dellums and Sen. McGoveni (72
perceni for Dellums. SO perceni
for McCjovern.)
Sudanese radio did n o t say what t h e guerrilla*,
their d e m a n d s were n o t m e t .
This year, students in Berkeley
are determined lo place one oi
I heir number on ihe ( i n
Council-and their chances are
considerably bet lei Ihan in
1971, when the one radical Coalition candidate who was a student lost a seal on Ihe Council
by a meie 2} voles
On April 17, foui seals nowheld by "non-radicals" on Ihe
town's 9-mcmbcr Council will he
filled. Among twenty-eight can
didales lo fill ihem aie Iwo
broadly-supported slates • one
radical, one liberal ami students
aie prominent mi boil. Two of
Ihe radical Apnl Coalition's loin
Council candidates, anil one
memhei ol the libeials' "ctvn
unity" stale, are Umversil) ol
California graduate siudeuts
concrete lestimon) to the students' emergent mlc in the
National
SAN QUENTIN
Former ITS. A t t o r n e y (lent-nil K a m s c y ("lark u.!.-.<!• -,,sioll ayain this week ol pari ici|>al<- iri Hiifhi'll Ma^'i-i-'s il- •
Willi Clark in Ihi- t-ourtniom I'm- Hi<- rirsl l i m e -luil,-. \1,
vin aflain ruled thai Ihe Cornier A t t o r n e y Ceneral CM .'
Miifjee's lawyer ljeeau.se ihe judge did nol k n o w ' 'I.Clark has heell pi-i-|ianni: lo e n t e r Ihe c-a.se since lie ,pwhen he I'irsl visited Marji-e al San Q u e n l i n Prl.son Cl.irl
had thought defend,mis had a MXHi .imeiulmeiii rnjhi
l a w y e r s . " l i e then declined I'urlher c o m m e n t Ijee.i'.e,
heen tiled in cH'orls I., reverse Judge ('tilvin's ruliili;
WASHINGTON
town'-, politics in lecenl i . . n ,
A Icllerv lor a slandl.y m i l l l f i r j drall will la- held •
even ihoii,.|, il is unllkel) thai anyone in He- loio-r'lie- Seleclive Service System said lie- men recer,
An important announcement to every
student in the health professions:
NEW SCHOLARSHIPS
ARE AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
THEY COVER TUITION AND
RELATED COSTS AND PROVIDE AN
ANNUAL INCOME OF $5,300 AS WELL
hers will be Hi
in I!)., I
vac-limu age I'.l dmme
• l-'or l i e - I'irsl t u n e s l i n e
m e n I-
HIIIJJ l o l l e n
mihiclion into
I h e loin-.-,
I'lV.i
in e
w . i - in 1,1-. •
n t i n i l i e i • w i l l II..I la.-. Hi- ,
I - irnu-tl Ion . . . " ..
,i., , i
*\ \ S l l l \ t , l ( ) \
I ' l e .S'lXoii . , , 1 , ,
JallH-s It
•"
l!|
Moll
I,,,,,,,,,. w l n e h h e e d 1,,,,,,.
e " ' • ' ' piVMtlci,1, ,| r|,.,-!,,„, h,,., , ,
||
"•".'[" ' " r , ' «
I " ' * ' ' '" Ihe 141
, , ! „ „ an,,,,,
I In- Riivernnveul Will i i i i m - , | „ , , - U \
1
"
I
,,, prison and lll.-n -.; ,-. end,,,
,, ,
l l , h
'»l eomimilalion in lie- event thai Mi 11,
I'"' " " " I ,
s
„ , . , | „ , l MM " A l l , , , , , , A ,
ICIeiiidiensI , , , , | M o n t l a j
llV
W\SIIIN(,I()N
The I! S Auriculliire I leparl mem s I-., on,,,,,,predicts that III,- In,III rale in Ihe I lllled Sl.,1,-.
ehne drain
ill-.
Calvin lie.ile ol Ihe Ues,-.,, el. Service says thai
il a stead;, -alary of $ I'M) a
nn active duty ( with e x t r a
month anfI paid-up tuition
[•'»>') ' " ' l'r> days. Naturally.
will help you continue youi
it your academic schedule
professional 11 a m i n e . the
require.1* that you remain on
-'ho!;n-hip- just made poseanipu^, you stuy on campus
- i M e \,\ t h e I ' n i f o i r n e d
and still receive your active
-ej". ire- Health Piot'essiom
duly pay.
l i e ' . i u l m i t i o n Ael u\ 1*172
Art in tluhj
rnfimvninit*
de-ej've youi e|o.se at lei. t ion
an l<ttt Musically, you serve
K' -i-nu-t- if Will ma now m a
one yeai as a eommissitiiied
i;i''d.i< a!, o-ieopathic, dental,
oflicer I'm each yeai you've
.eh-i idai y, podiatry, 01 up
participated in the program,
'ofne'i. -ehool, or aif wui'k
with a Iwo year minimum.
u.u ''/.'.,! jd a 1'hlJ in ('lifiieal
Vou may apply foi a scholai
f . ehoK"',, you may qualify
.-hip .vith either the Army,
\V> ,,oit -iii! ,)iii unit h,
N'avyorAii Force, and know
• ••!,•!,icJc •}'>n, }.tii<l,<•.>;,You're that upon e n t e r i n g active
'•omir.i ioneda an o/Jicer as
duty you'll have rank and
'.on a '.o i e n t e r the produties in keeping with youi
. .;(,-,, f, ,' 11 fnain in Indent
|ii(jf'essional t rainine,.
' a ' . .l.i'A ui'-i't oi'ion. And,
The life's work you'.i. rhoyou will he sen I'oryourself retpjjres long,
h a u l , expensive I r a i n i n g
Now we aie in a posh ion u
tfive you smm< hcl|.. Mail in
I
coupon :il vuiii farlii-si
i
vi'iiicncvfoi iniuvdi-taili-il
i urination.
r
1 '. IV •_' Ihe 11 S I,nth rate has fallen from I 1 \i h u l l
lo
I fi 7 births per
I 1)1)1! people
lleale .it111-. III.
Illil.N i i e l l l a l l V Kill b e l o w I h e level n e e d e d l o ,
'|i,,o
by Audrey Seidman
Jay Goldman, a SUNYA senior, said he is "very interested in
politics." That is why he is
working as a legislative aide in
the New York Senate.
Jay is one of the many students here who have found jobs
at the State Capitol, not five
miles from campus, for the present legislative session. Their reasons for applying for legislative
jobs range from a desire for
governmental experience to a
need for money and/or graduation credit.
Jay got his job through one
academic channel, the Legislative Internship class, taught by
Roy A. Spcckhard. Associate
Dean of 1'oliiical Science. Speckhard descrihed the course as
"much like an independent study m the legislative process."
SAIGON
U S . and C o m m u n i s t delegations are m e r i i n g l-'iui
final arrangements tor t h e w e e k e n d release of l.'iii .\
ers of war by the North Vietnamese a n d Viet COOL;
The refusal of the C o m m u n i s t s to free Ihe men e;n
had set off the first real crisis in t h e V i e t n a m cease
The U.S. delegation said that while it had been ;ISM
cans would be freed in this latest g r o u p , it harl imi
Thursday night of lull details of release p r o c e d u r e s
In Paris, North Vietnamese foreign m i n i s t e r , Ngu
assured Secretary of Stale William P. Rogers th.i
would he released by 9 p . m .
H a.m. EST Saturday
Capitol Jobs Offer Various Opportunities
•' Aim-.
Between M and 40 students
are enrolled in Ihe Co credit
course requiring a final research
paper and participant observation. Speckhard said he has tried
lo lie his course in with ihe
assembly intern program, lie
believes working in the Capitol is
good for Ihe political science
student to gel "Ihe experience.
Ihe feeling of atmosphere." He
feels it will either stimulate Ihe
sludenl lo continue in politics or
dissuade him.
Jay is fulfilling his participant
observation requirement for Ihe
coinse by working lot Senator
Jack Brotislon. (Queens-I)em,
credit. He researches bills after
they conic out of committee foi
Steingut and also works for the
Ways and Means commit lee researching bills with fiscal im-
Women's Studies is now a
registered
in terdeparl mental
second field at ihe Stale U niveisity of New York at Albany.
Women's Studies employes an
"tint r a d i l i o n . i ] " locus (sex
dilieienliiilion) and diaws on
disciplines m the humanities,
social sciences, and the professions, A second field in Women's Studies would he professionally valuable to persons,
•eilhei men 01 women, going
into law, government, journalism, social woik, librarianship,
oi education m aiCJS wheie they
would deal with women's problems oi research on women
l-oi nexl fall Ihe following
courses will be offered
l ; N ( o M Women i ; Modern
l.ileiatuie ( I ciedils)
I lis! £i() Women inn I j p e a n
llisloty (.1 ciedils)
llls^M Histoiy : Wo
ihe Ameikas (.1 ci U s )
I ' k S . V Uibun ueili
Family ( * ctedits)
SO<
K'U I V u c s s
Jay Goldman
• he wants to go into politics. "It's
a good place lo meet people." he
added.
Some students, like Jean
Quinn. got their Capitol jobs
independently from school. Jean
is one of the iwo girl Senate
Pages at the Capitol. When Ihe
Senators are in ihe chambers she
runs errands including copying
bills, bringing lunch, ordering a
tuxedo, or wiring flowers. She
also works in the Senate Document room pulling hills.
She heard about Ihe job from
former female pages and applied
to Ihe Secretary of ihe Senate.
At first Jean had no interest in
politics, hoping to go into Public
Relations, but by asking ihe
Senators questions she has gained an understanding of politics.
Mike spends his time making
coffee, filing, researching, and
answering phones. Besides the
credit he's receiving, he wanted
lo work al Ihe Capitol because
Women's Studies Offered I
.nioii I i ciedils)
Ciucta
I 111 ^ 0
State
plications. 1* is one of Steingut's
constituents.
Working at the Capitol since
September, Jerry said, "I find
this more rewarding than student government." He is hoping
One interesting experience he to make contacts for law school
has had so far was when he had and business. "I succeeded in
lo handle a roomful of trial- becoming involved," he said.
One of his duties last fall in-Uwyers lobbying against the
no-fault insurance plan. He en- cluded helping to research campaign speeches, such as one on
joys his work, and feels that "by
working down here you actually education for Assemblyman Lill.
Jerry is encouraged thai somehave an input."
Another way to get academic one as himself could be so incredit for working at the Capitol volved in government. He recalls
is through the Community Servi- researching a tax bill for the
ce Program. According lo lledi Ways and Means Committee
McKinley, director, the students which was supposed to have
must arrange foi their own minimal fiscal implications. His
placement, and then come lo research found that the bill
enroll in the Community Service would lose $200 million in reveProgram. She estimates thai nue Ihe I'irsl year The bill was
Iherc are about ten students killed in committee
doing Community Service al the
Also in ihe Community Service
Capitol this term.
Program is Mike McCiuire. who is
for
Assemblyman
Mrs. McKinley docs not en- w o r k i n g
courage this because she doesn't Arthur O. Lve (Buffalo-Dem.) as
feel
"that
it's Community an aide. Mike, not being a
Service at its essence." In Ihe Buffalo resident, called live and
non-profit situation, however, volunteered his services. Accord"il is loosely within community ing lo Mike, he chooses in work
for Eve because "I wanted some
service."
Jerry Pasichow, sophomore, guy who's son of close lo me
works for Assembly Minority politically. Lve was Ihe only one
Leader
Stanley
S t e i n g u t who had Ihe guts lo say thai
(Biooklyn-Dem.) as a Research Rockefeller should have been
impeached over Attica."
Counsel, for community service
His main duties are to answer
constituency letters and write explanatory memorandums on
bills. He plans to write his research paper on the process of
passing a bill.
lems (2 credits)
('IIL3-S3 Family Health Problems {2 ciedils)
Faculty and advisers will he
leceiving furthei information on
ihe Second Field in Women's
Studies through the Office ol
Undeigiaduale Studies in lime
foi advisement and pie-iegistiailon, 'Ihe individual Women's
Studies anuses will he clearly
marked in the Fall Schedule ol
CI asses. Furthei
inloimatiou
may he obtained liom ihe coordinatoi of Women's Studies
Committee, Prol'essoi June F.
Ilalmei of the History Department.
One student is working for
boih professional and economic
lle.dlh I'l
Reprinted
Spectrum
from
Buffalo,
The
(January
'J2,I97H)
T h e average s t u d e n t is often
en#i[j('d in t h e l a n d l o r d - t e n a n t
r e l a t i o n s h i p at s o m e point during his a c a d e m i c life
T h e essence of t h e relationship
is a c o n t r a c t . T h e c o n t r a c t may
he either w r i t t e n or oral, the
usual being a w r i t t e n i n s t r u m e n t
Q u i t e often w h e n o n e is considering b e c o m i n g a tenant he is
given a form c o n t r a c t t o sign.
U n f o r In n a t e ] y , o n e
/ill p r o b a b l y be laced with a
c h o i c e of signing this c o n t r a c t ,
or with n o l r e n t i n g the u n i t at
all, as t h e l a n d l o r d m a y he hesi t a n t t o c h a n g e any of t h e wording. But if a n y bargaining p o w e r
a t all is possessed, here are s o m e
of
things
- <" the
•'• ' - : — one sh
i o u lid
- i ask
..•••• for.
f..T h e y can be w r i t t e n i n t o t h e
margins of t h e c o n t r a c t , or o n an
additional sheet signed by b o t h
parties a n d a t t a c h e d t o t h e original c o n t r a c t .
1. Have t h e landlord spell o u t
when a n d u n d e r what c o n d i t i o n s
y o u r security deposit will be
r e t u r n e d , a n d for exactly what
reasons there will be a d e d u c t i o n
from t h e security d e p o s i t ;
2 . A provision for airing of
grievances, such as a " t o w n
m e e t i n g " where t h e landlord is
forced t o listen let y o u r gripes,
H • A provision requiring the
landlord t o paint and r e d e c o r a t e
the premises provided t h a t y o u
remain a t e n a n t after a period of
time, for e x a m p l e , o n e year
4 . Provisions as t o children,
EASTER IN SPAIN
$275
tuxes included
TWA offers Students & Family 9 days
on the Costa Del Sol
for the Unbeatable price of $275
ihtfXM
M.IIANY
.
I
J
I
A r
"l'»'"'"l«"v,
lele,,,,.,,, man n i a c i n , ers „ , , „ .
' ' " n " K l l l u r « l a j lh„i N , . w Y , „ | i , „ „ , , , „ , , , „ , , „ .
" ^ ' " • • - ' « ' - 1 . s i„,..
Hl
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;
I
„„.,.„,
.j,h,,;
"
" ' was d i s p u t e d h> „ .poke-.,,,,,,, I
"'"'-"I'hal
lereen, , „ „ , | , v ,
Itrtiups
„„,.,
A-ssemhlyman Peter |,,. r |„ „ „ . „ , ,
.„, ,.
i", .'/'r|h"111" " f
- - I ' M n l s . will, Ihe , „ , „ . . , s,
',,
' " • ' • " r m l al Ihe annual | o , „ , l„,nr,n K ol
^'.nhlyeonservalloneommiltees
ll„
PAG..' TWO
CWdun
SPIEDI
LASAG*JA\
OH
\
smote™
feiad Buffet I
cnur «S» INHCN i
F R I D A Y , MARCH
pets,
a n d p a r k i n g spaces should
n o d : - i n r l n i t r i c tiiif S l i a G G f i s i
he clearly spelled o u t ;
TJ Almost all of t h e form leases
or rental a g r e e m e n t s have a provision included s o m e w h e r e within t h e m , indicating that you
have inspected the p r o p e r t y , and
received it in " g o o d c o n d i t i o n . "
Be sure t h a t y o u actually inspect
the p r o p e r t y or a p a r t m e n t before y o u sign t h e agreement, and
if a n y t h i n g is n o t in " g o o d "
c o n d i t i o n indicate the exact nature of t h e d e t e r i o r a t e d condition
on t h e a g r e e m e n t so that y o u
will n o t be held responsible,
(i. Read through [he contract,
and t r y t o u n d e r s t a n d as much
of it as you c a n . If any clause
s o u n d s t o o restrictive or unreasonable, ask if y o u can delete
that
clause.
Got a free night
March 26-29 or April 2-5?
If so how about giving
lour Alumni Association aj
Air Fare
Double Occupancy
Private Bath
All Breakfasts and Dinners
Sightseeing
Phonothon?
(it might even be fun!)
Tips and Transfers
Departs JFK April 15 - Returns April 23
Call Pat Schiavone
T W A Representative
6 0 7 4 3 2 - 6 8 9 0 F o r Info
For details, come to an interest meeting
Wednesday, March 8 at 7:30 p.m. in LC 5, •
or call Aralynn Abare 7-7716
Limited Seats - March 17th Deadline
pmly l « W * I'
F R I D A Y , M A R C H 2, 1 9 7 3
ALBANY S T U D E N T PRES,'
exclaimed.
hand with their
Deluxe 1st Class Beach Front Hotel
'
she continues.
Two sohpomores spplied for
Research Assistant jobs with
earnings as the basic aim. As bills
come in they compile information on them for the Assemblymen.
One of them, an English major
considering law school, said she
"really jusl wanted a job." After
being turned down by Ihe
campus cafeterias she decided to
give the Capitol a try. 'It's
bet lei Ihan washing dishes' she
Advice to the House-Hunter
Trip Includes
i
reasons as a General Clerk in the
Assembly. Her job consisted of
"odds and ends" which disappointed her. "I'm a political
science major thinking of going
to law school." she said, "and 1
wanted to see one area of the
law that I hadn't seen before."
She hopes that she will soon get
more important work to do as
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
;
Synchronized Swim Presentation This Weekend
The themes from your favorite
nursery rhymes, fairy tales, and
legends are set to music, and the
stories are interpreted through
on-deck c h o r e o g r a p h y and
synchronized swimming and.
stunts. The results of months of
hard work and practice on the
part of these twenty-six people
is a show that is not only beautiful and hilarious, but also amazing to watch. Not an exhibition
just for children, "Mother Goose
is Loose" will be appreciated by
all who value form, grace, technique, and coordination in the
water.
by Judy Daymont
In the mood for some alternate
entertainment this weekend?
Well, you're in luck, because
merriment and enchantment will
come to life as the S.U.N.Y.A.
Synchronized Swim Club presents its third annual show •
"Mother Goose is Loose." Show
time is 8:00 p.m. tonight and
Saturday and on Sunday it is
3:30 p.m. at the Physical Ed,ucation Building Pool. Admission is free.
Mother Goose will be there,
along with the comedy routine
of "Three Men in a Tub," the
pagenlry of "Queen of Hearts,"
and the mischievous escapades
of "The Three Blind Mice."
Jouincy wilh Peter Pan to
'Ncvcr-Ncvcr Land,' see a rendition of "The Ugly Duckling" and
view the breath-taking romanticism of "A Midsummer's Night
Dream."
As the show opens, Mother
Goose (Maureen Mulling), while
telling stories to children (Pat-
ricia and Michelle Rogers) is
kidnapped by five daring young
men (Dave Amell, Don Framont,
Tony Freeman, Ric Gelb, and
Arnie Seltzer). The fun is taken
from there by the rest of the
cast. Graduate students in the
club are John Sherry and Maty
Gaillard (Assistant Coach). Seniors include Jackie Levy, Meg
Hahne, and Peggy Dalheim.
Denny Godberg, Bev Schmidt,
and Sue Ashley are Juniors. In
the class of '75 are Sylvia Case,
Pam Quinn, Holly Sherman, and
Sue Rowley. Freshmen members
are Pam Burris, Paula Norton,
Sharon O'Connor,
Molly
Schmid, Leeann Avcllino, Karen
Abelc, Laura Rais and Joanne
Trabold. Narration will be by
Judy Daymont. Manager. Mrs.
Patricia Rogers is Faculty Advisor and Coach.
This year has been a particularly busy one for "Synch." The
high point was winning, for the
third consecutive lime, the Lastem Inter-collegiate Synchronized
Swim Conference stunt Competition (EISSC), held in November at the University of Ver-
by David Lerner
Donald Lynch, in an amazing
example of economic foresight,
has recently sold approximately
250 acres of the fast-dwindling
Pine Bush area for an estimated
two-million dollars. Back in the
fifties, Lynch, a former Democratic Party headquarters manager, county clerk, and in-law of
Democratic boss Dan O'Connell
bought the land under the name
of the Colwash Corporation for
a little over \'X of his final return.
mont. In October, the Club hosted the Association of Synchronized Swimming for Colleges
and Universities' annual conference.
The season culminated with a
trip to EISSCU Routine Competition at the University of
New Hampshire on March I nth
and 17th. Hopes will !>•• i H ,.
the participating mcinlv
i1JII:
early from vacation i
,|. tl
their duets, trios, tjti.ni.-i :i,.j
group members.
Synchronized
Swiu n
funded by student I.I••
Christ Scientist Speaks Here on Rights, Faith
by Paul Stewart
"Where do our ngbls come
from." was the question asked
by Mr. James Spencer. C.S.B.
(Clirisl Science Bachelor] in Lee-
groundwork for the answer he arding that relied
Mis final answer [.
planned to present. He observed
first that it was obvious every- ion therefore was rh.ii
where that people really did not come from the Divine
seem to have rights. This isn't, or God.
he said, because they don't have
A question and an ,«
them, but rather because they followed the ex posit
aren't recognizing and using Spencer alluded in In-, |
them. Ik summarized that part ience wilh his faith
of his exposition by the point,
Another issue thai
You live it, you gain it." That
was the concept ol dc
|is, by living out the rights you
pioved
inlctesliiu
are supposed to have you actualSpencer did nol In-.ii
|ly gain those rights.
cept in depth, the ('In
A second part of his ex position ist manual Science i>
treats it bluntly as
•|was that, "Every human right is
divine right," which is derived
the lie of life in
*afrom man's nature, lie claimed
Spencer said it was 'j
that man's nature is a reflection
The manual add
:of the image of God, and that
"Mallei has no ic.il !
any limitation we place on our
has no teal exist:)n,
JSC"
Science and Ik'allh I !
t) JrigliIs is from our ignorance reg-
lure Center Five last Friday, ship. As one of thrity such lecFebruary twenty-third. The lec- turers he tiavels around North
ture began at I 2:15 PM and America and Europe speaking to
more than a hundred people audiences for the purposes of
ex plaining (lie Christ Scientist
were in attendance.
Mi. Spencer is a teacher and faith to the general public.
After Spencer posed the initpiaclilionei of the Chiisl Scientist faith, and a member of the ial question concerning our
Christ Scientist board of lectin- lights, he proceeded to lay the
i
KOSHER
DELI-DINNER
j
Sunday-March 4 7 p.m.
A
1t
) Randye Kaye - folksinger
|C.C Cafeteria
Lv. ALBANY 4:00 pm
7.00 pm
SUNDAY RETURN
SERVICE*
Lv. N.Y.
4:00 pin
This Coupon Value
>
<
ad
I
PAGE FOUR
\ I baity Stale Cinema
06
a.
CLIP THIS COUPON & SAVE!
Good March 2,3,5 ONLY
CUP & SAVE
Limit 2 per person
M STIMESm PIAZA Onk
ALBANY S T U D E N T P R E S S
s
directed by Ken Russell
Hie money specified in Ihe Enviioiinienral Qualily Bond Act is
Sit) million of the 1.1 billion
dollai lund sel aside exclusively
loi purchase ^>\ unique area preservation. About half of that is
already designated loi a wel
lands project in Ihe Hudson Valley Long Island/New Yoik City
program, according lo a souice
in Ihe Slate Office ol Planning
Seivices.
The City of Albany has asked
Carlton to preserve 250 feet on
either side of Ihe Kaikout
Stream, a waterway heavily inhabited by trout, whose headwaters lie on the designated
property.
Then there always remain the
problems of bureaucratic inefficiencies, in this case concerning
who or which agency will deal
wilh the acquired land once the
State buys it. According to Mr.
Diamond, "Neither my departmen I nor the State Office of
Parks and Reerealion is really sel
up to administer small areas."
He had hoped that Ihe localities
would exercise their options,
since they'd handle it more efficiently, which is something they
obviously won't do.
Meanwhile. Ihe PYE Club is
continuing lo press for all ihey
call gel and their hopes lie with
Henry Diamond and his Trust.
*hditor's note
I'YI: Club,
for the first time in A Ibany history, lias succeeded in making
the Carlton Construction (.'«"/juration hold a public meeting
to review their plans for the tievelopmenl. The meeting is on
March 7, at j:U() at the City
Hall.
SPAGHETTI
SPAGHETTI
Our own Abrtaze style mute. All the salad
you tan eat! Tang) Dressings. Oven fresh breads!
Creamy Butter!
ftf y/f<?/J vat a//-. • /#
LASAGNA • CLAMS- BEER
BURGERS • SPIEDIES- ETC,ETC
1.25 without
Western Ave. at Fuller Ret.
rjjjuUDMirtt-JOiaanaoi M'laim^
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
FRIDAY, MAR''
volved in the joint effort to convince the State to help lake up
the burden.
In a huge report detailing biological aspects of the area that
normally go unnoticed, as well
as comprehensively explaining
the exact nature of the niches
and eco-syslcms that make the
Bush area unique, the group recommended that "all undeveloped land within Ihe area be
considered for acquisition by the
Slate of New York as a unique
area preserve." The comment
was pail of a letter sent lo Diamond along wilh the study conducted by architecture students
at R.P.I, containing documents
attesting lo Ihe unique nature of
Ihe Pine Barrens. Die letter was
in icsponse lo Ihe one mentioned above sent by Diamond
lo Mi Keleshian staling his inlent lo act on the situation.
Albany State itself is built on
land of the Pine Bush with its
geographic boundaries lying between Routes 20 (Western Avenue), 5 (Central Avenue), 146 to
the west and Fuller Road on the
east. Therein lies the remaining
difficulty with development of
the area. Debris and garbage invariably follow the path of progress and already sightings o K
Hash dumps spot the remaining
pure land not yet ruined by development. The problems of pollution are far loo complex to be
briefly discussed here, but continued development of the type
layed out by the Carlton Corporation certainly won't alleviate
the problem.
Sun. Night 8:00 PM Only LC 18
.75 with tax & ID
CLIP & SAVE
Presents:
"THE DEVILS"
RATED X
>
<
5 Any Record Or Tape in our Record Dept. S
Buses leave direct from:
Administration Circle
GO GREYHOUND
and more tax revenue for the
terms of the Bond Act "must be
town.
recommended lo the Governor
The Pine Bush originally conand the Legislature by the
sisted of 16,000 acres of ecoTrust." Decision on the Pine
logically unique land left ovei
Bush problem is hoped to he
from the extinct Lake Albany,
reached at Ihis month's meeting
itself a result of extensive glacial
of the Slate Natuic and Historic
action in Ihis area thousands of
Preserve Trust. Commissioner
yeais ago. Whal was left was an
Diamond says that discussion of
area of sand dunes larely found . the Pine Bush al the meeting is
away from an existing body of
"probable."
water. From this sand/land grew
In an attempl to make the
the abundantly found pine trees
odds more reassuring, a coalition
present all over New York.
of concerned citizens has formed
The Bush has been the object
lo press home their point. HeadUnder increasing public pres- of extensive studies by environed by Albany Stale's PYE Club,
mental specialists cheeking on
sure from conservation groups in
the Albany League of Women
and around the Capital District, the claims of its being a "unique
Voters, Ihe Albany Taxpayers
the city has been asking Carlton eco-syslem" and "environmenAssociation, and ihe Eastern
lor a detailed plan which they tally rare." Their findings conChapter of the Stale Nature
firmed these claims and recomhope will guarantee open space
Conservancy, lire group, called
mendations lot its preservation
in ihe development.
"People loi the Pine Bush," have
been putting relentless pressure
All this merely is an indication have been sent to Ihe Departon Commissions Diamond and
of what the direction that the ment u\' Lnvironmeiital ConserSlate Education Coiiiinissionei
t u 1111 u of Ihe Pine Barrens lias vation in Albany. Henry L. DiaNyquisl, auolhei of the lour
taken. With value up to $I.),G()U mond. Commissioner of the Demen on the elite Trust.
pel acre, economic rather than partment, said in a letter to
environmental interests have 'ieoige Keleshian, President of
Willi lire local efforts comsl'NYA's Protect Your Environtaken piioniy with the Pure
pletely dead, lull attention now
menl Club (PYE), that should a
Bush's fuliire placed in serious
focuses on the State and oilier
local effort oil flic part of Alduiibi. The niajoi obstacle that
individual efforts. One of these
baiiy-Ciiiilderland fail lo save a
the Pine Hush, a 2.01)0 acre
is by the Eastern ( hapici of the
signilicanl pari of Ihe Pine Mush
spread encompassing pans of AlNature Conservancy to imilalci
lor preservation, he would rec- ally buy 1(1(1 acres lioin a private
bany, (iriildeilainl and Colonic
ommend
dial
the
Slate
Nature
faces, is Ihe ever-increasing deland owner of a portion ol ihe
and Historic Preseive liust. a
sire on the pari of the iwo
land now straddling Ihe border
sub-committee of lire Depart- of Colonic and (juijdciland
smallei towns lo increase then
ment, consider buying a portion
lax revenue base Colonic is
Rudy Peterson, head ol ihe
ol the area "under Ihe unique
stressing upper income resijenConservancy's Pine Bush Comarea allocation of Ltiviioiiinenuil
Hal developments, such as those
mittee, teporls ill.ri negotiations
Quality Bond funds."
planned b\ Caillon, while (hill
wilh Ihe owiiei has already List
del land is li vine lo hue Luge inAccording lo Commissioner
ed seveial months bin Ire is con
,|nsii\ mi lo lilt site wilh Ihe
Diamond, any land iindcj con- fidenl lli.il setlleiiienl will he
potcuii.il lor ,1 Inn,id |ob maikel
snle1.1i
I'm acquisition undei
leached Mi Peleisou is also in
UJ
$1.00 OFF
Ar. ALBANY 7.00 pm
All tickets sold
11am-1pmon FRIDAYS
across from check cashing
The new owners of the land,
the Mid-Atlantic Land Corporalion, was formed lasl June, a
month before they bought the
land from Lynch. The corporalion is made up of "just names,
that wouldn't mean much,"
though local and non-local poo
pie are involved. This comment
was made by David Berley in an
interview with the Washington
Park Spirit this past December.
Mr. Berlcy, along with Samuel
Berley, are officers on the Carlton Construction Company, a
land development firm with a
long delayed plan for a series of
town houses to be developed in
that area.
RECORD & TAPE SPECIAL
VOUR
UJH&IS.
Ar. N.Y.
j
;j g&
lyulutilooiaaouIGPlanlaL-jluulaQlDDIDnnultiiitJDlDUIDiJlijL* n ituuli u ii nilijuluUuUOtiluuIuulijnluulnuldiauutolJlGLili:
m
FRIDAY
ESCAPE SERVICE'
$.50-JSC*$I 50-non
PYE Continues to Press for Pine Bush
ALBANY S T U D E N T P R E S S
PAGE F I V E
Coalition to Retain Discount Fares
Washington, D.C. (CPS)-An intensive l o b b y i n g effort seeking
Congressional a u t h o r i z a t i o n for
t h e c o n t i n u a t i o n of y o u t h fares
o n d o m e s t i c airlines is a p p a r e n t ly p a y i n g off.
A r e c e n t Civil A e r o n a u t i c s
Board ( C A B ) decision threatened t h e d i s c o u n t plan with extinction. Congress is considering
legislation t o override t h e C A B
ruling.
Last
week,
Representative
Harley Staggers ( D . - W . V a . ) ,
chairperson of t h e House Inters t a t e a n d Foreign C o m m e r c e
C o m m i t t e e , i n t r o d u c e d a hill to
reinstate t h e air travel d i s c o u n t s .
Any legislation on y o u t h fares
would have h a d t o clear Staggers' c o m m i t t e e before reaching
the floor o f t h e H o u s e for debate.
" I t ' s a really good sign that the
chairman of this c o m m i t t e e is so
ubviously in favor of y o u t h disc o u n t s , " said R o b S i m m o n s of
the Coalition to Retain Air Disc o u n t Fares ( C R A D F ) . "We only
wanted
him
to
introduce
a n o t h e r person's resolution on
the floor," he said.
T h e r e are already t w o o t h e r
bills in Congress c o n c e r n i n g
y o u t h d i s c o u n t fares, b o t h favorable.
Representative
William
Keating ( R . - O h i o ) and Senator
Frank Moss ( D . - U l a h ) introduced y o u t h fare legislation in
the House and Senate earlier this
year.
T h e l o b b y i n g campaign is being c o o r d i n a t e d by C R A D F , a
group that shares office space
with
t h e National
Student
Lobby (NSL). C R A D F has gained the .support of a n u m b e r of
other s t u d e n t organizations.
T h e new legislation includes
special fare a u t h o r i z a t i o n for
"Individuals w h o are 21 years of
age or younger, or (i5 years of
age or o l d e r , " in t h e w o r d s of
the Moss proposal. T h e inclusion
of the senior citizen clause had
garnered additional s u p p o r t e r s
for the l o b b y i n g effort, including the American Association of
Retired Persons and the National
Association of Retired Federal
Employees.
C R A D F was formed by the
National S t u d e n t L o b b y last fall
when it became evident t h a t t h e
Civil Aeronautics Board planned
to abolish y o u t h fares. On Deeember 7 the CAB did jus! that in
a tight H-2 decision T h e CAM
has bei n s t u d y i n g airline rale
This
s c h e d u l •s for four years
was the first action based on the
For as long as a n y of us. even t h e most a n c i e n t , can r e m e m b e r , o u r
university has been "in t r a n s i t i o n , ' , " c h a n g i n g " " o n t h e w a y . " T h e
rate and pressures and oscillations o f change c o n t i n u e u n r e m i t t i n g l y
t o intensify, and in t h e t u r m o i l t h e p u r p o s e , t h e character, t h e philosophy of our i n s t i t u t i o n have c o m e to seem to s o m e uncertain:
challenging!)' uncertain, disconcertingly, or even demoralizingly uncertain.
It is possible that o u r university intends t o build on t h e traditions
of collegium,
thai is. a c o m m u n i t y o f s t u d e n t s , those n o w in the role
of teachers imagistri)
and those n o w in the role of s t u d e n t s
lar!): t h e basic idea of collegium
(scho-
is that e v e r y o n e in the c o m m u n i t y
is a s t u d e n t . This possibility can be nourished bydialogueamong t h e
m e m b e r s of the " c o l l e g e . " that is s t u d e n t s and faculty
illil
Students Busted In Hofstra Raid
and their
representatives wc call a d m i n i s t r a t o r s .
ASP reflects student
concern and intellectual dedication to this
idea. Special encouragement should be given, however, to the facult)
to speak in dialog about w h e r e we are headed in our " t r a n s i t i o n " By
dialog we mean something less mechanical than whatever is suggested by ihe current phrase, ""in put into the d e c i s i o n m a k i n g process "
It has been decided to reserve J page in Ihe ASP e v e n Tuesdav t o
this end of developing public dialog on the cliaraclei ol out . H J demic c o m m u n i t y . o n oui collegium and Ihe principles which should
HEMPSTEAD, N Y , APNassau County police arrested
28 Hofstra University s t u d e n t s
in a dawn raid Tuesday a n d
charged t h e m with sale of dangerous drugs.
T h e raiding party, 70 police
officers in plainclothes, arrived
at t h e c a m p u s in t w o c h a r t e r e d
buses, which were used to ferry
t h e arrested s t u d e n t s back t o
C o u n t y Court in Mineola for
arraignment. T w o s t u d e n t s were
arrested at. their h o m e Police
CommissMmt-i
Frank labeled the a m ~
dents " h a r d - c o r e pusinsaid t h e raiders e n n f w ii
juana, hashish. amphH
b a r b i t u r a t e s , cocaini- \.>
caline, pipes, needles •
n a r c o t i c s ecjUipmem
T h e raid, which v.., •
with t h e approval •'
officials, was lb r- •,,.
five-month
invcsiigain.
which u n d e r c o v e r mei
chased drugs from stud*ice w e r e o n the Loiii
c a m p u s for a tut;il t,\
utes.
govern our response u> whatever issues p i o h l e m s . i n d e e d , crises tlial
emerge in that c o m m u n i t y
f-'Jwaril
Charles
William
Cowley
William
Kohaii
Alfred
Rowley
/'
Crimes
finkelsiein
Harry
Sttlley
POT
NEVER HAVE A
NICE DAYi
PRISONERS
Hang/ft
WE DELIVER!!
FRESH
NEW PIZZA PLACE
PINE HILLS PIZZA
HOMEMADE
1108 Madison Ave., Albany
PIZZA
just above
Madison
Theater
489-0137
EAT IN
TAKE OUT
We deliver locally, Open 5-11 p.m.
CLOSED M O N D A Y NITE
Pine Hills Coffee Shop, 7 3 p.m. P i « a 5 11 i " "
loooooooooooooooooooooooooutfooQooooooooooooo
IIWH^jHlPIIWinni)^
Frank said the raid the result of indictnn ni
u p hist week by a Xass.i
grand jury. Six mil. •
were being sought in ••
gation, he said
Police would gn •• n« •
of t h e a m o u n t ni tin • •
s t u d e n t s had earned '•••
illicit d r u g t r a d e Inn
"considerable " The\ .
of i h e drugs came from
York City area
Eight of t h e s i u d n u
released in their own •
zance after
arraignni' n
o t h e r s were released ,i. '•
ing from $ 2 5 0 to * I " "
Police said they had <!university
requeM
IM
notify t h e s t u d e n t s i>!
dictments
rather n
(hem in a raid
1
Subs
Name Your Fixens
Chicken
By the Pieces
1
Oswego Programs
in the Caribbean
I Summer-June 25-Aug. 8
)
I
(Dl
Univ. of Puerto Rico & Univ. Pedro Henriquez Urena R
Cost:$675.00 incl. round trip, t u i t i o n , cultural activities, room & boanl
|
I
1
study
The I ,1 response of C R A D F
was to send a news release and a
clip-out
form letter to over
2,000 c a m p u s newspapers. Many
papers ran the form letter as a
free
advertisement,
and re
spon.ses began to pour into the
c r a m p e d office of C R A D F on
Capitol Hill
S t u d e n t s at West. Virginia Univ
ersity took a special interest in
the effort .since a key to the
struggle lay in t h e h a n d s of a
fellow West Virginian, R e p r e s e n tative Staggers. T h e Congressm a n ' s office was deluged with
letters a n d telegrams of s u p p o r t .
The s t u d e n t newspaper,
The
Daily Athenaem,
took a strong
editorial stand in s u p p o r t of
y o u t h fares, a n d along with t h e
s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t h e l p e d organize t h e c a m p u s for t h e c a m paign. The s t u d e n t r e s p o n s e was
i n s t r u m e n t a l in Staggers's decision to i n t r o d u c e y o u t h fare
legislation, claims t h e National
Student Lobby.
NSL a n d C R A D F have contacted a large n u m b e r of c o n gresspeople in their l o b b y i n g
effort and are guardedly o p timistic a b o u t t h e c h a n c e for
passage of t h e legislation. T h e
Moss bill cleared the S e n a t e last
session, b u t a House version died
duri ng d e b a t e over t h e skyjacking bill t o which it was
atlached.
Although the reaction in Congress seems favorable, C R A D F
C o o r d i n a t o r Steve Russell warns
the fight is not over yet. " T h e r e
are s o m e procedural p r o b l e m s
and s o m e s t r o n g lobbies against
the d i s c o u n t s , " he said. O n e of
these lobbies is t h e Trail ways
bus line, whose suit four years
ago p r o m p t e d t h e CAB review of
airline rates and discounts.
In t h e December 7 C A B ruling,
the panel held that y o u t h fares
were unjustly
discriminatory.
'Hie majority of t h e C A B m e m bers felt t h a t t h e d i s c o u n t s had
outlived their usefulness as a lure
'.o n e w air travelers, and simply
had b e c o m e u n d e r p r i c e d seats.
C R A D F argues t h a t airlines d o
benefit economically from t h e
lower Tares, " b e c a u s e t h e y t a k e
care of e m p t y seats w h i c h c o s t
relatively little t o fill." T h e
lobby feels t h e h e a r t of t h e
dispute is t h e l u m p i n g t o g e t h e r
of s t a n d b y fares and d i s c o u n t s
on
gu a r a n t e e d
reservations.
C R A D F would eliminate t h e
guaranteed reservation d i s c o u n t
as o n e s t e p t o w a r d revising air
fares. T h e y p o i n t o u t t h e original c o n c e p t of s t a n d b y disc o u n t s was justified by t h e C A B
itself. T h e CAB had e n c o u r a g e d
y o u t h fares in t h e m i d - 0 0 ' s on
the grounds t h a t y o u n g p e o p l e
have m o r e time than m o n e y ,
while middle-aged travelers are
usually business people with
travel expense a c c o u n t s and fixed
lime ,s c ,|,„ u j M, "ta
This eom'.'-V is still s o u n d ,
argues t h e lobby g r o u p , and
equally applicable to senior fit
izens It is the guaranteed reservation y o u t h
fares that are
economically u n s o u n d and unjustly
d i s c r imi n a t o r y ,
says
CRADF
With s t a n d b y rates " t h e central
point (MI terms of judging dis
c r i m i n a t i o n ) is w h e t h e r or n o t
there are all these y o u t h willing
to pay full fare for reservations
and all these adults willing to fly
on
a standby
b a s e s , " says
'A75T"NOW
Dear Congressman
Please take action to save the Youth Fares and Discount Fares which have recently been
abolished by the Civil Aeronautics Board
t would appreciate it if you would also write the CAB and request that they delay enforcement
of this decision until Congress has an opportunity t o act on this important question
Some 5-million students traveled using this discount fare in the past year This contributed
over $40Q-million to cover fixed costs of the airlines These carriers can be presumed to have
a full grasp of the marketing considerations involved and are, at least, as interested as the
CAB in dropping any useless discount fares Yet. an overwhelming ma|ority of the ntrlines who
participated in the CAB investigation are in favor of these f h-e c
Millions of students have purchased their Youth Fare identification cards with the belief that
the cords would be valid until their 22nd birthday Now the cards are being abruptly cut off by
the CAB's decision
As one of millions of young voters, I respectfully request that you act to pass legislation that
will allow the CAB t o discriminate on the basis of age by keeping Youth Fares I will be anxiously
awaiting the results of the coming legislation concerning this matter
^•t.
^ _
_
_
,,
c
Soda!
Give A Call!
Hours
Phones
Wed & Thurs 7:30-11:00 pm|
457-3827
Fri & Sat
8:00 pm-12:00 am
or
Sunday
v
3:00-9:00 pm
457-3205
Campus Center
DEADLINE: MAY 5
II Exchange Programs
A Univ. of Puerto Rico 1973-74- $1550 cost
incl. tuition, room & board, cultural activities, health insurance.
Courses: all courses available at Univ. of Puerto Rico
D E A D L I N E : M A R C H 16
B Univ. of Pedro Henriquez Urena(Dominican Republic)
(all info, as above from cost to courses)
D E A D L I N E : APRIL 6
L For info & application blanks: Director of Int'l. Education
State Univ. College at Oswego
Oswego, N.Y, 13126
phaklee Organic
Products
CRADF
u
HBL
Cleaners Cosmetics;
Laundry Aids
Food Supplements
Men's Toiletries
S i m m o n s , a T e m p l e University
g r a d u a t e w o r k i n g for t h e National S t u d e n t L o b b y . S i m m o n s
d o e s n ' t think t h e r e are, a n d
c o n c l u d e s t h a t the s t a n d b y rates
are fair and profitable as well.
S t a n d b y has increased air travel,
a c c o r d i n g to C R A D F .
T h e C A B disagrees o n b o t h
c o u n t s a n d says the figures o n
passenger t o plane ratios (load
factor) s h o w a decrease in air
travel. S i m m o n s , however, says
the load factor w e n t d o w n not.
because of fewer passengers hut
due to an increase in the n u m b e r
of s c h e d u l e d flights. " I t ' s hard
lo believe t h e C A B didn't realize
t h i s , " he says.
F u r t h e r , S i m m o n s claims t h e
elimination of y o u t h fares will
mean even fewer passengers for
the airlines thus reducing revenues even m o r e .
If a substantial n u m b e r of youth
s t o p p e d Hying because of t h e
elimination of y o u t h fare, t h e
net result could be disastrous for
the already floundering airlines
A c c o r d i n g t o C R A D F , s o m e five
FAST DEPENDABLE SERVICE
LOWEST CAB R A T E S IN T H E A R E A :
SUNY Campus to Albany Airport-$3.60
SUNY Campus to Colonic! Contor-$2.00
SUNY Campus to Northway Mall -$2.00
THEY'RE WORTH A TRY!!
449-8958
Roy
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
.
t
_.
million s t u d e n t s traveled on t h e
d i s c o u n t fare last year a d d i n g
over $4 0 0 million to airline
coffers. More than o n e million
new y o u t h fare cards are purchased annually. T h e funds gerea t e d by s t a n d b y fares go t o w a r d
offsetting t h e fixed operational
costs of an airline and m a y
actually result in lower overall
fares for all passengers, claims
C R A D F This is t h e position of
Trans World Airlines,
which
plans to testify at ('Alt hearings
that it makes a healthy profit on
J B
y o u t h fares except when guaranteeing reservations.
But a n y CAB decision will
b e c o m e m o o t if legislative approval for youth and senior disc o u n t s is in t h e offing. T h e CAB
is a discretionary agency that
m u s t abide by the will of Congress. If Congress passes t h e disc o u n t fare bills pending in the
House and the Senate, the CAB
m u s t reinstate y o u t h fares. It is
t o w a r d this end that the lobby
ing effort by C R A D F is directed.
AFRICA ARISES!
Come to a benefit program for
The Pan-Africanist Congress of
Azania (South Africa)
featuring
* Guest speaker
* Ebony Voices
* Guyanese folk singer
* Burundi Dancers * Black Gold
Sunday, March 4
Brubacher Hall
Lower Lounge and Snack Bar
730 State St
additional pauangara o n l y $.25 extra audi
Our other rates are equally l o w - Call for quotes
Concentrated and Economical
482-5632
Dcvid
(address!
(city s t a t e s ?ip)
2 4 hr. Service
Totally non p o l l u t i n g , non-i
flammable, norvallergenic
(signature!
Co Sponsors
The National Student Lobby and Continental Marketing Corporation
North way Taxi
BIODEGRADABLE
^ _
(Coalition To Retain Air Discount Fares)
41 3 East Capitol Street. S E
Washington, DC 2 0 0 0 3
Courses: Beg. Spanish thru. Literature. (8 credits)
Ice Cold
Bud!
%
4
DIAL
t /
TAXI
D O - 8 2 94
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
at 4:30 sharp!
Donation- $1.00
Contributions of usable clothes and
non-prescription Medical Supplies are also needed
PAGE SEVEN
Kaleidoscope
KALEIDOSCOPE,
a multimedia p r e s e n t a t i o n of t h e m u s i c
f r o m t h e Jesus R o c k Musical,
G o d s p e l l , a n d various selections
from t h e S c r i p t u r e s , will b e pres e n t e d b y a n area s t u d e n t c o m p a n y u n d e r t h e direction of
F a t h e r G a r y Gelfenbein. Based
o n the f o r m a t of an a n c i e n t m o rality play or religious experie n c e , a t r o u p e of 10 singers,
slides a n d lighting, p i a n o , organ,
lead a n d bass guitars, t a m b o u r ine a n d d r u m s will c o l o r t h e joyful message of t h e G o o d News of
G o d ' s
s a v i n g
love.
KALEIDOSCOPE
will be pres e n t e d at t h e Performing Arts
C e n t e r of S U N Y A on Sunday
evening, M a r c h 4 , a t 8 p . m .
T h e r e will b e a d o n a t i o n of $ 1
t o cover costs for t h e presentat i o n . T h e event is n o t planned as
a m o n e y m a k e r . T i c k e t s can b e
p u r c h a s e d at t h e Performing
Arts Center.
While t h e c o m p a n y will t a k e
c a r e o f m o s t o f t h e details, t h e y
d o ask t h a t we provide s o m e
people to make arrangements
w i t h o u r Audio-visual Service for
t h e r e n t a l of s o m e technical
e q u i p m e n t . We also need help t o
b l o w u p a n d m a k e available hund r e d s of balloons for use a t t h e
e n d of t h e s h o w . Also we would
like s o m e volunteers t o work o n
a Wine & Cheese Party afterwards. We feel t h a t this is a
u n i q u e service t h a t our S t u d e n t
Parish can offer t o t h e University Community.
An ASP
Observations
consciousness a m o n g the a c t o r s
and s p e c t a t o r s . This is w h a t
we're trying to d o with " S c h o o l
P l a y . " We are asking the audience t o bring their o w n set of
experiences based on sitting in a
lecture s i t u a t i o n into a Lecture
(.'enler. Most m e m b e r s of the
a u d i e n c e will have lines I
as w e l l . "
L e c t u r e C e n t e r 22 holds
1 30 people so if y o u ' r e in
ed in seeing " S c h o o l Plav
t o t h e Box Office early
Medieval Canticles
A c o n c e r t of early vocal a n d
i n s t r u m e n t a l music is s c h e d u l e d
for the Recital Hall, Performing
Arts Center, S t a t e University of
New York at Albany, when
"Carols, Cacce, a n d o t h e r Canticles of the F o u r t e e n t h and Fifteenth C e n t u r i e s " is p r e s e n t e d
o n Friday, March 2, at 8 : 3 0 p.m.
Admission free.
I n c l u d e d o n t h e p r o g r a m are
w o r k s by
Machaui.
J a c o p o da Bologna, U
l o l o m e u s Brolo, and o
c o m p a n y i n g the voealL
m c n l s such as the ha;
p r a n o , a l t o and bass
lute, and viola will
Most of the p e r f o r m e r s
bers of the s t u d e n t bo
S t a t e University of ,\V
Albany.
| WANTED:
Circus!
WSUA Radio is looking for an engineer.
Must know something about transmitters and
" C I R C U S 1 " will he Hi.- u
electrical wiring. If you are interested call
ol
Leave
week's
l'.\{ieiius<
Theatre
IJ i is.
Workshop,
to lir
dueled
by
Piolessoi
R..I
Sngaimun of I he ihe.iiic 11 • i
menl
your name and phone number. A first class
on
Sunday
M;ir. h I
4 : 3 0 p i n . in iheSiihliM II
FCC License is suggested but not required.
T h e W o r k s h o p will eoi.M i
Funded by Student Tax
nfty-ininiile film, iiiosi oi o >
by P i o i
S u g a i i n a n ovei it
I w e n l y y e a r s , showine llie •
•CCGB presents:
TONIGHT
|: Telepathy
details o f c i r c u s hie tioin p u n
up the Big T o p to some
most f a m o u s acts
LC 1 8
Memory Feats
Power of Suggestion
DR. FRANZ J .
Wallendas, the Zacehini >.iin<
Professor Suguiman
25c w/tax & ID
75 c w/out
POLGAR
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
mans in
.1 men *
of the Circus llistoiical S" 1
of
America, will iiiumlu. ••
film with b n e l c o m m e n t A m e r i c a n circus as .1 '•" •
peifoimaiiee
PAGE EIGHT
'
the I '•
Clyde I k a t t y . and
OpfYI
With Volunteer Subjects from the Audience
'"c
by Ron Barneli (see page 6 a ) and Andy
PaUey
by Andy Paiiey
Experimental T h e a t e r presents
a rather u n i q u e excursion into
Living Theater in t h e form of
Donald
H o w a rth \s
"School
P l a y " t o d a y at •!, 7:110 and 9
p . m . in Lecture Center 22. A
limited n u m b e r of tickets are
available o n e h o u r before at the
PAC Box Office.
Director Steve Aminoff describes his play as o n e which
" d e d i c a t e s itself t o everyone,
everywhere who had to read a
play he really d i d n ' t w a n t t o . "
" I doti't really b u y this crap
a b o u t all drama having as its purpose the goal of e i t h e r educating
or entertaining. Occasionally we
c o m e across a play or ;t style oT
doing a play w h o s e o n l y goal is
t o create a k i n d o f collective
and ask for Eric or Dave.
-1
Lenny: The Artist at Work
Experimental Theater
457-5808
Special:
plicuoiticih
also a c c o m p a n y
comments
the
liln
as well as
i"
a l l i e s iiuisK and sound
I
lion, Ihcie will he ,1 hue
eoloifiil displ.is
cis. models
.il . 11. 11
l"i.s .Hid |>i",'<
m a n y ol I d e m e x l i e i n e h
So he oil h a n d Sniid.r. 1
latest 111 a sei les ol seun w
hxpeimienial
shops,
and
HUM lie
exploit'
the
W
1 H<
world ol glamoi anil I ' M itemthat is the Circus
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
Leonard Bernstein is the uncommon man. He is the epitome of all
the New York Times loves to print, Playboy loves to interview, and
Intellectual Digest enraptures in flowery praise. His weekly datebook
reads like a young socialite's dream ("No, n o . Friday I record Haydn
with New York and S a t u r d a y eat with the Lindsays"). In short, he
Ls an incomparable world celebrity.
()ne's first impression is the opposite entirely. I was waiting in the
control rcxim of Columbia's E. 30th St. studio, chatting with an
assistant conductor and a representative of CBS Denmark, when
I /'iiny LNohxiy calls him Mr. Bernstein) strolled in through the
double doors around ten a . m . He greeted his long-time production
manager, John MeQure, with a hug and a kiss, said hello to Buddy
and the rest of the engineers, and quickly took off his coat, lie was
tlrtwsed in his working clothes-bluejeans and an old Harvard sweatshirt, 'litis is not as surprising as one would imagine, for standing on
a podium and waving a baton wildly for upwards of four or five
hours is tiring, all-consuming work. 'IVy it sometime (Toscanini once
tried it with a heavyweight boxer. The poor man lasted nine minutes
and gave up. Toscanini wis sixty-eight years old.).
Lenny has aged considerably. All those pictures on the earty
< blumbia discs are helplessly outdated. In addition to all the norma!
vestiges of approaching old age (Bernstein Ls Ti7 years (id), there are
conspicuous signs of overwork. This is primarily caused by a breakneck recording schedule; Lenny Ls getting about ten or so discs otu
ol the way in less than a month. After this impossible task, lie plans
to retire completely fcjr over a year to relax and possibly compose a
hi lie.
'Ilie New York Philharmonic is as eccentric as their Laureate
C o n d u c t o r . About half of them are real artists, in every sense of the
word. These are the people who can appreciate every nuance
i n phrasing or can detect the subtle changes in flow in an hour-long
symphony. One quarter of the musicians are genuine Phonus
Bal ognus Americanus- people who can play their axe to perfection,
but don't have the foggiest notion about art. They've been pretending their whole life, and will pretend ad infinitum. The other
quarter might understand their work and might not, but they
couldn't care less anyway.
The unusual thing about the N.Y. Phil is that they d o n t strive for
the perfection which other orchestras reach. They are all fine technicians, and can handle their instruments well, but they play without
a great deal of inspiration. In concert this can pass by unnoticed, but
on record it is immortalized for thousands of itchy critics t o dismember
The Chicago or Philadelphia orchestras rarely, if ever, play b a d y on
record. Interpretations may turn sour, or the engineers may bomb,
but the orchestra must lie the e l e m e n t as close t o perfection as
possible.
While waiting for the recording t o begin, Lenny couldn't resist
telling an old story:
"It was around Uiristmas, and Mstislav Rostropovich (the great
Russian cellist)was over at my place te got very drunk, like he always
does, and Ijegan to tell me of hLs friend Dmitri Shostakovich's new
symphony (the I,5th)."
" 'It is so Ixiautiful! Have you ever heard it?' he asked."
" 'No, 1 haven't been able to,' I replied."
" 'Oh! He must tell you in his own words how beautiful it is!'
Here, let me telephone h i m ' "
" 'Now, Mstislav, you'll never he able to reach him" "
" 'No, no! I will!' "
"Well, suffice it t o say that he was re-routed and interrupted from
here to Europe. 1 think he finally got as far as Belgium. At any rate,
he offered to get me the score for the American premiere. It turned
out that Ormandy had had it arranged long before, anyway.
Ormandy, poor fellow-he's so overworked. Well, lie's a conductor "
At this, Lenny snickered noticeably, and his c o m p a t r i o t s agreed
thai a point had l>een made. Lenny is something mure than a
conductor.
The first few takes went horribly, as tin- orchestra was playing
without inspiration. They seem to need an hour or so to warm up.
They were working on Nielsen's SeaotidSyrrfjhtxiy% which will com
plele Columbia's Nielsen cycle (Ormandy did NOB. 1 and o, Berstisn
'I fi) 'lhe work lias Home vtfry difficult string passages, all of which
went much Ix-tter after lunch. 'Ihe pu/./Jing moments cyme in the
M-mnd m o v e m e n t , lilting waltz in a moderate tempo (Lenny was
taking it slowly). At the end of the movement there is, a unison
[itiahc lor violas and second violins It consisted of six notes, each
identical in rhythm and pilch They were each to have a slight attack
on tbfin. separating them evenly Weil, nothing seemed to work The
iittacks wen- out <»f phasi' continuously, and that would have
mounded imrlecfly awful on disc It had U) In? fixed
'lhe next hour was spent fixing it. In all, six teen takes were made
ol ,i short (five minute)movement, which, in the end after annulet*
hours of editing, will sound like one flawless one.
'lhe editing of a disc is something which is never touched upon in
music appreciation uourseB. John M e d i a e , wiw has l»een with
UiurnhSa and Bernstein since lhe late 1960'ii, is one of the musUm
of the cutting hoard. Ifis untie** are perfect-never detedablB-and lib
rapport with the musician*! is mure than conkal. He wan u child
prodigy of sorts, and was an early muster at the piano, l i s choice uf
die switchboard over lhe keytxwrd lias l w » a pmfilahlc and
rewarding otiu. All of BunisUan's ovmumenutl MaMur reuurdinipi
were produced by him, as well as everything Bruno Walter did back
in the early 1960s. With score in hand, he walks into every session
with a thorough knowledge of the music, the recording time, the
Units of endurance (which he has often pushed in his career), and
the engineer's art. The switch to quadraphonic recording seems more
of a nuisance than a challenge to John, but he takes its difficulties in
stride. All in a day's work.
The Nielsen was completed around 3:30. There were enough good
takes t o produce an exciting disc, and everyone was happy enough.
There was no rest for Lenny, though. He had t o listen and re-listen
t o every take, and make the final decision to go on to another piece.
This takes forever, but must be done. The okay was given, and the
orchestra set up to play Haydn's 95th Symphony. I h e trombones,
most of the horns, and the extra strings donned their coats, patted a
couple of backs, and went to grab taxis to the West Side (where
most the the City's musicians live). The rest of the orchestra
fumbled through eight miserable takes of the Haydn. Lenny got fed
up and rested for a while, then went back and did the a c c e p t a b l e
takes. The New York Phil was never a good Haydn orchestra and
probably never will be one. It lacks the nth degree of precision
which it needs to record sixteenth-note runs.
After the session was over, the perennial bottle of Scotch was
poured, and everyone was grateful for surviving another day in New
York. For Lenny, it was just one less day until his latest retirement
and a long vacation. For John McOure, it was the beginning of long
sleepless nights over which parts of what take, etc., etc. For the
orchestra, it was time to go out and drink beer, And for one of the
and myself, it was time for the long ride up the Thru way.
" H e r w l c i n UnteiiH t o u playback of (he Nielsen 2nd S y m p h o n y , ( a b o v e ) , a n d confers uflerwurds with
producer
Barodi)."
John
McClure,
regarding
suggestions for s u b s e q u e n t
retakes, ( l o w e r ) . (Photos
by
Ron
EBBIETHEEEP
U. Singers' Niteclub
women's forum
" N i g h t c l u b o n a S u n d a y A f t e r n o o n , " a u n i q u e p r o g r a m of musical
e n t e r t a i n m e n t , is s c h e d u l e d for t h e Performing A r t s C e n t e r Recital
Hall, S t a t e University of N e w York at Albany on S u n d a y , March 4 at
2 : 3 0 p . m . Performers i n c l u d e Clnudine Cassan, R o n Abel, J o h n
Cimino, Cindy R a l p h , Dick Albagli a n d Dave Hirsch. T i c k e t s arc
S2.00 ( S I . 5 0 s t u d e n t s ) a t t h e P A C b o x office, 4 5 7 - 8 6 0 6 .
T h e p r o g r a m includes s h o w music, popular songs, i n s t r u m e n t a l s ,
o p e r a , a n d even lieder.
T h e p e r f o r m e r s have a p p e a r e d together at Carfc Lena and T e l e t h o n
' 7 3 . w h e r e they b r o u g h t d o w n t h e house with their p e r f o r m a n c e s of
e x c e p t s from " M a n of La M a n c h a " and "West Side S t o r y . " Best rem e m b e r e d for her starring role in t h e S U N Y A p r o d u c t i o n of " P e t e r
P a n " in 1 9 7 1 , Claudine Cassan has been featured in o t h e r S U N Y A
p r o d u c t i o n s as well as a n u m b e r of song recitals with pianist R o n
Abel. Abel, also an arranger, d i r e c t o r a n d vocal c o a c h , h a s c o m p o s e d
the musical scores for several S U N Y A p r o d u c t i o n s , n o t a b l y " C a m i n o
R e a l . " Together, t h e y a r e n o w a p p e a r i n g in clubs a n d s h o w c a s e s in
M a n h a t t a n . A recent w i n n e r of t h e S c h e n e c t a d y light O p e r a Scholars h i p c o n t e s t , J o h n Cimino is a part-time p e r f o r m e r a n d w o r k s h o p
participant with t h e Lake George Opera. He has p e r f o r m e d in n u merous c o n c e r t s in t h e Tri-Cities area, a n d has a p p e a r e d on t h r e e local television s t a t i o n s . S o p r a n o Cindy Ralph is a voice major a t Manhattan School of Music, a n d has performed at b o t h P h i l h a r m o n i c
and Carnegie Halls with David R a n d o l p h ' s M a s t e r w o r k C h o r u s . S h e
has also starred in p r o d u c t i o n s of " M y Fair L a d y " a n d " A n y t h i n g
G o e s . " Principal percussionist with t h e A l b a n y a n d Berkshire
S y m p h o n i e s a n d t h e Lake George Opera Orchestra, Dick Albagli has
appeared twice as soloist with t h e Albany S y m p h o n y . S U N Y A undergraduate Dave Hirsch played douhlebass with t h e Lake George
Opera Orchestra in 1 9 7 2 a n d is t h e principal bass in the S U N Y A
University C o m m u n i t y S y m p h o n y .
This concert is being presented as a benefit by t h e S U N Y A University Singers, t o help finance their planned trip t o C y p r u s this s u m mer
A Quadrophonic Encounter
continued
front
scoring
pane 6a
li was once again necessary for
the engineers lo go o u t m llie
sludio a n d reposition mikes t o
compensate
for t h e simpler
of
the
Haydn
syn-
phony.(a tidal of only \2 micro-
ml lie
phones were used in comparison
of quad known as
.mil.
In t h e l b m e n t i o n e d previously.)
where the uVstial i lie, 1
Here
give the lislcnei the linpie
the
quadraphonic
the orchestra spic.ul Mill ...
'.I "I I I- 'J
stage hefoie bun .11 .1 III
channels
icpiodi III..'
reOeclcd
icvcibciain
II.
ceiling, walls, and 11,11
hall
..•
f o i llns pinpo e 111
nceis added the nip
11'
micuiphoiics lnweiiii g a i n feel above llie stud 1
, ||.„,
situated 111 llie b.uk ,,l i h ,
where they would 1 n k .,,
focal pcuni nl llie . el.n.'.l
ondaiy a u d i " signal
Noi
much
,',',1 1
mote
said. save, llial 11 wa .1 . . . . ' I . '
performance. Ilns .1 I.'l l o
Coffee House with
aside almost t w o ict Is ..1 I
John Simpson
due
in
pool
ensemble
Sunday, March 4, 1973
Brubacher Snackbar, Alumni Quad
8:30-11:15 pm
Free coffee and tea
charge
Doughnuts
f*******************************^*******CC4K*4**^**4****f-*****
IHQHiaai^JBpJacjrjBHBEl^
plelc
Federico Fellini's
llni
7:15 & 9:45 LC 25
admission for each film:
$.50 w/student tax
$1.00w/out
at b i r t h - w i t h
blankets
pink
and ribbons
Al a small age, t h e little girl is
given a doll and the little b o y a
set of building blocks. Il is all
d o n e i n n o c e n t l y enough bul t h e
effect is o n e of defining the role
that he or she is lo play in future
life We see ,1 .ill through t h e
youngest years of a child It is
alright for .1 girl t o erylainl of
c o u r s e girls will!). but a b o y
must learn t o be a man and not
s h o w e m o t i o n in such a " s i s s y "
way. A hoy c a n show anger or
s t u b b o r n n e s s , but a girl M U M
learn I u he a lady
The child then slarls eleinen
lary school when-, if In- (or s h e )
hasn'l learned yet, the stereo
t y p e of ihe sex roll- is coinnniui
r a t e d An e x a m i n a t i o n ol child
ren's h o o k s yields whal Could he
surprising results if we have Hoi
been aware of i h e subtleties ol
ah/;.
chlldlM
afte
Bool.
IH
.1. sin
MM
icheil, o
Vlllle
Ihe
lewiHind
'
A,UH ,i,],, * inluuli iLJlutllnfJloi Hungiiili mini ill )ulQUMi3UltiHlDninH(i:
IF
u u v ptr
D U ui—unr
tr
rr-
IHMCJCCJ | j
f
theless t o w a r d s t h e goal of role
liberation,
W A S H I N G T O N - - I t t o o k a long
Fifty y e a r s a g o , w o m e n w e r e
time, b u t Congress finally is
granted t o right t o v o t e . A t this
a h o u t t o t a k e a close look a t t h e
time, it was a d e b a t a b l e issue.
traditional
b u t whollyWere w o m e n c a p a b l e of voting?
unauthorized
military practice
T o d a y , it w o u l d be considered
of providing enlisted " s e r v a n t s "
absurd
t o take a w a y t h e
for generals a n d admirals.
w o m e n ' s vote. How m u c h of o u r
A General A c c o u n t i n g Office
sex roles t o d a y a r e a c c e p t e d as
s t u d y requested b y S e n a t o r Willu n c o n c i o u s l y a n d falsely as was
iam P r o x m i r e (D-Wisc.) r e c e n t l y
the role of w o m e n 5 0 years a g o
disclosed t h a t t h e r e a r e 1,722
in the political system'.' Fifty
soldiers officially designated as
years from t o d a y , o r p e r h a p s
personal aides t o generals a n d
even five years, we will look a t
admirals. T h e cost t o t h e Amerio u r sex roles t o d a y a n d w o n d e r can t a x p a y e r is in excess of $ 1 3
in t h e s a m e way t h a t we a r e
million every year just for t h e
amazed n o w t h a t t h e w o m e n ' s
pay a n d allowances of these
vote was a result of radical strugmen,
file.
These enlisted personnel a r e
Dean Kackley s p o k e for t h e
assigned t o 8 6 0 of t h e military's
men when he said:
more than 1,300 general a n d flag
i personally find repulsive
rank officers, usually on t h e
the t h o u g h t that I a m made
basis of rank ( o n e aide per star),
il M a n y s u b t l e processes must
of snips a n d snails a n d
says P r o x m i r e , with t h e highest
be a flee l i n g m e in m u c h
llie
p u p p y d o g tails I find n o
ranking military officers having
s a m e way thai Dick a n d .Jane
m o r e a c c e p t a b l e t h e idea
as m a n y as eight, o r t w o per star.
alTecl the small child. Bul we are
llial m y self esteem d e p e n d s
According t o t h e G A O r e p o r t ,
all so c o n d i t i o n e d Ihiit we can't
upon
thi' suppression of
t h e allocation of aides has alarm
always see whal is h a p p e n i n g t o
s o m e o n e else And t h e fact
ing racial o v e r t o n e s . F o r ex
us
C o m p a r e t h e n u m b e r of
thai from birth, I have been
a m p l e , s o m e 9 8 p e r c e n t of aides
women l each ers y o u have in
p r o g r a m m e d to fit a male
.11 the Navy a r e Filipinos. In t h e
college with e l e m e n t a r y school
s t e r e o t y p e , to assume preMarine Corps, fin per c e n t are
Why is I h e r e a decrease?
serilx'd characteristics a n d t o
black.
The role pressure is M\ in
respond in certain ways ae
Moreover, p r o m o t i o n s c o m e
college
for b o t h
men and
cording t o m y masculinity
far m o r e slowly for aides than
women
Although
m o r e and
gives m e a vague sinking
for o t h e r enlisted personnel T h e
m o r e w o m e n a r e being a c c e p t e d
feeling t h a t p e r h a p s , alter
average Navy m a n a t t h e rank of
m i o medical programs y e t , ihe
all, I d o n o t define m y o w n
K (i receives a p r o m o t i o n in nine
reverse is not as true
Home
life a n d live according t o m y
yars, whii<i a Navy aid* at the
women may start in nursing and
own values
same rank is likely to stay there
switch
lu Pre-med
il
they
S u b s t i t u t e "Suyar a n d spic<
for IH years.
ell.
Yel. societal views and and every thing n i c e " a n d f e m a But most shocking of all a r e t h e
m a k e it m u c h more
i | ( ( W n u u . h u f m i r |jV(.s k ( ) U r
pressll
demeaning
chores routinely as
difficult
f o r a m a n t o d o the
own definition?
signed
t o officer aides: Cleaning
reverse
H e w o u l d n o t h e I'nl
filling
even
his m a l e
lhough
better
f i l l e d l o he a n u r s e
1
talked
with
a male
about
o u r plans f o r after
about
Ihe dilTirull>
into
law
,1-hool
Ihi.l.gh
-Tor us l o e.H
H e , 011, l u H . .1
" A l Ie., 1
ibiHit
aippmling
UUshaiiil
-ii
vmiKfll
••.',.,.•
V..1.
•;:.;.,
in- ,
playback nl llie iniisi
seen
(hough
i
1 ,,:
111
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1,
,
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n i l :1M
1. '
1 l>. .,.,,1
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Ill
IV.'..
1
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in. *
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M.I . ; l i . . .
Igeh ,1 i a o u e l , w i l l . 111.Mi
t
.. I i m l i l l . '
voliiiil.inlv
Will
lo
Hen. ...1 Hospital . 11,1 g i l l l l l l l l s i - l l
ili.stlllll.il
H e ' d II ol.'sl.-il young
I I . ' glJCSI.I i n n l,-s I ' l l ! l o M i l l
l.,,, Is
i:,ils i i i u i i - i
Grievance C o m m i t t e e
.—— •
I:: v . . s o l .,,,.-
.....
Dorms - Pt. 1
lly Hurry Dayis
Thi'i'i- havi' IMTII many com
plaints all,ml the search and
Inspection policy now being
lollowcd hy t i n ' residence staff
(Irieyanee Committee has been
working on the problem and tins
is how 1 view the situation
llileiscssioii
always
with i h . , . mania
In Dcnvi'i i.',,' I l l s
III.in
generals' private cars a n d t h o s e
of their wives a n d children; gardening; cooking meals for m e m bers of t h e family, even when
t h e c o m m a n d i n g officer is n o t
t h e r e ; running errands for genorals' wives; babysitting; dogw a l k i n g ; cleaning
swimming
pools. T h e list goes o n .
These duties a r e n o t a u t h o r ized either under law o r w r i t t e n
military p r o c e d u r e s ; ; nonetheless,
through a c o m b i n a t i o n of longstanding tradition a n d t h e fear
of reprisals, aides have felt cornpelled t o d o the bidding of their
masters, n o m a t t e r h o w demeaning t h e task.
Already P r o x m i r e has received
letters from aides, their families
and friends which u n d e r s c o r e
the G A O conclusion. One aide
t o l j of having t o m a k e the beds
of his c o m m a n d e r ' s lazy childrun, and being required t o serve
the family dinner o n Christmas
Day while other soldiers were at
h o m e with their o w n wives a n d
children.
p r o x m i r e has i n t r o d u c e d legis| i l t i n n specifically forbidding the
practice of turning aides into
personal and family servants. His
proposal is likely to have strong
support among Republicans a n d
Democrats alike in b o t h Houses
,,f Congress.
has been
iis.'il
It A s have a l w a y s
II"'lis
was ...1,1.'
11 ll.ll
Il.,|,|,..,„.,l
1'., I'll |llsl CO i l o .1 iig.illi
ilolllls.
III.
.....
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.111,1 1
. m i l ...
M .
I,s
. . 1 . .. . .1 I I . II . . . . .1'
liiiiiiinuig .il"i v, w i l l
music as he sipped s. ,1. Il 1
11,.
,.,|„.
1,1,, 1 III.,,,
hi'
Hill
ill,-,,
Inl.l
ilnl
loliiiil.nih
All
I..I
II.'
I I . 'il
Wtic,
'I'h. .
N.
papci sup llial .111 .islsl II.1
.ills
w. .
l l l . i l ,,,,, | „ , i
l..,-.i y i ' i n
I),..... .1 . . I l l ,•
tl,< 1,, .1 1 I,111' i l . . H I . I I
,l
Ihe\
charging
pie
•,,
bewildered
1
- ..1 t h e i r o w n
missing a n d e u i l c n c ,
being
as,nil..!
lh..11 ,11 .|..s l e , |
llli.ll
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I....ml
is
II..
lo,
gal a | i
pie g
I""',
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1',
I'lii-clo .! l o r
|i l i a n . e s a m i 1, i n n i n , , - w e n re
m m e i l lioill III.
||s ... h i l l s
wen
Ill m i l
lor Ihe removal
W.is I I I . ,
linic
I10il.se
pll'ltl
' I " g " T h i - is a s e n , , , , l o
us • I ' l l , , . n l . . '
s u m ., new eh
1' . ' I " . ' '
H.l|...s'.ll.l.'
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Il • 1
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loi cleaning
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H.|..-.,l,-illv. l i . ' l o l l l
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II, I,,III II,r , , , „ , !
II S o u I.I ....
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1 I II O I I I " Sumo of
III,,SI' IIUIIIIIH S . I I I ' l l l l l h l , . l o < - . , | i i .
igerl
g"
I.I
are " k n o w n sex criiiiiniil.s," why
.Hi' l i n y . . i n
.... . m l leu
'II . m i l l i . . l l . l l
U .slllllgloll
llieic
state university of new
york at alhany
... , , . •
. il,,,,;.
<
hi
icvive linn
V.
11,1
Ibiniigli Ihe slmlm 1
!>"• . . . M l . ' s s . ' l l
.,.,,
Ill
I'n
t o i l d o n I have I,. W l .
tapes
wrapped .I.IIOIHUI
Rape is Naught y
friend
mll<«gc
hi
Hcinslci
Pau Harvey News
r o l e as a n u r s e ,
he m a y he
vvcic '
tin play I' ,k ,
exhausted
The General's Baby Sitters
T h e twelve-year-old n o w goes
to J u n i o r High School w h e r e t h e
girl takes H o m e E c o n o m i c s a n d
t h e h o y takes s h o p . It is t h e rare
case w h e r e t h e reverse is t r u e .
High School c o n t i n u e s this formation of t h e sex role: girls arc
trained t o be secretaries a n d
boys t o be a u t o m e c h a n i c s . Even
the college h o u n d s t u d e n t s a r e
pressured i n t o sex roles. Think
a b o u t i t - t h i n k carefully for it is
n
" t so o b v i o u s for t h e s t u d e n t
w h o intends t o c o n t i n u e s c h o o l ,
H o w m a n y parents e n c o u r a g e
their d a u g h t e r s t o be teachers?
Why? Because it is a good j o b
for a girl. S h e can take off w h e n
she is pregnant, vacations a r e
convenient for caring for t h e
children
And n o w we are in college. I
find il m o r e difficult In a n a l y z e
my situation because I am living
urn diM ussion with
In
I\. III 111'
ol
r.lll.el
I h e , , . was a Ills
.1.11,; .,1
ace
Ihoiiglillully picivnl"
As Ihe l.isi lape 1 v , i p i
ishcil
playing
McClme
whal
MIDNIGHT
licin s l l ' l l ,
hall nun kn g l l
shall
we Ilea
imu
.I....I .!
W.I
iliink llial evejyoii
l l l c i l I n even laugh m l 1
James Dean in
IIISI.IIKI'
Elia Kazan's film of
East of Eden
Midnight LC 18
coming in March:
The Cinema of
Ingmar Bergman
1. 11
Willi
, Ills
,
1
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l e d llg
lull,
liciiisicin 1 is 11.
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In M
IK'll
l.lll.c "1
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in.- M i . wil Il ,'.
Upcd Bui bH now II iv.,
1
In shake 1 if. s.n j
and head i m i l h "• nl M 1
1,111 n u l l ] l i e ' 1 " I d .1111
1 " Albany
Hie
iclcise
llelorc vigilante justice g e l , out
d.iil
I I " ie 1.
u l the disk
wa)
S.i J1 y
h.n
I'eggy
ha
1
Sally
,11.
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l i e n , I. Ill
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Wllal
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doll
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doll
I'eggS
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••
,1,esses
do
have
all
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Oil. .
1 V.
a
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| , , i h e 111l i e . he will mil
;,.,.! 11,, l l i e s s l l l • l o I I . " , , ' l | l e
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s o m e t h i n g Ji
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m l , ,,
llg l i e
., ..,,1,,
.1 lOUtplcIC Stl.lWNsI 1
The Nights of
Cabiria
begins
blue
III
Haydn pn-n'
Wink-
Friday, March 2
EVENING
It
and
half-liiiin nl c.i.sih 0 ,'l III
managed in Imisli 1 ,. II,.
-a—u-u u i r u u
-mr u
By P a t t i Maslinoff
A father a n d s o n were in an
a u t o wreck. T h e father was killed a n d t h e s o n was rushed t o a
h o s p i t a l for emergency surgery.
T h e a t t e n d i n g surgeon looked at
the b o y a n d said, "I c a n ' t operate, t h a t ' s m y s o n . "
If t h e testee fails t o realize t h a t
the M o t h e r ' s a surgeon, h e ' s a
chauvinist.
from Behavior T o d a y .
Men-T ask y o u n o t t o feel t o o
badly if y o u failed this test. I'd
venture
Lo say t h a t m a n y
w o m e n also " f a i l e d . " W o m e n ' s
Liberation is a struggle against
ascribed roles in society—not ;i
Struggle against m e n . It wants to
destroy t h e preconceived image
of w o m e n held by both s e x e s - a n
image t h a t we are brought up t o
believe t h r o u g h the subtle p r o
cess of socialization.
inl'i 1.Ill' HI
piublcn s
orchestra
sold
1
PACK 2 A
1
o f sitting al .1 live s. 1 1 , . i l
her frustration, s h e falsely accuses h i m of lewdness a n d sorcery Her a c c u s a t i o n leads t o a
mass public e x o r c i s m , instigated
by Cardinal Richelieu. T h e priest
is found guilty a n d b u r n e d at t h e
slake.
Russell's screenplay lor " T h e
Devils" is based o n Aldous Huxley's " T h e Devils of I . o u d u n "
anil " T h e Devils." a play by
J o h n Whiting
The film is in
Technicolor
.mil Hanavision.
Probably i h e mosi g u n - s o m e a n d
terrifying film y o u will ever see,
" T h e Devils" is an explosive,
brilliantly-made film with unm a t c h e d visual s e i i s i i o u s n e s s ' !
international
film group
setrccorded was not lie SUM
sound used heltiie.
>**********»**********»*********»*H>*»**********************H
25' cover
ron hendren
i
Young View of Washington
Why Women's Liberation?
"The Devils" at State
Ken Russell's " T h e Devils" is a
true s t o r y , carefully d o c u m e n t ed, historically accurate - a seri
ous work by a distinguished
filmmaker acclaimed cine of t h e
cinema's o u t s t a n d i n g talents As
such, it is being hailed as a mas
terpiece by many Bui because il
is explicit a n d highly graphic in
depicting t h e bizarre events that
occurred in France in l t i . ' t l . o t h
ers have found il visually shock
mg unci deeply disturbing
Vanessa Redgrave plays l he
h u n c h b a c k e d Mother .Superior
of a c o n v e n t w h o b e c o m e s sexu
ally obsessed with a worldly
priest, played by Oliver Reed In
view/commen t/pre view/commen t/
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a n li.-iMi; r o u n d e d u p , " II Llley
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and
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He, e i n h e r
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residence olbce will lake on llus
sllggestlllll is unknown We tan
only h o p e , ml push'
II you ha/e any questions or
suggestions call |57 ii. r ii;i and
ask for Marry Davis.
ttii'aauiULUjL
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH ?., I''V
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, l97'o
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 3A
d
preview/leisure/preview/leisure/preview/leisure/preview/leisure/preview
I,
Books:
Country Matters
Crossword Contest Rules
Puzzle solutions must be submitted to the Albany
Saturday, Mar. 3
Friday, Mar. 2
I:
The Allman Brothers Band: appearing at
Donald Howgarth and directed by Steve
the Palace Theatre at 7:00 p.m. Tickets
A m i n o f f . 4 : 0 0 p.m., 7:30 p.m., 9 : 0 0 p.m.
$4.00 w / t a x , $8.00 w / o u t .
Coffee
House: sponsored by
CCGB; 9
p.m. in the CC Assembly Hall.
and
discussions of contraception, abur
tion
and
venereal disease. Beginning at
Early
14th
Vocal
and
and
15th
Instrumental
century
music
Music:
at
8:30
Sunday, Mar. 4
H y p n o t i s t : spunsored by CCGB at 8 p.m.
Ice Skating: on the campus lake, free hot
Weekend Dance: sponsored by P R O L E ;
1 0 : 3 0 p.m. in tne CC B a l l r o o m .
gress of
Azania.
Featuring
tne
Con
Burundi
Dancers, guest speakers, others. Refresn
ments. 4 : 3 0 in Brubaciier Hall. Donation
S1.00,
usable
clothes
cocoa.
Tobogganing: Sunday nignt at Mohawk.
Benefit Program: for Pan-Africanist
an,
non
prescription medical supplies needed.
correct solutions have been chosen.
p.m. in the Recital Hall. Free.
n o o n in tiie CC Assembly Hall.
in LC-18.
ber must appear on your solution.
Puzzle solutions will be drawn at random until three-
Council o n Health and Drug Education:
guest speakers w i t h various presentations
following the Friday that the puzzle appears.
Name, address, phone number, and social security num-
in LC-4. Tickets are av :ilable in PAC box
o f f i c e one hour before performance.
AC 1 A MA J C A N D ] A N A O X A
A T O Z O MC H I
N A A S T E C L M
1 N P NA EY 1 A H B P R O R C A A
S B 1 Y GN PL U X O A R P O O G L
E D R A G O RE O R R N Y E K R U T
D N E A P E UL C M N I
D R H O T N
O A A X Z S SU Y L A T I
U T M R A
H L AT U 1 B X O T A N Z A R I O D
RO 1 D N A L E C I
A E A A O A P R
U WA N N N 1 M l
L H G C W N U S O
S N A T L A M B U A U R O N S S H J
S R A O D H G O A I
NAZNATRA
1 RA A A G TU N R G K I
A O R O L
A MN 1 R Q A R l E A L R S N I
F B
A A T E B E R G E G R I
E A R A I
A
CI E OA YN E K L Y L D B M A J
N
A C R 1 WAL A M A A M R U B N I 1
EESUPPO R T G O O D M A N E A
N EP A L LA D N E K W E R C S O D
Student Press office (CC 334) by Monday, 12 noon
Experimental Theatre: " S c h o o l P l a y " by
Free busses.
Kaleidescope: M u l t i m e d i a presentation of
Each of the three winners will be entitled to a Sill gill
certificate to the campus bookstore (not including tuntu-i
service). Certificates must be claimed within two weeks ni
notification.
No one working on or for the Albany Student Press is
eligible to win.
contemporary religious music. 8 p.m. in
Sorry, only one entry per person will be accepted.
tiie PAC Main Theatre.
Coffee
House:
John
Simpson
Directions:
Hidden in this puzzle are tinthe world. They appear in nil directions
diagonal; they ran he spelled hnvltwurds
eight directions
Letters may he Used more
plays at
8:30-11:15 p.m. in tne Brubacner Snack
Snow Sculpture: behind Campus Center,
free hot cocoa, cash prizes.
Bar,
Alumni
Quad. $.25
cover
charge,
State Quad Party: Introducing "Sauce" at
Baxter's Cafe: Roger and Izzy play banjo
9 p.m. in tne Flag R o o m . S.25 w-'State
and guitar c o u n t r y music at 9 p.m. Free.
Quad card, S.75 w / o u t .
Nightclub on a Sunday AfternoommusicSemi-Formal
Room
Dinner:
In
at 5:30. S2.25 w /
ASP Crossword Puzzle
free coffee and tea.
tne
Patroon
meal and
tax
cards; S4.00 w / t a x card, S7.75 w, I D .
al
1
2
3
6
Recital
Hall. S1.50 for students, $2.00
15
II
26
27
28
20
•
33
32
Tower East
"Tlic
Gryffon Film Society
French
-102 0 0 1 1)
Connection"
F n . a n d S.U.: 7 : 3 0 . <):.}()
in
LC 7
"A
In.
Ntm's
Story"
and Sat.: 7 : 3 0 . l):3(l
Fox Colonie (4 59-10201
3B
"Jeremiah Johnson"
U6
Fri.and Sat.: 7 : 3 0 , 9 : 3 0
" W o r l d ' s Greatest
SUNY Cinema
"The
Athlete"
Fri. and Sat.: 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 0 0
Hellman 1-159 53001
Devils"
S u n : H p . m . in I.C-1 X
"Heartbreak K i d "
Fn.:
IFG
7:30. 9:45
"Judge Roy Bean"
(Schedule n o t available)
Nights
Fn.:
7:l,
ol
,IIH1
Caliiria"
n:.|S
in
Colonie Center (45 ( ;-2i70]
Circle Twin (7«5 U H K
| (".15
" E a s t of
"Cabaret"
"Avanli"
Eden"
M i d n i g h t 111 I.C IH
Fn.
and
S a t . : 7 : 0 0 . <l. I l l
1 n & S . i t : 7 : 1 5 . 9 : )()
"Judge
Aldenberry Cinema
"The Dentist"
Towne 7X5 1515
In.:
7 1)1)
AM.::
Main.
1 i.ungi
I n . & S a t . : 7: 15. 9 : 2 0
7: 1 5. ' ) : (II
S a l . : 2 . O 0 . K:()0, 1 0 : H I .
Cine
1234 I45«>-«.MUH
"1776"
1'ricvSat:
Diversion
"'I lit
Madison CIH'J 51 u 1
African
Q u e e n " and
"Shannis"
"Sahara"
f n.
and
111 l.f. 1 1
PAGE4A
S.ii
Bean"
"Poseidon Advent lire"
"M"
1r
Roy
7 : 0 ( 1 . '): 10
7:00. 9:30
" M a n o f l.a M a n c h a "
Fri&Sat: 7:30
I n . a n d Sat.: 7 : 10, 0 : 3 0
"Cietaway"
Sat. M a t i n e e : 2 : 0 0
Fri&Sat:
7:00, 9:30
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
no
|l
50
2,
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idwa
T7 J l i U
973
3.
N o w t h e m y t h a b o u t welfare
cheaters. These 7 in a t h o u s a n d
are certainly publicized. But
little is said a b o u t t h e real
f r a u d s - t h e states with their illegal
"residence
requirements"
and "waiting lists" a n d t h e c i p h e r
game they play, m a n i p u l a t i n g
federal
standards.
Maryland's
" s t a n d a r d of p a y m e n t " is only
6 5 % of need, a n d Mississippi's
standard is a fiction c o m p a r e d t o
the real p a y m e n t of $ 7 0 a
m o n t h for a family of four.
California breaks so m a n y federal laws that HEW t h r e a t e n e d
t o cut off federal funds, b u t
Reagan m a n e u v e r e d with Nixon
to prevent it.
Welfare Mothers
Speak
Out
was written to inform people of
Iheir welfare rights, and t o emphasize
the need for G A I
-guaranteed adequate
income
-now. T h e publishers are giving
their p r o f i t s f r o m t h e b o o k t o
welfare rights o r g a n i z a t i o n s , a n d
asking p e o p l e w h o can afford
the b o o k s t o p u t t h e m in t h e
hands of p e o p l e or groups w h o
c a n n o t . T h i s b o o k is i m p o r t a n t .
It will clue y o u in o n facts. It
will t u n e y o u in t o t h e voices of
the p o o r :
" T h i s c o u n t r y spends $ 6 5 0 0
for 3 s e c o n d s of w a r , " says o n e
of t h e m , " a n d t h e n talks a b o u t
$ 2 4 0 0 for a family of four for a
year. N o w w h a t kind of sense
does t h a t m a k e ? "
Contest Winners
A l a n Balkin
Jacob Schal
L i n d a Cipriani
(So iution
to last week 's puzzle)
i n I T s
V E N A h
A F I C I
M
N o N
S E I S M
T E B
H 0 A R D
TT M 8 10
N I L | ?
A
S T E
A •«
P|A|T I N
1 1 1 T
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Li.
1Li
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Dear Ask the Asp,
Dear AW..
Dear Ash the Asp,
Why is it t h a t people get t i r e d
on 3 h o u r car trips? I told my
s u i t e m a t e s that it's because t h e
mind a n d b o d y m u s t exert energy t o keep o n e ' s physical a n d
m e n t a l s t a t e in m o m e n t u m with
the car a t 6 5 m p h . T h e y laughed
at m e . What d o y o u t h i n k ?
Have y o u ever though that it's
not the m o m e n t u m that puts
you to sleep, b u t the company
you keep on your car trips. Try
finding some more interesting
traveling c o m p a n i o n s .
Whenever 1 go h o m e for vacation, my parents e x p e c t me t o
spend almost all of my t i m e with
them. We always e n d u p having
arguments because they t h i n k I
spend t o o much time away from
home with my friends a n d n o t
enough time with t h e m . I think
that I divide my time in such a
way as t o please my parents a n d
myself. I really h a t e t o fight
with my parents b u t I d o think
that they are being unreasonable. What should I d o ?
62
—
WSUA640
Ta
rgum CW7
~
1
rt.1V
ACROSS
DOWN
1. Partnership
1. T y p e of C a n d y
B. Italian Dessert
2. Saa
Absence of Government
3. N a t u r a l E n v i r o n m e n t
Ellington Tune
I*.
P r o Nobis
5. Honth (abbr.)
17. Returns on Payments
6. B e l o n g i n g t o T h e n
16. Marked With Linos
7. Heart Contraction
19. French Priend
Wait (2 wde.)
8. D u f f a G o l f Shot
20.
9. A c h e s
22. Branch of Accounting
Bon
10. V a s s
Coverings
11. M l s a W e s t
12. Standing
2 5 . Bantu Language
'" Ulna Wood
26. Perform
Not Precise
29. RusBian Measure
30. P o l l o w e r of Zeno
2 1 . Dove'a Cry
32. Live and
(2 wda.) 2 7 . Clerical Attire
3». Cotton Pabric
26. Bxhaueta
36. Mouthi comb, form
30. Senator Thurmond
37. Italisn Number
31. Haai Sp.
Causes Irritation
33. Mam Lat.
Marine Animals
35. Chemical I n Body
38. A c t r e s s
Langford
46. Ettlng and Roman
19. P l e a a l n g Sound
l»7. Cry of Anguish
Signified
0.
Of
t
h
e
S
t
a
r
a
»9.
tl. . Tara
Monkey
50.
Peelings
<*2. B i r t h p l a c e of Ragtime
51. A c t o r
1 3 . Houss Warmer (2 wda.l
_*_ Krwin
H . I n t a r n a t l o n a l Agreemen
Sports Organ!tation
'15. Speak H e s i t a n t l y
Arm Bones
18 T a v s r n
Hebrew Letten var.
51
Infleldsr
Amaro
57. Ceylonsse Capital
52 Lines of Stltohlng
60. flickering
One Who Makee Possible 58 Japanese Sash
Nook
Style Shsst
65. N a t i v e s of A l e p p o
61. ^anoua Collage
„
66. M o r a S h r e w d
62. Heat Measure
*****
N o t e : Letters t o "Ask the A S P "
can be sent t o CC 326.
(Kremlin Billay Generate?
II:
VICIOUS CYCLE.
12:
M.F.
Dcur M F,
\l:
Have a talk with y o u r parents
and explain t o t h e m your p o i n t
of view. Tell t h e m that a l t h o u g h
[hey mean a lot t o y o u , y o u r
friends mean a lot t o y o u t o o ,
and rightfully so. Perhaps if, at
the beginning of each vacation,
you discuss with y o u r p a r e n t s
which days y o u ' r e planning t o
spend with t h e m , they'll realize
that you are not a b a n d o n i n g
them for your friends, which is
what they might he fearing. A
little reassurance is p r o b a b l y all
that they need.
IV.
11:
11:
8:
FRIDAY, MAftCH 2, 1973
i
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
"This Week"
***
Phil Chansky,
M
E
A
D
S
W
A
Y
S
A
K
E
Li
Sunday Highh at 7:00
51
66
65
Another myth: Put them to
w o r k t o solve t h e p r o b l e m . A
p e r c e n t a g e b r e a k d o w n shows a
fourth are senior citizens a n d
half are children. T h e n t h e r e a r e
t h e incapacitated, t h e p e r m a nently disabled, t h e blind. A b o u t
eight-tenths of o n e p e r c e n t are
fathers looking for w o r k . T h i s
leaves 1 3 p e r c e n t - m o t h e r s , o n e f i f t h of w h o m are already employed or in job-training, t h e
o t h e r s with small children a t
h o m e . N e w York City's " G e t
T o u g h P o l i c y " revealed o n l y
2'/$% of t h o s e o n aid were emp l o y a b l e in the c u r r e n t e c o n o m ic s t r u c t u r e .
"Ask the ASP"
56
6i»
63
By Elinor Houldson
The subtitle is We Ain't
Gonna
Shuffle No More, The mothers
who speak o u t are leaderfi of t h e
black, w h i t e , red a n d b r o w n
ghettos of Milwaukee. T h e y
speak for t h e poor all over
America.
They are backed u p by solid
editorial research. T h i s b o o k
shows that almost everyone in
this nation is o n welfare, t h o u g h
for t h e rich it's called " f a r m
subsidies," " d e f e n s e c o n t r a c t s , "
" g u a r a n t e e d l o a n s , " "oil depletion a l l o w a n c e s , " or "tax-free
capital gains."
The U.S. gives $ 6 0 t o $ 7 0
billion a year in assistance t o
business a n d the rich. A favorite
e x a m p l e : over 300 people m a d e
m o r e than $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 in ' 6 9 a n d
paid n o federal income t a x at all;
among them, 5 6 persons earned
a million, tax-free. " A t i p of o u r
hat goes t o R o n a l d R e a g a n , " say
the editors, " a millionaire w h o ,
in 1 9 7 0 , h a d a house provided
by the s t a t e , d r e w over $ 4 4 , 0 0 0
in salary, b u t still paid n o s t a t e
income tax at a l l . "
A c h a p t e r on " P o v e r t y P i m p s "
tells h o w billions of War on
Poverty dollars never reach t h e
poor at all. " W e feel w e ' r e just
urban p r o s t i t u t e s , " o n e m o t h e r
says. " A n y b o d y can draw u p a
proposal and present it t o HEW
(or) t h e O E O people a n d say
they are going to d o s o m e t h i n g
for t h e poor, and m a k e a lot of
m o n e y off u s . "
"Welfare
Mythology"
deals
with society's fantasies. Welfare
lakes most of y o u r taxes, they
cry. A factual c o m p a r i s o n shows
the cost of welfare was under
$15 billion in 1 9 7 0 - h a l f of this
was federal m o n e y - while war
fare costs for fiscal '71 were
$73.6 billion-over a third of t h e
federal b u d g e t !
WSUA's News Feature Show
37
55
5lP 59
57
Delaware (462-4714)
Sat.: 2 : 0 0 . 0:1 5. H:20
•'The
39
5"
Cinema 7 (785-1625)
11
21
2U
36
Off Campus
10
9
Albania, A h j u t i j , AMJOIHIM.I. A u s t i u , l i u l g i u m , Botswana, Bia.
Canada, Chile, China. C y p t m , Cuba, UonmatU, Fiji, Lgypt, Fran
Greece, Honduras, Munijatv, H.nli. Iceland, Iraq, Iran, Italy, J.irn.i
Lesotho, L u x e m b o u r g , Malawi, Malta, Morocco, Nepal Oman,
Saudi Arabia, Sudan, S-w-it/inland, l a n / a n l a , Russia, Uganda, Lyli
N o r t h Korea, Japan, Jordan, Spain, Peru, Congo, P'lrluqal
13
17
19
Timetable
1 II
6
mimes <>f ;>l countries of
horizontal,
vertical, and
and forwards a total of
than imce
16
23
On Campus
7
entertainment; 2:30 p.m. in the PAC
others.
Movie
5
it
Welfare Myths Explored
by Steuen Alan Berch
host
*** featuring Kim J chase's exclusive interview
with Perry Durea
*** Brian Lehrer on "This Week" in music
**+ Audrey Seidman on campus news
+ ** Steve Needleman commentary
*** )udyBialer, campus happenings
interviews with . . . and reports on . . . people making
the news
PAGE 5A
R
Bernstein A Quadraphonic Encounter
by Ron Barnell
To the vast majority of people who sit in their living rooms listening to the music
coming out of the hi-fi, the world of the recording studio and the records that are born of
it. seems like the work of a remote and sequestered order of wizards, who perform their
sonic miracles in a frenzy of rites as secretive and alluring as the search for the
Philosopher's Stone.
In actuality, it is never anything as exotic as all that, although miracles are
occasionally performed- What is more often involved is men and machines toiling and
sealing together in capturing forever the beauties of a composer's score.
It was therefore with great anticipation that ASP arts editor Andy Palley and myself
left for the big town one day last week, having been afforded the rare treat of being able
to sit in on an actual Columbia Records tecording session with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra under the aegis of no less than conductor-extraordinaire, Leonard
Bernstein.
We arrived early in the morning at Columbia's large east-side studio, (re-converted
from an old church), to find the technicians and engineers moving cables, microphones
and stands to prepare for the actual recording which was to begin at 10:00 a.m. sharp.
One by one the musicians arrived, and soon there was heard the cacaphoneotis din of
valves, strings and reeds being tuned.
This was going to be a quadraphonic form of recording known as "surround-sound."
where the instruments of the orchestra are so positioned and recorded in the studio that
when played backover a quadraphonic speaker set-up. the listener has the effect of being
placed in the center of the group. (Sort of an audio analogy of a "theatre in the round
performance") Since 1 am myself presently producing a series of quadraphonic experimental recordings here at SUNYA, as part of a special research project in assoeiati>it
with the Music Department, I was doubly intrigued to sec what methods the huge
recording company would use to record the orchestra. As I soon found out, problems
soon crop up, whether large symphony orchestra or college band, problems such a> the
musicians being unable to sometimes play in phase all the time. (Caused mostly by the
conductor's inability to see all the musicians while they are playing, due to the circular
arc sealing arrangement called for in the quad recording set-up).
The two works being recorded this day weie the 2nd sympliony of the Dinish composer. Carl Nielsen, (written in 1902). and the "-5th symphony of the classical master
Franz Josef Haydn. For the Nielsen symphony, lire outputs ol some Id .'ondensor
microphones were being mixed into the inputs ol .in H channel mastering machine and
on to the Dolby-processed tracks of the 1" tape In llie spacious control room with ils
lounge-chair atmosphere and double-glass panneled observation window looking out
into the studio, we met the producer, Mr. John MeCltue (Who is now producing only
Mr, Bernstein's recordings, aflei many years in cluuge ol .ill of Columbia Records
classical offerings). I made mention of the fact, in oiu hi id discussion that the recording
of Ihe Nielsen 2nd being made this day would complete Columbia's iccorded
discography of the six Nielsen symphonies. (As n Hum oui II was almost exactly 10
years ago to the month that Ihe whole craze foi Nielsen's music was stalled when
Bernstein recorded the dramatically exciting 5Hi syinphon\ (. The 2nd symphony is
subtitled, ''The Four Temperaments," and logically enough •' emovemenls are meant to
be evocative of some mood such as "sanguine" or "phlematic" etc. To say that the
music succeeds in a powerful 'expression of these moods would be a gross understatement.
Mr. Bernstein, wearing a Harvard sweat shirt, and a comfortable pair of jeans, strolled
in the double-sealed doors of the control room shortly before 10 a.m. and asked to hear
the opening of the first movement, as the assistant conductor went out in the studio and
led the orchestra. Bernstein and McClure sat at the console, getting an idea of the
balances and levels, before Berstein went out and took over the baton for the actual
takes.
Take after take of the first movement of the symphony rolled by, as McClure.
following along in the score would pass instructions to the mixing engineer seated next
to him at the console to either raise ot lower the microphone levels covering a certain
group of instruments so they could be heard to better advantage (usually in Ihe concert
hall, the basoon or some other wood-wind can get lost in a loud passage and the control
exercised in the recording process shows its great strength in revealing with exceptional
clarity the full scoring as the composer originally intended us to hear).
Once the musicians got into the heat of playing, they were able to maV lakes of up to
7 or H minutes in duration before stopping. During the pauses there was a great d-al of
consultation hetween control room and the studio floor over a private telephone line.
As the session moved along, the effects of Ihe surround group inikni* was evident as
Bernstein wheeled around to give cues to the players. Horns on the left. Irumnets on ihe
right volleyed and thundered in glorious passages reinforced by the strings, woodwinds
and timpani.
At the end of the morning recording period and as ihe final reverberations of ihe lasl
chords died away, in the speakers. McClure clicked on Ihe intercom swilch and ,isl
uttered one word,"fantastic."
Just to give you one final idea ol the quality ol sound Ihe engineers were able lo cap
lure on tape, let me mention the fact that in regard lo instrumental isolation, when fed
just Ihe microphone Irack being used to record the timpani, you couldn'l heal any other
instruments playing, even I might add, when there was a crescendo in llie other
orchestral sections, ami the timpani remained silent.'
After lunch the orchestra reassembled lo finish up ihe lasl two movements of ihe
Nielsen. Bernstein and the orchestra gol inoi some siicky stung parts that had lo he
re-done over and over again(a total of some 10 separate takes at the end of one of Ihe
movements for instance.) Finally as Ihe hands of the studio, wall clock neaied .! in ihe
afternoon, the final lake of llie ending of the lasl movement was rolling on "-me and
Carl Nielsen's 2nd symphony was in the can.
The final work that Bernstein was scheduled lo record thai day was Haydn's OM]I
symphony .(one of the "London" symphonies.) With the departure of almost half of 'he
palycrs called for in Ihe Nielsen, (Haydn uses only two horns and trumpet: compared lo
the large horn and brass choir called for in Ihe Nielsen.)
The French
by Joseph Dougherty
The French Connection was
released in time to keep Twentieth Century-Fox from becoming a supermarket. At the
end of the sixties Fox was in the
worst financial situation of any
major studio in the history of
"Hollywood." The company had
sunk ten million dollars into the
ultimate G-rated picture, Hello,
Dolly and an almost equal
amount on a try for the soTt
core market with films like Myra
Breckinridge and Beyond The
Valley Of The Dolls. In 1970
there was a plan to turn the back
lot into a housing development.
The vice-presidents
were
bringing their lunches to the
office in brown paper bags.
And then, like the dawn, came
The French Con nee lion
a
film with a rather low overhead
which would pull an estimated
world-wide gross of fifty-four
million dollars. Three months
after initial release the vicepresidents went hack to eating
out.
The film, directed by William
Friedkin (director of the film
version of Hoys In The Hand and
The Night
They
Raided
Mimky's}, was based on a book
by Robin Moore who had fie
tionali/.ed the events surround
ing an actual police case. Moore,
the author of "The Coven
herds" and co-author of "Tin
Happy Hooker. " is a graduate <>l
Ihe Infamous Writers' School
and his work reads like some of
Ihe more puerile issues of SpitT
Detective Stories.
The French Connect ion is ;i
very traditional film, Cops and
Robbers in its most basic form
"Popeye" Doyle (dene Hack
man) is a New York City cop
interested his job done without
much regard for anyone who
gets in his way. The film follows
Doyle as he picks up the slim
leads which will result m a
massive drug bust. CTotwl guy,
bad guy. Simple? Simple. Kven
though it's based on fad rule
geLs the feeling it's all been done
before. Well, it has at least ;i
dozen, dozen times.
What differentiates The French
Connection from countless other
"Ker-pow, kerpow, the weed of
crime may come up with some
hitter fruit, but I still make more
money than the average cop,"
movies is a strong sense of style
of the part of the director.
Kriedkin fancies himself an arl
ist and he enjoys fooling around
with rather obvious metaphors
You get the feeline he's trying to
bring symbolism to the masses
We can see this best in 111*'
sequence where " M r . Big" (Fer
nando Key) eats a l u x u r i o u s
lunch in a fine restaurant while
hard w o r k i n g , u n d e r p a i d ' T o p
e y e " can be seen through ihe
window freezing t o death as he
eats a slice of quick cooling
pizza between gulps of library
paste take-out coffee. The idea is
blatant to the point of being
embarrassing, but the whole film
is such a game one can't take
any real offense,
'Hie basic metaphor in the film
can he found in the htlle scene
I
wishes
i Good lAiek
i
to
I
Harry
\ (Hot Dog)
Literally surrounded by instruments on all sides, Bernstein cues Ihe musicians at all points of llie compass
during his Columbia Records quadraphonic recording session for the Nielsen 2nd Symphony
PAGE 6A
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
•RIDAY, MARCH 2, 197"
Connection
in which "Popeye" and "Mr.
Big" play in-and-out with the
open doors of the Times Square
shuttle train. Everyone is playing
cat-and-mouse with someone
else in the film. It's all one
glorious and confused game.
"Popeye" chases and is chased,
hounds and is hounded, shoots
and is shot at. The characters
charge about after each other as
if they were locked in a house of
mirrors.
Now
why,
doesn't
bewildered
as
bystanders
away
you
might
ask,
t h e a u d i e n c e e n d u p as
the
innocent
(rapped o n the run-
El
of
(he famous
sequence
or
Ihe children
chase
who
p l a y al " P o p e y e s " f e e l w h e n h e
is
attacked
because
by
a sniper'.
the characters
1
It's
are n o t
o n l y p l a y i n g the game w i t h each
other
they,
and ihe film,
are
p l a y i n g t h e same g a m e w i t h t h e
audience.
Everybody
is
loying
w i t h e v e r y b o d y else. I t ' s a t r i c k ,
an i l l u s i o n like o n e o f those i r i e k
r i d d l e s w i t h an a n s w e r t h a t ' s t o o
s i m p l e l o p u z z l e o u t . The f i l m is
like
going
filmic
through
a form
f u n house where
of
nothing
m a k e s v e r y m u c h sense.
The p e r f o r m a n c e s a r e m i n i m a l
for
the
meni
film
not
derives
from
its
niove-
conflicts
but
f r o m t h e sheer p o s i t i v e i n e r t i a o f
lime
. i n d e v e n t s . T h e I'M in has a
forward molion beyond ihe c m
i m l cil I h e p e o p l e in ll . nn n c h 111
nner ol ill
vii v Kl
I'hrir 1
,,.. I l e u ,
s. u l I'llUR
• Hack
l l i n l.isi w o n 1 in e o n
ipilelll
iictorv
l i e h r u i u s t i n ,, m u s i n e ,
111.Hi
I'lllllH'.V. l o l l i e n i l e o l " I ' t t p i ' V f "
D o y l e W h e i l he's o i l I h e s c r e e n
,11,1
v i m en
K v i - r y o lie
els,'
III e
lifer.
. l o he
,11-
14 I'iII I h e r i d e
T h e H u n c h C o p is n o l l l l lie n e w
l o M i n i l i e e i e w , Hit o l l li f K i r k
•'
D o l l g l a .<
role
film v.I'l'siol!
,SWi\
lie
i i n p r o v ell
Ihe
(Sii'iH'
/ l; ll, ll
Hillv
Wilder's
The 11,
icctlve
was , l e v e l o p t ;\ a n d
111 I h e i l l l i e s ;, n i l s i s
D o n Siegi '1 111 sueh
lies llV
i,s
111
Ol'
1 in, i r •
s Ihnv Hairy
f omit;
it, ill
liili-ly •
int:
ii e w
( 'omit t IWIl,
show h i/
in
|I1S|
films
1/,; .henna
/7fe l-'rcnch Connection
diverting
much
else. I f y o u ' d
undemanding
l i k e a very
evening
it's
film
ever, n o ! t o go in l o o k i n g f o r a
l o r y o u . Be w a r n e d , b o w
greal f i l m
III,
Connection
llt'll,
se,lis,'
ll
of
K r i e d k i l 1, IIS ,1 lll i ' e e l o r .
( l o i n u l o The
expecting
perience
knows
City
cherry
Lsu 'i
is
into
only
any
chocolate's
a
good
chal-
deal
a chocolate
lo
find
cherry
okay,
like
covered
out
there
inside.
The
but
tion
is a b o u t as d e e p as a b o t t l e
cap,
M is an easy w a y t o k i l l a n
hull' w. i \
just
fori
ellllliix
n i l , , I I I , f i l m . I I III I h e n
lin lies i n o l l l l ,1 I'm
v in. m u l e s
.m o t h e r
interest meetings. It is mandatory that
interested students attend one meeting:
While m i l f o r those w h o m a k e
ever. ,1 h l l l e we,'. k.
( omit', lloll
le.iel les
Ils
on the downtown campus, there will be two
Christ, 1
demands o f the films they
Ill, l-rench
SAYLES INTERNATIONAL HOUSE,
wanted (he cherry, t o o !
i h n l is ;l N e w V o lrk City w i n t e r
I l l s sei ise o l si i l l l i u r e is., h o w
i o see, f u r Ihe
French
Living
If you are interested in living in
French
a
l e n g i n g a n d r e w a r d i n g f i l m i c exbiting
how B I I I I , by New York
ci i l l he w h l l e lit III e s.inie
l n n r M • e i n i n i ; s o Sterile ,111(1 he
htm cu p l i i r e i l t i n l l m i s l u r e o l
masted I ' l l e s l i n i l s i i n d hn.s f u m e s
international
the
mill :es Ihe
alls,,
Experience
but uol
l i m l ..
There' s noil,
;i
is both
and amusing,
elect
March 6 at 10 pm in Sayles
Connec-
March 8
evening a n d it's a lot better than
Turn VC Pairoon
Lounge
Any problem, call 457-8383 any weekday afternoon!
a sharp slick in llie eye
-gOllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllfflllllllllllllllllllllllllimlHlll
TOWER EAST CINEMA presents:
| THE FRENCH CONNECTION
|
Friday, March 2 at 7 , 9 and 11 pm
Saturday, March 3 at 7:30 and 9:30 pm
LC7
$.75 with state quad tax
$1.25 without
Short Feature: LE CHIEN ANDALOU
|)lll»||W||l«»^^
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 7A
-^sf«^
w
| f YOU'RE
* INVITED
TO ATTEND
editorials & letters
Greek Students Come Alive
University s t u d e n t s t h r o u g h o u t t h e U n i t e d State's a n d w e s t e r n E u r o p e a r e
now
more
"passive"
than
at any
time
since
the
1950's.
Although
the
c o n d i t i o n s w h i c h gave rise t o t h e great u p h e a v a l s o f t h e last d e c a d e r e m a i n
essentially
unchanged,
the
student
movement
remains
uninvolved
and
disinterested.
&& the Most Advanced Speaker
Demonstration Your Ears will ever
Hear.
T h i s is n o t t h e w a y it is in G r e e c e . G r e e k s t u d e n t s , f o r y e a r s t h e m o s t
p a s s i v e in t h e W e s t ^ a r e n o w b e g i n n i n g t o p r o t e s t t h e p o l i c e - s t a t e t a c t i c s a n d
b r u t a l i t y of t h e r u l i n g m i l i t a r y j u n t a .
While A m e r i c a n
s t u d e n t s five y e a r s a g o w e r e a c t i v e , t h e G r e e k
were subdued, and were often
students
l o o k e d u p o n a s a n a c h r o n i s m s in a d e c a d e o f
turbtilancc.
O n l y ,i l e w p e o p l e c o u l d b e f o u n d w h o d a r e d t o o p p o s e t h e a l l - p o w e r f u l
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"Popular opinion Is the greatest
lie In tne world."
Thomas Carlyle
regime.
Today,
however,
nonviolent
thousands
ol
Greek
s t u d e n t s have joined
p r o t e s t , d e m a n d i n g less g o v e r n m e n t
lite ,IIH1 i i n c i t e r v o i c e in a c a d e m i c
together
affairs.
T h e s have b e e n m e t b v c l u b s , tear gas. a n d h u n d r e d s ol a r m e d
T i n - Litest b u r s t
Thurs. March 1 - 6pm to 1 Opm
Fri.
March 2 - 12pm to 10pm
Sat. March 3 - 12pm to 6pm
CONTINUOUS
militate
ol protest
deferments
in
i n t e r f e r e n c e in u n i v e r s i t y
was sparked
lor s t u d e n t s
who
by a new draft
are striking
or
police.
decree,
uniting
ending
others
to
protest.
We s u p p o r t
t h e s e e l l o r t s o l tin- G r e e k s t u d e n t s .
Their a c t i o n s h a v e b e e n
l i o n v i o l e n t , a m i b v ail a c c o u n t s , t h e v i o l e n c e s o far e x p e r i e n c e d h a s b e e n
initiated
bv the m i l i t a r y
police, l o r t o o long n o w ihe (Jreek military
r u n ili.it I').ilk,in n a t i o n w i t h n o o p p o s i t i o n
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—ADMINISTRATION SFOKESMfW
S U N Y A is ol In i.illy t e r m e d a " u n i v e r s i t y
Traditionally, university
campuses
center."
provide an a t m o s p h e r e
of
discussion
and deb,He b e t w e e n learned m e n and s t u d e n t scholars.
Albany Stale, howi"
BlSR
PIONEER
SUNYA SA Not OK in SASU
bv
The
Stale
University
Student
Association c o n f e r e n c e thai met here I his
weekend a t t r a c t e d delegates from niosl of
the State Colleges and all of the t n i v
ersity Centers. T h e r e was o n e oijvioi^
e x c e p t i o n , h o w e v e r , a n d that was Albany
State .
STEREO COMPONENT SYSTEMS
I--I
S U N Y A ' s -student association still has to
decide w h e t h e r or n o t to join the stale
wide s t u d e n t organization, so we had no
official delegates at a n y of t h e workshops
held in t h e C a m p u s Center, or at the
organization-wide m e e t i n g on Sunday
T h e reason for holding t h e conference
here in Albany, in spite of SUNYA's
" o u t s i d e r " s t a t u s , was o u r close prox
imity to t h e s t a t e legislators. This was to
be a "legislative c o n f e r e n c e " and on the
agenda were m e e t i n g s with a s s e m b l y m e n
and s e n a t o r s in their S o u t h Mall offices
Special Relationship
—-5tt_>
ALBANY
79
A
ss?^o, '*
4M-9S01
SCHENECTADY
l4,
t
^s,?f
MM111
GLENS FALLS
PJTTSFIELD
""toss?•"*" ^-rMM™"
™" , ™
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
*
™
AMHERST
MASS.
IbE.PlMunl 81
Clf/m
who was sponsored
XnstltZ
Project.
MCDONALD
COLONIE
h a s fallen
lar s h o r t id tins i m a g e , e s p e c i a l l y w h e n
last semester, for e x a m p l e , the o n l y " b i g n a m e " speaker was J a n e
when you want something better
«•*->*«
ImilLi
r
it i n i n e s l o I h e i s s u e of s t u d e n t s p e a k e r s o n c a m p u s .
T h e Albany S t a t e o p p o s i t i o n to joining
SASU seems t o have c e n t e r e d a r o u n d the
person of Mike L a m p o r t , S t u d e n t Associ
ation President. Lampert still does not
feel that SASU is Worth the $l.ui)(i
annual dues we would have to pay U''
does not see h o w Albany State would
directly benefit from joining
The SA President claims that we \«.-.
ently enjoy n "special relationship"' wiih
the SUNY Central Offices and Dial » e
really d o n ' t need SASU repii-seniing " s ' "
Albany since we're aire.ids here win
close p r o x i m i t y to t h e Chancellor and Ins
staff, as well as to various people al tinCapitol bus m e a n t that we can act mile
p e n d e n t l y of the o t h e r SUNY schools in
dealing with t h e b u r e a u c r a t s .
And it has been L a m p e r t , himself, who
has w o r k e d hard to develop this special
relationship. During t h e past few years he
has m e t many University officials and
now k n o w s m o s t of them o n a personal
basis. T h e r e l a t i o n s h i p b e t w e e n t h e m and
us has been curefully cultivated In s u m ,
And there
by an outside organization
have been
in c o o p e r a t i o n
Fonda,
with
a lew minor speakers sponsored by
Peace
various
our executive branch has become expert
in the fund Killings of ihe University
acadcntii d e p a r t m e n t s and clubs.
The problem, then, is what will happen
next yea, when Lamped graduates. Who
is t h e n ' in the entire SA organization w h o
has the requisite persona! contacts It
seems all l o o clear thai when Lampert
leaves, so will that "special r e l a t i o n s h i p "
which he has done so much to cultivate
s p e a k e r s \ isii n i g t h i s c a m p u s h a s d c i l i n e d iii.u k e d l y o v e r tin- p a s t y e a r a n d a
Il\
and
large,
however,
the
number
ol
nuK
notable,
crowd
drawing
hall.
A d m i t t e d l y , (lie P o l i t i c a l C o o r d i n a t o r ' s b u d g e t h a s b e e n t r i m m e d , b u t w e
still
It ol ih.it
ilie
University
is e n t i t l e d
to
,n
least o n e o r t w o
popular
personalities.
With the r e c e n t a l l o c a t i o n of (he r e m a i n i n g ( a n i l r a l C o u n c i l B u d g e t t o t h e
Attractive Proposals
Allman
Meanwhile, SASU officials have been
directing strong over In res at Central
Council lo join their slate wide organiza
lion. Several hours of Central Council
meeting lime have been devoted to
delegates beiween Mike Lampert and Ray
Glass, former SUNY Bmghamton S t u d e n t
Government President and now director
of t h e SASU Captol Office
The officials tell Council that there is
"strength in n u m b e r s " and that eventual
realization of their n u m e r o u s programs
will c o m e only with the strong s u p p o r t of
all t h e University * 'enters, including
Albain
Their programs ami proposals do sound
attractive
II icy range from s t u d e n t
control
o! campus
faculty
student
.issoc.aiMir. .,nd student participation in
c o l l e t live
,!,;•
bargaining
union-,
Willi
lo the add
faculty
anil
The
schedule
According
lo
SASU i- proposing the creation of .1
si
lobby here in Albany lo
i; student
push then piograms
And they aie trying lo enlist SUNYA's
aid in doing this
Some of the steps lhc\ have taken in
i n c l u d e e x p a n s i o n of their
Buffalo Oilier and the creation of a
Capiloi Office d o w n t o w n
Additionally,
they publish a hi weekly newsletter, and
mall hi weekly legislative reports to
student government leaders
continued on pane ten
concert
"possibility"
for
the
that
tomorrow
night
(they
cost
over
$"W,000),
the
the balance
Student
Ralph
the
semester
Association
of
Political
appears
unencouraging.
Coordinator,
there
is a
Nader, the consumer advocate, may appear. But
t h a t ' s a b o u t it.
W h e n S a l m n a n a p o k e o n t h e K e n n e d y a s s a s s i n a t i o n in L e c t u r e C e n t e r 7 a
few w e e k s a g o , h e d r e w a n o v e r f l o w
shows
thai
il ( h e s p e a k e r
is w e l l
c r o w d of s e v e n h u n d r e d . S u r e l y , t h i s
k n o w n , o r his t o p i c has m a s s
appeal,
s t u d e n t s w i l l , i n d e e d , a t t e n d in l a r g e n u m b e r s .
T h e v i a b i l i t y of S U N Y A a s a " u n i v e r s i t y c e n t e r " d e p e n d s in l a r g e p a r t o n
o b t a i n i n g more anil b e t t e r speakers.
j£\wm
ti" a s t u d e n t
m e m b e r l o I h e B o a r d o l 'I n i s l e e s
thai d i r e c t i o n
Brothers
p r o s p e c t for b r i n g i n g a n y m o r e s p e a k e r s a p p e a r s b l e a k .
/ •
Ldiloi-in-t.hief
g.di y HI. Li.iidi
News
arm e hunkei
iiiindy j l t n u n
k j l h y eckede
Off Campus
bob m ay ei
bdiiy ^chwdi tz
ntndctl in / ° 7 o
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Editorial Board determines policy.
Office; CC326
Phone: 157 2190
In Hearst's Tradition
Save Every Chicken Clucks Away
by Mike McGuire
In the days since publication of my last
column ("Chicken Society Meats Match",
Tuesday's ASP), I have been tirelessly
attacked for being oblivious to many of
the basic principles of the New York
State Save Every Chicken Society. So in
the spirit of reconciliation, I am now
giving the Society its say before I expose
their arguments for what they are in
future columns.
A press release from a Save Every
Chicken spokesman follows:
Virginia, RTM Is Not A Meditation
Cult, by Mel Cox, Regional Coordinator
ofN.Y.S.E.C.
From my experience in talking to several students and faculty members here at
SUNYA, I abruptly came to the shocking
realization that there is an almost universal ignorance among the university community of the goals or even the existence
of a Save Every Chicken organization,
and an appalling degree of misinformation among those with any conception of
the group. Fortunately, I have been very
graciously allowed this space for a brief
highlighting of our goals and plans.
First off, as the title suggests, the Riyht
to Meat Committee is not a meditation
cult. Rather, it is bloodthirsty gang of
carnivorous barbarians, who have won an
initial legislative victory over the idealistic
goals of S.E.C.S., but over whom we
know in our hearts eventual triumph is
inevitable. In the past, the college-age
block has been a formidable power base
for many pet issues and interests of sly or
manipulative politicians. We would encourage a reversal of this trend, and shall
endeavor to win the hearts and support of
idealistic and motivated
individuals
through a straight-forward, no-bull presentation of our platforms and goals.
Those who share our beliefs, join us in
this noble quest; those who object, you
know what you can do. But most importantly, let's all get off our apathetic
derrieres and show some spunk! Below is
a stylized rendition of our platform.
For more information, call SECS at
SUNYA, 457-1665.
General Platform:
1) To obtain written legal guarantee by
Congress of the unalienable right of Every
Chicken to be Saved.
a) To accomplish this through incessant
picketing of one chauvanist chain of
eheezy chicken cxploiters-namely Ken-
tucky ;Fried, and the impeachment of
Colonel Sanders for war crimes.
Letters to the Editor
by Gary Ricciardi
b) To petition Congress for immediate
action on this project through a notorized
document containing the signatures of no
less than 2/3 of the combined total
population of New York and Oklahoma
who are of Swedish ancestry.
2) To censor such blatant obscenities as
Kentucky Fried Chicken at least to a
more suitable Kentucky Pried Turkey.
3) To petition the U.N. to redefine
international law in regard to the safety
of Every Chicken.
4) To obtain the speedy release of all
chickens who are now being held captive
illegally in penal institutions throughout
the country for crimes of nationality or
political crimes against the hard- boiled
establishment.
5) To declare abortion, as well as
sunny-side-up, unconstitutional.
6) To provide for the future reality of a
National Chicken Party.
7) In summary, to provide aid and
eouncilling to Every Chicken, regardless of
race, color or creed.
The way the American press has presented the Indochinese wars over the past
decade is rife with arbitrary speculation.
An example of such unfounded speculation in objective reporting is a February
25th Associated Press dispatch from Saigon concerning Hanoi's delayed release of
a list of American POW's. The dispatch
says a list of POW's due to be released last
Sunday was not released because, apparently,
"rock-throwing,
shouting
mobs
numbering
North
in
of
the
Vietnamese
banner-waving,
South
Vietnamese,
hundreds....attacked
compounds....in
the
northern cities of Hue and Danang."
to furnish
the list...." The AP reporter
established
nowhere
in his dispatch a
positive link between the anti-North Vietnamese demonstrations and the North's
failure to release the list. Rather, in order,
probably, to meet an approaching deadline, he arbitrarily
linked
the two to-
Possibly, there is a link, but thai reporter's failure to establish one, destroys
whatever credibility
his dispatch might
have had. For all the information tire
dispatcli
contains, the
reporter
would
have been equally justified to link any of
the numerous truce violations-or America's own
recent
bombing
raids over
Laos-to the delayed release of the list.
Although
reporter
no
reason
was given, the
does quote-several
paragraphs
into the story—Bui Tin, the chief spokesman of the North Vietnamese delegation
to the four-party Joint Military C'oiiiniis
sion. in
regard
to the delay. Bui Tin
in an
list of American POW's-explained within
the article as the result of a riot against
North Vietnamese delegations-anil
to
:•:• Only a strange quirk of fate t o u l d cause
'.v t h e Waverly Place issue t o c o m e u p just a
:•: few days after the SA elections were held.
:•; Waverly Place is a stately old house
:•: dating back t o the days when the rich
:•: people of t h e Albany C o u n t r y Club roam
» ed the grounds, long before blue-jeaned
0 s t u d e n t s with Long Island accents invad
$" ed t h e Capital City.
:•> T h e building is located on t h e s o u t h
:•:* side of t h e c a m p u s , an area m o s t people
:•:• like t o forget a b o u t during t h e severe
:•:• winter m o n t h s of Albany
:•:• S t u d e n t
Association President Mike
:•:• Lamport, along with the officers of t h e
:*:• classes of ' 7 3 , ' 7 4 , a n d ' 7 5 , has b e c o m e
tf interested if buying t h e place
;•:• It appears *Ar L a m p o r t believes that the
:•:• house would be an ideal place for various
:•:• activities. Thus, he is willing t o spend
•;ji s t u d e n t tax m o n e y on the project
>|| S t u d e n t Association, incidentally, is the
>!• organization which hold a s t u d e n t opini
£: on poll a few weeks back. It included
£• such m e m o r a b l e questions as w h e t h e r or
•j: n o t t h e word c h a i r m a n should be changed
•j; t o c h a i r p e r s o n for SA dealings
'•:• T h e spending of u p w a r d s of $ 5 , 0 0 0 for
f, an old h o u s e a p p a r e n t l y was n o t i m p o r t
•;> a n t enough t o vote o n . T h e reasoning
•;j: s e e m s t o be that it d o e s n ' t m a t t e r h o w
X o u r elected officials apend the tax m o n e y
y as long as their title is correct.
;•> Nevertheless, the proposal does bear
:j* s o m e merit.
%
This r e p o r t e r never knew t h a t t h e eight
% dollars he has paid in class dues would
All of this is fine, b u t the Albany
S t u d e n t Association still isn't buying.
m a k e him a partial owner of a h o u s e . Mis •$
SASU leaders have a t t e m p t e d t o win over
dreams of a quiet little place overlooking >>
Central Council, b u t their efforts have
the Western Avenue traffic have been :jj:
largely failed. C o m m e n t e d o n e Council
fulfilled long before r e t i r e m e n t age.
•:•: Member. " I ' d like t o see just what o u r
On the realistic side, t h o u g h , o n e can '% m o n e y w o u l d go for. What are we going
just imagine class presidents Richard Max :£ t o got o u t of i t ? "
well, Jeff Bernstein, a n d Scott Waldman :•:•
fighting it o u t to be sure t h a t they get *•
their respective $'2,000, $ 2 , 5 0 0 , and S
And o t h e r s have criticized conferences
$ 4 , 0 0 0 m o n e y ' s worth. It s h o u l d be :g like the o n e hold h e r e this w e e k e n d ,
interesting t o **w what s o r t of plan is ft; charging t h a t n o t h i n g c o n c r e t e was acdevised to d e t e r m i n e h o w m u c h u s e :•;• c o m p l i s h e d and t h a t they are merely a
$ 2 , 0 0 0 is entitled to as c o m p a r e d t o a % drain on SASU funds. Still o t h e r s have
$ 2 , 5 0 0 investment.
£ criticized t h e SASU full time leadership,
11 wouId seem t h e venture requires -y. c o m p l a i n i n g that " t h e y gel most of t h e
m u c h m o r e thought t h e kind that makes £: m o n e y , a n d spend all their time travelling
around the state "
o n e decide to abandon fiscally u n s o u n d -y
ideas.
£:
When asked wi.y he was interested in j>:
that
Of c o u r s e , the leadership
purchasing Waverly Place, Lam pert re -x u n t r u e
plied, "I guess I'm just a r o m a n t i c . " Mr *;
Lamport might he better advised t o do his *:
So what will h a p p e n next year when
romanticising in a canoe on Indian Lake. X;
Lamport leaves is still uncertain T h e
Perhaps he should invite the other :*
special relationship will n o doiihl disap
hackers of the project t o join him at the '.;:•
pear, and then perhaps Albany s t u d e n t
lake No mention will be m a d e of t h e old -x
loaders will feel a need for the s t a t e wide
cliche a b o u t depositing oneself in a cor ••/, s t u d e n t association On tin* o t h e r h a n d ,
tain body of water
v';
perhaps they will c o n t i n u e to believe in
"local a u t o n o m y " a n d withhold the
SIDELINE SHOTS
T h e event which |
$ 4 , 0 0 0 e n t r y dues.
featured FSA assistant Peter Haley recoiv- g
ing a pie in t h e face certainly h a d t o be '•&
o n e of the better highlights of last week's •£
T e l e t h o n ' 7 3 . It seems sort of ironic, 4,
t h o u g h , t o be wasting good food o n o n e £:
of the people w h o is helping t o per «
p o t u s t e high food prices on c a m p u s .
j£
Whatever the case, o n e thing is true
W i t h o u t Albany, SASU will look rather
I n c o m p l e t e . And t h a t does little to help
its bargaining position before either
Chancellor Buyer or t h e State Legislature.
include
Bui Tin's
statement
then
as an
essentially irrelevant and peripheral cause,
is in, without substantiation, make veiy
controversial value judgments in the ills
guise of objective news reporting.
The
journalistic
nonmg
is,
first,
sin
that
behind
such
unfounded
icpre-
indices and misconceptions can be easily
and widely spread in the guise ol straight,
objective
lepoiling, and. secondly, thai
the piess loses the confidence ol those
icaileis who stop loi a moment to examine the speculations ol reportets who
[HCteud only to lepoil the facts.
I he story casually e x a m i n e d here is not
an ex ceptioli. Such reporting is in the
mainstream ol American objective reporluig-as lust encouiaged and populaii/ed
by such publishers as Puht/ei and Ileal si.
Iiuly objective lepoiling does mil exist,
ami possibly
cannot e x i s t . Theie is no
«!ch thing as neutral language.
Neveillieless, until newspapeis liive up
the pielense ol oh|ecIivily, ami pi ml .ill
news in which the lepoilei ts called upon
lo make inleieuces as essentially specula
linn
tins counliy will continue loeinei
w.us Ms population does not understand
|he vuleis will continue in elect caiidl
dales for reasons oilier than then stands
on basic issues. And school children will
continue to learn to distrust and despise
people thousands of miles away, so that
someday they will have the opportunity
lo pay tax
money lor bombs In destiny
them.
Mmwmmmm>mxmmm<^^
PAGE TEN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
\1\0n
we rail read the H e a r s ! n e w s p a p e r s
in town 01 listen to most radio or TV
i n w s Why 1- ihe ASP pruning this jiuoisl
cohl war crap"
There were after all nearly a million
Americans who refused to participate in
I hi I S iv.ii crimes in Viet Nam These
draft
resislors
desertors, rebellious Ol's,
l , \ r s m t i n s c o u n t r y are I h e real h e r o e s o l
article first concerned with the delayed
|:|: by Mike lgoe
I In 11 is
'xcuiie lor the ASP lo prinl
vinii Mai.mi right wing, propaganda News
sources ntliei than AP are certainly
available II the people .111 this c a m p u s
wani ihe hilesi gospel according lo Dick
the success of the cease-fire is Saigon's
To include Bui Tin's assertion
Waverly Heights?
Untaxful
To the editor:
Regarding
your
editorial
on the
" a b s u r d i t y " of spending student lax
money on a c o n c e r t for students instead
of c o n t r i b u t i n g it t o a " w o r t h y " cause,
you are c o r r e c t in calling it absurd hut Tor
the wrong reason. Frankly, the All man
Brothers are simply n o t worth $,'{(»,000
and t o a p p r o p r i a t e that sum for I heir
concert is an a b s u r d i t y . Yet neither are
William Kuntsler a n d Noam ('horn.sk>
worth $ 3 , 5 0 0 . T h e m o n e y , of course, v\;,s
not intended for these speakers hut ratlin
was a disguised c o n t r i b u t i o n lo the Attic.•
Defense F u n d a n d t h e Bach Mai projeri
Tax m o n e y , because it is mandated,
should go t o providing services for
students a n d n o o n e else. If you wish lo
c o n t r i b u t e t o a n y cause, no matter bow
" w o r t h y " , d o it with your own money
not mine. In its decision lo refuse to
make the a p p r o p r i a t i o n to the afore
mentioned speakers Central Council faced
this principle head on and need make no
apologies. But w h y t h e Allman Brother-''
Mitch Frost
By contrast, many of Ihe freed North
Vietnamese
and NLF soldiers were
maimed and suffering from u n t r e a t e d
wounds, Until they received assurances
from Provisional Revolutionary Governmcnl representatives, the detainees did
not know whether they were actually
being released or being taken away t o be
assassinated, as had been the fate of most
of Iheir comrades.
Tbi> condition of the military prisoners
held by the U.S. Saigon side (actually all
Vietnamese captured by t h e U.S. forces
who were not executed or t o r t u r e d t o
death, as was often the case, were then
turned over to Saigon's jurisdiction) raises
Ihe question of t h e fate of t h e h u n d r e d s
of t h o u s a n d s of political prisoners still
being held m ihe jails of the Nguyen Van
Tlueu regime
There has not yet beer any formal
release program worked out under Ihe
peace agreement Tor these detainees, most
of whom are being held in suh h u m a n
conditions, with numerous
recent
in
stances ol torture and assassination, or
slow death from starvation or disease,
resulting horn inadequate Food and sani
lary conditions and nun existent medical
men
unwillingness to release Vietnamese civi-
con timed from page nine
It might make me sad to see that there
are no people in Albany State's community who can write an intelligent political
article.
But the real tragedy is your representation of Bob Mayer and Mitch Frost as
left-wing right-wing debaters.
You might as well wait until someone
comes along and fills the ideological
vacuum on campus, instead of serving
hamburger as steak.
Jack Schwartz,
Underground Press Syndicate,
Washington, D.C.
wounds, t h e returned Americans were
obviously in excellent health. T h e detainees had all been given advance knowl e d g e of their repatriation a n d the terms
of t h e Paris agreement on Viet Nam.
asserted that an obstacle in the way of
lian prisoners arrested for political crimes.
No SASU for SUNYA
To the editor:
However, the story also says, "No reason was given for the Communists' failure
gether.
Side'ines
Meat and Write
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
Blatant Propaganda
To the editor:
And the lies c o n t i n u e ! Now thai Nixon
has his " p e a c e with h o n o r " over the
bodies of a million Vietnamese dead, and
f> million w o u n d e d and homeless, the
propoganda barrage intensifies
The Associated Press dispatch by Hugh
Mulligan printed in I
February 'JO ASP
is a fine e x a m p l e . ' I h e article is entitled
"POW's Survived Malaria, Starvation
Imagine t h a t ! T h o s e dirty loinniies c,i|)
lured o u r c r e w c u l American liberators
who had d r o p p e d b o m b s on then dikes
and cities a n d hospitals and didn't even
feed thum steak and potatoes Wh \ l In
POW's even c o n t r a c t e d malan;
In
jungle w h o Ihe hell doesn'l ' I lies ;\er.
fed the s a m e rice and vegelabh". Ili.ii Itn
C o m m u n i s t soldiers eal Perhaps the.<
h e r o e s i m p r i s o n m e n t should have been
caler-d by Colonel S a n d e r s "
The I'ael is thai almost .ill Aim n< an
POW's are professional, well [Mid I Ovei
IMO.OOO ;• year lor a li ;j 'J. pilot i Naval
..ud Air F o r c e pilot*, officeo and iriiln..• \
advisors working lor Ihe CIA i 1 i e \ are
very different from lb. hall million C! •
o n c e s t a t i o n e d in South Viet Nam, man\
of wh Mil were drafted against I hen will
who s m o k e d d o p e , fragged ollirers, and
often refused to fight ihe Viet names.'
people.
A man w h o lives a h i e ol luxury l.n
from was on an aircraft carrier oi on a
hase in T h a i l a n d , anil w h o each dav has
hreakfasl a n d then flies a coinpleich
c o m p u t e r i z e d plane which rains death
and d e s t r u c t i o n on a society of peasant
farmers is a mercenary and a munlerei
K e m e n i h e r Nuremberg?
Now these
" h e r o e s " r e t u r n with the staged rere
monies and Pentagon prepared speeches
attacking the a i m win movement ami
amnesty for war resistors and com
plaining bitterly a b o u t their treatment by
the liberation forces in Viel Nam
Tile first POW released aclually demon
strate t h e h u m a n e h e a l men I accorded
POW's a n d underscores once again ihe
barbaric savagery of the U S Saigon side
American POW's were returned in dignity
directly t o American officials and except
for those still recovering from com ha I
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
Hi-
,1, p r i s o n s , l i v i n g a b r o a d
\mcrieait
war
iiganisl
or as fug,
Viet
Nam
These me,, who refused lo hltnilU follow
ihe geiioculal policies ol the U S govern
mriil should he guarauleed a sale return
in life in this c o u n t r y
Hopefully, m the future, the ASP wi 1 !
So let it b e with C u r t S m i t h . T h e n o b l e
teachers
Have d e c i d e d Curt Smith is a childish
Marxist.
If it is s o , it is a grievous fault
A n d grievously hath Curt Smith answered it.
N o d o u b t n o o n e would c e n s u r e m y
opinions
{For these teachers are o p e n - m i n d e d
men,
Yes, all of t h e m are o p e n - m i n e d m e n . )
So here I leave my w r i t i n g o n t h e wall
Curt was m y t e a c h e r , inspiring, fine t o
me,
But there are t h o s e w h o say h e ' s n o t
w o r t h keeping.
And all of t h e m are o p e n - m i n d e d m e n .
Curt has b r o u g h t m a n y t o the English
department
Whose interests were t r e m e n d o u s l y pronounced;
Is p o p u l a r i t y cause for a dismissal''
He k n o w s s o much of an exciting genre,
A genre of t h e future, present, past.
Literature s h o u l d be broader than the
minds
Of men t h a t deep down think science
fiction's junk.
(And all of t h e m are open
tided
men.)
I r e m e m b e r myraid discussions
When Curt just added views like one of
us,
Noi diclatorially. Is 1 his dogmatic'.'
Yet there are those w h o feel he is
dogmatic,
And all of Ihvm are o p e n - m i n d e d m e n .
I speak not t o ridicule a n y o n e ,
Hut herf I am tu speak what I do
The Campus Coalition
Shaking the Spear
To the uditot
r'UlKNDS,
TKACIIKItS, FACULTY,
lend me your ears,
I writ.- lo bury Curt .Smith, not lo
nise him
The ten amis caused by men deny their
Then
quail I icahont. are often times ig
In reference t o t h e o p i n i o n poll as t o
h o w s t u d e n t t a x m o n e y s h o u l d be s p e n t ,
I t h i n k it left o u t o n e very necessary item
- t h e need for a fieldhouse. G r a n t e d that
c o n c e r t s are a good thing t o have b u t w h y
n o t have t h e m in o u r o w n
fieldhouse
which is all planned b u t lacks t h e
necessary funds?
A n y o n e w h o uses the p r e s e n t university
gym is a w a r e of t h e o u t r a g e o u s s i t u a t i o n
there. Inter-collegiate s p o r t s , i n t r a m u r a l s ,
a n d physical e d u c a t i o n classes have practically a m o n o p o l y on t h e use of t h e g y m
which
leaves t h e e v e r y d a y
student
looking for some exercise o u t in t h e cold.
Very often we go d o w n t o t h e g y m , take
o u t a basketball, get dressed, start
s h o o t i n g a r o u n d a n d p r o m p t l y get chased
off because " t h i s s p o r t h a s p r a c t i c e " or
" t h a t class needs t h e g y m " .
instead of shelling o u t $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 for a
rock group, or m o n e y t o t h e gay alliance,
or $ M , 0 0 0 t o change WSUA from m o n o
to stereo, w h y n o t direct t h e funds
t o w a r d building ol' o u r fieldhouse, which
was promised h u t never built?
Besides alleviating the dire need for
m o r e physical e d u c a t i o n facilities, t h e
fieldhouse would provide an excellent site
for Ihe c o n c e r t s which are placed so high
on the list hv s t u d e n t s
Andrew Sulzbach,
Eric Eisner,
Alan Fetnei
Ui\mi>_
You all loved literature o n c e , n o t with
o u t cause.
And literature means ' r u t h and h o p e
and life.
0 Knghsh, art thou fled l o fawning
names
And yawning, sluffy, status-conscious
folk"'
Is literature an a c a d e m i c joke'.' Whul are
you teachers l o r ' ' Bear with m e ,
My dreams of what I'm doing here' are
gone
1 (»nly feel contempt...futility..,
SPARTACUS
Getty Them Bock
To the editor:
^ive us sonic news abolil Ihe plight of our
brothers who bravely resisled, ralher than
echo ihe lies ahoul the military robots
the government s poh
vln
Fizz Ed
To the editor:
1 a m writing this letter in the hopes that
it will he printed in the ASP for all
s t u d e n t s with cars t o see I had heard
from many p e o p l e that t h e University
Hetty Station located near the c a m p u s
on Western Avenue was very h o n e s t a n d
did very good work 1 went, there aboul
two weeks ago l o have my car greased
and oiled lief,,re inspection (they could
no) officially inspect [lie car hccaii.se they
do nol have ,, be.-use) They offered l o
give me any advice "free of c h a r g e " about
what the inspector might tell nie was
wronu with uiv ''ar, so Unit I would not
"get t a k e n "
However. I was "really t a k e n " by Mike,
Ihe uwner ol University (Jetty Besides a
hsl ol other tilings that he told m e was
wrong with my car, he lold me that the
shocks were bad a n d should lie replaced
to pass Ihe inspection Knowing very little
aboul the entire m a i l e r , a n d trusting him,
I let him put in tin- shocks
Upon speaking t o my parents, 1 found
out thai my car had new shock absorbers
put m three m o u t h s ago (hat were u n d e r
guarantee 'They were declared l o be in
perfect c o n d i t i o n hy (he c o m puny that
originally put them in G e t t y kepi no
record of t h e price that I had paid for the
shocks I bought from Ihcni (my bill was
not itemi/.ed) and would only refund my
m o n e y after a great deal of pressure from
letters sent t o Ihe Altorni'y General a n d
others
I found o u t that the owner of (Jetty is
not Ihe same as t h e ones w h o previously
gave good service t o the s t u d e n t s T h e
Getty station changed
o w n e r s h i p in
J a n u a r y So. S T U D E N T S BKWARH. T h e
o w n e r , Mike, slil! claims that he is jusfi
hed However, the facta still prove that he
tried t o cheat me out of m o n e y , and that
he might also try t h e s a m e on o n e of
you !!
Marci.i Wimnur
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Cull
WI I t l i ' i
(,,11(111 ,|1|( ,',.,l-i 1
1 1I.1 II
Alii.
Id In.' i v l . i i
,11 III .11 I I I ' !
..ll I ' . l l l '
HV M ' l . l i ' i
(I1I1.1
1 I'C'V.
SUNYA
.'.-. 1 -.-. .1.'
All,, ' i v . N . Y
2T12
•Xlldlll
1 1 llll'S
i«
(1.
The Wheelock Turns
To the editor:
After hearing that Alan Wheelock's days
are n u m b e r e d as a m e m b e r of o u r university c o m m u n i t y , we feel a sense of very
justified indignation. As s t u d e n t s of ibis
m o r e than exceptional i n s t r u c t o r , we feel
il is our obligation t o lei t h e administration, s t u d e n t s , a n d m o r e specifically, the
Fnglish [Department know
The enthusiasm that Dr. Wheelock
brings l o every class m e e t i n g is contagious. Mis love ol' k n o w l e d g e sparks
similar desires in his s t u d e n t s One leaves
his class in awe of his endless wealth of
knowledge, but mure i m p o r t a n t l y , with a
great desire t o expand individually
In o u r impersonal i n s t i t u t i o n , I)r
Wheelock is o n e ol' the lew professors
whose d o o r is always o p e n t o his slu
dents. His willingness to listen and extend
himself Lo Ihem is reflected 111 his widespread popularity on this c a m p u s
T h e sad part of this c o n t r o v e r s y is that
n o b o d y is disputing Dr Wheelock's excellence as an instructor The q u e s t i o n is o n e
of an archaic tradition taking precedence
iivt-r exceptional teaching ability.
We as s t u d e n t s are c o m p l e t e l y disgusted
with an English D e p a r t m e n t w h o arbitrarily dismisses its most c a p a b l e instructors in total disregard of o u r wishes
S o m e a c t u m m u s t be taken immediately,
so that future s t u d e n t s are not denied the
Kit p e r i o r t e a c h i n g ability
of
Alan
Wheelock.
Diane Aronchick
Helen Bloch
llll All
m i 1,
llll! IS
.III,' S t . l l l l '
.KlllllUHl.il
II y . n
lllll'HM.'il
li ill , (
m.n in..
11 W i l l . n i l M i l
!!',• e O i l o n . i l
l|!ll!
CHI
:::;::::,:,;
Hill .11 M'lili'S
l
'""'"" '
Hill . l . ' l )
Y.H
PAGE ELEVEN
I,
Rtfrlgarator - vary good condition.
$70. 4 9 7 - 7 9 3 9 .
I
CLASSIFIED
Second-hand f o l k a n d square-dancing
drosses. Jeanne, 4 5 7 - 7 7 4 0 .
New b e d , desk, dresser, cabinet f o r
sale. Call Mlchele, 4 8 2 1 4 0 4 .
WANTED
W A N T E D D E A D O R A L I V E : Lionel
trains. Quick cash. Call 4 3 9 - 5 1 0 9 .
FOR SALE
19G3
Comet, excellent
running,
4 1 , 0 0 0 original miles, $ 1 0 0 . Call
371-7726.
1965 Volkswagen van w i t h a 1971
engine. $ 2 5 0 . B69-B503.
F o r d step van, engine, transmission,
c l u t c h , all new. Must sell. M i k e ,
785-7910 aftor 6 .
Adorable 1963 Volkswagen.
Call MIKe, 4 5 7 - 3 0 2 8 .
$349.
1968 G T O A / C , PS, radio. Runs well,
body excellent. Mag wheels. $1250.
Call K e n , 489-1626.
Bicycle
459-8329.
1967 V.W. Good running c o n d i t i o n .
Asking $400. Mike. 869-5138.
Refrigerator • good c o n d i t i o n . $40.
Call 4 5 7 - 4 7 3 3 .
1968 Cadillac. 57,000 miles, l u l l
power,
alr-condltioning,
excellent
c o n d i t i o n . $ 1 9 5 0 . 869-8503.
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
earrings 2 for $1
buy 4 pair get 1 free
cigarettes 397pack
very
choap.
Steve,
A l l m a n tickets. 4 8 2 - 5 7 8 1 .
Ticket t o A l l m a n Brothers Concert,
$4. Call 4 5 7 - 7 7 5 3 .
Stereo amplifier - D Y N A PAT-4 Preamplifier w i t h Harman-Kardan Citat i o n 12 power amplifier. 140 watts
RMS, W o r t h $ 4 6 0 , sell $ 2 0 0 . Call
Rich, 457-5255.
excellent c o n Call Cathy L.,
Panasonic
dltlon - m
457-4741.
For Sale: Spalding Q M Skis, 195 c m .
T y r o l la bindings, Koflach boots size
7'/>. $50. Call B o n n i e , 4 5 7 - 4 0 9 1 .
Afro earrings
Everest M u m m y Sleeping Bag. Three
pounds goose d o w n . N y l o n zipper.
Box c o n s t r u c t i o n . $ 5 6 . Used one
season. C A I I : 4 3 6 - 0 3 9 2 • B i l l .
264 Central Ave.
Men's Munari S k i Buckle Boots. Size
8. Excellent c o n d i t i o n . $ 2 5 . Call
Paul, 457-4693.
cor. N o . LakB Ave.
Albany
Canon F T - Q L 55 m r n . 11.2 Lens.
Excellent c o n d i t i o n . Filters a n d lens
h o o d . Call Rich, 4 7 2 - 5 4 4 3 .
in the 'ifilr*'"' Urban Geography and Quantitative
Methods at the University of Minnesota
Will Sneak On
THE SHAPE IN MENTAL MAPS"
LC11
presented by the Department of Geography
Open to the University Community
• t « > » M M » H M M » « M M * * H M M » M » t
Earn extra broad • d o your b i t for the
ecology - Distribute Shakleo Organic
Products (see ad}. U n l i m i t e d Income.
449-8958 ( R o y ) , 482-5632 (David).
ABC D R I V I N G S C H O O L Invites applications for instructos, p a r t - t i m e
now,
full-time
during
vacations.
438-0853.
Roommate wanted (or Fall ' 7 3 to aid
handicapped d o r m student. R o o m
and board in return (or sorvlces. N o
experience necessary. Call Phil at
4 5 7 - 4 3 2 8 aftor 6 P M .
College graduates wanted In Latin
A m e r i c a , A f r i c a , Asia, the Caribbean.
A g r i c u l t u r e , h e a l t h , teaching, and
c o m m u n i t y development
positions
open here and abroad. The choice Is
yours In the Peace Corps and V I S T A .
C o n t a c t : Theresa Martin Division of
M i n o r i t y Recruitment, 90 Church
Street, N Y C , 212-264-7124.
90 H o m e Economics majors wanted
as Peace Corps Volunteers In Brazil,
Ecuador, Jamacia, Ethiopia, Honduras, and Dahomey. See placement
office.
SERVICES
Married Couples- Earn extra money
babysitting p a r t / f u l l t i m e , $ 1 1 7 per
week. Live-In situations available f o r
this semester. University F a m i l y Services Inc. Agency. Call 4 5 6 - 0 9 9 8 .
Woekond
waiter/waitress
wanted.
Must have fluency In Chinese. N o
experience needed. Golden Dragon
Chinese/American Restaurant, 2035
State St., Schenectady. 374-5773.
Waitress. Iron Horse Pub, 15 Colvln
Ave. 1 l : 3 0 a m - 2 p m . A p p l y In person.
1973 STUDENT JOB
OPPORTUNITY BOOKLET
STUDENT JOB
OPPORTUNITY BOOKLET
R.R. 1, Box 11-C, Orleans,
Mass., 02653
• > • •••-• «
Aldenberry Cinema gloriously announces
Riders w a n t e d t o Cleveland, O h i o .
Leave F r l . March 9, r e t u r n f o l l o w i n g
weekend. 273-6840.
Ft. Lauderdale. Riders w a n t e d . Leaving t h e evening o f March 5. Call
John at 4 8 2 - 3 4 9 8 after 6.
Pierce Hall D a y Care Center: L i m i t e d
openings available for this semosler.
N o w accepting applications for this
summer and (all semester ' 7 3 . Please
contact Mrs. Mendinl, D Irector, at
436-0184.
Typing;
Inexpensive,
489-1661.
T y p i n g done at home. Reasonable.
459-1395.
T y p i n g done in my horno. 869-2474.
Papers t y p e d ,
371-7726.
I B M electric.
ler.
p
and N e r v e s "
Well d o c u m e n t e d b o o k s a n d p a m
phlets o n the plight o l South
< hair-nan
-,| tht
namese political
prisoners
D. Gareth
wavi-s. Retr-fishmen-ts
tarn i i | Cornell
in (In talor
Riding
Club
members
needed to
china
Campus C o a l i t i o n l i t e r a t u r e table in
"•'""•.
•'•tvm
the Campus Center L o b b y .
h i i show o n Sunday Rides
- le il .' IK) p m I'iease
Jack Chen
Two guys, 23 and 26, need 3rd
person t o share rent; nice country
house, 6 0 acres. Castloton. 15 minutes
from
university.
$75. Call
732 2 3 6 1 or 482-3498.
LOST & FOUND
F o u n d : Whllesboro
(University College).
Ring
Uolly
F o u n d : Adorable German Shepherd
puppy l o o k i n g lor a loving home.
Call M i k e , 457-3028.
RIDE/RIDERS
WANTED
Ride wanted to B r o o k l y n { or anywhere N Y C ) un Marcti 'J. Call Matt,
7-4032.
Ride wanted to Boston or Fra
mlngham. r- ild.iy, Man h ') altoi
1:30. Mart., / JO/ll
Controversial State I. d.
lhe Aldcn Man
lhe Bahai
I n f o r m a l discussions i
lest
I «
Faith Sunday nile 8 ()(J
All
Oclihie, / 5 1 4 2
Club
Meeting
II
if,
Miv,
.•.
Hoherl
i l y o u have
i tototry
for a theme,
M E N - W O M E N . W O R K O N A SHIP
N E X T S U M M E R ! N o experience required. Excellent pay. W o r l d w i d e travel. Perfect summer j o b or career.
Send $2 lor I n f o r m a t i o n . S E A F A X
BOA 2 0 4 9 - D J , Port Angeles, Wa,
98362.
ii Donna M a r l e l l a l o . 7 5 2 2 9
International
ith
Captain Charlie:
Love your smiling laco. Who's the
kood?
Allocllonatoly,
1ooPunk
Man,
What's going on? 1 miss y o u . . .
Love (torn
your greenoyocl w o m a n
1 ye.
Good-Bayo a n d U.B. Nave Was (or
Is) ih.it really piss on your f a c e ' Does
Assin i
Wtimen's
in is ' . p n n s i i . i i i i l ' i m i . I , . W ; I S I I I I I I |
lull, U.C m i M.in Ii n
I
ll,iiiiii|li April
lira r i i i i s i is $2A l o i l i d i i s i i i i i l . i l i u i i
I..'
I Hi, i
'An
Ii . ,
Boncua
Weekend
II,
nil A. beyins I ii.l.iv
Ltberatutt
I ,,v,'
,,i
/
. , 1 .1 I
I i
II
Mil
ndeo
tape t>l part ol
Tele
I'vciil i-
lor Experimental
n l Apollo
Tlwatn
of Bullae
I,,
Ope,
on Mainagt!
I ml,,I,,-,
people:
and Shath.iMl and
10 a in. Di.mi Shahlial o n Friday arid
Koshe,
I unci, ,).i Saturday, all at
Chapel House (on l u l l , behind i f t r n l
, . m i i,pi The CSI Suite.
This
Episcopal
Sunday
Service ,il 10 3 0
will i onsisl o l (i (leiiple w h o w i l l l e n l
A M HI Chaiiel House A l l P m l e s l a n l s
,.. oin|ii111,i teletype, etui h.ive it i iijhl
welcome
in llieii o w n suite ( n i l Sl.ile Oued] II
contact
ynu .in; if.leiested, .mil w.inl
1489 8 5 / 3 1
inure
I ,,, f u i l h e i
llin
Rev
nilormatiori,
Hamld
Baum
Neuman Schedule for March 5-9:
i•omnitTiiHir.de
Foreign
Lan-
lues H 3 0 A M Prayer
guage Week, live I much D e p a r i m e n l
0 I I I A M Mass
ol the College o l Sa-ml Hose w i l l pro
Wed
sent f x h a i fs of Molu're's Le
12 10 PM Mass
(lhe
Hypocrite)
Tartuffe
I lie c o m e d y , •«:
cnmpfitned hy an I-nglisti n a r r a t i o n ,
11 10 A M Mass
H 0 0 PM
Mass I h u r s
will lake plate in the college audi
t o r i u m o n Madison Avenue.
0 10 A M Mass
Ihurs
1 1 10 A M
Mass
1 i i H 30 A M
Mr. I d
Piayei
will '.peak
o n " I he
Summer
I here w i l l he no meeting
rei anrl song festival w i l l f o l l o w lhe
open in lhe p u b l i c , is admission free.
11uman11 .H"i
presentation
I he
evenl,
ol tl
I n t e r V a r s i l y Chrishan Fellowship FT
day ruglil
Camp
1 3 / . I vuryono wel
I lie. c an nxii'lieiit
- <i -|'< ir liinilY-
\|:.
I'aiholonv
and
STUDENT
summci
Spnnsoied
by
SPECIAL
SAMMYS SAUCERS
Audioloiiy
A n n e . m i l Halliara and Debli.
ITALIAN KITCHEN
and Beth
980 CENTRAL AVE-NEXT TO McDONALDS
I AMNION AND FOSTER CARE
Record
Coon
lie Uo.id I lano
\0peti
knurn
Special this Sunday —Students only
for Students and
Homemade Lasagna
•~~l
UFO tnvestu/ai
\ Faculty preparing for marriage
Siud',
99'
We now have Fish Fries &
Jumbo Hotdogs w/ Greek Sauce
!)2 p m in CC 315
SCall 489-8573 or 489-1561 for more infoS
. m t , K l (iiun
KM C i y u y . i
JEWISH STUDENT S COALITION MARCH
4: KOSHER I M I J D I N N I K
Plus entertaiitmunt 7 |im in Cunipus Ci.'nloi C^luturia
Featuring Ruiidyu Kave. $.&0 -ISC $1.50 nun JSC
I l.tiMiY l l l i l l i c l . i y .
, .'.»iy
tin ASP
N n t t i l n i j (..in In! I ' "
tliiiitj I ..HI v wulnui. I
•
pica
\
W-
WE DELIVER TO CAMPUS
CAl I 489 ?39lj
01*1 N / DAYS A Wi I K
HILLEL: MARCH-APRIL-MAY SCHEDULE
APRIL
. 3:TES
Professor Melvin Urolsky
7: ISRAELI COFFEEHOUSE
II:
1 30 pin in CC 315
A special week of speakers, films, concerts, an Israeli
FORGET!
MM
p.ipi'i is yum
Usl i hancc
f
25: GENERAL. MELT INC.
nightclub and more
7:30 pm in CC 31b
in adveilist;
HI
lor
rulers llll the uwiing
spun). vacation.
• 27: T LS
I'.ISSOVOI 57 1 i A C.ill loi , i " InU'inalion.il
Freedom Sedci
Professor Donald Cohen ut 7:30 pin
JO: DIPPIKILI
Sabbatn Services at Ciiapel House
Wl.l Kl Nl) K L I R I A I
ill 7 5180.
> w > a
^ « t M r
W
SUNYA
E * r g * f » < a ^ * ^ a a B ) M ^ ^
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
F R I D A Y , MARCH?., 1973
Friday at 7:30 pm
Saturday at 10 am
JSC HILLEL BOX 369 BB
**»**"
ELECTIONS
IN HONOR OF ISRALl.'S 25ll. ANNIVERSARY
$3.00, $5.00. II intuiusUid, uiHGdil Immwlialuly
IS..Ml,.
'RIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
inCC315
<>: (.ENLRAL M E E T I N G
i
I
MAY
1 uesd.iy's
1in .i i ulr
MODEL SEDER
• 28 May 5: SHALOM WEEK
20: HEBREW C L U H P U R I M PARTY
•^ DON'I
A Wall in Jerusalem
7:30 pm in CC 315
7: (Wi'd). T L S Roots ul A I I H - I U . I I I /iunism
& m M M * * M j « * . * e « J««K mn. XKK xm<-a*
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Sabbath Services • Every r-riciay
IC.isil.vi'l , I I I 30 p . " .mil Saturday
( h . i i l i l i i . o . i l l ,H !l 3 0 ,i in
pre
/S»;T >;*;-;»;v/;•;•; •»> •;•;• -;•;• •;•;•. -:•:• •:•> •:«;• <»Tso»..»x>3K:>ii^:*r>;*3«^^x;>a«^^
i nc .1..., Illnu 1% M , „
PAGE TWELVE
Quad
l-ni rno.e info call J i n ,
V>r>^T>T^>>T>V>y>>i^OTT>T^>TTySOBOC«CC'5T>^^
' * •
Allen Allman (Treasurer)
Chuck Yenson(Secretary)
• Prvery M u n
,il 6 . 3 0 P M . , C o l o n i a l
I'rotirani" I rrd.iv March 2 al / 3 0 I'M
and Open,
' HluiiUS
The officers class of k74
Jeff Bernstein (President)
Sheldon Svvitwr (Vice-President)
diiy
Spnnsoied b y JSC H i l l e l
Ihank-. h n ,1 IJJU.J
I Happy HiHiiU.iy, H.iby.
In response to the opinion poll we conducted
earlier in the year the Class of '74 is co-sponsoring
the Allman Brothers Concert,
Dues-paying members will be reimbursed
at the concert upon presentation of their ticket
stub and LD.
Learn more about the w o r d o l G o d
Come to a Bible Study
,i i n i i n l h d r . , m n,,xi September t o
ns on Saturday, M a r c h 3 at
ATTN. CLASS OF '74
Science
Speech Clnm
I [ill
Alhany
lEcumenicals
o.'M seiiii'sl.n. . m i l can allure! $ 1 0 5 0
Io
huse
SAU Majors:
Ithaca Speech Cliim
hcijii
in
loh
Computer
Molien-
i oiiH'i
'73 Personnel
4 t h e d i t i o n , in
one, please read i t a n d pass it o n .
Penthouse
ward M,xli|'-r. I)iri!i lor of lhe Ithaca
PAC,
Volunteers:
Handbook,
dorms at mailbox areas. I I y o u take
d e l . i l l s , , , i l l D.iyid Kellei ,n V.il 4 6 5 6
tin the spoils,,.ship ul the
Attention
lean G i i a u d n u x , d u n , led by P H.-i
Telethon
Control
day. A ( i n l b. 1 0 / 3 . at 8 P.M. A caba
Nil, Sun Man h 4 , / 3(1 I'M n, I ,1,
tions
Ili.lliiiuli'l n l l l l l '
m i ' , vuhii is .1
I iiilh',1, l l e p . i l t i n e n l .
M.iuli
to
attend
,II„,W
H :ill n
i r i n a l i o n n u m b e r , / 4(111!)
production
should I
Liberation
M.iyl, Ittell y o u (liny be inteieslrsl in
inleii'MisI in innsir .is well ,is Id
slu.l.'i.l'. n l In.,i.it,ne .mil nlisis. l h e
.inn huiiii Sign UP in t:c n 1 , m <;c
328
Auditions
Dear
Ka r I• Happy
6 mo
anniversary I It's been a fantastl
year! More to c o m e !
Student
are invited
II ynii will he ,i soph.im.iie i n |iin,oi
liinklli
[lislli„|uislKnt srh.iUi . m i l ,i p n i c t i i in.|
p u i ' i , w . l l ,1,-livi'i <i l e c l u i i i n n Browning and the Music ol Music u n Wisl
nilvl.iy, I i'li. 711, ,il 1 I'M in I h i '
C i n i p i , ' , c.'iui'i Assembly II,ill. I IHI
Where to Go
Women's
limin.iiy serviee
Majors & Minors
please call L i n d a W O I U S U H I . I H<J Vi
at A l b a n y
Calling
__
1'mfi'ss.il Intl.,
C U N Y .,1,1,1,
Studies
in I I I ! 3!v1 ,il I :«)(> in
In-;
will h i '
m H you
in Humanities 3 5 4 . A l l persons in
i.in.in iiMM.'hnii (in Suiiil.iy. Miticli A
Man h
State Fair w i l l be here snont'i d u n
Tho S U N Y A
G r o u p has placed copies of The Birth
day, March H, f r o m 11 15 to 12 4 b
in I I I )
i
Mike
Stud-
gram . i n ' HIVIIIKI I n dlteond un iifiun
( I I ' I I I M I I i l i i i l m i l s Willi I I I I I I ' .mil
li.nicis.mw limiuls
you llurik i H u l n w o n ' t be a su
Un;
lliis Siiniliiv. II :«l p m
please contact
Sliuii.'iils i i n p l y m i i I n i t h e Nice Pro-
linn us in ,i German Bier-
.11x1 M U M , . Iwi'i m i l
marijuana
M c G u i r e a t 4 7 2 - 8 5 8 6 or D a n n y Sachs
at 472-7731 as soon as possible. T h e
National Organization f o r R e f o r m o f
Marijuanna Laws ( N O R M L ) campus
chapter needs people t o w o r k b o t h
on-campus a n d in the Legislature.
Sellon, 4 ! , / 8 9 8 /
m LC /
Man h ?.. I M) P M S U N Y A
At h l i i i u j i
A n y students ( o r a n y b o d y <:lse I
interested i n w o r k i n g f o r legalization
of
w i l l be sponsored by
teresteri in the future of Women's
advisor h o r n Peking, China. It)
Wed
<, I t n l u l - d (or M o
_ _ .
Take Action!
— — — - — — . — — — — —
Women's Rights at S U N Y on Thurs
Aid to Indo-
China"
on Women's
— _ ^ _ — - ^ _ — _ .
lhe A l b a n y Chapter of l h e Caucus o n
University, w i l l he
1 uesday. Marcti (j at / JO p m.
Depl
,wy suggestions
Wanted: A call f r o m the girl w h o
stayed up t i l 5;30 A . M . Sunday
talking about Student Government. I
met y o u in Iho Snack Bar Monday
Rocky M o u n t a i n High - A n d y 465-1089.
under
t h e EnglishDeportment
;,nd Poets and W r i t e r s , I n c .
..•••
ies at SUNYA
a research nssis
l h e place is to bo announced
would like to help w i t h n i i f a n i / a t i o n ,
Free,
healthy,
box-trained
affectionate, calico k i t t y needs a
home. Call Betty, 465-95 1 1 .
HOUSING
Porter,
giving a talk on Medical
Thieu's prisons are available ,ii 11u•
w i t h o u t your assistance
Fuck. 4 3 8 - 1 4 6 3 .
is
Sponsorshipof
An open meeting
lliere will he d e m o n
Viet-
Bio
Call
T h e
the
pay for tour of Cyprus
of Phys.cs Students
hmsda
March ( j . ,,i / 3d PM in I'MY 1 7\) [)i
Interested Folk
2195:
I blew the test and t o o k It at
2, Instead.
w o t
event
p a r t m e n t . will speak about "Wave*
The Society
Group
Love,
V.F.
Happy Birthday MM n al
204 V.C
- M o o , K-Llps
M " and maybe Suya
ne,
of
^
Claudine Cassan, R o n A b e l , John
lecture on "Modern
John-John
q l us at
Cimbo J u
Ray.
teaches a t Bard College, i s o n e o f t h e
most promising y o u n g poets n o w
p u b | i s h i n g i a u l h o r o f a large n u m b e r
problems o f w o m a n ' s liberation n
political c o n t e x t . A l l are welcome
Rob,
Happy 20th Birthday, K i d !
experienced.
this M o n d a y , M a r c h 5 at 8 P M i n t h e
Humanities Lounge. M r . K e l l y , w h o
speech pathology and .tiKfiulouy d e
Study
See
DynamiteKeep on p o w i n g t h r o u | h 1ll.lt pile
and maybe someday y o u Will tjei
your reward a chocolal u b i nriy or <i
chuckle.
A n o t h o w h o kr o w s
w i l l read his p o e t r y
The group is f o r m i n g to e x a m i n e t i n ;
Woman's
will be meeting M o n d a y . Miircli 5, at
„
.,
2 p m m the Campus Ceoier Lobby
L )VL".
Kelly
There w i l l be an i m p o r t a n t meeting
to explain the Albany
MathematicsScience
Teaching project on Wednesday, March 2 1 at 7 PM i n L C 2 0 .
Enrollments for the project w i l l b e
started at this meeting. E n r o l l m e n t
4, .H 7 3 0 PM in the PAC Recital
lor science teaching majors is manHall, hckets at $ 2 , $ l . b 0 ;ire now datory. E n r o l l m e n t l o r mathematics
being sold in the PAC Box Office.
teaching majors w i l l be l i m i t e d .
Benefit by University Singers t o help
Coalition's
u irry
Robert
C i m i n o , Dick A l b a g l i . Cindy Ralph,
Larry B r o w n , and Dave Hirsch are
appearing) in "Nightclub
on a Sunday Afternoon/'
o n Sunday. March
slrahons o i musical and voice sound
S T E R E O R E P A I R - reasonable. Ricn,
457-5255.
Murderer
W.C. Finlds stars as
w i l l be shown ai 7PM Friday night in
the Atdcn Maine Lounge. Admission
is free (courtesy o l the SCR).
Clubs & Meetings
—•
— —•
—————
Julio,
bed.
Deadly Professional:
Dentist."
The D o n t i s f w h i l « p e t f ; r Lorre plays
.
ove,
.in v
of t w o
a compulsive killer i n " M . " T h e films
mk^Jm WLMV.M w* tv
Peace & Politics
the
"The
vs.
• liir'WMui
There is n o t h i n g I can t h i n k of
T o bring (jroater happiness
Than giving y o u a d i a m o n d ring
While getting gas at Hoss!
the presentation
more films f r o m its continuing series,
W **» ^ 1 * - < i iT
PERSONALS
Dear Poopsle
1 f l x o d the springs on
you Saturday night.
T y p i n g service. 439-5765.
Book-Hunters
Wanted.
Albany
branch of New York-based literary
search servlco n o w recruiting parttime personnel t o cover A l b a n y and
surrounding areas. Y o u choose t h i
hours and the t e r r i t o r y . Send seltaddressed stamped envelope for complete details. Glggs-Hlll Associates,
P.O. B o x 11122, A l b a n y , 1 2 2 1 1 .
3 =
Ride needed t o T o r o n t o . March 8 t h
or 9 t h . Will p a y . Call 4 8 2 - 4 1 1 7 .
1-
Babysitting - 4 8 9 - 1 6 6 1 .
Part-time rosearch or/clerk for State
Capitol bureau of major newspaper.
Hours flexible. $2.50/hr. u p to $50
per week. Call 4 6 5 - 1 1 6 6 .
For Cape Cod and Islands.
Complete list of businesses requiring summer employees.
Send $2.00 to:
Monday, March 5
.1
L
Mature person to care for 1 c h i l d T ucs. t h r u
Sat. evenings.
Near
MacyV 459-9314.
RALPH SANDERS
7:30pm
HELP WANTED
.
Overseas Jobs - summer o r permanent.
Australia,
Europe, S.
A m e r i c a , A f r i c a , etc. A l l professions,
$ 5 0 0 - » l , 0 0 0 m o n t h l y , expenses paid,
sightseeing. Free Info, w r i t e • T W R
Co. Dept. E 6 , 2550 Telegraph Ave.,
Berkeley, Cal. 94704.
I
I
PAGE THIRTEEN
Wrestlers Close Out Successful Season
Danes Edge Williams - "He Was Always Tough
by BUI Heller
h i m o u t o f t h e m e e t did n o t h e l p
by K e n n e t h Arduino
T h e Albany S t a t e
Wednesday
night
as
off
RPI w o n
Mims g o t
134 lbs. b u t , Larry
t h a t b a c k and
T h e four p o i n t s a d d e d t o t h e 6
p i n n i n g his o p p o n e n t
A l b a n y received via a forfeit at
Mims along with V i d o will travel
118 l b s . gave A l b a n y the lead
t o Brookins S o u t h D a k o t a , this
w h i c h t h e y never l o s t .
w e e k e n d for the N C A A College
beat RPI 4 0 - 1 1 . It was a success-
ners. R i c h a r d
ful e n d t o the 8-3 season. It also
for the last time in an A l b a n y
Moody
wrestling
in
Division C h a m p i o n s h i p s .
The w o r d s are from Paul Shee-
more
w i t h o n e m a t c h left, the
So,
they
things
m a t m e n w a n t e d to go o u t win-
t e a m e n d e d u p a successful season
started
d e m o l i s h i n g his o p p o n e n t 1 1 - 1 .
matters.
wrestling
uniform,
6:14.
Jeff A l b r e c h t closed o u t a fabulous
career
with
the
Great
Danes b y w i n n i n g in 3 : 4 9 via
d e f a u l t . T o o b a d his career e n d ed o n t h a t n o t e and n o t a p i n .
han,
John
school
Quattrocchi's
coach.
The
high
statement
starting lineup and scored over
shooting.
300
points.
tougher
evolved
And
on
Wednesday
from t h e l o c k e r r o o m and slowly
ruin the E C A C bid a n d make it
Last year he
was
night, J o h n Q u a t t r o c c h i showed
built
Troch's
co-captain,
tie
everyone w h o he is and w h a t he
p r o c e e d e d to get really hot and
y e a r s o f playing for t h e Danes
is, as he led
as
as a great team leader
t h e Danes to an
a five p o i n t
meant
a half
up a
p o i n t s and 6 assists h e h a d ac-
tough. He was t o u g h as a s o p h o -
scored 347 p o i n t s and was in the
w a s the last regular season game
65-55 bulge. At t h e 7 : 0 0 m a r k , a
c u m u l a t e d in the game also were
m o r e w h e n h e got t h r o w n in the
l o p ten in the nation in foul
lor the 16-7 Danes, and it w a s
Harry J o h n s o n j u m p e r m a d e it
meaningless. It was all on
foul line.
minutes
from t h e r e .
eighth
place
wrestlers in t h e area a n d lost via
great
in the New York
State
a decision.
captain from F o r t E d w a r d .
night
University
Championships.
Bruce C o m m i n g s wrestled I 67
something no
Albany
for
the senior
Gym
was
co-
to open
it was all
almost
a Williams c o m e b a c k .
b a s k e t s cut the Great d a n e lead
get a b i d . " As t h e Danes walked
to 7 9 - 7 4 . 7 9 - 7 6 . and 8 1 - 7 8 . T h e
off
s t o m p i n g and J o h n Q u a t t r o c c h i
lime left
A l b a n y wrestler.
ed all the g r a d u a t i n g seniors, lint
everyone w a s s h a k y .
Minis
were
in
the finals,
and
b o t h had a good chance to win. I
But the roof fell in, Mims was
decisioned by a wrestler he beat
in
the
SUNY
,
V i d o w a s beaten by Benedict of
U n i o n , the only wrestler to have
rounds
could
get
dropped
injury
who
yet
points
down
only
to
and
Albany
eighth.
to Walt Katz that
it
over.
an
up
and
down
season
for
and had o n e
T r o c h . Tonight w a s u p . He will
year.
Then Williams, playing a physic-
o n d s left. Hob I'alleison hil an
another
victim
to his list,
RPI
al inside game gol going. A Id-J
imconiested
spurt gol lire m i t o i s up hy I I.
game.
as the Great
did
Danes lei I ice cold
noi
lebumul.
Harry
laytip
lo
tie
the
The crowd was in hysterics as
the
hall
inbouuded
lo
lie waved everyone
was
off
J o h n s o n woke the leant and the
Troch.
season is over for the wrestlers.
fans u p wiih i » . . iiimpeis and a
and look it u p c o u r l himself. At
Much
follow-up, and the Danes roared
the
within Iwc. at the half.
fouled; o n e and o n e . So this was
improvement
is
evident
team. 11
The
'.ȣ..
was a good season.
Danes
came o u t
skying
14
second
mark
he
was
it for T r o c h . A loss here might
T h e r e will be a m e e t i n g for all
persons interested in trying o u t
for the m e n ' s varsity a n d j u n i o r
varisty tennis t e a m s T u e s d a y
March 6 at 4 : 1 5 p.m. in R o o m
125 of the Physical E d u c a t i o n
Building.
kept
AM/A
Basketball
Guard
Guard
CenLer
Forward
Forward
.wvwwvwwvwww
Riding Club Presents:
Horse Show
LEAGUE MB
Ira R a b i n o w i t z (Bells)
Walter Mayo (J.J. J o h n s o n )
R o n a l d G a r d n e r (J.J. J o h n s o n )
R o b Geller (The D e a d )
Stu Bellas (Bells)
LEAGUE IMA
Guard
Guard
Center
Forward
Forward
Sun, March 4 Ham
Dutch Manor Stables Western Ave
No admission charge.
Refreshments served
Mr more information call Stacy Frank at 457-4686
lundtid by iludonl tax
Guard
Guard
Center
Forward
Forward
Jim Nangel (Colossus)
T o n y T e d e s c o {Middle E a r t h )
Bill Spenla (A ( Z o o C o m m u t e r s )
Lou Mezzina (Colossus)
Elliot Marcus (Frogs)
Lloyd F i s h m a n ( H o t U i n t a )
K e n n e t h Wasserman (Narcs)
Ron Koss (Kum<|uats)
Ron R o s e n g a r l e n ( K u m q u a t s )
T o m Palmer (5-0)
Guard
Guard
Center
Forward
Forward
Dave Smith (Clanks)
Boh Paeglow (L.A. Lakers)
Isadore J o h n s o n (STB - A)
Boh Bandel ( S H I S H )
Mike Kadletz ( S t a t e s m e n )
LEAGUE 1IIC
The Albany S t a l e U r e a l Dane.
"Pups"
closed
out
their
1972-197:1 season on a success
I'nl n o l e Wednesday night
as
they defeated visiting Williams
hy Ihe score 7ti-li I T h e I'ups.
who saw
eight
p.
leads
dwindle Iwiee in Ihe I'irsl hall',
came from behind m i d w a y in
llie second period, and quickly
Inuke llie game wide o p e n
I'll., gami- o p e n e d Willi Tile
I'ups' Merrill winning the lap
the momentumaround, sending il
|i
huddle
|(J | h l . r
M11i(liml.
Willi
basket
lo.
" »"f' « •r'r'5
Coach Lewis was pleased wilh
Albany missed the l,.,i ami soon
found h. ... II I.el
I by ! |
C Hil'
wi
" ' """•
although he readily
a d m i t t e d hemp cjlille anxious
ovi-i the I'ups inability lo break
William s press late ill the first
half
However.
the
lialflime
bii.l,lie ii.ugliieiied things o u t ,
I the I'ups eatne lliriiugll with
,
III.
"' »
ll
with a :!.'('.IK lead
battle
hi
be...Hie
ll
eaeli
H-.III1
b.ekel
in ke.l .low
.,-
I
pollll
Hailing
ill.
chirk
In- I:' I .1 mark
Will,.nils
w.i
LEAGUE HID
T h c b c i g e , w l . . . laid
Guard
Guard
Center
Forward
Forward
Billy Mueller ( E E P )
Jay S i m o n ( S l a u g h t e r h o u s e
Bob Linn (Avengers)
O t t o G o m e z (Los T a i n o s )
Hal Malmud (Dirt Bags)
r>)
Guard
Guard
Center
Forward
Forward
W E E K E N D
}
2 ,3,4
Gary G u h i U (Capias)
Zaeh Alhahae ( A p a r t m e n t s )
Jerry R o t h s c h i l d s fDe-war's 5 t h )
H o w a r d S u m m e r s (Cop-las)
Dave Waterman (Meniax)
N o t e : There were no All-Star teams
selected from Leage IV.
the
LEACUli
I
was
Ihe
I'ups
IllM
S polltl
|„l
J
each
Snow Sculpture behind CC
FREE Hot Cocoa,
ca$h Prize$
..I
lead
..peiiine
."
sunk
.,
baskel
'••
,,,.1
Isapnei
III,
w.lh.n
,1,1.1, n h
:;, mil eventually I"-d Hu <>•"
..in.
IN
all
Ihe
An.',
Pups
taking
came
Guard
Cliff McCarg ( E E P )
Guard
Carl -Jones (Old T i m e r s )
F o r w a r d Dennis J a c k s o n (Old
Timers)
units can,.- r o a r i n g back
'
lead on
shoolingol Theberge
o n c e ,,g,i,„
.1 points.
I,
a linn
aim
again b u i l d i n g a l i o , , . . m l
within
I"
_
,
,,m
n||(
.Mrl
(|||.
^
and
Will
ear,'
Fori unaiely
III,
«.
'
be
I'up
enlllan
a.
,
be
oliei.e.
the
.,,1
I ,.
«•
< h-
I
'"
i
•,k<
I., all
I..-K
,
Wll,
n W i l l i .III
iaI, " l l
; .ir.ughl liu-kel
ill
tl
. . I'
t.,1,
w
William
.I.e..I
Ihe
Brad liiggs (Old Timers)
Dave Reynolds ( A P A )
'''•"
' '
l.tsenniun .mil
n o n e r o a r i n g back
all
.'"I " " "
First Team
Forward
Forward
I'ou.
' l'la\
began
„„d
and in
lied
ivillun .. n u n . I L
al
sponsored by I.Q.A.
Kame
Kisemnan. and
Friday Afternoon
""' Pul>s
season.
I,,,,!, hit both shots, and turned
by N a t h a n Salant
LEAGUE NIB
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ' • • • ' • • • ' • • (•u r' u•l o'd •By• •• . •l u r•j o' u•l — I
Info in CC Lobby W I N T E R
proy for snow
M < j r c h
Paps Top Williams JV
All-Stars
LEAGUE IIA
s
were
be o n e hard man to replace nex t
from last year's 5-5-1
An
fans
lo m a k e II H I - 7 9 . Willi 21 sec-
Except lor Mims and Vido the
Jeff
the
was smiling. T o u g h . It has been
I timed
fouled
court,
and o n e . Ik' m a d e jusl the first
Danes ..II
and
six th
Small gol
the
h. an K-3 itisli.
p i n n i n g his o p p o n e n t from
finished
oil
and
the
in 6 : 1 7 .
Albrecht
ripped
Danes
seconds
six points in ihice m i n u t e s to pel
Herman won via a
But A l b a n y might have held on
ation
Hymn
The
was 57
beaten, frank
ed
with some points in the consol-
when
to the line. " I was
really got s t a r t e d , and was easily
forfeit and then R u d y V i d o add-
b e a t e n him all year.
standing ovation
A psyched
to go o u t a winner as he never
Championships,
pave Byron Miller a two
the hcsl was yet In c o m e .
Senior J i m Dickson was unable
put i t ) " had personal t h o u g h t s as
t h i n k i n g if I missed we w o u l d n ' t
he was i n t r o d u c e d and applaud-
Larry
He hit a
shoot foul shots (as Doc Sauers
he walked
t h e fastest pin of the year by an
and
the
shot put it at 7 7 - 7 2 , successive
minute
Vido
17
e m o t i o n a l Great Dane loyalists.
They
Rudy
The
j u m p e r to m a k e it 7 3 - 6 5 , a foul
wrestler has d o n e all year; pin an
round,
now.
p a c k e d , and the fans were noisy
o p p o n e n t in 30 s e c o n d s . It was
semifinal
nothing
T h e "best m a n in the world to
third
the
downhill
Dick Small scored ten to pace
ed p r e t t y g o o d . Albany was in
place after
three
scored four b u c k e t s in t h r e e and
last
did
game. The
83-81 squeaker over Williams. It
71-59 but
and
last
He
player.
fitting that it turned out to be a
Last w e e k e n d everything look-
Troch
and a great clutch
T o m H o r m faced o n e of the t o p
weekend's
lead.
summarizes T r o c h ' s w h o l e style:
t o o k some of the sting o u t of
finish
#/
US
I.
a
-bull'
il » .,• ., '••
Hill
I " "
late
U
MMMTOu^B
Second Team
Friday Nite
Special Dinner in Patroon Room w/Music
Semi-Formal
Saturday
S k i i n g Buses leave for West Mountain at 8:00
and start back at 4:30
Sunday
Sunday Nite
— — — — « • — —
PAGE FOURTEEN
JY\
11 IV
mix.,. -HkX
UCB Presents a CONCERT
Saturday Nite
mhs&.Jv-'
ONCE A KNIGHT PIP COME
UPON A PRAGON WHO PIP
OFFER FOR THE PRICE OF
TWO 6-PACKS OF SCHAEFER
BEERE SARTORIAI SPIENPOR
Ice Skating on the Lake FREE Hot Cocoa
Tobaggoning at Mohawk FREE Buses
-
.....-.-.•
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
fi. \%Jrtf€\ IJM
Luis Kosario ( D u t c h m e n )
Chris Burke (Hkapis)
Mike Kilmade (Hkapis)
Carl llickson ( D u t c h m e n )
Rich Newmnrk I APA)
• •
\
v
-
ACCEPT THIS
ME KNI&HT « P ,ACCm
^Wo
'
PIP PROCEEP
TO
ALTER THE KNIGHT'S
O F F E
^
/
^
W V > _ - J
^
o
"
-
' -
.„,,.„.,,., u „ . v » . , „ . . , N e w r o i k . N Y
B a l l i i u o i c . M i l . I etne,li Valley, I'.,
•••••••••••«•••••«••••••
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1973
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE FIFTEEN
Stau Unlnnlty of Naw York at Albany
TUESDAY
Friday, March 2, 1973
A^ANY
S T U D E N T /
PRESS
Potsdam, RPI Picked For The NCAA's
Vol.
LX, No. 14
Sate University of N«w York at Albany
March 6, 1973
Lomperf on ISA:
Albany Looks To The ECAC's
'...But the Survival of the Corporation Comes First../
by J.S. Flavin
by Bruce Maggin
The Albany State Basketball Team's hopes for post-season play
now rest upon the ECAC selection committee with the naming of
Potsdam as the fourth entry in the regionals by the NCAA. The
NCAA will probably pick two more teams to complete the field,
including RPI. Albany, however, isn't in the running for the remaining spot because only two teams are allowed from one conference.
Brockport and Potsdam will represent the SUNYAC.
The teams that appear under consideration for the ECAC upstate
tournament are Union, Siena, St. Lawrence, Rochester, St. John's
Fisher, LeMoyne and Albany. Albany's chances for a bid in this four
team tourney are excellent. They have the best record oTany of the
other teams. The bids will be announced this weekend. There is a
good chance that Albany will host the ECAC's.The only problem is that
the dates for the tourney are on March 9 and 10. This conflicts with
vacation. Hopefully, if the tourney is held here, some arrangement
can be made to keep the dorms open an extra day or have the finals
played on the afternoon 'if the tenth.
November,
1971. Executive
Director of Faculty Student
Association Robert Cooley
presents "his" budget to the
board. Cooley's cure to FSA's
financial woes: a fifty dollar
hike in resident board contracts.
The key student representative
on the FSA board, Michael
Lamport, approves of the hike.
Reason: "The hike is necessary
for the survival of FSA." However, general student unrest over
the exploitation
of resident
students persuades the board to
adopt an "austerity budget
calling lot greater efficiencies in
the ISA operation and a cul
back m all ISA program items."
3 -->'
%i
Nun: A new Executive Drrectoi. Nuibert Z.ilmi. is calling lor
a -1'' across-the-boaid hike in all
ISA Food Service units and
board contracts.
I *&>
Seniors'
"I am still in favor of a hike in
board contracts in principle."
Lamport explains. "The reason I
was againsl voting lor the 4'"
Action
Joel Lustig, a student FSA
board director, wants to see an
entire FSA budget, but Zahm
claims he does not have adequate time to draw up an entire
fiscal budget. Students are speculating that Zahm is holding out
for the <\7t increase so more
funds may be appropriated to
program expenditures and/or
fewer cuts in FSA losing operations
Lamperl
maintains
that
enough of jiast sludge has been
raked to the surface and that it
is now tune to say "where aie
we now and where do we want
logo."
In taiiiK'ss. I ampert notes that
llieic aie now loin voting siudeuts on ISA's board. Three
yeais ago there was only one
Also, the whole hoard is new
and parts of FSA's management
are new.
"There are new people here
now. It was the old FSA corporation that screwed the students.
The new FSA corporation has to
get the job done. I am troubled
by the fact that FSA needs a
S500.000 buffer to carry it
through hard times and away
from constant bank dependency,
and that the $500,000 buffer
has to be raised from resident
students, but survival of the corporation comes first."
1 1 1 1 "<
pages 14, IS
Other groups in the University
Community, ibesides FSA, will
pick up the funding of events
that the State of New York does
not provide for. Then FSA will
be out of that business, and
perhaps resident students will
not have to carry its burdens.
rhe I u Hi n- ol ISA ami its lole
in the 1 : niwisii\ Community is
muddy at present Lampeil is
not convinced that ISA should
share its "piofits" dneetly with
students
"We have Student
Association. It is the lepieseittalive ol the student body I am s i
againsl quads electing directly §1
I S A board members. FSA
should be working towards a
"I am convinced that a (board) hike is necessary." - Michael Lampert,
break-even budget., alter raising
SA President
The University Parking Situation as it Stands Now
Beginning Monday, March IV. 107.i. the day that classes resume altei the Spiing break,
all uptown parking lots with the exception ol lots 3 and 4 (located south ol the
Administration Cir--' i and the visitor's lot will be on a first-come, fust-serve basis.
The action results from months ol hassling ovei the paiking situation . T h e move to
desegregate parking lots was initialed early last semeslei when discontent was voiced
over the priouiy parking policy effected and enforced by Security. Undei that policy,
resident students were delegated to the rear of the lots, while commuters had the middle
section and faculty/staff the section closest to the podium.
Opponents of segregated paiking argued that the practice was unfau and discriminatory, and advocated open paiking on a first-come, first-serve basis.
last Octobet. dissatisfied Willi the Administration's inaction on tins and othei related
grievances. Central Council wrote and passed Hs own paiking policy and called upon the
student body to ignote the official university policy This stnke set oil a iniiubei ol
actions winch culminated in revision of the paiking regulations.
fins change will not affect any olliei section ol the paiking regulations. Parking on the
pebbled aieas around the podium and quads will be available only to those holding
medical and special permits.
It was seniors' nigh. Wednesday for the> Albany State Great Danes graduating ballplayers. The top senior was co-captau, John Qualtrocchi wlmsc foul shot (pictured b o . t o m T h , ,
was the difference as Albany nipped Williams 83-81. Slory on page 15.
"»""
a half-million dollar buffer surplus. Profit sharing is not necessary. There is no direct correlation between number of proposals on a ballot and the degree
of representation of those
voting. There are limits to participatory democracy."
Lamperl is convinced that a
4'.? hike will be enough for FSA
to "get the job done" and small
enough to keep the pressure on
Zahm to make liuthci efficien-
Parking Changes Outlined
photos by rob magnien
Cagers, Pups, Wrestlers All Win
increase was I wanted to see the
figures first and do my own
computations. 1 am convinced
that a hike is necessary, but I
/
want to see the figures first."
Appeals Committee Appointed
l.asi October, a Paiking Appeals Committee was appointed by the University
Community Council lo deal Willi written appeals from persons receiving tickets issued
by the campus police. The I1 AC functions as an autonomous decision-making committee
to act upon such appeals.
Aside from reviewing written appeals, the Committee holds hearings for those
individuals who wish to explain then situalion in person. Personal hearings are
scheduled by mail should the appeal form indicate that a personal hearing is desired.
The iiiles currently being enforced and interpreted are ihosc published in November of
1072 as "Paiking Traffic Regulations. SUNYA" which are issued upon vehicle
icgislialion at the Security Office
The appeals procedure is as follows:
1 Appeals aie made on a slandaid NCR lonn available al ihe Security Office.
2 Appeals must be submitted within three days of receipt of the ticket.
.t If a personal heating is desired, it is scheduled by mail
4 Ihe Committee gencull) meets on Wednesdays from 10:30-11:30 a in. and hears
scheduled appeals from I I 0U-11 JO, or by special arrangement.
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