Two Students Die At Louisiana Campus m

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m
Two Students Die At Louisiana Campus
Vol. LIX No. 48
continued
from page
In an interview after the area a r o u n d the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
building h a d been cleared, Amiss told r e p o r t e r s : "We heard
t w o pistol s h o t s , s h o t s from a pistol that c a m e from t h e
While G o v e r n o r Edwards rushed t o the c a m p u s to confer
Ironically,
the
was
shootings
rushed officers and had to be repelled with tear gas.
c a m p u s in N e w Orleans.
continued
into
the afternoon
missies at
police
and
at
the
the s a m e
State
Board
time
of
of buildings at a sister S o u t h e r n
University
of
T h e 9 , 0 0 0 - s t u d c n t Baton Rouge c a m p u s and the 2 , 9 0 0
Fires
s t u d e n t New Orleans c a m p u s of the u n i v e r s i t y - t h e n a t i o n ' s
as crowds
newsmen.
that
E d u c a t i o n scrap a p r o p o s e d solution which ended s t u d e n t
with Amiss, a c r o w d estimated by police at 3,000 to 4 , 0 0 0
threw
occurred
recommending
occupation
Trouble
damaged t w o structures, one of which was the registrar's
largest
predominantly
office h o u s e d on the first floor of a university building.
broiled
in
boycotts
black
since
university-have
mid-October
when
been
began pressing their d e m a n d s for m o r e s t u d e n t c o n t r o l of
a d m i n i s t r a t i v e aflairs.
C r o w d s of
described
s t u d e n t s gathered
One
Edwards had met with s t u d e n t s from the New Orleans
c a m p u s o n l y this past S u n d a y t o discuss their o n g o i n g
b o y c o t t '.f classes and their earlier takeover of buildings.
extensive.
The c a m p u s was blocked
deputies.
One
hundred
by state police and
National
Guardsmen
sheriff's
were <>n
university g r o u n d s . Four hundred mine were ordered out
impossible to discuss constructive changes.
After t h e shootings at Baton Rouge y e s t e r d a y . Edwards
Governor
no further efforts t o solve s t u d e n t p r o b l e m s "il they d o
Edwards instructed the officers to " d o everything yn can
not have enough confidence in me t o go back to classes
to prevent violence. We've got to maintain c o n t r o l ! "
peacefully
In
sending
the
guard
onto
the
campus.
200,000
the
Baton Rouge Mayor D u m a s s p o k e in a similar vein after
the b a t t l e . " T h i s is the price you pay for a p p e a s e m e n t , " he
violence had not s t u d e n t s fired or t h r o w n the lirst tear
said. " A n d
gas."
worst."
he said. T h e governor claimed he had seen films of
There wan one step taken Lhal will have some consequences for the
university community. The Board decided to close the Patroon
Room at night beginning next semester, a move that Zahm estimates
will save I he corporation about five hundred dollars per week.
"Special Functions," those specially catered affairs, will be operating
on a breakeven basis only during the evening. This saves students
the expense of underwriting them, something the students were
doing indirectly through their mandatory meal contracts.
It was only a partial political victory for the student representatives, some of whom had been arguing over the last few months
lhal students shouldn't have to underwrite losses the Patroon Room
and Special Functions incur during the day either. But the majority
of the board members obviously felt such a step was a little too
drastic and a little too unpopular. So students can continue to pay
off the Patroon Room daytime deficit. It is one of the little
pleasi -es one gets from being a part of a liberal university
com mi lity.
and can give me t i m e to solve their p r o b l e m s . "
shootings on t h e s t u d e n t s . " T h e r e would have been no
At a news conference held later, Edwards blamed
300,000
He told t h e m a c o n t i n u e d o c c u p a t i o n would m a k e it
again criticized s t u d e n t p r o t e s t o r s , saying he w o u l d m a k e
as a bolster force.
by Al Senia
It hasn't exactly been the easiest of trial periods for FacultyStudent Association Acting Director E. Norbert Zahm. He has spent
his first semester watching FSA drive itself onward into backruptcy,
a legacy of his corporate predecessor Robert Cooley. He has faced a
university community that looks upon the corporation he heads
with attitudes thai range from detached indifference to outright
hostility. He has seen students who talk of unionization. And he has
faced that worst corporate nemesis of all---a slow moving bureaucracy.
That bureaucracy, better known as the FSA Board of Directors,
had another one of its monthly meetings shortly before the
Thanksgiving holiday break. About the most significant action the
student, faculty and administrative members of the Board took was
the decision to delay deciding significant action until the next
meeting, set for December. Norbert Zahm left the meeting without
much to be thankful for. Il was that kind of day.
400,000
Damage was
to watch.
the (ires as " h e a l t h y . "
Other Action Deferred
1970
500,000
em-
Firemen fought the blazes under the protection ol sheriff
fireman
Belt Tightening Foreseen o$ FSA Losses Continue;
Directors /Meet, Shut Patroon Room at Night
students
A b o m b e x p l o d e d in a n o t h e r building.
deputies.
Novmbar 28. 1972
the i n c i d e n t showing a cannistcr hurled t o w a r d officers as
t h e y a p p r o a c h e d t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n building.
Edwards
crowd."
students
Stan University of New York at Albany
one
il you appease p e o p l e , you can e x p e c t
the
The Bos. -d also derided to sell a piece of property, Waverlj Place,
as a way of increasing day to day operating cash, and so pay off
expenses and debts The action was one of the seventeen "recommended actions" Zahm uave to the Board for "immediate action, so
as to provide Ihe greatest amount of savings and income possible."
The rest of thai specific proposal was thrown to a committee for
further study In fact, inosl of Zahm's proposals were tossed to
committees for further study.
The Board talked for awhile about ending support for Mohawk
Campus and the Goodman Property which would save some
$12,000. "This is one of the program items we just cannot support,"
Zahm I old the Board. But his employers remained unconvinced,
especially since new evidence suggests both properties may break
even at year's end. So the matter was postponed for further study
AnulysiH of Churls
As the Lop graph shows, I*\SA's preseru monetary dilemna did not occur overnight. To stay financially
solvent, FSA must increase income and cut operating expenses. The bottom chart lists suggested
alternatives and dollar savings. Students should be assured by KSA Management and directors that no
increase in board rates will occur until all other alternatives are utilized.
It is no longer a secret that meal contract profits subsidize all of I*\SA's losing ventures ($1,280,000 in
four years). The fact that meal profits have done so tor over five years and will continue to do so for the
immediate future is appalling. The main goal of the new management and Board of Directors should be
to change this exploitation of undergraduate resident students.
If it does not seem ethically or morally logical to coerce students to subsidize FSA aL a greater rate,
losses will have to be cut. To cut losses, services will have to be cut. To cut services, some members of
FSA's Board of Directors will have to face reality and cut into his or her own baliwick, i.e.: close the
Patroon Room, partially or entirely; discontinue Special Functions partly or entirely, end support of
Dorm Directors' and their guests' free meals (FSA has often been used to increase benefits that state
funds did not or will not cover).
J.S. Fluvin
Zahm's Recommended Actions
Sheriff deputies wheel an injured student from the scene of the tragedy at Southern University (AP
Wirephoto).
•PAGE
TWELVE
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
EM
Louisiana State Troopers wear gas masks as they guard the
entrance to the administration building at Sourthern Univeristy in
Baton Rouge (AP Wirephoto).
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER t 7 , 1972
1) End support of Mohawk 0 ampus. Dippikill, University Funclions at end of fiscal year
2) Limit F S A . support of loan
fund to $15,000.
3) End Hoard support of Residence Directors.
4) End support of Infirmary
meals.
5) Close dining hulls beginning
of Commencement week.
6) Mandatory summer Hoard
contract.
7) Mandatory Board contract!
for graduate students.
H) Increase Board Contracts for
undergraduate students SI5.00
per semester.
9) u) Sell houses; l>) Sell Goodman house; c) Sell Mohawk
Campus.
10) Increase Check Cashing to
$.20.
11) University support of Executive Park.
12) Close I'uiroon Room and
Special Functions in evening.
13) Convert to partial vending in
Campus Center.
14) Close Cafeteria, I'alroon
Room, Special Functions.
15) Reduce direct operating expenses in Bookstore.
16) Reduce direct operating expenses in Food Service.
17) Reduce account expenses.
There was talk of ending support for meals of Residence Directors.
But the expected report was not forthcoming, So it was postponed
for further study.
There was talk of closing down some, or all, of the dining halls
during commencement week. But there were discrepancies over how
much money would be saved and how the students would react. So
H was postponed for further study
There was talk of raisint" the cost of cashing a check from fifteen
cents to twenty cents, a move that would bring in about $0,000. But
SA President Mike Lampeil said the amount of money involved was
inconsequential compared to what would be saved by adopting some
of Zahm's other sixteen options So the matter was postponedprobahly for yood
Tin
/as talk of geiiinn FSA out of its lease in the plush
Kxecul ive Tower office building. Bui Zahm felt this was the Board's
responsibility and the Board fell Zahm should take the initiative. So
the $;{•!,0U0 saving was postponed for further study.
There was talk of converting Campus ('enter food operations to
partial vending. Bui il was not entirely clear how much would be
saved from this So the matter was postponed until the Campus
Center Food Service Manager could provide an analysis.
And so it went. But the meeting was not all drudgery There were
moments of excitement as well
There was Norb Zahm explaining how Ihe bookstore would be
$H0,0U0 in the red at year's end "at best " There was President
Benezet stating that "The presenl retrogression (in the bookstore)
alone could put the corporation into bankruptcy "There was Zahm
again, detailing how the Food Service cash business "Is going down,
down, down."
And then there was this memorable dialogue
decreasing sales pictures many of the corporation's
lienezet "We have a very serious loss in sales...a
in overall resources that could threaten our credit
that too strong a statement?"
Zahm "No, I think it's perfect."
concerning the
operations face:
continuing drain
lines in April. Is
i
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T h e person w h o reigned over
the Catholic Church for t w o and
a half years as " P o p e J o h n the
E i g h t h " was actually a w o m a n
whose term was cut s h o r t when
she died in childbirth.
Lawrence Durrell—who is best
known for his Alexandria
Quartet novels—has just c o m p l e t e d a
book called Pope Joan. According t o Dun-ell's b o o k , t h e n i n t h
century Pope b r o k e with C h u r c h
law in more than o n e r e s p e c t not only was P o p e J o h n t h e
Eighth a w o m a n , she was n o t
chaste: during t h e day, P o p e
Joan reigned over C h r i s t e n d o m ' s
faithful; b u t at night, she reportedly entertained a 20-yearold paramour.
Although the Church has held
that t h e "Papissa J o a n n a " s t o r y
is merely a m y t h , other writers
before Durrell have asserted t h a t
Pope J o h n was a w o m a n . Included among these was a highly-regarded Church
historian
named Platina, w h o w r o t e a b o u t
Pope Joan in his "Lives of the
Popes."
*****
Claude Lazevis' restaurant in
Paris has surprised almost everyone by announcing t h a t it is
operating at a profit after o n e
year of business.
Why the surprise? Because
Claude's restuarant, called " T h e
Sampiere Corse," d o e s n ' t present its customers with a check.
Instead, eaters are told to pay
what they can afford. People
who are broke are actually encouraged t o eat w i t h o u t p a y i n g a
penny.
The Parisian restauranteur is a
dedicated c o m m u n i s t w h o is
convinced that people—if given
the
opportunity—really
will
share what they have. T h e restaurant has no checks, no cash
registers and no cashiers. Instead, people merely put their
money into an open cash box
and take out the change they
believe they are entitled to.
So far, the concept is working.
*****
Berry Oakley, t h e bass player
fur the Allman Brothers, died in
Macon, Georgia, less than two
hours after telling police he
didn't need any medical attention.
The 24-year old Oakley was
reported injured alter his motorcycle collided
with a city*
operated bus at a Macon intersection. Police report t h a t Oak
ley was bleeding from the nose
and
was
(quote)
"visibly
s h a k e n " by the a c c i d e n t - b u t
that he refused to go to a hospital.
Less than an hour later, Oakley
reportedly collapsed a n d was
rushed by friends to the Medical
Center of Central Georgia where
he died 45 minutes later. T h e
scene of Oakley's m o t o r c y c l e
accident was only blocks away
from the site of a bizarrely
similar
motorcycle
accident
w h ich claimed
the I i fe of
Dwayne Allman in O c t o b e r of
last year.
The Allman Brothers band had
been scheduled to appear with
(he Grateful Deud in t w o Houston c o n c e r t appearances. T h e
group had just finished taping u
television special at Hofstra University, and was r e p o r t e d l y half
way through cutting their latest
LP.
*****
Five c o n s c i e n t i o u s objectors
w h o have b e e n doing "alternative s e r v i c e " in a Boston Hospital instead of draft duty, have
been t h r e a t e n e d with Federal
p r o s e c u t i o n in a landmark case.
T h e reason behind the prosecut i o n is t h a t t h e hospital where
t h e five m e n are working has
been on s t r i k e for the past two
weeks—and t h e five are refusing
t o cross t h e picket line. Massac h u s e t t s S t a t e Selective Service
D i r e c t o r V i c t o r Bynoe has ord e r e d t h e m e n to return to work
i m m e d i a t e l y or be (quote) "rep o r t e d t o t h e United States at
torney
for possible prosecut i o n . " B y n o e stales it is a viola
t i o n of t h e i r alternative service
obligation for the men not to
w o r k full t i m e .
The
five
conscientious UIHPC
tors—John Szymanskl, Hubert
Nason, J a m e s Trie-ken Roger
M a n n e t t a n d Jeff ('arty insist
t h a t t h e y are protectee! under
t h e N a t i o n a l Labor Helaiium
Act which gives them like all
citizens, the right to strike fur
certain grievances The ( S -H
t o r n e y ' s office is ex pee led ii
d e c i d e this week whether ti wil
proceed
with
p rosecuhoii:,
against the m e n .
T h e B o s t o n case is coiwr|em|
i m p o r t a n t because hundreds »
other
conscientious objector,
a r o u n d the nation arc- cu 17 entry
w o r k i n g in hospitals. I'mon mn
d i e t s in those hospitals will pre
sent similar challenges to thi.
U.S. a t t o r n e y ' s office
If President Nixon's UN
inauguration is any ind
his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s war n
tion isn't working very *<
Inauguration
cererrton
Washington, D.C., this •
are e x p e c t e d to cost i.i
nearly t w o million dollar
gress has already appro
$ 4 0 0 , 0 0 0 — m u c h of win
be used to build the plat I
which t h e o a t h of offici
ministered. T h a t plat I'orn
ing built at a cost of Si-Tit will be used for [ess ilia
hours.
N i x o n ' s $2 million HI
tion c o m p a r e s to tin- >
which the governmeni
184 1 t o swear in Pre-id.
liam Henry Harrison
s h o w t h a t Franklin \'« •
inaugurated
in i e-ein< M
1853 that cost $5 17 '• I
George
"father
bis
Art Exhibits Threatened
Serious
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
ing
Statistics may s h o w that c r i m e
on c a m p u s has decreased this
year, but s o m e people will tell
you, "It s been brutal " T h a t ' s
h o w K e n n e t h Blaisdell. assistant
director of the C a m p u s (.'enter
would describe the vandalism to
art exhibits ibis year
T h e past lour shows e x h i b i t e d
in the C a m p u s ('enter have all
had prints stolen from t h e m ; a n d
it's not jus! ii m a t t e r of walking
off with .1 loose piece of art
work In the last show, e x h i b i t e d
in the ^nr! flour display cases.
seven .lames Poseibco p h o t o graphs I valued at $110) were slo
ten To e.f| at one of the prints.
Ihe \.ind,-I cracked a sheel ol
optically
perfect
pU-xiehrss il
will cosl S.,U to replace
Karbcr this year three prints
were stolen from the Marty Ben
lannii exhibit, as were loin ex
pensively
aircraft
cm
f r a m e d p r i n t s ol
Curiously
W o r l d and the
and
litis
Ihe
' F.K-CS ..I
survived
though
VUV I
"Mi
Atmosphere"
India
then
- xlll
.lluwMigs
art
work
our
of
ceremonies
that
this
campus,"
commented
pointed out
that
lure
He
pieces o f sculp
displayed
in
the
Patruoii
Room
Lounge
I its I m o n t h
poorly
treated
by
Students
oil
the
propped
tile
statues
uncommon
to
iheir
and
find
were
students
feel
il
up
wasn't
a cuke
perched atop an expensive
can
piece
(if art
The
are
expenses
nothing
might
have
permanent
pus C e n t e r
incurred
compared
happened
ail
work
h a d Hut
so
to
far
what
if all
i n the
been
the
d m
bulled
clown
" T h e things that
walk w a l k . " said Blaisdell
cienl
the
University
then
cniuyinent
ih
effi
the
cycling
program
The
tetlance
staff
often
refused
separate
the
garbage
bum
cans
and
often
cyelable paper
il
until
disposed
it c o u l d
re
be c o l l e c t e d
recycling
Sl'NYA
to
the
ul
seemed, until recently, thai
scale
re
Main
instead of storing
unless
II
large
would
fail
il
instllu
was
Both
w e r e g o i n g I n be
place
.,11
the
J,i < |
The major issues of the PYE
proposal involve t|ie actual imp l e m e n t a t i o n of such a p r o g r a m .
The plan is t o institute a " t w o
basket s y s t e m " for paper recycling on t h e P o d i u m a n d in t h e
residence
halls. The
system
would consist of two baskets,
one for " u n c l e a n " trash, the
other for recyclable paper.
Il has been e s t i m a t e d that,"excluding
the C a m p u s
Center,
Hft-flO'" of all office waste is
recyclable " T h e " R e c y c l e " containers would be d e c o r a t e d with
an a p p r o p r i a t e
environmental
symbol to draw a t t e n t i o n to its
intended use The m a i n t e n a n c e
staff would then be responsible
for similarly partitioning 'rash
bins.
Kinally. a bailing
machine
would be installed at the Social
Science loading dock lo bail Ihe
recycled paper so it can be
stored and loaded more easily
Can recycling would offer less
confusion to the c a m p u s population On the Podium and in the
residence halls large metal d r u m s
would
be placed
near soda
machines Cans would be col
lev let I by eilher paid s t u d e n t s or
by the m a i n t e n a n c e staff on a
b i w e e k l y or m o n t h l y basis, as
the c o n d i t i o n s warrant
Multi-functional
Monetarily
seven
could
each
he A d
which
Ibis
.HI
i i i s l i l ut Juiia
could
.<
11
wide
ol
difficuh
in
ol
be c o l l e c t e d
calls
Cans
()id\
could
live
bring
in
WESIEBN AVENUE
is
that
we w i l l
hi
on i
natural
i
d< p l e t ,
bulled
i.v,,~. so vandals c . u l d
CtmUmH-tl on /war IU
i-
a return
tiuanlity
month
paper
campus
S/.M) ., i o n
pi.
llciui
II
$ 1 0 0 t o h e l p defray t h e c o s t o f
the program.
T h e case for recycling can be
defended o n m a n y grounds. It
has been p r o v e n t h a t t h e operation of recycling p a p e r a n d c a n s
could r e t u r n an a m p l e m o n e t a r y
s u m , or, at w o r s t , break even.
T h r o u g h t h e recycling p r o g r a m
the University w o u l d receive a
great deal of p u b l i c i t y a n d comm u n i t y r e c o g n i t i o n . M o s t imp o r t a n t l y , t h e University w o u l d
be on its way t o being an ecologically o r i e n t e d i n s t i t u t i o n with
an ecologically aware population.
Needs Backing
C u r r e n t l y , P Y E is a l m o s t exclusively r e s p o n s i b l e for C a m p u s
recycling. Effectiveness and efficiency c o u l d be considerably
increased on a year r o u n d basis
if the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n would aid
PYE in institutionalizing recycling on this c a m p u s . PYE c o u l d
then c o n c e n t r a t e its activities
where they are m o r e n e e d e d - i n
a re-education of the faculty,
s t u d e n t s , staff and the c o m m u n i t y in ihe need for recycling.
It has been s h o w n in several
municipalilies such as Binghamlon, S c h e n e c t a d y , and Springfield, Mass that large scale, insliutionali/.ed recyIcing works, if
backed by t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . It
can work here, t o o ! What is
needed is c o n s c i o u s c o o p e r a t i o n
from both t h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n
and t h e s t u d e n t s .
One of the chief ways in which
we can b e c o m e responsible is
through recycling our wast' 1 p r o
duels Recycling emphasizes t h e
re use of resources. T h r o w i n g
away o u r garbage does not s o l v e
the p r o b l e m , it only hides it
goal
r. . g r a i n
heme
it Is e o n
i ecyclable
the
sell al
ton.s
ol
\ lelding
dollars
estimate
do
ol
Ions
be c o l l e c t e d
week.
i;r, V.'i
mime
;e
speaking,
servaiively estimated thai about
I nuld
Slups
paper a n d c a n s is s u c h t h a t t h e
m o n e t a r y r e t u r n would m a k e
the program e c o n o m i c a l . T h e
going price, as of Nov. 6, is
t w e n t y dollars a t o n for cans a n d
ten dollars a t o n for p a p e r , with
the cost of t r a n s p o r t a t i o n being
paid by t h e purchasers.
Plan Laid O u t
al
ti.mali/ed
Program Practical
There is i
PYK
before the KI)C i.
recycling p
lures
into
of
can
< ' o i n m u n t i •.
..I
p r o b l e m s arose in
implementation
Prints
especially
susceptible
were n a t u r e shuts nudes, rm-a
dows, !•!(* the kind ol p i d u r e s
\ i HI would like hanging • tn youi
walls Blaisdell was particularly
disgusted thai Ihe people resp.,11
slide lor llle thefts also lohhetl
IHJIII
I '•' 1 '•• • '
pi'iirfilu
('ulllllH
EEI
e\m
Applications for
counm
office
on
concern
Blaisdell
di-p!,i\
in
didn '
anyone
Central Council Representative
from:
G e t t i n g zapped by .1 I.
lightening is not us urihb
m o s t people think 11 is
Science
News
report
a p p r o x i m a t e l y tVOU peopb
United S t a t e s are killed
year by lightening strike
a n o t h e r 1500 are injured
dies have found
lh.ii
pro pie are killed ea« h \ '
lightening than die m eii hricanes or t o r n a d o e s
Well, capitalism has oil
>'
m u d e it in t h e Soviet I ! i " " "
T h e Chase M a n h a t t a n hank re
p o r t e d this week that " ha»
received formal approval to "I"' 11
up a branch bank in the middle
of Moscow.
Colonial Quad (one seat)
Dutch Quad (one seat)
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1972
Let's make
a trade
Your old d i a m o n d (or a lux
ufioub
n e w Keepsake difl
rnuiid ring W e have a spark
hny array to c h o o s e b o m alt fully g u a r a n t e e d 1
Indian Quad (one seat)
Are available in the SA office, CC 346.
They must be returned by
lljtiUlili
PAGE TWO
" T h e r e ' s a lousy ethic
by K a l h y Eckerle
Washing
of
oath
penny to
A c c o r d i n g t o K e n n e t h Blaisdell, C.C. assistant d i r e c t o r , the display
cases o n the second floor of t h e C a m p u s C e n t e r have been
repeatedly vandalized.
by Steve Kalian
T h r e e years ago t h e Environmental
Decision
Committee
(EDC) was f o r m e d t o h e l p increase ecological awareness on
c a m p u s a n d in t h e c o m m u n i t y .
Since then, E D C a n d P r o t e c t
Y o u r E n v i r o n m e n t ( P Y E ) have
had their hands full in instituting
an effective recycling program at
SUNYA.
In O c t o b e r , 1971 t h e first experimental can recycling program was begun on S t a t e Quad.
Large c a r d b o a r d
boxes were
placed in t h e low-rise d o r m s and
55-gallon
metal
drums
were
placed o n every fourth floor of
Eastman T o w e r . S t u d e n t participation was e n t h u s i a s t i c and by
N o v e m b e r the S t a t e Quad can
recycling o p e r a t i o n was d e e m e d
successful. Plans were then made
to e x t e n d similar p r o g r a m s to
o t h e r Quads.
By the Spring of M)71» paper
and can recycling had begun on
all Quads T h e initial success of
lb use programs
was
marred,
however, by Ihe lack of p r o p e r
use of the receptacles by the
s t u d e n t s . Recycling d r u m s were
often mistaken for garbage pads
and un recyclable garbage was
mixed with papei meant for
recycling
UV
5 PM
Friday, December 1 , 1972.
CCLONIE CENTER
Upper Level
illlUO
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE THREE
INTERESTED FOLK .
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Degree applicants: Studenteexpecting to graduate in May must file a
degree application no later than Friday, February 9, 1973. Applications
and forms may be obtained at the
Registrar's office, degree clearance,
J
\dm Bldg. B-3. Completed applicajon;: should be returned to the same
office.
Notice to all students, faculty, staff
and organizations who have University rented post office boxes. If back
rent from the fall semester 1972 or
any prior semester is not paid by
Dec, 30 the box will automatically be
closed and mall returned. If you have
any questions regarding the matter or
if you wish to rent a post office box
call 457-4378 or contact the SUNYA
post office staff.
PEACE & POLITICS
Sanford
Rosenblum Student
Association Lawyer will be available
in the SA office, CC346 from 7
p.rn.-9 p.m. on Tuesday trite.
Inform draftees and enlistees of
their rights and alternatives by
handing out information leaflets .it
the Albany Induction Center. H'lji
those who otherwise would run be
informed. Call Jim 463-2593.
The Htennek Society for backwards
people will meet on November 30 In
the Moor Gnop-Gnip.
There will be a mandatory meeting
for all songleaders for Holiday Sing
on Tues., Nov. 28 at 8 p.rn, in LC 20.
There will be a meeting for anyone
interested in a Clube Brasileiro.Wednesday November 29 at 7:30 p.m. in
the Campus Center Assembly Hall.
Anyone with any ideas for ihe forma
tion of this club or a Noite Brasilaira
please attend or call Debra457-5135,
Record Co-Op. every rhurs 6 9
p.m. Slain Quad Flagroom, cheap
records!!
Albany State Judo Club will have a
5th degree black bull. Mr N Kudo as
guest instructor tonight in 1 he Wrest I
ing Room u p.rn, foi advanced. 7 30
p m for beginners Spectators wel
Robert Kelly will read his poems on
Thursday, November 30, at 8 pm. in
the Physics lounge (Phy 129). The
event is under the sponsor ship of the
English department.
Well-known playwrights Jack
Gelber and Arthur Kopit will bo on
hand to field questions and discuss
issues concerning the contemporary
scene in American theatre. The informal patiel is scheduled for Mori. Dec.
4 at 8 pm in the Studio Theatre.
f he Covenant Players a traveling
drama group will present the Sunday
Morning service on Dec. 3 at the
McKownville Methodist Church.
Time 10 30 on Western Avenue MI-IT
wesl of the Thruway.
letlucii tioyi ' ill will In shown •'
SUNYA soon Wan h ASP (MI detail-,
wiU Ijf -in ouicini/aliori
n
meeting t-u-j ,t!l 'hr>\e mieresied in
wort' nil) on a new li'wtsh newspaper
nuxi
'iemeM.-r
>m I huivi.iy
Nnvemhet 'ifj ,,i / \> m. .,! if it- I in:
Ml].! I .iiiit.liMU lh.*C.ifni«i' CHOI.H
Appln rtliuns are im« being an 'tpl
.td Irjr AMIA student assistant Appli
(um-ns -nay be piiked UP in CCJbfi.
Any iiueslinns 'all I.'. I if-in I b'l/M
or I . I i.hm,in / ilJHi.
It i
..p.
lb.- Albany Frmnds of the Farmworkers I -day D' ivt'inlnu '/<', n
dis- i/v.n.n rtritl h i ' Ih.; I . - I ! ,< >• \',- ,
">i\.
fln<
'ilJN fA's iotlin.1' pull' y
l ' l / i N V ',
.i"l
I M.(,.,l,nivf .ess u
•IH')
I i
Ihi-ti' is coed volleyball •••- i 'h<-'\
..lav i'vemi.tl .H / 0(1 |. in
n '.,-n
C l i u n g a tTinnil
Ih.-
i.ipirli/ rising VD ran? i ••
Ain.ni/
FOR SALE
li.w
WANTED
I'ubli'
SHe.tls
W A N T E D D E A D OR A l I V I
Lionel trains. Quick cash Call
439-5109.
196/
American Rebel convet
htole, iun'> perfect, body great,
<1-',peecl. Asking $900. Call Sue
457 7729.
I AH.»•/'•.
r
Kfrinili
,i l.j/i.-f
'.ii lbinsil.iv
i- H p m
07 Chev. Impjla PS, PB, AC.
Must '.ell tbOO. N e j l 466-9600.
2k /?.
J-'hi
Nnv.'liib'-'
Mi. Ray Nunn,
hiMiib ailv.vii
*"• 'I •• United
Public
Somen
Health
hMWimj
HELP WANTED
Immigration
Information: Mr.
Francis Murphy, officer in charge of
the Albany Immigration and Naturalization Service, will be on campus
Tuesday, December 9. at 3 p.m. in
the Campus Center Assembly Hall to
discuss currenl immigration rerrula
turns. Foreign fuculty and students
are invited.
Student
III
Anyone interested in Armenian
Studies course at SUNY including
language, contact Ctiarlie-457-4656.
Business Students: Delta Sigma Pi is
still alive. This yi.u will soon see.
? Studies is now a second field.
People win, are interested in obtaining a syllabus, nr who just want
to ask questions about flu, program,
. an do so in SS375.
Cuine and i,i,i, tii i. youi Spanish
ivei a i.up ul i.offmi al the Spanish
Conversation latile Mondfiys ar 2 90
p.m. and Inesdays at 'I 00 p.m. in
the ( ampiis Cmilur ' atiltirlla al tables
'"•ar II
Iiaiiur In Ihi' sn.i.k bill.
Altniition all Psych, sliirfonfs! lire
Undenjnid Psych. Assoc. Newsletter
is available in ',9217. In, youi only
only rhanre lo lilld ,,„l wlial's
l,,,|,|,eni.i,|i
t w o '.now l u e s likri i n - / . 6.8'j
/
IS. studded, Y."> 18') ' . / ] ; '
/eii'in
IV
Double
K i d time sales position available.
I lour s lo suit youi st hedule
Musi be neat appearing and have
a serviceable cat. Avei age slu
dents are c u n e n l i y earning over
$10,011 per hour Hi,? ]')(,{) I
I .-y trj arrang*; a peisunal mtei
Hud. .'
'I'.rv.ei'., .irift kltr hen Uble .mil
• ha rs. Must sell Cull '1 I? 9 J/4
III;
record', V 00 489- 1886
IJIAMONU I N G A G L M I N I &
WEDDING KINGS
1,000 ring
selections in all styles at bt)%
discount to students, slall, anil
faculty. Buy rtnei t Irorn loading
manufacturer and SAVI ' 1 '.'
i aral $1 / 9 , i/4 carat only %.">'}
I r.r free color foldui irri ilir Ho>
4?, I anwood, N J 0 / 0 ? 1
SEIDENBERG
JEWELRY
Mori I r. 10 U
Sal 10 6
264 Central Ave
cor. No. Lake Ave.
Albany
PAGE FOUR
Piofes'.i.i Ri,l.."i ' '
Political Science rli'i..
live, two le, lo',NuvemhiK '.(I A' 1.' : ;
mi Soviet Law and Qui,;
Al 4 4', Pi,,(,-•-.,- I '
prosmilatiun /.ill I"
Legal Develop <nenl
| i „ . C -I' - .in-- '
rtergruriuati Linyii,'-l„ :
SUN / '
,,l
,lll„r.,(
ll„. I ,I„|,„M,
Weilo,".'I.iv
a, H l l . " I d
lessm
"I
I i
I,.,in„
/all
'
Mi.v.o.a
I i'
On May 2nd o f this year workers at the Farah Manufacturing Co.,
San A n t o n i o , Texas, called a strike. Within t w o weeks nearly 3,000
workers had responded and the strike expanded to Albuquerque and
Las Cruces, New Mexico. I n the Sept. 1 1 , 1972 issue o f the New
York Times the company president swore " t h a t Farah never w o u l d
be u n i o n i z e d . " Of course the company feels that it is doing wonders
for the workers and that in the face o f foreign competition it cannot
afford union interference. A t issue is the stark admission that at
Farah there is no collective bargaining on any level. The company has
used every possible tactic to block federally supervised elections
where workers could exercise this basic freedom of choice.
In this atmosphere production demands can be set by the company
as high as they wish, and they can fire the worker who cannot
physically stand the strum. Workers claim that wages increase only
when and if the company wants. Mexican-American women who
comprise the vast majority of the work force, have complained that
the maternity benefits are far from adequate and that when they
return to work, they would lose their position on the pay scale and
start as beginners. The average annual Income for all clothing
employees is only $4,300. Subtracting the highly paid supervisory
and managerial positions, who are very well paid, it is figured that
thtf great bulk of clothing workers earn closer to $3,.r)0() a year or
about $o(J a week. Much smaller local companies in the areii which
are unionized pay in the area o f $ 102/week.
%U8 W t /
The whole picture involves numerous violations of basic social
justice and comes home to us through the retail stores at Stuyvesant
Plaza, the Colonie and Northway Malls etc Making.sure to question
and hold accountable store managers about their reaction to the
Farah situation, especially as it relates to reordering supplies for the
holiday season is w i t h i n the grasp of each of us. I f a given store
shows an insensitivity or a conscious ignorance o f the facts, perhaps
the enormous economic levernge o f the university community could
be brought to bear on every other department of that slore until it
at least comes to terms with a very serious situation.
SI" • ,'
foul H
Smith
,, ,
X
(le
'lyphothi
'mingy
,1 l,i
I j.'i
,. ' • -...,],,.
II ml,!,'! | .'• .".,"•, ..I |,.,|»,l.i
i ,il 'I,,-. .","• "-- ii..- A.u,,„„i,„t
.mil Space Science Department /.
II.
-.1 ,'1..'els
ASP "Keystone Cops" Flop
.,("1
' ,
in '•', 1 'A .,i / .
.,' I r , , r n , / / ' . ' , ! , I,,
Uryam/atn
.
II
I
To the Editor
I must say, that us a student at S U N Y A I thought that the article
on the campus Security department was one-sided and unfair
Contrary to the "Keystone C o p s " image, I personally know of lour
instances where the Securily Dept recovered property that the
owners had no hope o f ever seeing again. The author of the article
was cynical and sarcastic and the article might have been better
placed in a high school monthly newspaper. I am disappointed that
ihe ASP didn't see fit to add some favorable points about a
Department that is so essential to the University
Opinion by Dominique Plihon,
Gary Schinasi, & Erik Stenehjem
It is no surprise thai the ASP is
currently publishing a series of
articles concerning the problem
of student representation on
promotion and tenure decisions
Unfortnately this problem is no'
unknown in the licnonomics De
partment. In the past 10 years,
39 people have either been refused tenure or reappointment,
or have simply sought jobs elsewhere. We wonder how many o f
these people would have been
granted tenure or reappointment
had students been granted a
representative vote.
lloill.
',;'
KM
mi
lepan
1i 4 9 / '..".',
p j n d m g sales rjigam/.il ion. No
• ,n ncn.j.'d Will lidtii in even
IIKJS K i l l lime Ol lull lurii' 107,
i rjrnmisMOM. t all A In 'MY) i.
rrurrt (.'mipUrti pert tune Jnh
..' /... nlher iinillh'H
children
hume* while (ill eueullim
1 <-,• In,in, ,„i,l tinurd. Wnrk M
rru eh n» vr.n WUItl Mtllil /lull'
tine chtltl nkuy SI mi „
I'U
:, 1 I'll
Cull
l.'ili IIU'IH '1 1 nr
Mi
r.r
,,.
( .,
H:IUH
I),
f .i ( j .i JI y <•,
<Dine ski 'JIIIIIIMI, Ai.sln.i « i l h
tliO Alljany Mali- ')ki I liih I?
,\.,y, Jan.iaiy ' I , 1 9 / 1 lanuaiy
19, 19/ 1. Hi ico I. 112 liansooi
latii.n,
rnoals, ,n I riiiKiif.itiini,
taxes, IJI alnifi",, ski Uarj, pai ty
I ontai I
Itolrerl
W.rl.lrr
M « 41,', I/Of, I' () H o . | /Ii
1)1) M I N Y A
emu.
Auto Repair
We Do
I nginc luiie ups A Ki'piiits
lliuke
|nhs A
AcljuslliiiMils
Winteri/ing- with 1'iesiinut I!
gifts
loi
everyone.
Have you-i pnonotpdph ru( ords
made into eigtit ttack tapes loi
<ai
t a pe playui s
Mossman
Sound <\H') 0001
SUMMf R
Motor Pool Offers Tow Service
I 2 ler
N. -ai
l.u
II, I 1114 I
w
iiii'ili", wauled
ViO/mi,
( all
2
Cu r r e n t l y
p r o m o t i o n and
tenure decisions must be made
at 3 levels: the Department, the
school or college, and the University Council on Promotion
and Tenure, which makes recommendations to the President. I t
is pointed o u t in the ASP that
President Henezet, with w h o m
the ultimate decision lies, is
quoted as saying, " I n general,
both
promotion
and tenure
should increasingly be the re
spousihilily o f departments or
schools. Recommendations up
the line which go past the Dean's
level should become increasingly
procedural and less substantive;
that ii, tin; pattern found in
mature universities." We agree
with the President
However,
this does not alleviate the prob
lum of student representation
As stated in the ASP, many
students
have voiced " c o m plaints centering on 2 main argu
men tit: lack o f meaningful stu
dent say in promotion and ten
ure procedure, and jealousy by
fuculty members of the departments.
To the SUNYA
Community.
Now that we are in possession of a low Iruek we are adopting the
IHAPPY
o ;;:::';;::,:T;/"'"!""!""- ^ B I R T H D A Y
'1,2119, Paik oi'.u Main, i oru
pletl.'ly loiiir.hi'd wdb //.r.hci
rfi /i'i
/vv.nl
Dei
11
following approach.
During and immediately alter a snow storm, persons stuck in the
snow in a regular parking loi who risquest assistance will be aided by
the Motor Pool ul no charge The same will apply to persons stuck in
other locations who have approved permits for Ihe area
All olhers will be referred Lo private garages.
John /-' liucrthoff, Jr
Director of fhymvul I'lmil
'|i,2 99 12 >. mo. IIIIIII'. 4 111 14112
M.D.
Chf isl rtldS
Richattt I,
HOUSING
Ili-i-il a math I I I I I I I ' i -in In.1.1..i
19/ / /I.H
IN Vt-HMON I t
rhlnk
MiiJitloljiJiy ( ulleyo. AdvaiM.uU iludy
in French, German, M.-• II<»<•, ntmidn,
Sparllfh, Uij'ihmMiij ami advanc«U
ttudy In '.iii'i'i'.ti, j.ipiiiKiio, Bouln
woic. itiwrinl lh« M.A. at an unclcruraduatfl, Wrtta Room I 24, bunder
land Language Center, Mt«jdlel>ury,
VT
0S7S3,
We Install
Slunk ahsuilicis
Sleieu
Sysicins
Alaiin SyMeins
lliii.il Locks.
(,ni', p i c l c i i ' d
I roouunale warded lor '.pi mi)
semester Own room Do bus
line ( all 4 !(, 0129
lie,inIdol l o u n t i y
house loi
lenl Doc ( onplc lives Iheie now
4 iiioi c bodroorns need o u u p a
bun al V.O II) anus land, bain,
murium utilities 40 minutes 9W
ol Albany Call allin 9 p in
I 2 19 l,/')9.
T'
It,,.
Mall*
I,., )...>..I MM
[ IHMIIIWI Ail MdiM(#i
, ill.y IJJIIBI, |,
HrrllM.II.1'1
Help twri sluclciiis pay lot llicii
College ciJucatiDii.
lly appiiinliiieiil only
I arm, / bedroom, I 1/2 ballts.
10 mi south ol Albany. 1>?90 00
12 19-4300 eyes.
KxliKiiH* ttlu.it
AH*",
Will*"
•I N i - >
Dennis Manet
Mike Neinliclt
482-5781
438-6316
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
House toi rent. Four student'.
Convenient to bus. Colonic. Call
469-73S2.
receive a PBKHdNAI.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 19'/^
>l .1 A Km. I
It >• INKIIMI II
"" " l imir tint •'•>< u l " " " " "• *''' J""> •"
,1,),,, .,) |), I lit ttfllUMll H ' " " 1
I'UESDAY, NOVEMBER, 28, 1972
'"M".'1^ Kl1
""• , v I J * v h v
-
_—_
Students Backed Ehemann Tenure Effort
II .- i n
l'l,',,-,,• , MI
-
I#£U 5H0W 1H05E POINTY-HEAPED INTELLEOVAL-e/'
In 71, F.hemann denied tenure for 'lack' of student support
Goourephy Club
States
.,,
o
To the Editor:
'jtCl
Women MU,U M IMI loi
SERVICES
earrings 2 for $1
patches 25c
cigarettes 39c/pack
Afro earrings
Attention SAU. Pre-Med. h
Students
Dr. Theorize
speak on "Cleft Palai,- , -i " I
Thrusting
end
Mala,:,:!,.
Thursday. Nov mi / "• .
Assembly Hall I . ' " , r...
Sponsored by Stiee, I I' "
AiKlinliigy Club
[i o,
"•j'l'l
1 V I )„ i , |
4K;» .14
Pre-Med. Pre-Dunt Meet,,,,,
Faculty Advisoiy Ounm."' •
ral info and rooistrahn' •
applying for Fall. 19/4 !
28-Bio 248, 7 00 pm
I he '.palush Club and Ihi: Depail
ni ,,l Hisiiani, and Italian Stuili'",
i.
„ „ • • . , I„. lure by Prr.lessol I eon
I iviniisl.ine ,,i Id,. ',lan; IJltivrrrsily " '
lie.-, r-,„t ,,| Bullali, on the Sll/mill
cant Reality: Celnya, Rnlibe Gnltel,
Oaldos on Ihuiviay, Nov 111.,I / 10
l„
'i'.'iHH. ltetri-,1,iiieiil', will he
I • -i . /
I A.O l ! j " studtteO '.MOW, 'jr.ull
r.ondition. $30.00. Call H.ii'y
i / 1 i6.i8, evenmgv.
The Society of Physics Stu
will hold a meeting on ' .
November 28 ill 7 (III |. i.
129. Dr. B»khrii ul ; i
conduct a toiri (,t tin- ,. i
linear accelijiattii Hi'ln-.' ••
be served.
i P'.ti .
* „ ! ,.• , j $ , , , „ , ., ,,
Ukrainian
A
and h(M„d
A.«
Boycott Stores Stocking Farah
MAJORS & MINORS
Professor Earl Mmer of Princeton
University will talk mi The Japanese
Sensibility on Thursday, December 7,
at 8 lb prn. in the Campus Center
Assembly Hall. Professor Miner is a
distinguished 17th ceniury literature
scholar. Ihf [-.ngfish deparimeni is
spufisminij the talk,
"Viva La Causa," ,i ilu
1
Cottiftiutiieations
I
I
II is our opinion that these
arguments apply directly to the
Department o f Economics. Our
Department seems to be followme; the status q u o , by denying
students the representation that
is rightfully theiru'. The Departments were granted the right to
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
allow students to IH* represented
in p r o m o t i o n and tenure decisions. I t would be rather interesting t o learn the rationale of
our department for not granting
that significant right to students.
During the month o f November, our department will meet to
discuss recommendations
for
tenure of the following 3 professors: Dr. Cipriani, Dr, Sternberg,
and Dr. Ehemann.
We, as students who havt
taken courses given by Dr. Ehemann, would like to express our
view that Dr. Ehemann be unanimously recommended for tenu re.
Dr. Ehemann was appointed to
the department as an Associate
Professor in the Fall o f 1970.
Because of university regulations, Dr. Ehemann was reviewed for tenure in the Fall of
1971, in which case tenure was
denied. The rationale generally
given was that there was lacking
a sufficient body o f favorable
student support (via student
recommendations). Since then,
Dr. Ehomann's stu dim ts have
t wice
uuanimously
demonstrated their full support by petition, for Dr. Ehemann's continued association with the Department o f Economics. The
sentiments expressed in these
petitions can be verified by looking at a few facts. Last May,
with few exceptions, all o f the
students enrolled in Dr. Ehem a n n 's (i 2 211
Econometrics
course requested him to offer a
seminar in econometrics for the
following semester. This seminar
is currently in progress and is
attended by most o f Dr. Ehe
matin's former students. As fur
ther evidence o f the rospeet students have for Dr. Ehemann's
abilities, consider the number of
students
currently
preparing
Master's Essays and Doctoral
Dissertations
w h o have re
queiiled Dr. Ehemann's advise
mant, both official and unofficial. Dr. Ehemann has both the
respect and support o f the stu-
dents in our department.
The three basic criteria upon
which decisions o f tenure are
based are (1) students evaluat i o n , (2) service to the department and c o m m u n i t y , (3) scholarly ability, Obviously in Dr.
Ehemann's case the first criteria
is fulfilled. His service to the
department is unquestionably o f
high qualify. As demonstrated in
class and in his scholarly work,
Dr. Ehemann has superior command of both Econometrics and
Economic Theory He is one o f
the few professors who cun effectively teach in the t w o corerequired fields on the doctoral
level.
This brings us to the question
of scholarly ability better known
as publications. I f is true that
Dr. Ehemann has not yet published in major journals. The fact
is that Dr. Ehemann has been
teaching at S U N Y A for only t w o
years. His decision for tenure
was made after one year o f
teaching. How is it possible for a
man who is teaching 3 courses
for Ihe first time to produce a
publication w i t h i n
the same
year? This is beyond the capability o f most. A n d yet, he has
been actively engaged in sevend
personal research topics. In fact,
Dr. Ehemann recently submitted
a paer concerning the operations
of fiscal policy under a wage
price froezu to the A E K . I t was
returned with a referee's comments and has been revised by
Dr. Ehemann. The paper is available from Marcie Franklin.
These are the facts. If an equitable deeiaion is to be made in
the case o f Dr. Ehemann, these
facta must be seriously considered. I f they are, we feel
confident that Dr. Ehemann will
be unanimously recommended
for tenure
Note: On November 20, Urn.
Cipriani, Sternberfi, and Ehe
maun were denied tenure by the
Economies Department.—Ed.
PAGE FIVE
Juliet of the Spirits
The Elvis Phenomenon
so m u c h
m o r e feeling a n d
vitality t h a t it was infinitely
better than t h e w h i t e " c o v e r "
version) a n d when h e f o u n d
Presley, h e knew h e h a d found
what h e h a d been searching for.
Presley's first efforts for S u n ,
" T h a t s All Right M a m a " a n d
"Blue
Moon
of K e n t u c k y , "
really d i d n ' t impress m a n y a n d
didn't even chalk u p m o r e t h a n a
passing m e n t i o n in t h e c o u n t r y western c h a r t s where they were
o r i g i n a l l y a i m e d . Y e t , Phillips
kept plugging on with Presley
k n o w i n g t h a t in giving h i m t h e
right musicians a n d material to
work with would eventually pay
off, a n d sure enough, o n e aftern o o n in 1 OTj'l at t h e S t u d i o s of
Sun s o m e t h i n g h a p p e n e d as easy
and natural as breathing. Presley
had been working o n a c o u n t r y
rendition of a song " G o o d
R o c k i n ' T o n i g h t " a n d during a
coffee
break
Klvis
started
stinging it in a semi-falsetto
voice a n d included a d i s t i n c t
u p - t e m p o beat in t h e rhythmicphrasing of t h e song. T h e o t h e r
musicians (Bill Black and S c o t t y
Moore) began joining in a n d
unknowingly
to them Sam
Phillips taped this i m p r o m p t u
"fooling a r o u n d . " What came
out resulted in a change in t h e
course of musical history, for in
c o m b i n i n g t h e conn try western
s o u n d with t h e feel a n d r h y t h m
of r & r, Presley created a
distinct new form thai came u>
be k n o w n as " r o c k a b i l l y " a n d
went on t o sing with KCA
records a n d well, you k n o w tin'
rest. Bui wait, m a y b e you don't"'
T h a i ' s where ihe new book
(originally released in hardcover
edition in 1971 ) c o m e m, In
Kins
Mr Hopkins gives us t h e
story of t h e meteoric rise nl lite
V'Uini) star thai shows b o w ;i
" H e a r t - b r e a k H o t e l " Revisited
T h e re-genesis of t h e Moses of rock
hv R o n Darnell
A Book: Elvis: A
Biography,
by Jerry H o p k i n s , Warner Paperback Library 6 8 9 3 8 .
A Movie: Elvis On Tour, An
MGM release, Cinema Associates
Production.
A Record: Elvis Presley: As
Recorded
a t Madison
Sq uare
Garden, RCA LSP 4 7 7 6 .
First of all, let m e explain t h a t
the scattergun approach that I
a m taking in covering each of
t h e three separate w o r k s above 1
h o p e t o justify, in light of t h e
fact that t h e y all can b e viewed
as recent manifestations of a
singularly u n i q u e p h e n o m e n a in
the p o p music world, t h a t phenomena being the emergence over
t h e last few years of t h e original
" k i n g of r o c k " as new superstar
in his o w n right. And, indeed, it
is a n e w a n d distinct Elvis that
emerges than t h e o n e w<* may
p i c t u r e from o u r past mental
images of blue-suede
shoes,
hagjjy pants and sideburns. Older
n o w , some?what more paunchy
I b u t not m u c h ) and i m b u e d with
a professionalism and sense of
"show-biz,"
that
l e w per
formers, save perhaps
Frank
Sinatra o r Bmg Crosby have
a t t a i n e d , Klvis has c o m e back
strong with a new stylish image.
By now, ii is realized t h a t Klvis
is credited with having fostered
t h e breakthrough for t h e early
rock scene back in t h e middle
r>0"s, when h e was picked up by
i h e late Sam Phillips of S u n
Records in Memphis. Phillips
was searching for ;i while singer
w h o h a d t h e negro s o u n d ami
feel (most r & b records were
" c o v e r e d " by a white artist's
version, in almost every ease (lie
negro version was instilled Willi
Argyle sleeveless
Orlon R acryli c sweaters
ir
> navy/rod/white.
S, M, L, XL.
$
13
WEILS & COVERLY'S NEW SHOP
AT STUYVESANT PLAZA
J U L I E T O F T H E S P I R I T S h a s been called " t h e female 'K 1 /-'." It
seems almost
p o o r w h i t e laborer's b o y b e c a m e
the m o s t successful and e n d u r i n g
pop-music
phenomena
in
h i s t o r y . Hopkins informs us of
m a n y of t h e little side-lights a n d
scandalous intrigues along t h e
w a y - a l s o , b u t this in no " f a n
m a g a z i n e " a p p r o a c h , it c o m e s
across as a scholarly job of t h e
a c c o u n t i n g of a legend in o u r
own time. EMs, should b e reuuired reading for a n y o n e interested in t h e history of American
music, for in being able t o
u n d e r s t a n d tin* roots, we a r e
b e t t e r able t o see where t h e
branches
arc growing. A n d
incidentally,
if y o u n o t i c e
H o p k i n ' s book is as m u c h a b o u t
Presley's famous (or should it be
infamous?) manager, Col. T o m
Parker, as a b o u t Presley himself,
t h a t is because Parker's s t o r y in
all this is as much half of t h e
Presley p h e n o m e n a us Elvis himself. T h e book then b e c o m e s a
t r i b u t e t o t w o things', first, t h e
Horatio Alger type rise of a p o o r
S o m e call him the Moses of R o c k , and o t h e r s call h i m the Pelvis of Ages
white boy t o fame and glory and
secondly,
the most
famous
artist-manager r e l a t i o n s h i p in
the history of show business.
Just where all this early history
I've been telling you has led t o is
ill evidence in Klvis' new movie
called, Klvis on Tour T h e r e w a s
a previous movie, That's The
Way It Is. thai showed s o m e of
Presley's well polished night c l u b
performances in Las Vegas, b u t
Ibis n e w film bikes to t h e road
and shows Klvis a n d his t r o u p e
playing t o some 1"> different
cities in almost an equal n u m b e r
of days T h e recorded Madison
S q u a r e Harden p e r f o r m a n c e is
also included in tins. T h e performances are shown in multiscreen p r e s e n t a t i o n that gives
the performances from several
different angels and perspectives,
like what was d o n e in t h e film
Wnmtsltieli.
that lie c o u l d n ' t
u n d e r s t a n d all t h e fuss being
made over him a n d just wanted
to lie treated like a n y o t h e r
regular fella'
So, il you haven't 1 n able t o
get t o a live performance by
I'll vis a n d wonder what it is like,
I r e c o m m e n d thai you see Klvift
On /'.MI. not just for in i n d e p t h
look .il what the Presley excitement e, .ill a b o u t . Inn for an
o u t s t a n d i n g ph
graphic docum e n t a t i o n of good musical per
I... malices
duces the
inbci's of liis group,
Lastly, we come lo ihe record
tunes was as overpowei inc
outstanding among them being
This J u n e , Klvis for the first lime
what was c o m i n g nl f Hie I ,t'i
ihe male q u a r t e t , J I) Sumner
c i m e l u .Mid p l a y e d 111 N e w Y o r k
( D o n ' t k n o c k il, u 's all pari ,.t
mid t h e Stamps, w h o b e i n g
I'lly
l o o v e r ':,II.I1II0 t a n s m
live p e r f o r m a n c e )
l'r,-.iim,,i,t'.
slepped in Hie uospcl tradition
three days Many people (myself
when they release I lu- qii.nli
which
Klvis
originally
comes
included I had wailed I V years In
phonic version
Hie .mil" m from, c o n t r i b u t e fine backing
see this .in,, arts in Hie flesh T h e
balance will be rest,,,,,I mill He
111 rough
"American
Trilogy"
result was a kind of mass hys
addition of t h e mix I,
soil of a patriotic N o r t h / S o u t h
Icriu,
villi
Klvis a n d crew
ball m i c r o p h o n e s
< n 11,.
anthem, including elements of
romping o n Ihe Inc. singe of
thai, llie sleren imaging c. • •••
" D i x i e " a n d " l i a l l l e Hymn of
Madison Square Harden .mil
lent, with go,id side li, -.nl
the Hcplllilic " I,el me tell y o n ,
laving d o w n some of Hie finest
t i n l l l I n hack
imleplll
In,
il is an electrifying performance,
s o u n d s von have ever heard on
l/.allnn
of t h e pcrloi mci .
liisi in;,ile for lli.il expressive
this globe I was lucky enough l o
slage .mil with Klvis :,
voice ,,f Klvis and in Hie record
have a t t e n d e d Ihe very evening
sharply
in celllei
ill
UIH I I " ' W a y Ills v o i c e
revel
performance thai was recorded
position, tins in spite "I !>
liei.ilcs
through
111,' V.isl
e,
(mostly intact) and can tell you
frequent m e a l i d e n n g s .icm- II"
p a u s e s o f t h e C a r d , ' i l is n o t h i n g
[hill listening to Ihe record I eel
slage, which ordinarily n u l '
llHH'h the smile feeling that I had
slmri
of spellbinding
right
Ihe recording engineers Ilium ,q,
in that e n o r m o u s hall that even
through t o t h e final climax You
their hands in despau
nig After an i n t r o d u c t i o n Willi
• ire as exhausted emotionally .is
I would highly ni
"Also Spi.icli /.ainlhllslni" ami a
Hie performers at the end of Hie
s e e i n g III,- Illlll ,,
Mill I I "
barrage nl drums, Klvis conies
sunn
Appropn
Iv em,unh
record anil then il vnu
,,
out on si,ie.es anil Inn, us with
KIVHi e n d s
Hie s h o w Willi Ills
lead vou further, In obl.imim'
"That,, All Itlghl, M a m a " IVoll
b e a m il'ul
Int. "Can't
Help
Jerry Hopkins' book, because n
see. we're liacli l o basics already I
Kallmg lii Love." a n d goes o u t
really
is a highly
reailuhl.
Willi
,i
Ii.inane
of
drums
and
a
iiccouiil of Ihe story nl Kin
done
111 a more
modern,
a
l
l
i
u
m
lull
t
h
r
o
a
t
e
d
screams
rise
lo
funic
and
fortune
up t e m p o version. Klvis goes
from Ihe audience
through
some
current
rock
"Wellllll,
since
mall
n u m b e r s ( " P r o u d Mary," "Never
bebbee left m e / A b v e I,,unit
Bonn t o S p a i n " ) a n d then unii new place In dwell/Its
leashes a medley of his hits from
A few technical words about
the fid's ("All Shook U p , "
" D o n ' t Be C r u e l , " " L o v e Me
T e n d e r " ) . After a gorgeous per
formunco of the song " T h e
Impossible D r e a m " , Elvis Intro-
t h a i Fellini, having explored his o w n subconscious,
decided l o d o t h e same for bis wife, Giiiliclla Musina. Both are
the record. 1 felt that t h e stage
miking wus a little t o o close to
the performers, with a corresponding
diminution
of t h e
audience
response
which at
d o w n al t h e e n d of I . I H H U
Street/Its
Heartbreak
Hotel."
Long Live t h e King nl H'" '•
a n d Itoll!
spectacular,
dream-like
approaching
middle-age,
films
in which
is confused
lite
central
by doubts,
character,
fantasies a n d
childhood fears. But "H'A" is primarily c o n c e r n e d with Ihe problems
of artistic c r e a t i o n . J U L I E T is about a n u n c universal p r o b l e m : the
role of a w o m a n in marriage. GtulieUa. the wile of a prosperous
businessman, suspects
employs
that
a detective
bci h t » b a n d is having an affair. She
agency
and has t h e suspicion
confirmed,
(iiulielta's h u s b a n d , unembarrassed b y bet discovery, tells bet that
she is m i s t a k e n , then leaves on a " b u s i n e s s n i p , " Giulicii.i knows
[bat he is going to meet
her rival. Inn .it the c u d . she I.ices hci
position with h o n e s t y . I lei entire existence has ceiiicied atound bci
h u s b a n d , h u t n o w she must find aiiothei tolc in life
As in "8VS," Ihe plot is a framework, I'm a d.i//liiic. study of the
central c h a r a c t e r ' s m i n d , (itulielia arrives .it bci sclf-icali/alion. not
through logic. Inn t h r o u g h painful eticniinleix with the subconscious
and spiritual w o r l d s . Neai
which o p e n s
Ihe opening, she takes p , m in a seance,
her senses In a world
mine complex
b o u n d e d b y marriage and c o n v e n t i o n a l
mote
confidential
with
,i sexually
than
lite one
liientlslups. She becomes
liberated
friend
Guarneri String Quartet To Play
(Vulenitiia
C o i t e s e ) ; c o n s u l t s a b a l l - m a n , hall-woman guru whose mess,ice is
purely sexual; p a r t i c i p a t e s in ,m elaborate orgy in the home nl hci
beautiful, v o l u p t u o u s neighboi (Sandia Milo) Giiilicll.i also sees, lot
the fust lime since c h i l d h o o d , iiiiliiendly appanlion.x ( " s p i i i l s " ) : .is
she b e c o m e s liitlhci
isolated I'tniii bci h u s b a n d , ihe spit its appeal
n u n c frequently. U n a b l e m lace reality . (.niliell.i lives in a world nl
her imagination. Mnsi p r o m i n e n t is a childhood iiieiinuy iclated in
the chinch ( c o r r e s p o n d i n g In ( m a i n ' s i n c m o t y in " S 1 •") In ,i school
p i o d t i c l i o n . she played a m a i i y i w h o was b i n n e d al ihe si,ike
I he
vision of Ihe little gnl suiioiindcd In Haines lecttis in (miliei la's
mind. Al t h e e n d . she is able In " u n t i e " Ihe c n l .mil Hits lihciallon
allows bet to dismiss the spiiils and coiilioiil hci cvislcncc
The Ciunnu'ri String Q u a r t e t
will perform T u e s d a y , Nov. '2H,
at State University of N e w York
al Albany in a program sponsored by t h e Musie Council. T h e
program will begin at 8 : 3 0 p.m.
in t h e Main T h e a t r e of Ihe
Performing Arts ('enter.
Arnold Hteiuhnrdl a n d .John
Dillley, violins, Michael
Tree.
viola, a n d David Koyer, eello, are
the four virtuoso m e m b e r s ol
ihe ijuartel w h o . since a sensa
lioilal
[his is I'ellnn's fiisl enlni feature, and lie .mil plinHigi.iplici (.i.iiini
1)1 V c n . u i / o ( E V A , E C L I P S E . " X ' . " l have p c i l m i u c d cxiiaoidni.iiv
e x p e r i m e n t s . T h e screen b e c o m e s ,i canvas. Idled with vivid ,,,l,,is
si tinning sets a n d e l a b o i a l e c o s t u m e s
I cllini dues nm intend in be
subtle in his effects: eveiyllrmg is thiowii ,ii the vicwci in a lavish
overwhelming display
JIM II I c o n t i n u e d
lite d n c c l i n i i
1 ellim's
wink had taken since I.A D O I f I VI 1 A Ihe u i u c u s i n g p i m u i t i e m e
nl laiilasttc a n d silncal e l e m e n t s . .du.iys pieseul in vaiytng degtces
in his e a i h
films I I III WHITE S H E I K . EA S I KAUAI
Eellini went as fat .is possible in b l a c k , i n d v v h i l c
him In go fttrtliet
In " « ' ' : . "
JIT.II I allowed
inln the realm "I expicssiunism and suiie.ilisin
and prefigured t h e lialluciiialuiy style ,,l SA I Y U K O N
JULIE! O h J i l l : S P I K l i S will be shown
November
.10 and Dccembci
I
Ihuisd.n
.mil I n d . n
in l e c t i i i e Centers
1 and ' ^
respectively. S h o w t i m e I'm b o t h dales is l >l) p in
N e w York
City
debut
in
!.H..~!, are regarded as t h e most
iionubir quartet of t h e era.
Sold out Lours have taken t h e
qUiirU'i t o cities a m i colleges
t h r o u g h o u t l b ' 1 United States
and Canada, l o uiuioi music fes
livuls., a n d t o Kurope, Australia.
nwl Ihe Far Kast The C u a m e r i
was founded al V e r m o n t ' s Marl
b o m Music Festival
The artists play w o r k s of siicb
20th C e n t u r y c o m p o s e r s as Herg,
Webern,
Sessions,
Kirehner,
Sclioe nberg,
Hartok a n d
H i n d e i n i l h , however, they pre
sent t h e traditional
repertory
and d o not specialize in m o d e r n
Festival),
Free
Musie
Store,
L a b o r a t o r y T h e a t r e , 8:110 p . m .
Dec. 9 , Sat.—Birdcage, Main
+ + ***
T h e a t r e , KlliO p . m . Free (Free
Eleven
cultural
events, l o
Music S t o r e ) .
which t h e public is mviled, lire
Dec. 1 1, Mon.— Woyzeck play
s c h e d u l e d for December at S t a l e
in G e r m a n performed by interUniversity of New York al Alnationally k n o w n Die Brueke
bany.
Co. from Munich, Main T h e a t r e ,
T h e events, all of which are
:i p . m . o n l y , lickels are $ 2 . 5 0
s c h e d u l e d t o take place in t h e
a d u l t ; $1 .Ml any student.
university's
Performing
Arts
Dec,
1 ^ , Tue,—Universityt'elller. will be as lullows:
C o m m u n i t y S y m p h o n y OrchesDec I , t'ri Creative Associ
tra, Main T h e a t r e , H:30 p . m . ,
..Ins iMusic Council) $11. $1 with
\'rt'f tickets available by mail
lux
L a b o r a t o r y T h e a t r e , H:.'l()
Willi s l u m p e d return envelope or
p 111
nl t h e box office beginning Dec.
Dec -1. Sal laikas k'oss, Main
I I.
T h e a t r e , S .ill p in f r e e , ( f r e e
Music S t o i c ) .
Dec,
1 1 , T h r . -Choral a n d
DeiI, M o o ('In,ml a n d In- Wind Concert, Main T h e a t r e ,
s t r u m e n t a l C o n d u c t i n g Student
H'.fitl p.m. Free lickels available
I'rcscntali.Hi, liceital Hull, K::ll)
by mail with stamped return
)> in f r e e
e n v e l o p e or al b o x office beginning Dec. 1 1
Dec I, III, Wed Sun Alice in
Dee If,, F r i . - S t u a r t F o x GuiWonderland, Arena T h e a t r e , 7 &
tarist, ( F r e e Music Store), ReciII .III p in , S a l . Matinees, lt)::l()
tal
Hall, H:30 p.m.
a in a n d 2 p.m. S u n d a y Matinee,
Dec. lti, Sal. Flute and Piano.
'1 p.m. T i c k e t s . %'S, children and
Music Faculty Concert, Main
lax
c a r d s SI
T h e a t r e , H::iU p.m.
Dec K, Ini SUM C r o u p (('age
Tickets at $.'! arc available at
the PAC b o x office, I r,7-8(i()li.
TOWER EAST CINEMA
Gelber and Kopit to Speak
I'laywnghls
Jack
CiiimecHotll
{Indians,
Cclhci l / / n
.mil A i i h m
KopH
II Dud, I'tuir Dad) will
be on hand disv tisMiig Coiiieiii
pnraiy
A m e n , an
I he.iiie a n d
f i e l d i n g q u e s t i o n s , III .III l l l l n l 111.11
panel, mi Monday evening lie
eeinhei d. .H S (111 p II
Si inln > llie.Hie
nl
CiMici
Hie S U N Y A
llicnl
he
lil.lillsb
I nglish
dcpail
Which Is spnnsoillle Hie
event will cll.ill
l.kk
Kicll.lldsnil
thitinw\
whose
Humor
ccitlh
acted
j.l.iS
was v c i \ ic
mi .aiiipus
lias
icni.iiiveh engaged l o . i p p c u mi
Hie
panel
, in icnlls
lie is ,H
ivmk mi ,i novel
\lllim
I'.hir
in
Kopll
whose II D,hl
11,1,1. Mammas
ih,
< l,t\el
Hunt'
Sad
dneelcil Hv lei
Hid sl.iiiine
, k,.h
In \ in | leel
I.I H a m s w.i-
liatimt.ll s u , , e s
lei
(I ium.ui I'.ul
We-1 (,cllll,lll\ I .is w. II .i . .1 ill
Him
i k,,..ihnii K n s s . n K.iiii.n.i
II.mi.I
bee.in will
If,n.inI
whele he «., HI limim
in,!,nl
Ih |
I, thin i.
Ih,
( am,
;,,
In Ii
ll.i,
ih,
Dm :•• I'l.n I, nm
\W I.ill
Indians
pl.iv .il
bid,
hVi../,v
S.i/e
ne
Ih,
I'rtuhnal
When was he last nme you were airaid?
and
t,.ill, m i Hum,'i
,m,l I ... / i, tin
Inns
.in,! II.
1 • •<•
plays
PROUDLY PRESENTS:
t,.i\uei
.1
Id.iilisli
w i n , lea,lies
,i emilscs in SI \~l \ - I llg
Il h h i
inline
In
nl .in,l ti.i due, led
s pl.ivwiighluig
been
,l)i,nil
IllMilvei!
.mil
.mil
'lllnllals
in
willing
d u e , line
Kopil's
he was 11.111 -1:
PI.,-, u n g h l s
siu.il.,
Hie
I nil
Vims'
in \ r » ^.,lk
I'M, ' i m , ;
when
in
(,elbei and
Kopll we,,' llieilll.el
.,ii H i . , , , 1 , ,v i .n„l
l i b , Km.,I Sli.ikespe.iie
I .,,„p,,m
in I
I
in,! mi
I.i, I. KKII.11,1-
Hill
jlshels
Hin.iilw.iv I
. best known
Ml,
nl
Wane
\ I Illlll
(ni.vel'ie.sln:
.lie Ihe
Knpil
s
pull
plays
Cclbci
l.n k (.clliei s /'//,' ( . n m nun
is icg.udcd .is mie nl lite iiiipm
i.mi |,l.i\ s nl t h e e.iiK I 'iiui s H
was sl.iccil hv llidllb M.lllll.l nid
lull,ill
link
nl
Hie
Ihcilie
w i n , .lis.,
(iclbct's
I'lic
I mill'
pcilnlliied
I/./,/,
lit, ( m i
no Iwn was siil,sei)iientK
inln
,, liliu
i.elbci
iii.ulc
has .lis,,
wiillen
lilt
(pindllecil
o n llin.ulw.iv ). a m i
most
Cuban
icccnlly.
American Place
Ynik
limit'.
Sleep,
al Hie
I he.iiet in New
lie is a dliccloi as well as
a witlei,
has d n e c l c d
play Indians
curienlly
Kopil's
in I o n d m i a n d is
represented
Telethon !
in a p i n
d u c t t o n of Robert Coover's Tint
Telethon '73 is approaching!! Share your talents with us
this year and help make it a success. Auditions are being
held this week:
Wednesday, Nov. 29th
11-2 - CC 316
Wednesday, Nov. 29th 7 11 CC Ballroom
Friday, Dec. 1st - 7 12 - CC 315
For info call Chuck 7 7986 or Patty 489-7334. Read the
ASP for more notices about Telethon '731
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, NOV
K)XfroMfilsAajlNNWAfJTlN.1«;XXX:TON
• The MephistoWaltz
Dec. 1 & 2
LC 7
7:30 & 9:30
$.50 WITH STATE QUAD CARD $1.00 WITHOUT
Plus: ROAD RUNNER
Kid al i h e American I'lace
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE SIX
TWtN.lUHlTNrUfY
ER 28, 1972
PAGE SEVEN
BYRON MILLER: 'FORGET THE PAST'
GO HOME
by Bill Heller
A key m a n , if n o t the k e y m a n
approached, Byron a n d his teammates
seemed
to a big s e a s o n
for D o c S a u e r ' s
NCAA
bid. Seemed.
Great Danes h a s d e v e l o p e d a con-
Byron
missed
e
years of p l a y i n g h o o p h e r e . T h e
man is j u n i o r , B y r o n Miller, a n d
reminded
what's
happened
according to the " 1 . 6 prediction
enough
to make
in
his t w o
to
him
is
one take out
the old violin a n d h a n d k e r c h i e f s .
rule,"
decided
themselves
Miller
it
somehow
that
shouldn't
have
p l a y e d in a n y games in his first
year.
In a special
ruling,
they
declared B y r o n ineligible for t h e
Hot o u t of Gloversville
High,
last
3
games
of
' 7 2 , and t h e
Byron c a m e t o A l b a n y in 1970,
Danes s u b s e q u e n t l y ineligible for
to
post-season
score
6 3 points
games
form
of
in h i s first
for t h e
NCAA
bureaucracy,
T h e results
SAT's
showed
the
standard
freshman
of
that
Byron's
he
minimum
of
1.6.
ran i n t o
Byron just
before
Thanksgiving
I
a n d posed
a few
q u e s t i o n s t o t h e big forward.
didn't
NCAA
So
h e was
ASP:
It
mattered
little
that
Miller w o u n d u p w i t h o v e r a 1.0
for
both
his fro.sh
more y e a r s . W h a t
a n d sophoc o u n t e d was
MILLER:
stronger
he
feel
about
thing?
"I
was
because
I was j u s t
the
whole
disappointed
getting
into
playing. I missed all t h o s e games
my
freshman
year.
I(
was a
whole y e a r ' s loss, s o m e t h i n g I'd
never be a b l e t o m a k e u p . "
do
you
think
"Overall
we're
an experienced
ball-
club. This'll have to be the year
we
put
it
all together.
It's a
tough team."
that " r e l i a b l e " p r e d i c t i o n . H o w
did
"What
about this year's team?"
forced t o sit o u t t h e rest of t h e
season.
play. This, t h e n , is
B y r o n ' s legacy from the past.
d i s a s t e r , in t h e
struck.
predict
"after finals going home" ad
NCAA
as a
the
enough. They
history
team. B u t t h e n
That's all it costs you to run our special
17 games
frosh,
three
FOR 25
for an
Although
wasn't
troversial
AFTER FINALS
destined
ASP:
and
"Because
talent
of
of
the depth
this squad, you
may have to split your playing
lime
How do you view this''"
MILLKR
" I feel as though I
can gel the job done
player
who
thinks
enough
dins splitting
No ball-
lie's
good
his Lime.
I'll be satisfied, though, if 1 play
Willi only 3 games experience
from his freshman year,
nonetheless
found
Byron
his spot on
as much as last year
less
use it to get a ride or to get riders
to become
bounder,
and
as
high
additional
ASP
MVP of
the
Capitol
"Do
MILLKR;
scorer,
honors,
Rookie of the Week.
said
strikes
that
lightning
in the same spot
twice, right? Wrong. As the end
of
the
'7 1-'7 2
season
you
feel
mad at
"Sometimes I think
into it more There's no way you
screwed
often
Anything
disappoint
if the school would have looked
can't
It's
a
anybody, n o w ' ' "
DisLrict Tournament and ECAC
never
ADVERTISE NOW!
second
earned
such
the leading re
be
men I
the varsity last winter. He went
on
would
NCAA
Right
feel
that
the
you. They
school
blame the
Gymnastic Exhibition - Friday
It noes along those lines
now I'm looking forward
to this season. What liappened in
the past - forget i t . "
by hi*wis
Reynolds
finest
Gymnastics is an o l d sport, but
interest
the
hasn't
sports
States
seemed
fans of
the
The Springfield
to grab
United
College
gymnastic exhibition team is one
For your convenience , use the form below.
Limit of ten words per ad
to
Be a LaSalette Missionary.
No. of times
ad is to run
The LaSalettes are a religious community ol men
commuted lo living Gods word through service lo
HIS PEOPLE.
We search lor ever more creative ways to serve the
Ad is to read as follows:
People ol God. To bring the Peace and Joy ol Christ to His
People. To extend the hand ol friendship and love
to all His People.
We search to lind ever newer ways lu promote our
community lite. To strengthen the bonds to pull us together
To torge that unity which is our dillerence and our strength
We search, tinally. lor God. through prayer, through
liturgy, through our work and our being we seek Him who
gives ultimate meaning to our lives.
It you are thinking ol serving those in need in a special
way, ol being part ol a vital community, ol reaching out to
your God, then perhaps, you
are called to join our People
Corps, to be a LASALETTE
Cost
is %.2b tor ifcjcli
time
yuuf
classified
MISSIONARY.
ad appears.
TOTAL ENCLOSED
$.
For information
Nirnt
call: Inlormation
11 Massachusetts
Address .
write or
Director,
Avenue,
Worcester, Mess. 01609
.Phone.
(617) 754-7259
Inlottnuliun Uuuctvi
tuSuhitlo Ctintot tor
Church Missions and Vocations
n Massachusntts Avenue
Worcoslut. Muf>s flfSffl
yes. / would liku to tuatn iri
uttoul Uymg thu LaSalottv lito
ploosv got m much with rnw
I
I
I
Siaie_
PAGE EIGHT
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1972
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1972
X<P
event
retjuiring
great team-
work, balance and strength.
midway
Added to the straight gymnas
statuary,
the
I a hleaux,
with
a
Along
will
with
Lhese
be pyramids
beauty
and
spectacles
of
aesthetic
symmetry,
exciting
uneven
bars,
the ever
popular
parallel
bars
and the
the young men
daring and climatic moves on the
performing
this Friday night at M ill) with a
nated by former Coach Leslie .)
tor
performance
.ludd. They have become a tradi
$2.fj(J
tional
$:!.."><) for adults. They
in
the
university
pari
women combine athletic
ability
There's
a two
performed
show
thiil
into
guarantees
to
women,
make gymnastic fans of at least
balance
'JO percent of the viewers
part
has s o m e
of the
• Lesson schedule can be tailored to
meet individual needs Lessons
can be spread over u period ol
several months to a year, or for
out ol town students, a period
of one week
•Opportunity for review of past
lessons via tape at the center
Special Compact Courses during
Weekends - Intercessions
Summer Sessions
STANLEY H . K A P L A N
E D U C A T I O N A L CENTER LTD.
Bronchos in Major O t i e * in U.S.A.
horizontal bar. Tickets are $2.00
of the show, and a
of
b\
the
men and
and the men's
exhibitions,
S a /e
with
i o
I'D'.
students, and
the door.
can be
Advance
S I' N Y A I b a n y
students I.I)
card
%-l 0()
FO R
I) O R O I II K A
MKMOH IAL
wilh
together
students
for other
I' H OC K K l ) S
triple
team, also ,, traditional
the
Sl'NY
obtained ;it
also .i dance routine,
three men working
ALL
Til K
IJ E I T Z
SCHOLARSHIP
KUNIJ
in
Read The ASP
MCAT-DAT-GRE
LSAT-ATGSB
OCAT
NATI. BDS.
• Preparaoon tor tests required tor
admission to graduate and proles
sional schools
• Six and twelve session courses
• Small groups
•Voluminousmaterial for home study
prepared by experts in each field
as origi
classic in (he field of creative art
and
showmanship
statuaries
the
will
living
will bring their show to Albany
Additiss
I phono Number
spectators
the breathtaking show.
before packed houses
NOHW
\ctty-
V —
relax
through
be
The team
an
clowns, who offer some comedy
Classified Advertising Form
LOST & FOUND
HELP WANTED
SERVICES
RIDE
RIDERS WANTED
are the
tics and the clown routine
Springfield
Circle appropriate heading:
FOR SALE
HOUSING
PERSONAL
OTHER
sbowol'f
Lies, a team which usually plays
hour
Albany, New York 12222
gymnasts in the country.
due to
of those rare animals in gymnas
gym
This group of young men and
1400 Washington Avenue
Also
Winter Sports Preview
Friday
151B S B B B B B B B B is B B ta B B B B B E E E E E
irri
(untied by fill
|
ia
ia
u
MANDATORY!
Songleaders' Meeting
j |
\ |
for
pj
11 •
i
holiday sing I
| TONIGHT.' Tuesday, Nov. 2 8 1
|
8:00 pm
LC 20 {§
—
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE NINE
Investigations Begin
Seminar Hosts Editors
by Audrey Seidman
COME
SEE OUR
ASSORTMENT
CARDS,
ROWS,
WRAPPING
PAPER
GIFTS
We have received -.
NEW merchandise /
for all your upcoming
gift giving occasions:
Keautii'ul
Scented
ornamental
eandlesi
votive
canities
Kuth and heitut •;
Warm stuffed
t
animals
and eraft
Cute bean baq
kits
W18?
friend
Stationery
1 U(>7 housing issue
Both journalists agree Ihe publication of an alternative paper is
a trying e n d e a v o r in asking people to look at things in a n o t h e r
way. P e i i m u l t e r ' s paper has built
up from his fantasies t o almost a
profit m a k i n g o r g a n i z a t i o n , vet
he lives " d a y to day with the
fact l-hal if the paper ,.«.,.,
under, t h a t ' s c o o l . "
Art Works Jeopardized
products
Puzzles
Needlepoint
Even representatives of t h e "alternative p r e s s " have their differences, as a g r o u p of s t u d e n t s
found o u t by listening t o memb e r e d i t o r s Leon Van Dyck and
L e n n y P e r l m u t t e r at a discussion
s p o n s o r e d by the S e m i n a r in
J o u r n a l i s m course-.
Van Dyck, formerly e d i t o r of
The Liberator,
now edits The
Northnider,
the newsletter of the
N o r t h Side Advisory Council of
t h e Whitney M. Young C e n t e r in
A l b a n y ' s Arbor Hill. P e r l m u t t e r
edits t h e Washington Parti Spirit.
T h e main difference b e t w e e n
t h e speakers seemed t o be their
views of t h e role of a d v o c a c y
press. Van D y c k , w h o writes
muinly
for Blacks b u t sells
m o s t l y to Whiles, sees his j o b as
e x p o s i n g evil, people misusing
p o w e r , and judging t h e m . Perlm u t t e r says he writes for old and
y o u n g , Gay and straight. Black
a n d While. He runs his paper
m o re as a d ial ogu?, believ i n g
t h e r e is s o m e good and s o m e bad
in e v e r y o n e , including politicians.
Major points, such as Ihe need
for c o m m u n i t y newspapers were
readily agreed u p o n . Van Dyck
p o i n t e d o u t the single-ownership
of most papers in cities including
Albiiny, resulting here in similar
Republican editorial policies. He
emphasized funding as the main
p r o b l e m in running an "alternative p a p e r . " T h e m e t h o d s of
selling advertising space, s u b
s c r i p l i o n s and slreet h a w k i n g all
have iheir " t e c h n i c a l p r o b l e m s . "
This is especially true when an
e d i t o r writes s o m e t h i n g derogatory concerning an advertiser.
P e r l m u t t e r , however, cited the
good relationship between his
paper and the Price C h o p p e r
s l o r e , w h o ' s n o n u n i o n let luce
he lias b o y c o t t e d .
Perl mu Iter's talk e m p h a s i z e d
ph ilosophy
He o p e n e d
by
saying he was " i n t i m i d a t e d by
w o r d s , " but did n o | seem t o he
so as he espoused many about
his fantasies of a c o m m u n i t y
paper. T h e Spirit, named for a
" m e I a physical, organic
con
c e p l , " is a result of " s o m e t h i n g
o n e feels within in relationship
l o the rest of the c o m m u n i t y . "
Both
editors,
Perlmutter
n o t e d , h a d t o s t a r t from " g o . "
His p a p e r was free for the first
six m o n t h s of p u b l i c a t i o n since
beginning in t h e spring of 1 9 7 1 .
He later raised m o n e y by discussing t h e c o n c e p t of c o m m u n ity with local residents and advertisers. T h e Washington Park
area was played u p as s o m e t h i n g
real, part of his " n e w r e a l i t y . "
A c c o r d i n g t o P e r l m u t t e r , when
the Capitol papers left the city
for the s u b u r b s , t h e small things
were lost, especially the people.
N o w t h e Capitol press is returning some a t t e n t i o n lo the Park
area. He also tried t o i n c o r p o r a t e
the university into his comm u n i t y . In s p o n s o r i n g events
such as t h e Pinkster test, the
Spirit b e c o m e s an integral pari
of the c o m m u n i t y .
Van D y c k ' s efforts in
The
Liberator
were aimed to "educate people t o the landlord,
housing
commissioner,
legisl a t o r s . . . " Yet alternative papers
must
b e w a r e , as
Perlmutter
p o i n t e d o u t , as they often go
under because they " t a l k t o
themselves."
The
credibility
problem,
according
to
Van
D y c k , also h a u n t s the "alternative p r e s s . " These papers are
e x p e c t e d to s h o w m o r e facts
than the establishment press in
order to be believed.
Perlmutter
brought
u p the
p r o b l e m of political endorsements. His pre-election editorial
gave the pros and cons of candidates running for local office,
nol naming a definite choice for
office. Van Dyck brought out
his paper and " t r i e d lo nol be
objec l i v e "
His
volunteers
tended to be t h e "politically
oriented s t u d e n t s , " T w o of The
Liberator's
best stories were Van
Dyck's uiUi-melhadone article,
a id a report by former S l ' N Y A
.student Pele Pollack on the
{
Jewelry
Paperbacks
too
numerous to mention']
COME OVER AND
PICK OUT THE,
PERFECT
f
££M& [GIFT AND]
; ACCESSORIES!
Continued
from page ,'i
n o t pry open the .sheets of glass
a n d let ihe prints drops out, but
t h e last incident with the b r o k e n
plexiglass s h o w e d the uselessness
of that idea. What is heeded is ,111
alarm system or a guard. T h e
Fine Arts Gallery always has
s o m e o n e on d u t y during nailery
hours and they have never ex
peneneetl a theft
Blaisdell mentioned (he slu
d e n t s ' reluctance to quest 1011
o t h e r s as a n o t h e r reason for the
thefts
Kveryone just assumes
t h e person walking out with a
p i c t u r e has a right lo it
Whether a SUNYA s t u d e n t is
responsible lor the thefts is also
a q u e s t i o n One p,mil me,, on the
third floor, was found ripped
from (he wall, bolts and all
Later thai day a gioup of high
school sliulenls, who were r o a m
ing through the building causing
mischief, were t h r o w n out of the
C a m p u s Center
Whether they
were responsible for the d a m a g e
is a n y o n e ' s guess. If il was wit
nesst'd, no one reported il.
How will this effect future
exhibitions?
Mr. Blaisdell said that he could
no longer, in good faith, ask
p e o p l e to exhibit their art work.
However, o n e m o r e a t t e m p t will
be m a d e
Two
photographer,.
West
brook and Hewitt, have col
laborated on a p h o t o g r a p h i c pre
s e n t a l i o n entitled " F a c e s of Tin
key & J o r d a n . " They are aware
of the thefts but will nol let Ihe
"irresponsible a n d ant 1 s o c i a l "
behavior ol a few deter (hem
from sharing their work with the
greater majority of ihe Uuiver
sity C o m m u n i t y
With a d d e d
precautions, Iheir exhibit will be
up sifter Thanksgiving. Whether
the Capital Land Women Artists
.show scheduled
for J, uuary
lakes place will d e p e n d on the
success of this e x h i b i t i o n
What if the thefts c o n t i n u e - '
l i s ,1 shame, bul s o m e t h i n g
like a permanent exhibit will, in
thai case, have to lake the pi.ice
of
Ihe
rulaling,
IcMipoi.nv
shows
Statistics may s h o w thai c r i m e
has decreased ibis year, bul
don't let t h e figures fool you
Not all of these cited thefts were
" r e p o r t e d " Crime is slill thi'tv
ing on c a m p u s a n d . if il hasn't
affected you yet, il may soon
To s t o p it, the University Com
m u n i l y must take a m o r e active
part in protecting whal is here
for their benefit
by Tom Jory
Associated Press
B A T O N ROUGE* La. AP - A
m e m o r i a l service for t h e t w o
black s t u d e n t s slain at S o u t h e r n
University d r e w 4 0 0 p e o p l e t o
t h e s t e p s of t h e s t a t e capitol on
Sunday
as t w o
independent
c o m m i s s i o n s p r e p a r e d t o begin
full-scale investigations of t h e
Nov. 16 p o l i c e - s t u d e n t c o n f r o n t a t i o n at t h e s c h o o l .
'OH M Y GOD! NOT AGAIN! LSU LOST!'
Louisiana Aftermath
Faculty Fired For Support
(CPS) - University officials at
Louisiana's S o u t h e r n University
moved last week to fire several
faculty m e m b e r s s u s p e c t e d of
siding with s t u d e n t s in the conflict which resulted in the d e a t h s
of two black s t u d e n t s .
n u m b e r of blacks and whites and
would include two students.
Guste said that " L o u i s i a n a ' s
image and self respect as a stale
--which has as its m o l i o ' U n i o n ,
Justice and Confidence' is ;ii
slake,
University
President
Leon
Netterville, w h o has been accused of calling in a r m e d police
to the c a m p u s , d i s p a t c h e d dis
missal notices t o t w o professors
and is s u s p e c t e d of dismissing
four or five o t h e r s .
"It is therefore i m p e r a t i v e , " he
c o n t i n u e d , "for the well being of
our slate and m ihe interest of
public safety and the protection
of individual rights, that there he
a detailed and thorough invesli
gallon to find out who killed
those s t u d e n t s , how it happened
and why the tragedy o c c u r r e d . "
Both professors w h o have been
dismissed had s p o k e n in s u p p o r t
of s t u d e n t d e m a n d s , including
the firing of Netterville as presi
dent.
Dr. J o s e p h J o h n s o n , head ol
S o u t h e r n ' s Physics D e p a r t m e n t
and o n e of t h o s e dismissed,
slated,
"Black
people
know
whose hands are bloody Lei us
nol for the m o m e n t be con
fused."
J o h n s o n t e r m e d the dismissals,
"a grotesque and perverted .il
tempt lo deflect blame from this
massacre " He also denied thai
he had c o n d o n e d violence, ex
plaining t h a t "Mr. Nelterville
knows thai I do nol e n c o u r a g e
disruption. I simply e n c o u r a g e d
him to resign."
It is r u m o r e d thai J o h n s o n
represented the s t u d e n t ' s choice
as successor to Nelterville
George W, Baker, Jr., assistant
professor of engineering, was Ihe
second
professor
to be dis
missed. Buker had previously
appeared before the S t a l e Board
of E d u c a t i o n on behalf of slu
dents involved in the protest
In related d e v e l o p m e n t s , S t a l e
A t t o r n e y General William C u s t e
a n n o u n c e d the a p p o i n t m e n t of 11
biracial c o m m i t t e e to investigate
last week's conflict on the Baton
llouge c a m p u s . G u s t e explained
that the c o m m i t t e e would be
"above politics a n d u n b i a s e d "
and w o u l d be chaired by him
self.
"But more than t h i s , " Guste
said, " w e must find ways to
prevent this kind of tragedy
from happening again
(Juste stated that all parties
involved in Ihe tragedy, in
eluding Ihe governor, would be
subpoenaed before Ihe secret
hearings
Because
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1972
ol
Ihe
naUuc
ol
Ihe
Ih.il Ihe hcanngs would he held
behind closed doors
One ol Ihe is-.ues lo be hroUglll
before Ihe bo.ild of ilii|llir> will
he ihe ipieslion ol who fired ihe
sh<»ls which killed ihe 1 wo -,(u
dents
Immediately
-diet
the slu
d e n t s ' deaths the gnvernoi and
the
local
shcrjfl
issued
sUllf
m e t i t s d e n > nig
that
stale
I roopers or sheriff's deplll les
fired any weapon into the crowd
ul students
Lai ei , C o v e r u o i
Edwards
staled that Ihe sheillf had led
him " d o w n the garden p a t h "
wilii s t a t e m e n t s "f bis depart
nienl's innocence, and that it
that one ol I he
W i l s prolatble
According t o Guhte, the committee will consist of an equul
;heriff's d e p u t i e s had fired in
excitement,
killing
the
two
students.
Last week, Ed wards retracted
his original r e t r a c t i o n , labelling
news a c c o u n t s of his s t a t e m e n t
"irresponsible and i n n a c c u r a t e . "
Ed wards e x p l a i n e d t h a t his
s t a t e m e n t s c o n c e r n i n g the guilt
of the sheriff's d e p a r t m e n t were
delivered off the record and not
for public d i s t r i b u t i o n .
"Even if I was c r a z y e n o u g h t o
say t h e m , " the governor explained, "1 w o u l d n ' t be crazy
enough to put t h e m on the
record
"What's going to happen in the
wake of thai kind of s t o r y ' ' " the
governor c o m m e n t e d . " I t ' s t o o
great a price to pay for t h a t kind
of s t o r y . "
A b o u t 4 0 0 blacks assembled
for t h e h o u r - l o n g rally. Leaders
said it was in memorial for t h e
t w o d e a d s t u d e n t s . J o h n E.
B r o w n , w h o told t h e c r o w d he
h a d organized t h e event, said,
" T h e very e x i s t e n c e of the black
race t o d a y is t h r e a t e n e d . "
Brown said several national
civil rights leaders had been
invited t o speak, h u t he said
n o n e was able to a t t e n d .
Focal p o i n t for the activity
was t h e 30 m i n u t e s of violence
o n Nov. 16 which e x p l o d e d as
officers chased s t u d e n t s from
Southern's
administration
building. Denver A. Smith of
New R o a d s , La., and Leonard
Douglas Brown, Bilberl, La.,
b o t h 20, were sprayed with
b u c k s h o t a n d died of head
wounds. Authorities contended
at the s t a r t that officers fired
n o t h i n g but tear gas. loiter,
however, they c o n c e d e d t h a t an
officer could have mistaken a
s h o t g u n cartridge for a tear gas
cartridge.
Only the
12-member commission a p p o i n t e d by the s t a t e ' s
a t t o r n e y general, William G u s t e ,
c o u l d boast legal s t a t u s a n d at
least access to s u b p o e n a p o w e r s .
But organizers of the Black
People's C o m m i t t e e of Inquiry,
o u t w a r d l y skeptical of t h e official investigation, said t h e y ,
t o o , would m a k e their findings
available to a u t h o r i t i e s .
Gov.
Edwin
Edwards
a n n o u n c e d over the w e e k e n d I Insecurity force at New Orleans
would be beefed up for the
r e s u m p t i o n of c »sses, b u l he
d i s c o u n t e d warnings from dis
sidents and said he believes the
majority of the s t u d e n t s want to
return t o their studies.
S t u d e n t s have d e m a n d e d • >r>n>
of a voice in t h e admini.sti . u . u n
of the n a t i o n ' s largest black
university, and have called for
t h e resignation of the school's
(in-vear old president, Dr. G.
A career in law...
without law school.
When you become a Lawyer s Assistant,
you II do work traditionally done by lawyers
- work which is challenging, responsible
anc. intellectually stimulating. Lawyer's
Assistants are now so critically needed that
The Institute lor Paralegal Training can
ofler you a position in the city ol your choice
— and a higher starting salary than you'd
expect as a recent college graduate. Here
is a career as a professional with financial
rewards that increase with your developing
expertise
II you are a student ol high academic
s t a n d i n g and are i n t e r e s t e d in a l e g a l
career come speak with our representative
Leon Netterville.
T w o Southern-New Orleans
s t u d e n t s are o n the attorney
general's
investigating
commission, as well as Revius Ort i q u e , a black N e w Orleans a t t o r ney a n d former m e m b e r of t h e
President's
Commission
on
C a m p u s Unrest, J a c k s o n a n d
t w o o t h e r blacks.
Whites o n t h e panel include
T u r n e r Catledge of New Orleans,
retired e x e c u t i v e editor of t h e
New Y o r k T i m e s .
T h e black p e o p l e ' s c o m m i t t e e
includes Georgia s t a t e
Rep.
Julian Bond a n d t w o black
Berkeley, Calif., city councilmen.
FACT
OR
FICTION?!
You should avoid exercise
during your period.
Fiction! The simple rules of
good health are always important, especially during
your period. Exercise, a
proper diet and a good night's
sleep go a long way toward
relieving menstrual cramps
or preventing them altogether. And remember,
you're not "sick." So there's
no reason not to follow your
normal routine.
There's no odor when you use
Tampax tampons.
Fact. With Tampax tampons,
odor can't form. Odor is noticeable only when the fluid
is exposed to air. With
Tampax tampons,fluidis absorbed before it comes in
contact with air; therefore,
odor cannot form.
You should not bathe during
your period.
Fiction! Contrary to superstition, water can't hurt you.
Daily baths or showers are a
must throughout your period.
Shampoo your hair, too. And
don't deny yourself the
chance to go swimming.
Tampax tampons are worn
internally, so you can swim
anytime.
4
Single girls can use Tampax
tampons.
Fact. Any girl of menstrual
age who can insert them
easily and without discomfort, can use Tampax
tampons with complete confidence. Follow the easy directions in every package.
Contact the Placement Office
A representative ol The Institute
will visit your campus on
Our only Interest It protecting you.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29
NOT! II IIM above dale is inconvenient lor you
please (all o wnlo The Institute lor information
The Institute for
Paralegal Training
13th lloor 401 Walnut St , Phlla . Pa 1910
1215) WA 50905
J
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1972
PAGE TEN
Writer
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
MADE OHLY SV TAMFM INCOHrOHAUl), FAIHU, MAt|,
PAGE ELEVEN
by Glenn von Nostitz
Thii it the city: Albany, New
York. The state capital js here.
So to a port, a lot of banks, a few
small industries, and about
130,000 Albanians. ,
Some people don't like Albany. They're mostly dissatisfied
students and downstate legislators who spend only part of each
year here. They complain incessantly about the cultural wasteland, "hick town" atmosphere,
and the general lack of excitement in the capital city.
Then there are those who really don't find the city so objectionable at all. Albany certainly
has its share of faults, but on the
whole they see it as little worse
than any other American city its
size. "Look at Alburquerque „
New Mexico or Urbana, Illinios"
they tell us. "What do these
cities have that's so exceptional?"
They want to know why Albany is always singled out for
extra criticism.
Case in point: A story appeared recently in the Sunday
New York Times Travel Section
headlined, "Is Albany a Capital
Offense?" The question was rhetorical as the story which followed was essentially a rehash of
the oft-cited terrors of living and
working in the state capital. The
lead set the tone for the entire
story: "You're in Albany either
on business or by mistake."
Urban Ills
But is Albany really so much
worse than other American cities
of comparable size? Albany
backers point out that it merely
shares with most every other
city the usual plethora of urban
ills. It's not unusual, they claim,
that all of the major downtown
department stores have closed
down or moved to the suburbs.
Or that the major downtown
hotels have gone out of business
or become severely dilapidated in
the face of stiff competition
from suburban Holiday Inns.
As in so many American cities,
Albany's tomblike railroad station stands empty and splotched
with pigeon droppings, a stark
testament to days of heavy rail
traffic.
The city backers point to the
main business thoroughfare. Albany's State Street is nothing
but one long row of banking
houses, a situation which is common in almost every American
city. It's beginning to look a lot
like Fifth Avenue. Even the
names of the banks are the
same: Chase Manhattan, Bank*of
New York, Banker's Trust,
Chemical Bank. A few small
stores hang on, thanks mostly to
the lunchtime crowds of office
workers.
As in numerous American
cities, the riverfront area has
been destroyed by the building
of massive arterial highway
systems which whisk workers
into the city a little faster after
work. Which means they don't
have to see much of the city
either way. Nice for the commuters. Not so nice for the
downtown merchants.
And Albany has its share of
deteriorating brownstones, ugly
high rise low-income housing
projects and urban crime.
AH of these afflictions are not
unique to Albany.
Things Get Done
Indeed, Albany may actually
be better off than a lot of other
towns. Yes, there are some differences. Unlike many other
cities, the police do answer calls.
The fire department responds to
alarms, and neither is seriously
undermanned.
Garbage is collected from
every neighborhood. The streeU
are cleaned; the snow somehow
gets plowed. In short, the city
functions, which in this day and
age is something to brug about.
The city government may be
"corrupt and rotten", but the
PAGE TWELVE
average citizen here really
'doesn't care. As long as his street
is plowed and his taxes don't go
up, hell be satisfied. The Albany
machine knows how to please.
Atomy not so bad
Mediocre but Secure
Photos by dmrld Shapiro
Scenes like the one above are more and more common in Albany commercial areas as
stores move to the lucrative suburbs,but the city is by no means stagnating. Many new
construction projects are either in progress or planned throughout the capital city.
State Street is the heart of Albany's central business district. The street is increasingly
being dominated by banking offices as retail stores go out of business or flee to the
suburbs. Consequently, streets are empty after 5:00 PM, when office workers are safely at
home in the suburbs
Albany is a slow city. The pace
is langorous. It is a middleAmerican haven. The people
don't have to face crowds, subways, junkies, or high crime.
True, they are somewhat isolated from a lot of mainstream
America, and most of them appear happy. Happy, perhaps in a
provincial sense, but happy
nonetheless.
Living in Albany is a lot like
turning the clock back 20 years.
Albany in 1972 is a lot like the
average American city in 1952.
The government is somewhat
archaic, but things do get done.
The city is not falling apart.
Hopeful Construction
This is not to say that Albany
is completely stagnant. There are
even optimists who see a "bright
and prosperous" future for the
city. They base their hopes not
on the massive South Mall project, but on several other recent
developments which could go far
toward revitalizing the city core.
Most important of these is the
Ten Eyck Project. Construction
will soon begin on the site of the
old Ten Eyck Hotel of a high
rise office building, hotel complex, shopping mall, and other
public spaces. It should pump
some blood into the weak heart
of downtown Albany.
This Spring construction
should start on the new federal
building next to the Palace Theatre. Several other building pro
jects are also in the works.
Physical improvements are being made in harbor facilities
United Fruit Company recently
decided to bypass New York for
Albany, using the latter city as a
distribution point fur the north
east. And although we shouldn't
hold our breath waiting for large
corporations to move their headquarters to Albany, the United
Fruit move is indicative of a
desire to capitalize on Albany's
central position in the northeast.
There is the decision by the
State University to utilize the
delapidated Delaware and Hudson building for its central headquarters. SUNY will completely
lenovate the building inside and
out.
Whether Albanians are hanging
onto the South Mall as theh
"last hope," as the Nfw Yurll
Times story staled is questionable. Musi city leaders realize
that the final opening of the
mall won't really mean a very
large increase in the number of
workers in the city. The thous
ands of construction workers
will merely be replaced by a few
thousand more officcworkers
transplanted from other areas of
the city and consolidated at the
mall site.
The arterial highways will
whisk workers into the cavern
oils maw of an underground
parking lot anil whisk them
away when day is done Whether
they will bother to actually slop
in Albany to and from work, or
during noontime to do some
shopping is doubtful It's a long
trek from the mall offices to the
downtown stores.
Mediocre Yet Secure
Albany certainly wouldn't win
a Model Citins Award. It is.
admittedly, a mediocre place
The "well bred" anil "soplns
tacted" would undoubtedly he
bored here Mm the average Al
Iranian is content right where he
Is.
Albany's riverfront area has been seriously affected by the building of massive arterial
systems effectively preventing access to the river for cith residents. The expressways are
beneficial, however, to commuters who can whisk to and from downtown offices without
stopping in the city itself. Nice for the commuters. Not so nice for the merchants.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Winters may he harsh, the ar
chitoeture may he atrocious, the
cultural attractions few and fur
between, hut Hie average Albanian isn't complaining. His gov
ernment looks after him closely
His job with the statu is secure
His n e i g h b o r h o o d is unthreatened, lie is happy.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28,
1972
Vol. LIX No. 49
Most tipslale New Yorkers
beaded home from work Thursday evening in a major snow
slotni-lhc second in sixteen
days for eastern counties-while
flurries were repotted in the
Buffalo area and tain and sleet
fell on New York City and Long
Island.
The National Wcatltct Service
in Albany said the snowfall
would amount to over twelve
inches, as it fell at the rale
over an inch an hour throughout
the night.
The storm which hit Albany
about .1 p.m. in a lighl mist hut
quickly changed to heavy visibility-reducing Hakes, foiled
many rush-hour m o t o r i s t s and
liavcllers on the eve of the
Jewish holiday of llatuikkah.
Police in Schenectady reported
an injury lice 25-car pile-up near
one Tluuwav exit.
Colder air was forecast lo push
Into the stale in the precipitt
lion's wake, dropping temperatures into the teens Friday night
and the i(Js Saturday. The snow
was expected to taper off to
Hurries throughout the slate Friday.
Slate Police throughout the
state reported hazardous driving
conditions in their areas, with
toads wel, slippery and icy in
many places. Maintenance crews
SttltUnlnriltyofNtwYorkttAlbiny
were dispatched along the entire
length of the Thruway from
New York City lo the northwestern Pennsylvania border.
The weather service said (he
storm derived from a low-pressure system that intensified
tapidly off the Virginia coast
and moved northeasterly into
the region. "Nor'easlers" traditionally bring the heaviest snowfalls to the eastern sections of
lite slate.
December 1,1972
Another storm, possibly bringing snow into the western New
York si, >w bells, is expected
Saturday, forecasters said.
A storm that began Nov. 14
and lasted for the better part of
24 hours dumped up to 18
inches of heavy, wel snow on
eastern parts of New York.The
snow blanket stayed in most
countries with near-or belowfreezing temperatures in the
fall's wake.
Teevan Discusses Tenure With Students
by Glenn von Noslitz
The tenure controversies con
linue. About twenty concerned
students met Psychology Depart
munt Chairman Richard Teevan
Tuesday night to talk about
issues related to tenure and
teaching effectiveness.
Much of the discussion centered around the importance
placed on student evaluations in
tenure cases. Teevan said that
when student evaluations are
strongly unfavorable to a purti
culur professor, he will most
probably he fired. However, if
the evaluations favor the professor, his or her case will Ire
discussed further by the depart
merit
Other considerations
would then he taken into
account. These would include
research, university service, and
continuing growth.
Teevan told the students that
beginning this coming semester
nil Psychology professors will be
required to undergo student
evaluations, Students asked him
what would happen to professors who still refused to undergo
evaluation, and he responded
that, in essence, ho would Ire
"unable" to force thum to be
evaluated, particularly if they
are tenured. It is his own personal belief that every instructor
should be evaluated, but he is
not likely to force anyone to do
so.
Also discussed in this connection was the availability of evaluation information. Such information, Teevan told the students, is restricted only to the
professor involved and is not
supposed to be made public.
This policy was voted on an
approved by the department,
and Teevan says he is in no
position to circumvent it, although bis personal philosophy
is that all such information
should be public,
Teevan recommended that if
students so desired, they could
conduct their own evaluations
and make the information public. However, he feels thot If a
professor was against this, ho
would not be obligated to sacrifice class time for it to be dono.
Students would have to contact
their classmates outside of class
to gather evaluations. There
would not, ho emphasized, bo
any restriction on releasing any
information gathered in this
manner.
Graduate Teachers Defended
111 other discussion, Teevan
talked about teaching effectiveness in regaril to the issue of
g r a d u a t e students leaching
undergraduate courses. Students
questioned the use of graduate
students in teaching introductory courses, as well as several
upper level courses. In at least
one c o u r s e ,
"Personality,"
graduate students are teaching
two out of the three sections
offered. The undergraduate students feel they are being deprived of the teaching effective
noas of full professors, since
muny of them allegedly spend
their time doing research.
Teevan says that rather than
being harmful, the use of graduate students is actually beneficial. Graduate students can give
more personal help than full
professors and are often more
enthusiastic about their leaching, ho says. Also, he points out
that they are less specialized and
are thereby belter al teaching
Introductory courses.
Ho feels that research directly
benefits undergraduates since It
makes the department more
visible and gives it prestige This
benefit* undergraduates who
later apply to graduate schools.
Research is so important, in fact,
that professors are often hired or
promoted according to how
likely it seems they may make a
"research breakthrough," Teevan adds. Such "breakthroughs"
also add to departmental prestige.
Student Vole Denied
Also discussed during the
meeting was the issue of whether
students should vote at faculty
meetings. Teevan feels that this
issue is not of paramount importance. Ho udds that he
doesn't wont to create faculty
morale problems, which student
vutes could possibly create.
There was at least one urea in
which both Teevan and the students found themselves
in
agreement. Both feel that the
curriculum should be expanded
and that now courses should he
offered, In addition to "the
basics." However there is the
usual problem of money and
budget restrictions, which pre-
vent any new courses from being
established. Teevan did point
out thut one new seminar course
will, however, he offered next
fall. Where the money for this
course come from is uncleur.
One problem being encountered by the Psychology department is the faculty-student ratio.
Tire department reportedly has
one of the highest ratios in the
entire University. This is partly
the result of lurgo class sizes, and
the muny nursing and speech
pathology students who ure required to tuke psychology
courses. Neither of those departments contributes professors or
money to the Psychology deportment.
Teevun fools thot upper level
courses should have no more
than I fi to 20 studeliio, und he
claims that he will not teach
courses with large numbers of
enrollees.
Teevun says thut when he came
to this University, lie understood
that his main tusk was to develop a large gruduute program,
und thut this was the reason he
loft Bueknoll. That college apparently hus no graduate psychology program.
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