FSA Faced With Hard Times I stake my 3Sin1972 in large part on

advertisement
UNiVERS
wmwm
sin m~i^S
ALBANY
I stake my
3Sin1972
in large part on
theenergy,the
wisdom and the
conscience of
young Americans."
FSA Faced With Hard Times
by Al Senia
OPEN LETTER TO THE STUDENTS
OF NEW YORK STATE
In a very few days the American people will select either Richard Nixon or
myself to be President for the next four years
Yet many people have grown so
suspicious of government and so cynical toward politicians that they believe
the choice doesn't make any difference.
They are wrong. It makes a difference to the people of Southeast Asia. For
them it is the difference between four more years of ruthless bombing, burning
villages and terrified children and an immediate end to these scenes of horror.
It makes a difference to our prisoners of war- the difference between four
more years of agonizing captivity and the freedom that will come only when this
war is finally over.
Unfortunately, it no longer makes any difference to the 20,000 American
soldiers who have returned from this madness not in glory, but in death, since
Richard Nixon took office on a pledge of peace. For them his secret plan for
peace will remain a secret always.
I will end this war immediately.
Richard Nixon has not and will not.
It makes a difference to the millions who languish in poverty in the richest
nation of the world. It makes a difference to their children who may be
condemned to another generation of empty stomachs, wretched health and broken
dreams. It is the difference between compassion and neglect.
I will commit whatever it takes to give every American the chance for a
full life. Richard Nixon has not and will not.
And it makes a difference to all of us who look to the Supreme Court for
justice. Richard Nixon's appointments to the Court have demonstrated his
contempt for our nation's Constitution. Two of his nominees were so poorly
qualified that the Senate refused to confirm them. Yet Justices Rehnquist,
Powell, Blackmun and Burger will be with us for the rest of my life and for
a major part of yours.
I will nominate Supreme Court justices worthy of the position,
has not and will not.
Richard Nixon
During the debate over the California delegation at the Democratic Convention,
Assemblyman Willie Brown of California electrified the delegates with his plea:
"Give us back our delegation."
As this campaign comes to a close, 1 say to the wiretappers and the warmongers
and the powerful private interests that have seized control of our government:
"Give us back our country."
I am asking for your help in these final days. Without it I cannot win.
With it 1 definitely can. 1 stake my hopes on November 7th in large part on
your energy, your wisdom and your conscience.
incorely,
^^Z^-<^-<-"^A^frW
George McGovern
To work a t SUNY Albany c a l l :
PAGE SIXTEEN
463-7224.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
I t Eaal Fllly.ihlid Slrtei
Ntw York. Now York 10022
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1972
Vice President John Hartley: "We have a serious situation.'
The Waterman Affair
The financial walls are closing
i n on Faculty-Student Association.
Losses are extensive. Sales are
d o w n . Operating cash is shrinking. Bank loans are hard to come
by. A n d if first quarter results
are any indication, FSA is not
goi ng to h ave a " brea k-e ve n "
year - something the corporation desperately needs to stave
o f f bankruptcy - unless some
very drastic steps arc taken.
The remedial measures, aimed
at cutting FSA loses and increases income, may include:
— A rise in the cost of mandatory dorm meal contracts.
— I n s t i t u t i o n of mandatory
summer board contracts.
— Institution of mandatory
graduate student
hoard contracts.
— A n increiise in the coast of
cashing a check from 1 5 cents to
20 cents.
— Partial or complete closure
o f the Campus Center Cafeteria
and Putroon Room and conversion of Campus Center food
operations to "partial vending."
Students Meet Hunsberger
by Glenn von Nostitz
Several students heading the
fight to reinstate Psychology
Professor Caroline
Waterman
met w i t h I. Moyer Hunsberger,
Dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences yesterday afternoon.
The students presented Hunsberger with a list of some 2300
student signatures on petitions
supporting Waterman in her
quest for tenure.
T h e students presented the
petitions as evidence to be used
when the Waterman case reaches
Hunsberger and his Faculty Personnel Committee sometime in
the near future.
After being presented with
the petitions, Deun Hunsberger
commented that, " I'm not impressed by numbers, but by substantive arguments." He then
went on to explain that he felt it
"doesn't make any difference
how many signatures you get"
since alot of students may have
signed the petitions because they
"were jumping on a cause."
By "subs tun I ive arguments"
Hunsberger apparently
meant
direct student testimonials and
letters explaining exactly why
they were supporting Waterman.
He (lid add thai hi* will " l a k e
careful consideration of student
Views
Write lo leevan
The bludenU collected the
2,'ili() signatures during an mien
sive loin day campaign, coupled
Willi a letter writing campaign
urging students to write to
SUNY Chancellor Krnesl Uoyer,
legislators, Hunsberger and high
university officials concerning
the Waterman case
Hunsberger felt that the stu
dents cause could better he ser
vud by writing to Psychology
Department Chairman Itichard
Teevaii, instead of the adminis t r a t o r . He fuels thai most of
the evidence in the case is evaluated by the Psychology Department itself and that the students
should consequently concentrate
their efforts on the departmental
l«ve).
T h e students pointed o u t that
the Psychology Department has
already reached a decision on
the Waterman case, recommending she be denied tenure by a
9-8 vote, and that "going back
t o the department" would not
be worthwhile. Hunsberger responded that the students were
" j u m p i n g t o conclusions" because they assume that the departmental
recommendation
cannot be revoked.
Throughout the meeting both
Hunsberger and the students
were extremely cordial. Hunsberger paused occasionally to
recite anecdotes of his old college days and to tell about his
seven children, all of w h o m
"have been students."
The Arts and Sciences dean
repeatedly emphasised that he
was unable to comment on the
specifics of the case as he had
not yet studied it in sufficient
detail. He claims that he has " n o
value judgements on this case
yet."
The Dean stated any " c o n
erete" comments now would ser
ve (inly to prejudice the views of
the members of various re
viewing committees and admini
slralors who must handle the
ease He added thai the "news
paper p u b l i c i t y , " such as thai in
the ASP, only creates i
• pre
judlces
Student Terry Gelle) asked
Hunsberger how import tin I ^1 u
elenl input will he in the case,
especially when compared I o
other criteria such as university
service and scholarly ability
The Dean responded
thai
there is " n o f o r m u l a " for deter
mining how important the stu
dent input should he, hut that
he "looks at everything" when
considering u tenure case. He
uddod that, " I t all depends •• and
y o u ' l l never preBS me towurds
more of an answer than that."
The concerned students told
Hunsberger thttt they Ihought
WuLerman is the "beat instuctor '
in the entire Psychology Department, but Hunsberger remained
unpersuaded. He wanted to
know how they could "move
this." He asked them whether
t h e y have any " concrete
evidence" showing that this is
so.
The students attempted to
supply some of this " c o n c r e t e "
evidence. They cited the student
evaluation forms, pointing out
that Dr. Waterman receive'' ner
feci scores twice. But J.iu.nsherger thought this was n o t
"substantial enough" since, " I
think students are rather easy on
evaluating professors," a remark
which hrought immediate signs
of
d isagreernent
from
the
students. He added that, " I ' v e
seen very few harsh indictments
of professors by students."
The students then attempted
to give Hunsberger evidence
more to his liking. One girl, who
had bad Waterman for two
courses, said that she was " a l ways
alive and
enthusiastic
about the course w o r k " and that
she was the "most inspiring"
professor she has ever had. A n
other student claimed that "She
(Waterman | made us work very
hard, il was no! any easy A
Other students cited examples o|
Waterman's personal and sincere
interest in her students
Confidentiality
Neai Ihe t-iu\ of the meeting
Terry deller usked Hunshergei il
ii would he possible lor .students
10 he present al Kacull V I1 ft
sonnel Committee meeting when
11 decided Hie Waterman case
Hunsberger emphatically
ans
wered " n o " and quickly pointed
>ut that there are already three
.siudents on the committee. " I
wan! t o make a perfectly clear
that personnel decision must be
completely confidential," the
Dean added.
What finally came out of the
one and a half hour was a
decision by the students to meet
w ith
Psychololy
Department
Chairman Hichard Teuvun as
soon us possible. The students
seemed generally disappointed
w i t h the final outcome o f the
parley.
— A n end to the subsidation
of dorm director meals.
— A n end t o support o f Infirmary meals.
— A l i m i t to the amount of
money available through the
FSA loan service.
The various measures were
presented
for
discussion
by
Faculty-Student
Association
Acting Director Norbert Zahm
at the semi-annual meeting of
the corporate membership help
Monday afternoon in the administration building, Zahm was
emphatic in letting everyone
know - especially reporters that none of the proposals had
actually been instituted. In fact,
he did not even want to go on
record as supporting any one of
them specifically, preferring to
let the Board of Directors make
the unpopular choice.
Zahm said he was merely presenting the package as a possible
means o f improving the financial
position of the corporation.
"These are merely
alternulives,"
he explained. " A t this
point they are not specific recommendations from the management."
I l will lie up to the Board of
Directors -• a group of ten composed of faculty, students and
administration - to study the
"alternatives" and come u p w i t h
specific recommendations. But it
seems likely that some of the
alternatives Zahm drew up will
become
reality
very
soon,
though
perhaps in modified
form. Discussion at Monday's
meeting centered around the
deteriorating financial position
of FSA and immediate fiscal
constraint emerged as the most
immediate likely course.
"We have a serious situation,"
observed
Vice-President
John
Hartley, who was chairing the
meeting in President Bene/.et's
absence. "We had a bad year last
year and we are doing worse."
He indicated "serious a t t e n t i o n "
would have to be taken by the
Board of Directors by the first
of the new year.
Complicating the financial
picture is the increasing reluctancy of area banks to grant
lines of credit to FSA -- money
the corporation needs to pay off
debts, meet costs, and keep out
of bankruptcy.
The net w o r t h o f the corporalion
decreased
by
some
$200,000 last year and the decreasing figure is an indicator t o
the banks of a steadily worseni ng
financial
situation.
Net
worth is similar l o collateral for
a loan and such a dramatic decrease in the figure, when viewed
in the context of decreasing sales
and steady losses, results in a
diminishing bank credit line.
FSA management had d i f f i eulty
securing
the
needed
$(500,000 credit line this year
but were eventually successlul
alter arduous negotiating sessions. " F o r t u n a t e l y , "
Hartley
told the board, " w e had a
friendly b a n k . " B u t even so,
FSA must pay a service charge
above the usual interest rate,
send the bank m o n t h l y budget
reports and renegotiate the loan
in A p r i l rather than October.
This is evidence that the corporation is considered a poor
credit risk.
A n d it is no wonder. FSA
came out in the red again last
year.
The
f i n a l loss was
$123,000, an improvement on
the $217,000 loss o f a year
before but extensive
Hartley explained that the
point has been reached where
the corporation can not absorb
any more losses and still receive
credit from local banks. That is
why FSA management is placing
such an important emphasis on
ending the year o n , at the very
least, a break even point.
Unfortunately, they may noL
gel it. The first quarter audit is
complete and it offers little hope
for improvement. Food service
and bookstore sales are down
and profits for the period are
appreciably less than at this time
last year. Overall, FSA losses are
running substantially higher at
confirmed an pane ,'J
Cons on Campus ?
Acting on a lip from a "usually reliable source," Albany and Slati
ilici* brought their search fur eight escaped prisoners from Albany
ounty Jail to the campus yesterday afternoon.
A b o u t u dozen city and stale police, split into three teams and
•com pan led by a security officer, cordoned off Delancey and
CI inton Halls on Colonial Quad and conducted a room-by-room
arch.
They found nothing
A .-.ci urity official described student reaction to the unprecedenI search as "very cooperative." T h e n ' were no incidents.
The huntil lor
for the escapes
escapees began s h o i t h aflej three o'clock and
ted about twenty minutes, accordi
spokesman for security
te .search climaxed a week that bus
A Friday nghl i ape from the i.nl and a stop l l lln campus by
Ihe inmates,
The finding ol a .set of keys to Albany County Jail by a S U N Y A
student Wednesday afternoon near Stale l j u a d .
Daily visits to campus by city police
The tip to police yesterday.
The spokesman claimed that security was alerted to the upcoming
raid only a short time before it actually occurred and that a brief
strategy session wab held by city, slate, and security officials to map
out the actual logistics of the search. He discounted student rumors
of a " d r u g bust" by saying that security played a role in convincing
state and local police " n o t t o go looking for drugs."
Albany and Slute police had no comment.
No police spokesmen would say whether local police might return
to campus for subsequent searches.
Chow: Torch to Represent Students
by Arlene Kafker
Meet John Chow. He is the
Editor-in-Chief o f "Torch", the
S U N Y A yearbook. He is concerned. His purpose in this year's
edition o f the " T o r c h " is to
represent the students in recording the events of importance
during this past year.
Last year, there was s o m e concern over the c o n t e n t s of the
"Torch". The
Editor-in-Chief
and his Editorial board saw fit to
include pictures o f bodies without heads and other symbols of
their an ti- Vietnamese
feelings
within these pages. A number of
people in the student body, including the Central Council,
voiced strong o b j e c t i o n s to this.
Consequently, as of last spring,
the budget for the " T o r c h " was
frozen and -John' C h o w found
himself in q u i t e a p r e d i c a m e n t .
Although h e was in no way
responsible for t h e a c t i o n s of his
predecessors, work on this year's
y e a r b o o k was s u s p e n d e d until
t h e Central Council could decide
on s o m e s o r t of a c t i o n t o insure
that
nothing
o bjectionable
would be placed within the pages of this year's " T o r c h " .
T h u s , school began, b u t work
on the book d i d n ' t . A m o n t h
passed and still n o decision was
reached. According t o Chow,
when he a p p r o a c h e d Michael
L a m p e r t , President of the Stud e n t Association, a n d asked him
if h e could speak at a Central
Council meeting to put forth his
views and ideas for this year's
p u b l i c a t i o n , permission was denied. So, Chow was forced to
speak privately t o each individual Council m e m b e r . Finally,
he was able t o speak to the
Council as a whole. He explained
t h a t as of t h a t
point, Lhe
" T o r c h " was in terrible condition because work could n o t be
started until the budget was unfrozen. T h e backlog of work was
so great t h a t there was even a
possibility of n o t being able to
catch up with e n o u g h Lime to
put t h e b o o k t o g e t h e r .
After prolonged discussion and
interrogation, the Central Council finally decided to unfreeze
the budget with the provision
that there be a representative*
from the Council, the Media
Coordinator, who would be placed o n the Editorial Board. This
Board is a group of eight people
whose job is t o assist the Editorin-Chief in all matters of concern
t o the yearbook. However, it is
provided in the c o n s t i t u t i o n of
the school that the Editor-inChief has the final say in all
matters and cannot be overruled.
If
the
Media
Coordinator,
Debbie N a t h a n s o n , who is also
connected with WSUA, the ASP,
Sweet Fire and o t h e r channels of
c o m m u n i c a t i o n a m o n g the stud e n t b o d y , objects t o s o m e t h i n g
being considered for publication
in the " T o r c h " , she has the right
t o bring it to the Central Council. However, J o h n d o e s n ' t foresee any such c i r c u m s t a n c e .
J o h n has already personally
received m a n y complaints a b o u t
t h e c o n t e n t s of last year's issue.
S t u d e n t s seem to want to have
c a m p u s life b e t t e r represented.
So, J o h n is trying to do just
t h a t . He feels that the s t u d e n t s
are the ones w h o are really in
charge of the book and he is
subject t o their d e m a n d s . They
are the ones w h o are funding the
b o o k a n d t o w h o m the book is
d i r e c t e d . T h e t e r m " r a d i c a l " in
itself d o e s n ' t have much mean
ing for J o h n . He agrees with
Einstein in t h a t everything is
relative. T o use his o w n exa m p l e , t o include pictures and
c o m m e n t s a b o u t Kent S t a t e in
t h a t year's y e a r b o o k was looked
u p o n as perfectly
acceptable
t h e n since it did affect each
s t u d e n t ' s life personally. It was
s o m e t h i n g that uniformly af
fee ted college c a m p u s e s across
t h e c o u n t r y . However, if somet h i n g violent were t o be included
in this year's y e a r b o o k , it just
w o u l d n ' t a p p l y . Bui since no
o n e can tell the future, somet h i n g t h a t is o u t - o f - p l a c e t o d a y
m a y be a c c e p t e d as part of the
n o r m t o m o r r o w . T h e term rad
ical may t h e r e f o r e change in
m e a n i n g from day t o day. If the
s i t u a t i o n d e m a n d s it, J o h n will
indeed include " r a d i c a l " mater
ial. Things t h a t affect the life of
a S U N Y A s t u d e n t , w h e t h e r they
occur locally, nationally or even
Buckley Here, Condemns Nixon
Despite a cut of two thousand
dollars from last year's budget
and the vast amount of rising
costs, John is sure that this
year's book can and will be a
superior piece of work. It will be
a book on the happy side, because as John said, there is
enough pessimism in the world
without this adding to it. The
s t u d e n t body is so often apathetic, that they need something
to create some enthusiasm. The
entire " T o r c h " staff is extremely
enthusiastic and very dedicated
to their work. They have been
and will continue to work very
hard o n the book. It doesn't
have t o be drab, and after talking to John Chow, this reporter
is convinced that it couldn't be.
Uptown Campus: A Practical System
Chess Player Here for Exhibition
Chess players! If you think you are one-sixtieth as
good as the best collegiate chess player, and the 10th
best chess player in America, you can prove yourself
Nov. 1 1. Ken [logoff, the lOlh best player in
America, will come to SUNYA on Nov 1 1 for a
simultaneous exhibition. Ken (logoff will deliver a
short lecture on chess and then will play ftU people
simultaneously,
Kogofl" was a recent participant in Lhe World
S t u d e n t Chess Olympics and played on the first
board
for the American team. Me defeated
T u c k a m a k o v ( U . S . S . R . ) w h o has l><•• i
possible future o p p o n e n t of Bobby V i '
world c h a m p i o n s h i p .
T h e event will begin at about l l •. '••
Assembly Mall ( 2 n d floor). T h e chare,' ' •
$4 ( $ 3 for s t u d e n t s ) a n d $ M) for sped
interested in playing s h o u l d contact J M ,
7H.V7HKH before Wed. night, or stop !,\ ,
club meetings on S a t u r d a y afteniooi >• •
day night.
There c o m e s a lime every t w o
years or MI when a major change
in p o p u l a t i o n occurs here
the
graduation of iwo
successive
classes ll is lit this time thai the
lurinci juniors and seniors are
Hun.-. .Hid are replaced by those
ex freshmen
and
sophomores
w h o may have forgotten a few
facts they on«v new, and the new
freshmen and s o p h o m o r e s w h o
have yet to be told what those
before them have tony forgotten.
ll is at this lime thai the
rumors .t,.ii flying a b o u i the
" ( h e a t White Was "
why H is
the
we
M is, « h y
do,
whs
il l o o k s
we park
lhe
wlun
Her.-Willi, an a t t e m p t
t o .M|U< a i r
oddities
.,1
In e x p l i
Hie
lo
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Uptown
Camiuis
III
hrni Mar
III
SI NVA
ii ,,iid Aliramow U in Ni-w
i,
T h e n plan
-•I u p
II alls
traditional
m>g "ucli U - p u r t n it h o i
STEAK-OUT
delicious Choice Sirloin
MIHEIMIIMl
Delivers
Weekends
Call For Your Order
482-5587
Free Delivery w/order of 4 sandwiches
Buy 6 get! FREEH!
,
.
funded Uy tludanl tax
••••••••
..
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
...
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Ji'imiii
lhe.se
going
declares, lhal
to
see
when
Slohe
L.uimim<rr
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBEH :j, 1972
llu'
people
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negative
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Oil
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| Final Performance: Nov 4 -
§
|
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|
All Performances - 8:30 pm in PAC
§
H Main Theatre All Seats $3 per show, $1 =§
I S ? , Z with tax. Phone 457-8606
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Quud
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hat " w e have played a r o u n d
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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
all
and
It)'* a i r e q t i a l l s
When
| Friday, November 3 |
School for Scandal
The Hostage
lhe
Inil
was
eliminated Krom the original Hi
m i n u t e lag. Iransler time was cut
] 11111 ,ir cl
go
operation
his initial |)r«'M'iitalion
As is
obvious
by
looking
.,l
lhe
p o d i u m today, the problem ol
,., ..
(I oi HUM l y ,
l h e n i a j o i ily will
T h e C a m p u s Planners knew
pretty much just what they were
City C e n t e r Acting* Co.
z
fact,
for s y m m e l ry every I imc " In
lad he c o n t i n u e s . "I have been
asked l<, lakn a r o u n d ..II sorts o)
visiting architects and cngim en
h u m o t h e r colleges l a i o u n d lhe
world) and w i t h o u l exceplion
\ theatre council presents:
To Uptown Campus
on a fresh Italian roll
actual
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|
PAGE TWO
Was
Way it d o r s
cunttnut'd
finm fm^c I
d e m e n t in the entire Facultythe end ol the firsl q u a r t e r of S t u d e n t Association o p e r a t i o n "
this fiscal year than they were will also be looked at with much
las! year.
caie. It was once again F S A ' s
T h a t fact was al the rool of
biggest m o n e t a r y loser last year
Xahm's d r a m a t i c p r e s e n t a t i o n to ( $ 1 K 5 , 0 0 0 in the red) and was
the M e m b e r s h i p Hoard M o n d a y .
victimized not only by s t u d e n t
But il is the Hoard ol Directors
rip offs but, Z a h m a d m i t t e d , by
themselves w h o will have to
e m p l o y e e thefts as well,
e x a m i n e all of the- opt ions and
" T h e b o o k s t o r e c o n t i n u e s to
c h o o s e the ones lease offensive.
l>e ,,ur major p r o b l e m , " said lhe
Al this point, no one k n o w s
FSA acting director. " T h e shopexactly what they will opt t o d o .
lifting
problem
hasn't
been
Hut il appears certain thai
totally solved and there was
s t u d e n t rep resell La lives on Lhe evidence of (heft ' o u t the back
board will push for serious alien
d o o r " / a h in said s o m e s t u d e n t s
lion to lie given to closing tile
and e m p l o y e e s had been caught
•.leiihng.
reprimanded,
and
I'atroon R o o m
a steady tnoric
brought up before the University
lary loser lhal is u n d e r w n l len
Judicial system on charges. No
by d o r m contract profits
one has been b r o u g h t " d o w n In lacl, lhe enlire cash food
town. "
operation may be r e e v a l u a t e d .
ll is impossible to say what
I.asi y e a i . cash food (primarily
specific action 111,' Directors will
die I'atroon R o o m , lhe Cafeteria
lake c o n c e r n i n g the b o o k s t o r e
and Special F u n c t i o n s ) losl a
w h o p p i n g $ li.ll.lllll) Km pi..In.s bul d n e c l o p e r a t i n g expenses
will probably further be reduced
from c o n l r a c l food
lhe I..oil
resulting 111 m o r e layoffs
and
Ih.il ..II d o r m s l u d e n i s are forced
Ibere Inc. been lalk of letting a
i.. I.ike
olfsel this .1.-11. .I in.I
.,11.,we,I lhe enlire I.....1 service o r i v a l e c o n c e r n l a k e o v e r t h e
to I 0 m i n u t e s . According to
Walter Tisdale, Director of Cam
pus Planning, t h e r e was no way
the P o d i u m could be lightened
up w i t h o u t causing a major traffic p r o b l e m b e t w e e n classes. T h e
Podium today is as efficient as il
could he in its present stage ol
develop m e n !
The c a m p u s is obviously el
licient, but what of the inherent
s y m m e t r y and depersonalization
that is a direct result of this'' Mr
Tisdale says, " L e t me point out
that e v e r y b o d y is nol objected
to s y m m e t r y , and as a m a l l e i <>l
leni here entailed the e x p e c t e d
time
I ag
between
classes
a p p r o x i m a t e l y 20 m i n u t e s . Hul
il was a b o u t the time the Cam
pus Project was under c o n s i d e r s
lion thai Harrison and A b r a m o
witz were hired for c o n s t r u c t i o n
ul the South Mall, and they
asked to be released from the
C a m p u s Project. T h e firm ol
Kdward
Uurrell
S t o n e , also
New York City based, was re
tained for a " n e w a p p r o a c h " to
the C a m p u s . T h e a r c h i t e c t u r e of
S t o n e was a k n o w n q u a n t i t y ,
because he never varied from his
basic design, witness the uniformity of S U N Y A , the Ken
ii i'd y Pavilion in Washington,
and the Building ol ('ontinuitig
Kducalion at Chicago Univerisly
Al tin- lime S t o n e also was
engaged in olhei venlures
by David L c n i e r
J o h n C h o w , e d i t o r o f T o r c h ' 7 \.
l.-W
,
Mr. Buckley spoke for approximately forty-five m i n u t e s and
then t o o k q u e s t i o n s from the
floor. Me then r e t u r n e d to the
H y a t t H o u s e where he was
staying and left on Wednesday
m o r n i n g t o speak at a college in
Missouri. " T h e y ' r e really radical
down there."
FSA's Hard Times
T h e expected date of release is
May
1 s t . The entire student
b o d y is welcome to [iurcha.se the
" T o r c h " at that time. By all
signs, it should be well wurlh the
m o n e y Buy it. The University
needs cheering up.
remind
7,9,11 p.m.
Mr. Buckley claimed that the
Presidency of Richard N i x o n
will probably have a crippling
effect on the future of the conservative m o v e m e n t in America
simply
because,
rightly
or
wrongly, Mr. N i x o n is identified
by most Americans as being a
conservative. He is not, asserted
Mr. Buckley, and identifying so
incompetant a man with conservatism will surely hurt real conservatives' c h a n c e s for victory
later o n . After all, said Mr.
Buckley, when conservatives say
t o the voters "give us a c h a n c e , "
the p u b l i c will r e s p o n d " b u t we
already gave you a chance with
Mr. Nixon a n d we d i d n ' t like i t . "
It is, he claimed, u n f o r t u n a t e
that true conservatives are 1>eing
saddled with so unconservative a
man.
On the e c o n o m i c front, the
a u t h o r / journalist was no less
critical, calling the imposition of
wage and price c o n t r o l s a desperate m o v e . T h e e c o n o m y was
just beginning to recover in mid1970, he claimed, when Nixon
was s h o w n the results of t h e
latest Gallup poll which revealed
a lack of public confidence in his
efforts t o control inflation. In a
desperate
political
move
he
a b a n d o n e d responsible m o n e t a r y
policies a n d decided to slap o n
wage and price c o n t r o l s , the firsl
p e a c e ! i m e c o n t r o l s in our nation's h i s t o r y .
Thinly sliced
Sat. LC 18
of the upstate area.
Mr. Buckley o p e n e d his remarks with a searing attack o n
the Nixon administration calling
the President "a faceless, technocrat." He c o n d e m n e d
the
President's
Vietnam
policy
claiming that if all w e were
His fiscal policies were n o less
irresponsible. Campaigning in
1 9 6 8 h e spoke o u t against extravagant government
spending,
Once
e l e c t e d , however,
he
promptly ran up the largest
budget deficit in this country's
history,
Mr. N i x o n , with his trips to
China and the Soviet Union, has
d o n e m o r e , Buckley asserted, t o
blunt the thrust of w h a t he
called
"responsible
anti-comm u n i s m , n o t John Birch Society
Btuff," than any other man ID history.
m Ximifi^
The Killer Weed
the U.S. Senate at the time,
U p o n his arrival at the campUB he
was m e t by Mr. Phillip A b b o t t
Luce, a former Communist,
SDSe'r, and now a member of
Young Americans for Freedom,
a conservative youth organization. Mr. Luce is making a tour
Mr. Reid Buckley s p o k e o n
campus Tuesday evening t o a
group of about forty students.
This was his second speaking
engagement here at State, having
spoken here t w o years ago o n
behalf of his brother, James
Buckley, who was running for
internationally, are of importance to the "Torch." He feels
that people are bored with the
traditional college yearbook filled with group pictures of various
people. Without giving away any
surprises that might be contained in this year's "Torch", John
said that the students can look
forward to a creative and artistic
book. A colleger yearbook doesn't
necessarily have to be boring or
stuffy. It can be a tool for
artistic and imaginative people.
REEFER
MADNESS
fighting in Vietnam for was t o
permit the S o u t h Vietnamese
the luxury of democratically
choosing their o w n government,
then we should immediately pull
out. 1 In fact, claimed Mr. Buckley, w h o bore an uncanny resemblance t o his more famous
brother Bill, Mr. N i x o n upon
taking office should have determined immediately whether or
not South Vietnam was vital t o
our own national defense. If so,
we should have fought to win. If
not, then we should have withdrawn from the war.
III
go to the s t a l e and nol to
KSA.
U l t i m a t e l y , boluttons t o the
delicil may i'-line dimply from
watching lhe various "special interests"
faculty, administration, uiulfi giads and graduate
(•tudenU
hush out their differ
enci'h in c o m m i t t e e sessions.
Only then will it be d e t e r m i n e d
which id the groups had suffi1 n-iii political clout t o keep proposals t h a t might harm their
respective c a m p u s c o n s t i t u e n c i e s
Irom being enacted. F r o m t h a t
basic political reality will c o m e
solutions to the KKA p r o b l e m .
In any event, lhe s o l u t i o n s
will have to c o m e soon. " W e ' r e
Mill in business...at least for a
w h i l e , " Hartley told tint Membership in closing on M o n d a y .
Hut if the losseb are n o t plugged
soon no one is sure o n how long
1
' "
'' actually he,
PAGE THREE
Communications
SUNYA Administration Drags Feet
on Ambulance
On Tenure, Parking and Mohawk -
To the Editor;
I found a group of qualified
students, With an ambulance,
waiting for the administration to
The other day I was quietly
give them the go ahead with a
reflecting on my thoughts.
student-run
ambulance service.
We all attend a university
These students, all emergency
which offers
many services.
There are many extra-curricular medical technicians, certified by
clubs and activities, just about the State of New York, have
anything one could wish. But been ready for approximately a
one service, I believe, is badly year.
I aeking, and that is an ambuFirst, the SUNY central adlance service.
ministration has a regulation
which says a student-run ambuW e h a v e an e x t r e m e l y
good
lance serving the university is a
and h i g h l y c o m p e t e n t
medical
"no-no." Of course they turn
s t u f f , b u t t h e r e is u s u a l l y a l o n g
their backs when you mention
Willi f o r c o m p e t e n t e m e r g e n c y
that Stony Brook has had an
I'irsl a i d . W e a l l r e c a l l
when
effective student-run ambulance
half-back Hemic lioggs, d u r i n g a
service
for more than a year, and
f o o t b a l l g a m e last y e a r , w a s h u r t
that Oswego also has had an
and
wailed
an
interminable
effective student-run ambulance
p e r i o d o f Lime f o r an a m b u l a n c e .
service for the past ten months.
Every time a serious accident
Binghamton,
too,
recently
occurs it takes a m i n i m u m o f
started student-run ami) u la net-.
t w e n t y to thirty minutes before
Can Albany have a student run
an a m b u l a n c e a r r i v e s .
ambulance service? No, it isn't
Looking
and asking
around
allowed says SUNY central.
c a m p u s t o sec i f a n y o n e w a s
Administration
Deaf & Dumb
State University Chancellor
Ernest
B u y e r is f o n d o f c a l l i n g SI
M
" t h e p e o p l e ' s u n i v e r s i t y . " a n i n s l i l u t i o n r e s p o n s i b l e t o a l l i h c p,
\.
o l the Stale o f New Y o r k .
A l t h o u g h the university a d m i n i s l r a t i n r
h e r e at A l b a n y is l i s t e n
' .
accountable t o " t h e p e o p l e " I h r o u g h state legislative a p p n , p n . i t
•
we o l l e n q u e s t i o n e x a c t l y w h o m t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n listens t o
Sadly. Ibe evidence
is m o u n t i n g
that
the S U N Y A
adnniu-.n i
•
l i s t e n s r a r e l y l o a n y o n e b u t i t s e l f . W h a l is t h i s e v i d e n c e ' 1
Rrst.
Iheie
is t h e r e c e n t
Hurry
least t h r e e p i o f e s s o r s i n v o l v e d
and
Richard
numbers
Gaseoyne
of
consistently
in
their
o f controversial
tctuiic
\
D a v i d G o o d m a n , C a r o l i n e Wa
have been e n t h u s i a s t i c a l l y
students.
,.is,
Their
student
h a c k e d hv
evaluations
have
•
i
favorable, a n d i h c n u m b e r s o f s t u d e n t s H y i n g i>, • i
courses
al
regislialton
time
show
ample
pi,ml
interested
,,| '
ignore
the importance
(specifically,
the deansl
"teaching
effectiveness"
of
We a l e n o t s a y i n g
automatically
administration
campus
hasn't
hen'
y e t given
on
its ap-
number
know
reason
be g i v e n
that
tenure.
every
popular
has , 1 m
'It's not the principle,
as p i , I .
ptolessoi
B u t w e arc s a y i n g t h a i
tin-
.
popular
professors
for
p i o l e s s o i s w h o lack s t u d e n t
tenure
support
denials,
while
it c a n n o t be a very
many
o t h e r s have a s t u d e n t -
run
a m b u l a n c e service. So w h a t
makes Albany
There
sidestep
the
Umvctslty
issue
Scnalc
Ibe
Environmental Bond Basically Local Assistance
nnposiiiiin
'No' to Prop. 1 Expensive Error
b\
Jariel
I he
Harnick
YniU'i
V llcillOl
II [1
must
t h e ) IC g u l l l g
lllCtl
-Inn
tint
I I I . ICMM
c'llVIMHirilc'lll
they've alicidy
lui
d o ulc
h,,vv
lill
d e c i d e d t h e ) ....-
i h c v ',[• g o i n g
lie
b e e n ,i b u n d
doesn't
think
lcdei.il luuds
In
helms
mil
I-, . i p p l o v e d by v o l e s
based
beloit
on
piopos.ils
( nngitss
now
Ilic
bond
ptiich.ist
.ili.iul
paying
s,l
would
t bill
wollh
ul
bill
w a y is
posed
\\
ihiough
l*i
menial
Qualit)
appeal
uii
billion
llmid
voting
llns
I.mill
issue
statewide
I., assume
I nunui
paver,
would
w i n . Ii w i l l
e l e c t i o n d a ) u.s h u p o -
mi
in O u r
II p e o p l e v o l e " Y e s
bonds
'I b e s t
ovti
ibt
next
itn
yens
l u h d s w i l l be a p p i i i p i t a l e d
help
m m
n i u i i i i i e s b u i l d n e w sewage
Ileal
men!
uilllioti
lo
M'lil
mill
munllic's
and uVinictpal
In nisi.ill
linn abatement
1175
'liable
hospital:,
nicintiatois
lo
begin
I'loposlllon
One
I.ml
innsl
llieu
lliiouglionl
lliul
on
wash-
in
giow
'
lems
olllfi
w.i\s lo
aba I I'lncnl
local
I... al
honil
pmpel l y
cilhci
issues
I.III.I
(II ii,.
million
«vdl
,-vv.iec,
solid
pollution
pi,lb
will
inc.in
,|,,|M
lie-
York.
,in,l olhei
I.
di.nn.iHi
lacully
on
Ihc
i i n i v , i-.iiv
I.,
ihc
.,
.mi..
Cenli.d <
regulation'
,ludenls
slllke
llcxiblc
.mil
Was o i g a l l l / c d
upen
did
Ihemselves
ill
to
'
. . n.
is I lui I u l M o h a w k
in
, | n , i,,|
Ibe
-l.,I.
- laic
I,,, ill
p,idly
piuposi"
•lU.I, 1,1 g u v , II
w.i' '
,,|
lowei
seiueslel
ihc
A, m
sllldelll
.tndeiil
decided
iinl
in,1.1,
Mil I r . u l e i S
lie w, n, ,
hide
Hi
i n - n i , i n - P u c i i u |<
Ihc
need
\ '•!'
lead, i
l..i
lowcl
I he
bond
Issue
VVCIr ., I. ..'Ill
Nn
lln
||
I'.
They
an'
qualified,
by
of
enced?
-.1
,
pin
,
them
,,|
.
,1 legal m e a n s in
.bowing
n, ,'
I hey w i- , i.
i h . i p p i u v ,1
,
lie
I.
nd
,H i n .
ii
have
you
can't
get e x p e r i e n c e
unless
you
have
a job. Which
comes
f i r s t , t h e c h i c k e n o r t h e egg?
To
conclude,
of
the
taxes
. m i . eined
abuui
s a y , " t a n l we w a l l ,i v c . n
u n t i l i h c c, o n o i n v
is b e l l e i ' ' '
1)1
W a l e l i u a t l .Hid I I I
ia.lion.il
'hen
t
and " l e g a l "
patience
and
d m . , , , have
means
lonlinueil
.l.lled
l o piove
SUNY
preventing
getting
Lull,
ui
'the
system
Itm
wailing,
llie cosl
iisell
,nsis
.idnuiusli.iiive
111
n| cousllin lui)
' l i e I'asl
indllleience
h, sludenl
views aptly
tic.iiincni
plants
a much
that
is
help
coin
recycling
I lien
sliuclton
lor
in
lor
actual
purchase
government
is a l l
from
con
It is n o t
salaries
bureau-
I n acquire
lands,
wtllands
lands
and
thai
forever
iriercial developers
PAGE FOUH
paik
oibei
otherwise
lo
corn
projects,
not
lor
woik
alitady
undeiway oi completed
-It
is m i l a b l a n k
more spending.
check
There has never
a
machine
I which
lo
like
find
I'oi
either
or reject
ll
lb,' c.mipus
10
The
eellte.
II
dol
I.i, p o o r e r
I I is
I i p i i t e pissed
feeling.
1'lx a m p l e
'I'he m a r v e l o u s
machines
ill
the
I
eign
campus
campus
I I I , , neve,
III
,b,
Not
work,
den
we w o n d e i h o w l u n g l l i e u p . i t l c i n . w i l l I.i l
,.!,i
.11
.,,1,1 I ,1,1,
,II
bill
v
H i , M ll.lS I I , , , l
|,
Ml
v
lu.i.hnics
1
very
home
inaii.ie.ci
,,l
hndgel
knows "
say t h e
silppoileis
ol
is
have
bond
than
l o spend
I,,
ID"
from
really
of
these
the
I
m e t h o d ol u l ,
pay
anyway
That's
b o n d issue i s a l l a b o u t
whal
of
I
the
PARTY,
desk
NOT
mild
rip
I ines,
led
The
wiili
ui
these
I;.M
SOCIALIST
PARTY
candidates
Ii
v e m b e r 7 general e l e c t i o n
wail
Stale
Remember
ll
dollars
I;,
I a m o l d v o n e si n
campus
l i f e has al o n e
another
been
All>
DON'T
waste
your
II
you
waul
Ibis search
II
is t l o
individual
v o n c a n giv
I,,,
will
Ih
• in
be g r e a t l y
appre
Ihlllil
u'ltn
/ , , lln-
of
editors
is s o m e m i n g
\SI'
live
il a n e w s p a p e r
purports
with.
(which
t o h e ) is s u p
reporter
the news, the insertion
sheel
with
tin-
work
of a
willini
is a b s o l u t e l y
its
mrongruenl
principles
j o u r n a l i s m lh.it
ol
good
V " " presumably
under
IVrhaps
whatever
I L U I p r e j u d i c e d , il is
mediately
gree,
twins
put
that
preiense
likely
thai
editors
A,S7 J, s
the
'ha!
left,
If
are
the
ujiset
pro-Mc(iovern
independently
native,
or
submit
have
already
thai
articles
done.
Just
equal
as
the nonsense
Unit
little
and
supporters
A l l I ask is
w e hi- spared
should
their
as a n a l t e r -
l e t t e r s as m a n y N i x o n
a n d so f o r t h ,
as
a
newspaper
be a n a d v e r t i s e m e n t
lor
M c U o v e r n , n o m o r e s h o u l d it b e
a
vehicle
absurd
IW
for
pronouncing
virtues of ' i n t H
the
overkill,
i n s e r t i n g tiransntutn
in
your
p a p e r , y<>" l e n d I h e p o w e r o f i h e
press t o I h e s u p p o r t
bearingly
o f t h e over-
c o n l e n t 10 u.s
presen led
by
right-wing
discontent
remains
this
whether
positions
has l i o n
This
ol
fact
y o u claim in-
of
Us
editorial
jMibcy or n o t
hidiHttuiitly
ol
is
n
false
is
H was t h e n
sfieahlliu
us one,
David I' (Ireenbern
/•' Timothy Lusltey
David Keller
Mitchell Chamlm
Ittmuld Sthmalberurr
.1 d e
proelainung
principles
(although
the
means.
vntil.nl
me ol I l o
m\
journalist ir
wo,Id,
submission
to
p o s i t i o n , let U i e m c i r c u l a t e
a t t a c k s o n ( i e n r g e Mc< l o v i i n n n
vole o n the
slanted
dependence
p o s s i b l e ( h a t artisbwuta'
for
more
mgger
ul
II Si,,,,
I,
vlu,/cilCl
ihe hell o u t o l there before they
against
shot
| Ashloek |
lihl,,,
I lead Willi ilileresl Ibe e d i t i o n
l,u,.v.,,,,,fv
III.,I
was
lucked
Hi,- O c t '.t-1 A S P , a n d w h i c h
eollsisled
inaiiilv
I,,,111 v a r i o u s
,,l
Will,-is
ol
ol
Ihe ni.in
will
loiily."
had
lull
oil tleoige
'Pile o n l y
check
'New Mil
"Medovern
"Metloveru
delltly,"
the
was
article
careful bonlhei
Mcti,.vein's
lo
have
lusl
not,
to
evi
slates,
"a
" Robert A n s o n ,
biographer,
quoted
b o m b load
is s a i d
dropped
111,,
danilW
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
a
As landing with
T h e second
M c ( i , iveiu's
jelliso
or
I,
eilhei
unpopulated
bombardier
the bombs
farmhouse,
hind
A
carelessly
on a Yugo
a n d t h e ex
|,lost,in
was
witnessed
\ 1 , ( t o v e i n's waist g u n n e l .
by
Tex
Ashloek
was
\nhl,uii,
v,,||,.,|
L
Upon
bombardier,
„
y s
landing,
,„,
and
,,
, , ,!,.,,!
,,,
who,
'•,,,„
|
going
Anson
| H , repotted
Met',,,vein
M e llovern s
it's
ll
not
Metloveru, who
i „ , a b o v e i p i o l e al t h e
„ , ,|
to
the
Anson
man
officer
Metloveru
lighter
h
|,ul |
bridge.
cull
incident
,pioled
right,
was a l
that
overhearing
p i l o t s in a Inn c l a i m
W U
Itnlimi
However,
cmlhans
I find
t o b e c o m e iiiot ally
of
two
they
off a
it
dil'l'i
outraged
over M c t l o v e r n ' s not
an incident that, i n M c O o v e r n ' i
wolds,
"might
have
been
wills
k e y t a l k . ' It Is o b v i o u s , i n b o t h
t h e CSnisniols
article and the
Anson
hook,
,pceilic
that
evidence
there
I'oi
was n o
Meliovern
to report
response
' b u n a charges,
he
an
day kicked Ihe b o m b a r d i e r
into
In-
enlisted
o f f the crew
lu
slavian
h
linn
an
against
\,,m\
b u n as s a v i n g
where y o u c o u l d a m i gut
Willi
Ills
bombardier | . "
had
watei
t'overs
a mission
| the
hi nubs was i m p o s s i b l e , they
ol,used
l i e I was able
out,
17
A)c(;,„-c'<i. llie
o l M e t I , . v e i n ' s re
from
substitute
Nixon
ass o f f " O n page
is t o l d
luriiuu!
w h o suppo
Ihe
Richard M
your
Anson's book
slury
assaults
M e t l o v e r u , W i t h l i t t l e sal,I u l l l i e
bombs
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER'&,I W
llie
pages
No
"
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
is
about
person,
passive
t h e those w h o insist t h a i t h e
paper
Grassroots' News'Blatant Deception
"You
• Huu.,1 | / 6 „ , ,1,. Ct.iil.ui
M m t<li,u,,.l nul.1, „ ,).,.,, ,.*.l l.v l l . i l i | i | , , | | | .
U (
u
loleranl
pn»|iagiiiida
(.Sign,-,/)
\„!/„,,i I ' l m m i i i
ml,,
Tllailll MM,
I 1 />,„>>. , Imi
the
self-righteousness
of
real
voleSLI"
sponsible
I
,.-, -l,,v n i l s
a
I can grudgingly
Ihe
besides
., b e l l e ,
t h e ASI'\
to
paper
as the- so-
change
work
capitalist major parly
as w e l l
p o s e d t o b e an o b j e c t i v e
coming
you
within
that d i d
attacked
thieves
ihe p r i n c i p l e o l llie t i l i n g ,
llelp
"Grassroots"
Crassroots'
wages or are p r e p a r i n g l o d o s o ,
l o these t i n v u l
llielal
ballot,
(truss
t o b.- a v i o l e n t m s u l l l o m y
Being
are o n t h e
s t a l e s , III l l i e
you've
semester.
I consider the inclusion o f
pi ( l u p o u s
LABOR
Yolk
the
was called
making
I,,
New
11 is I h e M o n e y
ci
capitalism
I a m sure e v e r y o n e associa
urn.t,V
and
imperative
from
oilier
and
five
urgent
il
called dignity ol journalism,
B o t h F i s h e r a n d ( ' . u n d e r s o i l are
I al I h e
The Albany Sludenl Press welcomes mall from Us
readers Communications should be typewritten and
addressed to: Editorial Page Editor, Albany Student Press,
SUNYA, Albany. New York 12222. Unless there are
extenuating circumstances, all letters must be signed
am]
roots.
However,
ihe
October
by
with
bid for
of
in y o u r
during
Curiously,
SOCIALIST
Ihe validity
lor me to
to N i x o n
'he Job). I l ' s just thai I am irked
unparalled by any feature
carried
thai
stressing
i l ' s rare
as a
because
(Ircissroots*
c a n d i d a t e s are
a cheap
leller
2 4 t h issue s t r u c k m e i n a m a n n e r
promises.
NOW
(maybe)
estimate)
making
so-called
this
A S ! ' reader,
u p y o u r p a p e r at a l l . H o w -
voles by indulging in reform bail
i l l l i n l i c i p i i l i o n ,,l g e t t i n g
approximately
Ihe
PARTY
naul devotion
wrile
intelligence,
to other
parties,
LABOR
Kin-ally
si
their
U p Win f u m e s , ' written by the
,r
•'t'NS," turned out. I
,
l o a blatant distort
issue
Hit:
PARTY,
of the way the
conducting
contrast
Socialism
Illg i,•funds,
Hit o u t n i l n l i u
are
inn
unearned
A n d number
the
eaily and
postpone
I.ABOH
proud
of the
national campaigns.
Ibis
foolish
Communications
ale nines when it's m i n e
economical
wisely
Ihc
member
LABOR
Mllly
eveiy
don't
over, one i t e m
SOCIALIST
radical
are
returned
and land
is
I
pick
candidates
I n H i e lasl I w o y e a r s I have l o s l
leposlls Ins
„
he
skyip, keling
To the Editor
admittedly,
Presidential
soda
I i l is a h e ,
is e v e r
thiil
made
forever
,M I
N u u i l s ' i -', A H ,
„
I I , , - assorted
, , „ ! ippl,
-
I
a
I i l is r e a l l y
a nickel hack
I . '-"
,,;, - | u I , | , , , • huVV
a,
i h - iin ,
.,v
am
ll)
o f c o u r s e , t h e r e Is I h e e v e , p o p u
ill
On
in
machines
.-simian-
profits
oils'')
b a n d , o n e b u s a SI) til)
do
.SOCIALIST
one
ineideutly
IAHA
dellghl
chines
Hie hill
that
candy
a
change
quarter
i n , change
The
bill
have ell-
fury
when
m a r k e d " c h a n g e ret t i m e d " ) o n l y
coin
Musi
I
when
the flush o f
deposits
my
I
Change
2
piss
trifle
the body
ma
,-hi,lice u l c o i n i n g a w a \
I uiiglii
p o s t p o n e a n d e v e n t u a l l y have I,
fur
,Hed
a happy
Withheld
Kdllnr
a staunch
liicalion
"As
them?
Labor
(he
pending
"Iheie
• A l l t h e f u n d s are lor t h e n e w
tills
information
lb,, other
or
discover
Carbonated
Corp
said
I would
machines
III
A 'Bastion of Discontent'
simple
considers
,,11,., o n e has d . - p u . u . ' d n i l ' , h v ,
has
.lie. is
is a v e r y
the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n .
M a y w e hear f r o m
viilin-s
III in, is)
qualified
Ihiit
same
eilhe,
from
service.
ready
is n e e d e d
"yes"
p e n en I a y e n de
a n | II LSI 11, ill
I h c c n l l i e S I 15 b i l l i o n
needed
personnel a n d an a m b u l a n c e . A l l
I,, seventeen
mi
State
one
campus
u n f o r t u n a t e in-
loc'al'ioi'is
n n leases
least
SUNYA-is
Albany
I have been
on
make
dull,,,- b i l l
lieer
lo
i.s a m e r e
ul c o m i n g away w i t h change
I,.,, I,
money
and
P S A leaves l l u s
denl
i
Vs.
:
adminstrations—
central
ASP
outfit''
l l l . l l l b , v ...ill
ih.-u
the beauracracy
two
this
Caul,-en
will
and
disgrunted
Hoot
only
Palm
.1
„„|V
, nil. s
experience
Vote Socialist
h e is r e a l l y r e c e i v i n g is
/,-, ,-,, ,1 l i n e has a .Ml) h i ) c h a n c e
relic
I nl
the o l d
have a j o b u n -
you
L o u i s F i s h e r a n d Genevieve- G u n -
operating
Ihe
changing
i„,l
m i -
w ill
that's
can't
less
derson,
I,, llus
iiiimbe,
..I I h c p a i k i n g
oh,
State,
are n o t e x p e r i -
Baloney,
story—you
York
this
coin
dividual.
Will
\ t u l I m w d m - tin-, I,.|.H,. | , , i l , , - i , . „ , I , , - | V . , „ . i S t u d e n t
Some
of
lo
111.,,-hill,'
I
m m ,,,
, I
New
Hut
machines
personally
one
,im
I Ins
has a l
,'bines
Hires
('rush
what
make
drastically
certified
Some
is w h a t
so
water (really wets one's whistle).
for llie
investigation,
countered
h
I m m t h i s set u l l . i , l . ' l . i
gh
hud
Ill,,-
I I I.I I i • i l l i p l i
-uiv H i l l , ) '
lie
i.i
lealuies
operated
Kx.unples
p.i-
would
i h c de, c u m uvei
. i n , b e . ,,u Hi,, , a m p i i s
illVIIIUII)
SINUI.K
responsible
rinkv dink
I ' I I I I I I . I i , t i l i n g i h c i, 11 I.I I a l l o t m e n t u l , p , i , ,•
K l . a u sllldenls went
INDIVI
Royal
In find
P i n e , b i l l w h o is in c h a r g e u l l l u s
tloc-.ils u l - o e n i o n l o g e l t i n , n i l , c
e.iillet
n u t if
is ONE
M.
pi.nulls)
install,c
Hying
that
been
there
III
Orange
i n f o r m e d I thai
been u s i n g al Ihc i.ilc u l l l i i i l e e n
lolll dlsllllclive
have
l'|l,in
l a b . ' '•
advertised
I have been h a v i n g ? I
they
students
different?
As
Perhaps y „ u can h e l p m e w i t h
-, t
a problem
iiicsp.iiisibilie.
a n d sludetlls. a n d a l l e i
p.llklltg
I I took
MM- I
i. ,nl. u i i ,
Ill
loi
b u l l ] up
faxes
n.
the students can
M y answer
SUNYA
C, the Kditm
lo
thud
lin.inu
I
ih.ii.-mcnl
sewage
would
V I ,|
a n d I h c n ,i
{,'lh
I page u l
i
pond
•idniini.li
in- is h.i - n a i l . .,
a n d an
hospilals
ihc
sh.iic o l i h c expensive
pollullotl
Ihiuiigli
howcvei
c r a c i e s , or p l a n n i n g s t u d i e s
million
be lost
,,l|....ili
lien
adininisii.ilive
opposiiinn
a
I'liluiiiii.ilcly
Whal
solve
pilhll.
,11.11(111 m o n e y ,
cquipiiien!
million
unique
would
on
.HI pullu
solid wastes, and
,••$175
i
as I h c I
,1
in a n n u a l levies
lauliiics,
schools.
,i p . n l u l t h e
i l n i ' i I a n n u a l I.i s levies
as b i l l o w s
V.M)
i i " . i his
II I h c p e o p l e s i n , u l , I v o l e " N o "
state
i n sell M l > b i l l i o n n
si,iic
..Mi- i,il-,
has
hiiulen
-ign.il l u i
ilit
.iltcl
l'ie.id.-
, . > 11 I 11111111111 • -.
llie go ahc u l
Iial
htai
t h e y vvill
be g i v i n g
bond
hi, nils
-.Mil have l o
individual
51 I ' , h i l l , i „ i
help
is I.in
machines
.pelled
I . n . i l assist i n - . - i ' | i . ) ' i . i m
pin
lilt
approve
Ihc
a n d I l i u m lal e x p e i l s feel i l ' s i h t
best
sliong
•Ii,. - .-,1
iiinsllll.
i " |I,I\
the
.unci
I h c legl ,la
.-.nh s e n will
legulatinns
II,limy
the
our
staff
are c e r t i f i e d b y t h e State o f N e w
To
privilege
III i d v . m , e . i m i e v e n w h e n II
line
paiking
ol
lei l i n g
il,results
ol
i i l n n i n . i ! ,iiv,iii.nie\
by.
instance
consiilling
Only
c.uelulh
[ l i e sewage l i e . i t i n c u l p a i I o l lite
I he a v c i a g c . o s l p e l p i - i v m l o t
way ul
mine
leloiin
that
medical
h a n d l e t h e j o b , even t h o u g h
sail,-
in i c l logiesslon i.ilhei I hall i e l m in
without
Mi
Issue i n I h c s l . l l e s
plan
ilit |nh
One
would
IIIOIIC)
•used i n i i l a l c h
unci S u s a n P r i c e
New
bond
second
ol
handle
s h o w e d la si w e e k
rumors
qualified
classroom talents
I n s l l i i l l . t h e s y s t e m is l a c k i n g , a n d I ' l e s l d c n l H c n c / e l
different?
are
highly
it's the Money'
a n d s e e m l o have ,pie-,ii
good
bly
Name
appi
don't
b u t , whatever the
reason. T h r e e colleges a n d possi-
b a c k e d b y l l i e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , o l l e n s e e m s I n s i n g l e o u t s u m . • ••
more
o f m y colleagues
either,
Everything
the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
students.
The
a better
r e s p o n s e f u r e m e r g e n c y I'irsl a i d .
classroom competancy.
But
in achieving
proval. Why? I don't k n o w and a
you,
word
,,
S'mcerc/.y.
" " " " ' '
"
"
"
m
"
PAGE FIVE
SERVICES
I S P WHIN!
W
3rtP
• *xr.
*irr-
REPUBLICAN PARTY
- ^-^ofe"_'.-iocs: .ot>*"
RICHARD M. NIXON
CONSERVATIVE PARTY
LIBERAL PARTV
Tor PiesidetH
Fo' 1'H'siclt'nt
SOCIALIST WORKER PARTY
Toi PrL-iidcnl
SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY
Tor President
RICHARD M. NIXON
GEORGE McGOVERN
EVELYN REED
LOUIS FISHER
Ftw Vice P i o s i d w i
Frji Vice-frosidenl
CLIFTON DeBERRY
GENEVIEVE GUNDERSON
GEORGE McGOVERN
SPIRO T. AGNEW
•f
.
irtuaws-
-
,**
tirfr'
DEMOCRATIC PARTY
2J
rot
R. SARGENT SHRIVER
SPIRO T AGNEW
R. SARGENT SHRIVER
V.ii'PruMdi-nl
COMMUNIST PARTY
Foi F'lesidcnt
For I'tt-sident
GUS HALL
(ot
Vlco P r c n i e n l
JARVIS TYNER
- r "-• J C u r •
*' *SMJS
How the 538 Electoral
Votes Are Apportioned
sum.
&*
The McG Machine:
Chu^ing
1*
*W*V
•
-iiftcr
jj£iMf*T
*•»*-
Kgcggtait ajimi^atrn
u>-
«**
Ur
•tar' »f^smiiui_ jaiius-
t
IMJ.**' -a-
itir
f*~~
tismx^feLiui
ar
WKK
_aiUS>i;
. mfcr
M-
Hen.
if
primaries.
H a m p s h i r e , p i c k i n g u p speed
California, the campaign
machine
George M c G o v e r n was t h e p o l i t i c a l w o n d e r o f t h e
of
presidential
presidential
campaign?
A
J.'
— UBI !*- tsag&m
t»- miiiffiim': BP&az&i*ou
-rjaa-
the snows o f New
W h a t has h a p p e n e d t o t h a t M c G o v e r n m a c h i n e i n t h e
<; rj).
KUl
--i
through
in Wisconsin, r o l l i n g t h r o u g h
look
won
now
at
the
important
McGovern
primary
campaign
i n three states w h e r e
victories- Wisconsin,
California
he
and
Massachusetts—indicates m a j o r changes since last s p r i n g :
f
*i»
The
Hood
of
volunteers, particularly
from
the campuses,
which
f u e l e d M c G o v e r n s p r i m a r y c a m p a i g n s has n o t b e e n t h e r e t h i s f a l l .
T h e p o l i t i c a l l y savvy traveling t r o o p s w h o f o l l o w e d the primaries
f r o m state t o state have been dispersed and plugged i n t o various key
stales
T h e y are s p r e a d t h i n .
The McGovern machine now
has t h e b a c k i n g o f t h e
Democratic
p a r l y , h u t it has n o t m e a n t m u c h i n s o m e p l a c e s .
In
Wisconsin,
however,
the
McGovern
machine
appears
lo
be
iiiiinnui well w i l h local people w h o m o v e d irllo key spots vacated by
t o p c a m p a i g n organizers w h o let! after the p r i m a r y . President
carried Hie stale by
more
t h a n lit),0(1(1 Voles i n
Nixon
I«1 (iI) a n d l 9 ( i K , b i l l
k e y p e o p l e 111 b o t h c a m p s say t h e r a c e t h i s y e a r is n o w a t o s s t i p .
California A Swing Stale
McGovern
<W ' • *
&ai*~ -
California
frankly
machine there b r o k e d o w n after the
primary.
"We
staffers
were
in
fantastically
disorganized
in
admit
tile
the
primary
campaign
ll
all
broke
d o w n a l t e r the e l e c t i o n , " said R i m e r C o o p e r , w h o r e c e n t l y l o o k
McGovcrn's
Southern
California
campaign.
"There
was
over
basically
n o t h i n g here w h e n 1 came in. "
Cooper
installed
a highly
structured
organization
lo
replace
the
flexible, often overlapping machinery of the primary campaign. With
party
A'»»-»»».»<,.i,
w,.^
^ »^«fc»-
regulars f i l l i n g m a n y
like a trildilional
IIV
machine of primary
The
canvass
McGovern
incut
•
Ibe
determined
the stale
4
p o s t s . Hie o r g a n i z a t i o n
is n o w
Democratic
during
McGovern
Ihe
voters
the
primary
machine
impossibility
in
California
was
Popular
the
conducted
crowning
wisdom
had
by
achieve
long
ago
o f canvassing nearly every p r e c i n c t
M c G o v e r n w o r k e r s d i d ll
»
«
pace o f
lasl spring's
"We
i
iiisl
mo
McGovern
HEKWAY»S
'
Sa . N;u 4
*
?knternotior>ol Students' Assoc lot on s*
Cx
if
4
«
, |
4
^'
_.
*
4
i|
!
Uoves Fridoy, Nov. 17 ot 5 pm »
| from the Circle artd Soy»es Inter- i
"SKIN"
4
•
"MONTREAL
B«r.
exrrv.
we
had
in
(he s p r i n g . " said
he
uiu.sl
Nison
Califi
ll.lll.lll
can V
I Tl
showed
.1, W i l l i I h e largest
bloc
Dem
\
"agonal House. Returns Nov 1 9 J
,,,,w
,,,,,,,iiM,
McKcali
h'lVc p e o p l e
MeGovein
Mi Gov
,,,, i,, m o r e i m p o r t a n t
|,,l,s as t h e
w h o w i n k e d 111 M a s s a c l l l l s c l Is are
campaigns
in
other
stales,
said
John
"Those
people
,,|e
vei
Ihe
place
We h.lVC
I'l
oltlCl
McKcan
slates
III
campaign m now
sllong
Dellloeialli
behind McGovern
|
"Thee
V in
MassllcllUSCI Is Is n o w
.,,,• pl.u es w l ,
has I
officially
n a real h e l p , "
I,,
M,ii,e
pails
,,l
M a s s a c h u s e l Is
McGovern
workers
and
"
p.niv
$17.00 covers travel and looc
- j
X
S*9n Up Now tn CC 329
j
»••
*
"There
...fused
slate
are p l a c e s ,
lo
in,I m a n y , w h e r e Ihe t o w n c h a i r m a n have
cooperate."
llcmucialir
paily
said
"I
Charles
I.IIVI
.,,.„,
l'laheilv
h.,,1
people w h o , ailed M c G o v e r n olliees, o f t , led
contacted "
by Terry
Ryan
chairman
complaints
•K1UAY, NOVbMBKK 3, 1972
loan
ol
the
purly
, , h e l p .,,,,1 Were n e v e r
, \ a s i x - i a l c d Ihess W i l i e r
A_&ANV STUDEK7 PKES
FRIDAY NCVEV.r: ;
T
|„sl
is n o
fun
being
Berkeley,''
said
deit.e, a N i x o n
for
Nixon
Steve
t lie
Hay
Nixon
this
to
year,*'
ex-
White, chairman
tfroup
at
of
supporter
"You
maintained
p r o f i l e d u r i n g the
come
"It
was socially
Lo be f o r
said B u r d e t t e
was
of
now
sel
supptirfeis
acceptable
dormitories
had a lot
pro
still
Ljet s n u l e
looks when
button,"
head
of
tU-ni*
for
said
"l)ut
of
I hat
Now
rei-atum
I wear a
Hill
Schuek,
there
a few
is m o r e
of
Herkeley
120
at
tlie
the
and
in
draft
by
actions
virtual
during
Ins
viewed
last
Sprout
distribute campaign
lit
T h e plaza was the birl^i
tree speech
move
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
of
ad
were
partisans
as
favorably
by
Lheir c a m p u s c o l l e a g u e s
"People
are
politically
many
other
Schuek
"It
and
respects,"
is p a r t
being
overall
in
education
iLed
with
more
school
and
Politically,
driving
said
that
workers
many
s u p p o r t e r s i n f o the open.
many
wear
camNow"
but tons
not
on
"Four
when
itories
canvassing
and
dorm-
fraternity
houses
possible
Nixon
out
Unless
asked,
can
vassers at H a r v a r d , B e r k e l e y
Stanford will not
selves as N l X o u
which
people
away
and
identify
of
campus
strives
from
to
the
info community
most
and
them
workers
McGovern's
mips,
push
colleges
campaigns,
Nixon's
student
supporters appear content in the
belief that simply
presence
significant
demonstrating
on
campus
contribution
P r e s i d e n t ' s re e l e c t i o n
in
is
lowaid
gelling
In-
to
is a
the
in
o f a shift
philsophy
at
are against
their
their
becoming
r e f l e c t e d in t h e i r a t t i t u d e
'2H,0()U
end
repeatedly
Nixon
of
body
set u p a t a b l e in
the
tile
and
people
do
Unlike
China
their
dent
of
Moscow
to
Young
Years" and " N i x o n
supporters
pi'rsons in a stu-
month
place
Ulli
Ciil i l ' o m i a
Nixon
seeking
lias
of
President
puses
decline
he
the
"More
became
admit
trips
moderate,
workers
lo
Nixon's
the
sen
to
arcSteve
More
done some g o o d things
ministration
years
social
have
of
working
they
president
it
Even the
patina
nominee
p e o p l e are
because
for
the
N i x o n ' s p o l i c i e s have
cited
harass
"With
politics,
Ihe
"
Nixon
Pla/ii
Shi
is n o t
physical
existed
it
ve rsi t y
uruturo
Nix
the Ke election o f
President
meiil
and
Harvard Had.hffe
possibility
a|Jo
remarks
unacceptable
t o d o w i t h it
radicals
N i x o n voters.
"I
radical
up l i t e r a t u r e tables and
for
Fades
a
candidacy
McGovern than for N i x o n - "
Where
N i x o n l o u r years a g o , "
rest
his
from''
Social Stigma
eampuiLpi a n d w h e r e s t u d e n t unstronH,
campus
were t h e y f o u r years a g o '
a
I !HirS
Nixon's
of
Peniu'll,
diana
did
with
the
afraid o f M c G o v e r n , " said
shoving matches
c m i s i n a n d MictviLjun, places w e r e
supporters
lot
Nixon
Voters
Where
campus
con-
( l e o r g e M c G o v e r n was c r e d -
"A
for
at t h e N I M H I l a b l i - , but. t h e r e
supporters
H a r v a r d a n d C o l u m b i a , Wis
Sen.
in
basically
Democratic presidential
for the privilege o f
fight-
University
a
liberalism,
have been IVetjuent s h o u t i n g and
Stanford
IIniversity
At
ine,
of
moderate.
I n d iana
liloomington,
liiir
T h e r e has b e e n n o a c t u a l
Nix o n
plained
on
" W e ,,,,,1,1 use l l i e i n ,1 w e h u d H i , a i l . b u t w e i l o i i ' l , " s a i d
t h e y w e r e n o t seen
i.s b e e u i n u i t ! r e s p e c t a b l e
funny
s M a s s a c h u s e l Is c o o r d i n a t o r
regulars aie not g e l l i n g along
I
"ll
canvas
.,11 m o v e d
Nix
l o u r y e a r s atfo
,,, i n , . , , v i b e . e
Mc.irlv
President
at
At
servative
"It
advocating what y o u believe."
Nixon
M c t l o v e i it's m i g r a t i n g c a m p a i g n o r g a n i / . e r s w , „ l i e d ,11
ism.
stick
puses
where
have b e c o m e m o r e
activ
have t o f i g h t
very l o w
[ rouble Spol
campaign
their bumper
hul supporters o f
|s ., , w I l l g S1.1 I C M C G . IV el |l 's
M a s s a c l l l l s c l I,, e, a I r a d i i i o n a l I v
wear
ing the h e y d a y o f antiwar
oil have surfaced o n culleec c a m
support
M i t I n v e n t h a d b e e n e x p e c t e d l o w i n w i t h case
, n i,l
seldom
and
several clashes
b e t w e e n police and students dur-
Wnlvr
ers d o n o t s t a y i n p l a c e t o r l o i i L i ,
"The
s a i d M c K c a n , " h i l l l l h ' s i „ , l m a d e m m ll d i f f e r e n c e i n s o n i c p l a c e s
h
..$.30 co^er
thai
intensive
volunteers
Hie canvass in S o u t h e r n C a l i f o r n i a
Hie
They
I , , , . , I o i l ices 11 I M , u g h , , I I I M a s s a c h u s e l Is d u r i n g t h e f i n a l w e e k s o l I l i e
The
'
!!
of
bodies
Massachusetts
About
l a l e r because o f an
there
III
campaign progiessed
T
4
4
,i
stalled
p o l l s in C a l i f o r n i a a m i M a s s a c h u s e t t s r e c e n t l y
Voles
saul
,,,,:,In
* * '
Ihc
trailing I'lesideii!
decimal
staffers
*
/,
have
i l i u m l l i s l Is n o t
Independent
,,|
t't
don't
ll
Press
buttons
i d has b e e n s l o w e d b y a l a c k o f
Paul S u l l i v a n , d i r e c t o r
>
«
ih f.llHT
effort
voter registration driv
orient a n d s i t e o f
by T m y Ryan
Ansafiutfd
in
A s i m i l a r c a n v a s s is n o w u n d e r w a y . b u t i ' is r u n n i n g far b e h i n d Hie
4
Nixon's College Popularity
more
McGovern
days
of
workers
of
key
D e m o c r a t i c c a m p a i g n o p e r a t i o n t h a n (he
an
Nixon
puses
of
workers
conceded
studenU
for
on
that
will
McGovern.
peuple
they
Nixon
supporters
added
that
than
effort
most
a
probably
But
cam
majority
vole
invariably
more
expected
Nixon
had
ben located.
PAGE SEVEN
Where Did Reality Go?
And
News
Analysis
by Robert Mayer
The Final Poll
NEW Y O R K AP - President Nix-
between
on
over
New Y o r k , California, Michigan,
McGovern
New Jersey and Wisconsin, the
held
a 26-point
Democrat
George
lead
1 2 and 2 2 points
in
going i n t o the last t w o w e e k s of
poll said. In only one of the 16
the
states,
presidential
campaign,
according t o the fourth and final
Yankelovich poll.
The
by
New
did
McGovern appear ahead.
The survey also showed appar-
survey,
the
Massachusetts,
commissioned
York T i m e s
and
ent growing a p a t h y toward t h e
election.
In the first poll
last
T i m e magazine, gave N i x o n
56
July, 4 8 per c e n t said they were
per
for
"very
cent
to
30
McGovern and
per
cent
14 per c e n t un-
d e c i d e d . T h i s was a 4 p o i n t gain
for M c G o v e r n over the previous
interested"
The
Gallup Poll,
that
Democratic
Based o n t h e t e l e p h o n e interviews w i t h 3 , 0 1 0 registered voters,
the
from
survey
Oct.
ended
was
15
just
to
Oct.
before
ministration
conducted
24.
the
announced
It
ad-
that
peace was at h a n d in V i e t n a m .
T h e four Y a n k e l o v i c h surveys
were
taken
in
the
16
largest
states, which t o g e t h e r have 3 3 2
electoral
votes - well over
the
2 7 0 that are necessary to carry
the presidency.
Survey
gave Nixon a
lead of 2 2 p o i n t s or b e t t e r in 10
states - T e x a s , Illinois, Indiana.
Ohio,
Missouri,
North
Carolina,
strengths
Pennsylvania,
Georgia,
Vir-
ginia and Florida.
meanwhile,
it
found
party
which
has
may
"the
certain
not
be
a p p a r e n t in the latest figures on
candidate preferences."
In its m i d - O c t o b e r survey, rep o r t e d last week, t h e G a l l u p Poll
found
Nixon
ahead
by
a
23
p o i n t margin, 59 per c e n t to 36
per cent for McGovern.
But
when
the
voters
were
asked which political party they
thought
best able to deal with
the nations's p r o b l e m s , the GOP
was
results
cam-
per c e n t in the latest poll.
reported
poll.
in t h e
paign, b u t the figure fell to 39
ahead
only
55
to 4 5 per
c e n t , Gallup said S u n d a y .
D e m o c r a t s e m e r g e d ahead of
R e p u b l i c a n s , 51 to 4 9 , on quest i o n s designed t o test e n t h u s i a s m
and by o n e per centage point in
the c a m p a i g n activity, the survey
T h e President held a lead of
found.
of
course
m a d e miracles with Red
S o m e w h e r e a m i d t h e barrage
of cliches, Madison Avenue hardw a r e , a n d e v e r y d a y s t i m u l i , reality gets lost.
It gets lost on page 8 3 of t h e
N e w Y o r k Times, it gets lost o n
t h e 7 o'clock news, it gets lost in
a b a r in A n y t o w n U.S.A. and it's
a l m o s t as if it never existed a t
all.
T h e reality t h a t is America
t o d a y is perfectly and justly
exemplified
in t h e
President
himself. R i c h a r d M i h o u s e N i x o n
is just w h a t we need t o h e l p us
forget t h a t our n e i g h b o r s ' kids
are full of p o t a n d h e r o i n , and
t h a t o u r kids m u s t be subjected
t o t h e s e vile users.
" T h e President is going to s t o p
t h e flow of drugs i n t o this count r y . . . h e told us himself in a
special b r o a d c a s t to the people
on n a t i o n w i d e t e l e v i s i o n . "
R i c h a r d N i x o n tells A m e r i c a n
t h a t t h e b u m w h o held y o u up
last week is going t o be locked
u p and society will be o n c e and
for all safe from the criminals.
" N i x o n has sure got t h o s e criminals r u n n i n g scared because h e ' s
t o u g h and n o bleeding h e a r t
liberal."
A n d t h e n there is the Nixon
w h o e n d e d the war because " n o
o n e w a n t s war...we d o n ' t w a n t
t o see o u r allies t h r e a t e n e d with
those
communists and
their
hloodbaths.
I mean
he
has
s t o p p e d the draft a n d well we
c a n ' t just leave o u r P O W ' s . "
and
the
Soviet
furthered
the
has
million dollar b r e a k s . If it isn't
China
ITT it's the CIA a n d if it isn't
"Nixon
Union. H e h a s
goals
of
the CIA y o u c a n
good
commie
when
is a
it
S o y o u see w h a t I mean aboul
dead
comes
to
reality
being
lost.
was
time
when
a
fireside
There
mice
listening
to
$ $ $ $ $ $ $ . N o w it's all l e g i t i m a t e
F.D.R.'s
free e n t e r p r i s e for t h e sake of
t y . It was real t o listen to ihe
e n h a n c i n g w o r l d peace.
Brooklyn
T h e n we have to r e m e m b e r the
D o d g e r s a n d eal hoi
to
t h o s e b o y s w h o did n o t d o their
your
duty
and m o m
to
their c o u n t r y
a n d es-
will never
granted
"Why
those
amnesty.
bums
cowards
who
be
were
allowed
the
flag
and
teacher.
yellow
b a c k t o this great n a t i o n
when
about
our
peanuts
for i In
L i b e r t y and Iran my
glorious
revolui on
m y s o n w e n t over there a n d did
R e a l i t y was t h e " g o o d life'
his service (aside: killing g o o k s )
the A m e r i c a n D r e a m .
And
there
Nixon
is
who
mil
the
knows
ml
never existed. Why apologize for
killed,
it
happened
youths
and
came
when
for
never
all i n t e n t s
pur-
and
a
took
hard
few
respecl
ignore reality a n d Richard N
have
provided
many
that
Sn
poses y o u can believe it never
newspapers
decided
accept.
occurred.
the
we v. • <!
with an ill
dal or s o m e swindle. If it isn't
t h a t we were A m e r i c a n s In
about
good
deals
it's
home.
If
individual
it
isn't
linking
aboul
American
time
this
happened
was
American
in
p a n y " doesn't have the m e l o d r a m a t i c e n t a n g l e m e n t s
that g u a r a n t e e it f a m e / f o r t u n e . It has been h y p e d as
c o m p a r a b l e to " B o n n i e a n d C l y d e " ( R o b e r t B e n t o n
and " B u t c h C a s s i d y , " yet stands by itself w i t h o u t
(rated
" B a d C o m p a n y " is a Western, and a l t h o u g h
only
Westerns
made
t o d a y arc of the
my
American
the
I hale
have a p o r t r a i t of the West, p e o p l e d
D r e w Dixon is a p p a r e n t l y the I n n o c e n t
k n o w ! >.\
and
not
Babe in
brothel
at the uiging of his p a r e n t s , flees to Virginia City t o
avoid c o n s c r i p t i o n and to seek his f o r t u n e . Armed
Willi a new
s o m e millionaire politician giving
Nixon.
friends
some
Richard
HOJI..
Milli"" >
Yes, four m o r e years.
hundred
suit,
dollars
his b r o t h e r ' s gold w a t c h , one-
and
a Protestant
upbringing, he
arrives in Missouri w h e r e he is q u i c k l y
befriended,
his m e e k n e s s . D r e w will fight w h e n necessary; in a
JEWISH STUDENTS' COALITION
l u i r p u l l i n g and ear-biting, he recovers his m o n e y ,
J a k e ' s respect, and an offei to head Wesl with Jake
and his c i e w .
Jake has g o t t e n a most unlikely h u n c h id adven-
NOVEMBER 12-lce-Skating Party at RPI Fieldhouse
Bus will leave circle 3:30 pm, return 6:30 pm
Admission: Members 4.75 with skates, $1.25 without
Non-members $1.00 with skates, $1.75 without
Call Gail at 457-5632 for reservations
NOVEMBER 14-Educational Film "Memorandum'
About the Holocaust
7 p m i n C C 3 1 5 FREE
'Hirers I'm
Ins gang,
including
a
immune
pan
id
h r o l h e i s . a cily b o y terrified ot the wilderness, a icn
yeai
old. t l u c e
ilaiinii'd
Diew
by
launchy
lioises. and
the presence id
joim i n t o
ihesc
the spirit ol
a m u l e . (In-
"rough
types"
iluiigs. a l t h o u g h he
keeps a di;n \ and reads Jane I vie by the camp-fire.
NOVEMBER 18-"Rachel, Rachel"
Starring Joanne Woodward
Time and place to be announced.
"Living oil
hovs.
live l a n d " pioves l o o m u c h I'm ihe
sun.-
they'd
laihei
go h u n g i )
Hum skin a
l a h b i l , .mil iheii night w a l c l u n a u lalls asleep allow
ing ilii'in hi lie n i b b e d , I m suivival they a t t e m p t to
m h ,i stagecoach and leave OIK-ol iheii ntinibei as a
i l i \ u \ . lie J c . ides in lake Ins c h a n c e s with the coach
NOVEMBER 19-Dinner, Movie, Discussion
7:30 pm in CC Ballroom
Film: "Kibbutz Daphna"
anil civili/alitin and i ulcs a w a \
De.ilh .III.I ileseilion leave ihe eiew d o w n in Jake
,iml l l i m
m i l I hen s i l u a l i o u d e l e i i o i a l c s u n t i l , al
lilm's end l h e \ a u - u a i h
lui piolessional b.indili \
giving up ii'iiipiuaiil)
ihc ilii'ani ol srlvei mining in
Colmailo
scene
int'tl
SHABBAT SERVICES EVERY WEEK:
Congregation Chaverim B'Shalom
Friday 7:30 pm Kiddush, Saturday 10 am Torah reading
Kosher Lunch served Saturday. All at Chapel House
Anyone invited to write creative services
I In'
linal
has
the
d m • .Hid a m Hung Inn lough
,i Wells 1 ,II go o i l i c e . pull
most J a s . h
am
us
say,
ihe\
pan
slaiving
I lies u.ilk lulu
Ihi'ii guns, anil
in Ihal
ol Western lines, lines thai a n y o n e Willi
ol
what
mumble,
the
Wei
most
lie
would
iiuconviiicmgly.
iinglii
"Sink
'.'III up "
1 he i.isi was unknown .mil the n a m e s est
Inn llu-\ wen- e.xcellenl
piesenl
ped m e .
All ihc I an iili.n inles weie
the weeping inolliei. I lie l o u g h in.iisliall.
Ihe guzzled
Anyone interested in singing with JSC at Holiday Sing meet 7 pm Sunday, Nov. 5, in Cooper
Lower Lounge.
pi.uiie
laiini'i
and 11 icy e a r n e d
sleieolype
Ihey d o s o m e t h i n g u n i q u e , leaving llie
viewei sit,Hided a lew s l e p s h e h i u d and l e a h / i n g thai
B a u y Biowu is D i e w .
and in a i l i l l u u l l 11He, one I m g e l s he is acting
You can still join!!
Jewish students' coalition
box 369bb-SUNYA
then
p a i l s along as e x p e c t e d , u n t i l , s h i p p i n g |iisl slum ol
ilns is no siaiulaid Western
Budges as J a k e
l u m p i n g I'veiywheie
Ihe
p l u m p n e s s on
he's a kul al
Jell
connives and leads, kills and l o b s ,
play
and d o m i n a t i n g everj
scene
his cheeks nevei lets us loigel
unlil
Ins d i e a u i s ol
adventuie
b e c o m e too teal
Dues: $5,00 for the year-
members get discounts to all events.
"Had
lump;
Albans utiU ilu
PAGE EIGHT
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
m -1
- ''W- •
3«
1
Piper Laurie and McGovern, star of Once
p.m. in L C 2 3 . Admission $ . 5 0 .
To Every
Man And
Nation
W9&
Friday, N o v e m b e r 3 at 8 : 0 0
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
Controversial Man Leaves a History
Ezra Pound Dies
and as quickly r o b b e d , by Jake R u m s e y . Yel for all
b e a u t i f u l , y o u t h f u l struggle, full of h e a d - p o u n d i n g ,
NOVEMBER 11-Intercollegiate Party at Troy JCC
With RPI, Union, Russell Sage, Albany Med.Skidmore
Bus will leave circle 7:30 pm, return 12:30 am
Admission: members free, no -members $.75
f
was killed at C h i c k a n i a u g a . (it's IRh.1) a n d ,
'.
the o n l y reality is thai we SI.HK-I
of
,
by
a
four
•
myself
l o o t s " ) variety, judgment
some
of
•
revisionist
casligalion. let a l o n e Indians, are a v o i d e d . Instead,
we
m
P G ) and
White
chance
"rUrV
m Mr* WM
everyone's
the
good
...
" T h e Last Picture S h o w . " But " B a d C o m -
about
years
millionaire
does
the Wilderness, a M e t h o d i s t from O h i o w h o s e only
w o u l d pull us t h r o u g h . And i
H o u s e closer t o Watergate it is
some
old
thai
*
a r c h e t y p a l s u p e r m e n , but by very h u m a n figures.
t h a t all's well w i t h Amern .
wheat
last
favorite
and
•.-
a n o t h e r s t o r y a b o u t s o m e scan-
p u t t i n g bugs in every
the
"original-sin Lit lle-big-matt" ( " N o w
h e r o i n , realil \
to
simply
Daily,
unknowns,
Ihrowaway h u m o r .
d o w n , a n d several s t u d e n t s <>\
it
of
relying on i m i t a t i o n , sex-violence
b u r n e d a n d a few campus** si u
wish
cast
war got s t a r t e d , a n d a few n >>-s
the
or
a
after a p r e s i d e n t got shot, ,n I ,(
Watergate bugging is p r e t e n d it
A m e r i c a n way t o deal with
*> *
that
a movie by a new
the
Richard
that
with
film
and David Weaman w r o t e the s c r e e n p l a y s to b o t h )
But d r e a m s are not reality
for his c o u n t r y ? "
director,
of
t w o weeks'.' S o m e t h i n g must he w r o n g ! ) O f c o u r s e
and
of
sort
it was euphorm
e l e p h a n t s . It was a visit to the
Statue
rare
failure. ( F r o m the NY Film Festival to Albany in
Park
come
H
v
is the
It was apple pic
should
to
Company"
e v e r y t h i n g so right that it's destined for c o m m e r c i a l
and
zoo
"Bad
b r o w n -nosing
Reality was a walk in the Cent nil
be
Wi |
by Michael L i p p m a n
w a n d e r s in m a y b e once a year
R e a l i t y was p l e d g i n g allegiance
rest o u r m o s t heartfelt fears t h a t
"Bad Company"
Friday, November 3, 1972
State University of New York at Albany
c h a t s was p*uli
dogs a t Y a n k e e S t a d i u m .
Richard N i x o n w h o has p u t t o
c a p e d t o Canada
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
confident
good s o m e w h e r e .
m i e s " the "red m e n a c e " or " t h e
only
ASkj
t h a t t h e FBI is u p t o some m.
world
p e a c e . " It j u s t isn't " t h o s e c o m -
commie"
be
s and leisure
playing
Ml
l.llllil
H iIn.* Ik'lawaiti in
Venice, Italy
AP — Erza
P o u n d , praised for his verse and
villi fied for his politics, died
Wednesday
night.
He
had
m a r k e d his 8 7 t h b i r t h d a y Monday.
Th e
e x p a t date
American
p o e t , once i n d i c a t e d for treason
for pro-Fascist
broadcasts he
m a d e in Italy d u r i n g World War
II, had been h o s p i t a l i z e d Tuesday at S a i n t s J o h n and Paul
Hospital in Venice with an in
leslinal disorder.
P o u n d paired a public life of
.shocking s t a t e m e n t s
with ;in
artistic o n e that p r o d u c e d intellectual p o e t r y that s o m e unfriendly critics said was deliberately o b s c u r e and i n c o h e r e n t .
For W h o ' s Who he listed hit
principal
amusement
us " t i n
public taste."
When the treason indictment
was d r o p p e d in I95H and P o u n d
was p e r m i t t e d t o r e t u r n to Italy,
he said "I d o not k n o w h o w it
would be possible to live in
America o u t s i d e » m a d h o u s e .
I le had been declared m e n
tally i n c o m p e t e n t and had spent
\'l years in a Washington D.C
mental hospital.
Late
in life
bone-thin,
plagued by illness
the bearded
author of the Pisan C a n t o s lap
sed i n t o sell i m p o s e d silence and
his bitterness e b b e d . T e n years
ago lie told fi rare interviewer he
had
reached
"the
age
of
d o u b t 1 have erred always...and
spoiled w h a t e v e r c a m e i n t o con
tact with me.
"I k n o w n o w t h a t I n o longer
k n o w a n y t h i n g , I have b e c o m e
an illiterate literary man I am
u n a b l e to think 1 am a w a r e only
of
my
disconcerting
uncertainty
He steadfastly denied unlil his
death thai he was a traitor to his
roll til ry.
P o u n d s t a y e d in Italy after
leaving
the
united
States,
dividing his time b e t w e e n an
ancient castle ut the foothills of
the Alps and n residence in
Vwnce
As a p o e t , P o u n d wiis best
know
for the l e n g t h y
Pisun
(Juntos, a series of m o r e than
100 songs in verse t h a n combined c y n i c i s m
.id l a m e n t . He
c o m p l e t e d t h e m in p r i s o n .
P o u n d also w r o t e e x p e r i m e n tal verse a n d literary criticism,
and translated p o e t r y by Italy's
Dante Alighieri and o t h e r poets.
Carl S a n d b u r g o n c e hailed
P o u n d ' s work as " t h e greatest
single influence on
American
p o e t r y . " But a n o t h e r poet said
"Iv/.ra would rather perplex his
readers than e n c h a n t t h e m . "
P o u n d s u c c e e d e d in b o t h per
plexmg and e n c h a n t i n g .
T h e bearded e x p a t r i a t e won a
prr/.e for p o e t r y he c o m p l e t e d
while held in an American military prison in Italy on treason
charges. T h e
award for
the
"highest a c h i e v e m e n t of American p o e t r y " was m a d e in I91K
while P o u n d was in the m e n i a l
hospital in W a s h i n g t o n . It caused
a congressional u p r o a r .
1 lis literary r e p u t a t i o n 1*1 ou
ashed despite criticism and his
long
confinemenl
Ironically,
much ol the d e m a n d for P o u n d ' s
will ui^s c a m e from
American
colleges, which
he c o n t e n t p
Uiously d a m n e d when he left the
United Slates in disgust in I'.IOV
by then t h e brilliant y o u n g
man with red hair a n d an eccentric Hair already had a r e p u l a
lion as a p o e t . E x c e p t for t w o
s h o r t visits, h e did n o t return to
the United S t a t e s until he was
brought back in 1945 to lace
trjwison charges.
The pro Fascist b r o a d c a s t s in
Italy during World War II led to
ihe treason i n d i c t m e n t . P o u n d
was declared m e n t a l l y incom
pet en I to d e f e n d himself and
c o n f i n e d to St. E l i z a b e t h ' s Hospital in W a s h i n g t o n .
The
treason
charges
were
dropped
in
1958,
allowing
P o u n d to return to Italy.
"I d o not k n o w how it w o u l d
be possible t o live in America
o u t s i d e of a m a d h o u s e , " P o u n d
said.
Horn of Q u a k e r slock Oct. 3 0 ,
I8K5, in Hailey, I d a h o , P o u n d
was e d u c a t e d a I H a m i l t o n College and the University of Pennsylvania. He t a u g h t briefly at
Pennsylvania
and
al
Wabash
College
before
leaving
for
E u r o p e in 1 9 0 7 .
During his 38 years in England, F r a n c e and Italy, P o u n d
built a f o r m i d a b l e r e p u t a t i o n as
a p o e t , e d i t o r , translator, :ritic
and
iconoclast,
although
his
verse s o m e t i m e s defied interpretation,
His
p r i z e - winning
"Pisan
Cantos"
employed
combined
Knghsb w o r d s , Chinese figures,
music, Greek .script, p h o n e t i c
spellings, S o u t h e r n and Jewish
d i a l e d , .u\i\ Latin, French and
G e r m a n slang
A Iter
returning
to
Italy,
Pound lived in near seclusion
with his d a u g h t e r , Mary, wife of
the n o t e d Egyptologist, Prince
Boris de lC.chewiltz, in their
12th c e n t u r y castle near M e r a n o
in the Italian Alps.
He told an Italian interviewer
he had b e c o m e " a n illiterate
literary m a n " and was n o longer
writing
"1 w o u l d like to e x p l a i n , " he
said, " b u t e v e r y t h i n g is so difficult, and so useless."
The Jethro Tuff concert
which people are buying tickets
for is a fraud.'If
Do not buy tickets for this
concert —Concert Board
Bat-.
Coalition
PEACE & POLITICS
Nixonomfcs:
Can
we
take
by
URPE
(The
Re-Elect
ii
'h
(
f
the
President
Induction
who
Center.
S t u d i o of the gymnasium. Featured
available is barely adequate, especial
ly here at S U N Y A , we encourage all
pion Robert Russell and current t h i r d
w o m e n t o a t t e n d . Funded by SA.
otherwise
would
not
be
in-
A State
nell.
Cathexis
The Newman
Association
is spon-
sponsors Dr. Paul R. Pat
Influence
on
Development"
For i n f o r m a t i o n call J i m 457 8 7 5 1
Tues. Nov. 7, 8 p.m. CC Assembly
Later
Hall. I m p o r t a n t
Fic-
Maternal
tions!!!
Accepting
original
science
stop
Lewis
Fidfer
from
there
logical end of his aspirations, c o m e t o
a meeting Sunday night in Tuscarora
will
Campus
Center
Governing
Board
datory
p.m. A l l members please a t t e n d !
Gary
be a petition
Center
reinstatement
1 0 7 - 1 , at 7 : 3 0 p.m.
prof
of
Info
of
at
the
for
the
Miller
as
Desk
Harold
Psychology.
Anyone
A Commuter
Centra/
Council
in CC 316 on M o n d a y f r o m 1 3 and
Fr.dav f r o m 10 11 More times w i l l
be announced The phone number is
407 6 b 4 3
r h f SUNYA
Group
!",Z'Z,','!
ii I C
(
1
i1
i
,i,
w l
Sin
"
'"' "
Miiinj,
il
eh'
/
it ,'• t l f ' , 1
wo
( .•• / / . l i t )
Up
Nm
! • ! • . • A , 11- l a .
r3.ii i
u:
in
% . ;; Wflhllljt
lo
"™J
n gutnq in Cape
I iauionm
lldW
luewJd-y
,/'.,
Affairs
i
i ' i i
M
Iteuple m i e n "
i'ii
'i , ( m i l l i l i t e r - '.
"1
Council
•, c n i i i i ' i
,-
,s
Mi'
pin
'..ip.l.i
-,«r\ iri'j
Q u d h l m d Emergency
I II
N.i\
•'
,
(..«!
Ht'tOCjlliMtjlIf
r',n..'M
,it
! ) .'•
are i n v i t e d to a t t e n d . Free c o l •<;<
donuts.
History, CLC
t
»<t
' t i i -, •
.|.v
il
It.'
'
19
presenting
Ms bi(| and
Novembei
Night"
on
future
HIS
Courses to
156-Women
310
quity, ENG 313
in I
Women
W o m e n in
Jewry
committee
will hold
interested
m helping
with
Hebrew
Club
is
sponsui
Israeli movie, Lupo, in Englinite-8
&
10
LC
25
$50
without
judo
11 8 pin
IM kets
self-defense
and
Duimg pre registration pull the J u d o
j roniprehensivp listing ••!
loit-s and .ipp'o-n hes t- • !"
bers are now being arrep-ted
in P e f l o m u n i
Come
••
and visit us luesdays I p rn <j
"
3rd Mom in the i j y i n
, 1 . " available
p
,„
,
.1 It ain't love but
•',
ill
•-.
HU
1 -,•• |. ( l
^'jl
U'.
•., ii
!.,;„.
Camera /Photography
n | | i . ' R a t h s t r-lli
m ( irnpu- (.•
<!••,•
oin
I .1 n
'.i
io< .' v , t i ; d
••
't...p,M.. l t ) ( |
twii
1 ,i
1
M.iyi.
MI too- ,-,.i,ii,.,i
,ife
v • •"<>
A.',
I I.Ill
hi'
tl
,(!! <i \\>
A:;
|l It,
AH*II
-ROCK-
.'/I'll
•-,
in
:>/;•
tvidtffice
Hurna
llmsi'
1 irtnidt'
. V r J . M u j !-•
l i c i - n n r,,,n
ID'
.I
Cute
Viral
•
Cuus.ii
i >•• i* '•'
J u n i h i , , • •n.,,-1
[i,-i
111
A MO
H. , m i
•,
| . ••
'/AH
!-.•• '
• i "
.ml Bioioi,,
•
•• . t . - i
,.
i
(Jul.
,iv,i,i i t , ! . '
• " • >'
1 -hit.,
uy.i'd
,iri'
[wdftiils
r,
H...
infirmary
isi' AUU WIT*
•>••
K
All
-he
Coffee
Houses n.•• i V i ' ^ f h i I '.«l,iv Nov -;.
i.Mi'...., i r..i
f ,).,. . . . I . , ' m i i i i . i . , , '
1 t, ,i , . , , „ ,
Club ...II h, IV t;
•-.
Mil...,- w i t h ' , " ' - 1
.i.n w i l l In- d . v
CCGB
\'J
I o i n n j n . M ,' p m
n.te hi
uf...i
-,t
I
i.imoHi.w
Hii', •!'/.,).
iJiurniriHiit io(,ii p>.iy
$ 15 Budweism M- nd.iv
' l p rn
1973
Mu,Hil
i ,n-1,1111..• o f f , ' -
John Eraser
/vntH .ind ,Hitl oi
• t om't bud /v.n -iir.-ik
H.nhvti-ilHr
I.,r Spring,
,,hl,. h, , j „ y
,••
n,,i V be ohi.noed ••, •!,.• f • • i
International Student o f h . e ( X .\? J
PAC H u . n i d i H S.IV"-". .Ml.-.nin.,n.,
•,,„.
Ld<
has < orniJitcd >n*d :
C l u b ' s S p o r t ' s C l u b card New m e m
f
, ,i
The Comparative
department
i I'lo* fu
Arts Center of SUN t A Admission
$1 bO and
Learn
foi academic and/or g y m c r e d i i
Salijfda'*
K,,lh yv il IH> I I - K I h t i „ . f r. A'.vir.t.i
(iini-ntM-.i)
Between
/,,n
-,,,.,. ,,
the
Stais
m Space and Intmstellar
ion
'.•' ... 1 , .
' i . . . •- 1,. •
hoi-
tt, Election
Day
•
toed
r.AJORS
& MINORC
Hesse ex hi
1
bit •> ttii- HuwMI ' . i i - .'•' I'- i " ' .
m ',!•< i.m! Mn.,'1 I - -. '-,.•/, -1 r'»
t i , , , | , N - v i ' l l i h . - ' fi • N ..,'Mh.-. I.'
[Ulllh.
Friday and Saturday Night
9:30 - 2 am
'•]'
M»,'M'
will
/
HI
pin
.,1
ihi-.i'i,-
M ,1.,-M
pun
SOUL TO
SOUL
., lecture
.,,
M.;-,..,• .>!> W i ' d i n - , i | , i ,
hill,'
$1.50 Admission incl. 1 beer or 1 glass of wine
{'••
M
|,v,-,.
Ill
Co n
i ti'i M H I ' I
N'lvmli...
H,,.,.„.||
'.„.)•'
tiy
;•:
,1
( Mil.-,,-
' '
vet Si itron
,'
Hit • ( (
'
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I'l ilMviph-,
<!.-
in nt S U N Y A
OFFICIAL NOTICI
•INTERNATIONAL
invites
SI I DEM V \SSO( II llt)\
'
vuii to ii i ntiir/ul
Hi.'
.mil
Ciiniii,,
J/,;, frum
Onle^t<Ui04toi Nitfltt
Program will include
International Variety S h o w
International Fashion Show
I Kasino 16,000 500 watt
sound system
• , J ,,,t.,v,
Situr Recital
Saturday,
November
Performing
will be nerved
$1 60 per person
[THE BETTER TO HEAR IT WITH.!
WE'LL BLOW THE WALLS OUT |
PAGE 2A
II
II, lK)'7'J
li l l k l W i i
liefretthinvnts
Am
Center
$1 00 per person
I im mil i i . n i l . c;
ll.l».iH'..
wtth lux
Tickets available at.
PAC Box Ollicu
Say his International House
International Student Office CC 329
lirubuclwr Hall
Albany International Center, Willet Street
—
—,
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
'.m,.
I dirtklriks,
I I , i l i u m IV
lllll
...
Those t h r e e a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s
in themselves mark Nixon as a
man of c o n s i d e r a b l e talent, a
d i p l o m a t to be r e c k o n e d with in
the affairs of t h e world.
On t h e o t h e r h a n d , Nixon has
proved astonishingly inept here
a t h o m e . He has cloistered himself in the White House, surr o u n d e d by o n e of the most
brazen a n d h i g h - h a n d e d collect i o n of k n u c k l e - h e a d s , klutzes
a n d even c r o o k s t o be assembled
at o n e t i m e in t h e White House
in this c e n t u r y
And what is
equally r e m a r k a b l e , he refuses to
rid himself of the bums, even
when faced with irrefutable evid e n c e of their disservice Lo him
a n d to the d e m o c r a t i c process.
Less f o r t u n a t e still, t h e Presid e n t ' s p o o r j u d g m e n t a b o u t per
sonal advisors e x t e n d s as well to
his choices for judges and cabinet m e m b e r s , for he has:
—appointed a Chief Justice of
t h e S u p r e m e C o u r t w h o apparent!y tries to tell t h e Speaker
by Barbara Matilsky
volleyball
A,,,. .
win be .i Herman
WASHINGTON-In one w a y re-elected or n o t a n d like it or
not—Richard N i x o n will surely
be r e m e m b e r e d as o n e of t h e
m o s t effective Presidents since
Roosevelt.
In four years h e has ( 1 ) app a r e n t l y c o m e very close to
achieving p e a c e of his sort in the
Vietnam
conflict
which
has
plagued this c o u n t r y for twelve
years; ( 2 ) t h a w e d relations with
R e d China, America's bitterest
and m o s t feared e n e m y for the
last q u a r t e r of a c e n t u r y ; a n d ( 3 )
at t h e s a m e time eased tensions
with Russia, whose leaders aren't
even s p e a k i n g with t h e Chinese,
and w h o , along with the Chinese, have been directly aiding
the N o r t h V i e t n a m e s e .
of t h e H o u s e of Representatives
w h a t laws should a n d s h o u l d n o t
be passed.
— a p p o i n t e d a Secretary of
Agriculture w h o wihtn m o n t h s
after his c o n f i r m a t i o n perpet r a t e d t h e Great Grain R o b b e r y
of all time, and e x h i b i t e d his
scorn for t h e small farmers
w h o s e interests he is s u p p o s e d to
represent.
—appointed a S e c r e t a r y of
C o m m e r c e , now his campaign
finance c h a i r m a n , w h o collects
millions of dollars from undisclosed sources, funnels thousands t h r o u g h o b s c u r e Mexican
bank a c c o u n t s a n d d e f u n c t cor
p o r a t i o n s , s u p p o r t s a spy operation
from
a small f o r t u n e
stashed in his office safe, a n d has
t h e u n m i t i g a t e d gall t o m a i n t a i n
t h a t t h e w h o l e affair is completely p r o p e r .
T h e m i n d boggles. Washington
h a s n ' t witnessed a n y t h i n g l i k e it
since Ulysses S. Gran I f 1 ou n •
dered in t h e near total c o r r u p t i o n of his staff a n d friends 100
years ago. But the c o u n t r y reelected G r a n t , a n d N i x o n , with a
25 p o i n t lead, seems h e a d e d
t o w a r d his four m o r e years as
well.
If so, we can only h o p e h e will
have the good sense t o clean
h o u s e after the victory celebration is over, and find s o m e advisors w h o will help him d e v o t e
serious, innovative a t t e n t i o n t o
the p r o b l e m s here at h o m e
which have gone begging for the
last d e c a d e .
But it's a h o l l o w h o p e , :.ot
voiced with m u c h assuredness,
for t h e only people w h o seem t o
have Mr. N i x o n ' s ear are those
who o u g h t t o be kicked o u t on
theirs.
Dream or Reality?
• MldtJlll 1 *
!i
The Men Behind Nixon
d.\,dlnu-.
t
House
-day
Gay Consciousness
SUNYA Birth Contrg' Clinic:
Pullu
.n,-
Chapel
proudly presents
five piece rock
plan
newly formed protects is urged to
attend,
is
'
0>^The Brew
to
Anyone
[ i v H B a n d . TREK,
Pi.M-.e
meeting
Women:
fi
i esiden is
Studies
Important
17 at 5 p rn. and w o u l d r e t u r n f r o m
Hi
& A iden
Women's
Alliance
'72
i-tMMi
Waterb ury
Student
meeting M o n . Nov 6 8 p rn. H U 3 5 4 .
ii ,i
Carnpu:. Cites! 72
7 3 0 - 9 : 3 0 p.m. A l l interest.,]
frorn
ing student at S U N Y A .
national house on Friday November
I ,J<",
/ [,JH'l
the
7 30 p m. in the CC Fireside Lounge
Tech
Ml.
for
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n circle and Sayles inter
ntcians « Im
ftui> Medical Teih
nulogy ma/ors wctm..) ••. /*. .< i . •'K
Kill
status
' 7 3 ' 7 4 academic year and a c o n t i n u
Soviet
iMMiso ami Alti,.ny m t i - n ih..i, i
Medical
Junior
its hrst meeting Monday, the 6 t h , at
.fi
Student
I'.'.,'. mZ
t i n V.ll,
n.l.ili,, i
SUMY A G.iy Allia,
i
i
11 i.
least
L i t (2 Sections)
I n t e r n a t i o n a l Student's Assoc ia hoi
,il
rind Fhu-rsday fmjhf, .it H 30
, r o o n Lounge o n M o n d a y N o v e m u . ,
6
at
events and upcoming conference.
17-19 Price for
i
M o r e i n f o in CC 329.
Hatteras'
f Hid o u t
on
M o n t r e a l o n Sunday November
Y I K I i o n rihiy be able to at Tar id tins
MiiikWXti.
Association
is h o l d i n g
of
lodging and transportation expenses
Bible
'
his
Club
d e n t - f a c u l t y c o f f e e hour in tfn- i ,
also be noted that applicants must be
Buses w i l l leave simultaneously f r o m
"International
the State Quad
1,7 S A
Students'
the weekend of Nov
mBe
from
Geography
It should
this t r i p is $ 1 7 . 0 0 w l u c h w o u l d cover
^
H S
""I
P"V>n
on F-,
d a y . Nov 3. a i 7 p.m in the Physics
Build.nq I outap 11291 All mleresled
sludents are invileri in .illend Spun
si ned Ijy In i;r Varsity Christian I "I
hill h t l w ]
read
is sponsoring its t r i p (o Montreal
ln
G.Y.R.O.
will
for all applicants
Italian-American
Women's Liberation
in
i . nan i
Ther8
S,ud
Snyder
International
Rep
w i l l be in the Central Council office
B l d g . L o u n g e , R o o m PH-129 (
•
Speaker: Mr. Robert Turtnichfiri
the Pathology Dept. at Albany M - i
Refreshments w i l l be served
'73-'74. A
p.m. i n Lecture Center 1
There wttl be n o recreational
swim
on Nov 3 & 4 due to a special
program.
_
people
w o r k s on Tuesday. November 7 at 8
terested please sign
INTERESTED FOLK
or
general interest meeting w i l l be held
in LC 7 on Sunday. Nov 12 at 7 p.m.
Campus
line is Nov. 10-
players
A t t e n d a n c e at this meeting is m a n -
tography. Submit to HU 374. DeadCan we
Judo
business meeting at
meeting w i l l be held on Sunday at 8
becoming president? For a methodo-
All
Resident Assistantships
7:45.
material-prose,
Med. Tech. students and interested
folk: There w i l l be a Medical Teef,
nology
Association
Meeting
T h u r s . Nov. 9 at 8 p.rn in the Phy,
interested in Judo are invited.
t i o n magazine! wants your contribuf i c t i o n and fantasy
be
f l o o r wrestling r o o m of the g y m at
on
end of November 3-5. A l l are invited.
Science
clinic w i l l
2:00.
Medical College, speaking
of
(SUNYA's
Club
terson, Professor of Pediatrics at A l
and the Effect
PARSEC
Judo
held this Sunday, Nov. 5 in the t h i r d
bany
"Children
p o e t r y , criticism, art work and pho
f o r m e d . Call J i m 4 6 3 - 2 5 9 3 .
ron hendren
Young View of Washington
national woman fencer A n n O ' D o n -
of
Help those
1:00
w i l l be former National Foil Cham-
their rights and alternatives by handAlbany
Included w i l l be a f i l m , lecture and
p.m. in the Dance S t u d i o . In view of
i n f o call Dan D u n c a n at 4 8 2 - 2 2 8 0 .
leaflets at the
view/comment/preview/comment/p
Care.
the fact that the gynecologipal care
soring a retreat at D i p p i k i l l the week
information
and
o n Gynecological
combined
Tuesday 7 : 3 0 in CC 3,73. For further
ing out
Lolly
w i t h a fencing clinic in the Dance
meeting
Inform draftees and enlistees
of
d e m o n s t r a t i o n . Sat. Nov. 4 at
Fencers Club w i l l spon-
sor a fencing e x h i b i t i o n
O c t . 27 2 p . m . Ed 120.
Team
The Mo-
Jean Hirsh w i l l be presenting a self-
O n Sunday, Nov. 12 at 1:00 p.m.
Friday
Women:
t o n A v e . Or call 4 6 2 - 5 0 8 3 .
The SUNYA
of
S a n f o r d R o s e n b l u m , Student
Association Lawyer w i l l be available i n
the SA o f f i c e , CC 3 4 6 f r o m 7 p.m.-9
p . m . o n Tuesday n i t e .
University
ther-Daughter
four
Union
Radical P o l i t i c a l Economics)
All
Help
help clinic
more years? A n o p e n discussion presented
for a Free Choice.
save our a b o r t i o n law. ,184. Washing-
(i.HY
I I. :< I ill t
iBsaional
p.,.. i'i
I I . , m l i l Hui
Ihnm.,:.
hull
I Inn
In.,,
(li.inl
•
WUSlOIVUll
lii
lllll I
,,IIIII.ill.-r
I viiliiiiiiuii
A i n ti
I I'IIII v K i i , ' l „ i , i t . Jiidn IJ ,III iii.t
ll s e e m s hard Lo believe thai al
the State University of New
York at Albany t h e r e is no full
lime gynecologist w h o distributes c o n t r a c e p t i v e s Lo t h o s e
women
desiring
preventative
medicines. One of t h e girls in
S U N Y A W o m e n ' s Lib group in
vesfigated the Health Center at
SUNY at New Paltz; she found
that an extensive birth c o n t r o l
program exists full Lime there.
R e p o r t s from transfer s t u d e n t s
from o t h e r s l a t e universities in
tiicaLe that t h e r e are clinics
which o p e r a t e on c a m p u s a n d
are successfully fulfilling w o m e n
s l u d e n t s ' needs
I met with Dr Janet Hood a
few weeks ago Lo discuss the
present infirmary policy Inwards
birth counseling According to
I)i
Hood, Albany larks Ihe
money and space Lo u c c o m m o
date a full time gynecologist.
Then' are o t h e r areas thai need
1 he
money
m o r e in
other
words, o t h e r priorities must be
met first As it sLands now, there
is a d o c tore w h o c o m e s t o t h e
infirmary every Friday for ti few
hours. He h a n d l e s cases which
involve e n d o c r i n e problems and
t u m o r s , lie does m i l give o u t
prescriptions for the pill nor
does he measure for diaphragms
or l U D ' s . Dr. H o o d maintains
t h a t Planned P a r e n t h o o d o n
Lurk Street is available t o the
s t u d e n t s a n d t h a t a birth control
clinic on c a m p u s would only b«
a t o k e n gesture, scratching t h e
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
surface b u t not actually solving
the p r o b l e m of p r e p a r e d n e s s .
1 believe t h a i Planned Parent
h o o d does noL m e e t s t u d e n l
needs as it is not i n t e n d e d to do
so.
Planned P a r e n t h o o d is a
non-profit organization which is
designed to eater to a com
m u n i l y w h o c a n n o t afford birth
counseling services Their hours
are limited and very often there
is a few weeks wait for a p p o i n t
merits, It is not fair Lo Planned
P a r e n t h o o d for the university
c o m m u n i t y to bog t h e m down
with m o r e people than they can
handle Many w o m e n have c o m e
t o W o m e n ' s Lib m e e t i n g s t o
c o m p l a i n a b o u t t h e lack of in
formation and birth c o n t r o l ser
vices which m a n y w o m e n con
t»i.dt*-r i m p o r t a n t to their welfare
As a result, the W o m e n ' s Lib
group is trying Lo organize their
own birth c o n t r o l clinic which
would handle o t h e r
gyneco
logical p r o b l e m s as well Dr
Hood has agreed t o our selling
up a once a week clinic at night
if
the
students
themselves
organize it and the s t u d e n t
p o p u l a t i o n shows a desire for a
service of this t y p e An organizational meeting will be held Lo
s t a r t planning t h e c e n t e r on
Wednesday Nov H. The t i m e and
place will be p o s t e d on c a m p u s
It is urgent that all p e o p l e interested in helping with the clinic a t t e n d . We need trainees for
birth c o n t r o l counseling, s t u d e n t
nurses, and p e o p l e t o h e l p with
actual organization.
Any questions
4f>7-47&9.
call
Barbara.
Raising:
Shouting Won't Help
by Mary G u h i n
SUNYA Gay Alliance
R e p e r c u s s i o n s from t h e " t e a r o o m " c o l u m n have r u n from
official d i s m a y , particularly o n
the part of t h e C o m m u n i t y Relations Office, t o small t o w n uproar. An a c q u a i n t a n c e w h o s e n t
t h e c o l u m n h o m e t o titillate the
folks in a small t o w n near
Rochester reports that due to
the wide circulation it received
t h e r e , the guidance d e p a r t m e n t
of t h e local high s c h o o l is revising its ot nion of SUNYA. R o n nie's m a t rial in general has
caused r e a c t i o n s ranging f r o m
the a m u s e d disbelief of J o n
G u t t m a n to the outrage of a
significant section of the gay
c o m m u n i t y . T h e letter following
the first c o l u m n was only t h e tip
of t h a i reaction. J u s t for the
r e c o r d , we felt primarily t h a t the
c o l u m n was Loo p e r s o n a l ; the
title was pejorative and a lapse
of j u d g m e n t o n t h e part of the
ASP; a n d t h a t t h e c o n t e n t contributed too much to stereo
typical ideas a b o u t Gays. Particularly o b j e c t i o n a b l e was t h e impression conveyed t h a t impersonal sex in public places is an
exclusively Guy
phenomenon.
According t o Laud H u m p h r e y ' s
research,
summarized
in h i s
book, T E A R O O M TRADE, a
significant p o r t i o n of t h o s e m e n
w h o seek o u t this k i n d of sexual
c o n t a c t are n o t m e n with a
h o m o s e x u a l self-concept. Many
are men w h o feel t h e y need a
sexual o u t l e t in a d d i t i o n t o their
marriage; w h o are u n a b l e or unwilling t o invest personal resources in an additional relationship. Our p o i n t h e r e is n o t t o
defend or c o n d e m n a n y o n e , b u t
merely t o clarify.
We
{yawn) decent
homosexuals t h o u g h t t h a t t h e c o l u m n
s h o u l d be e d u c a t i o n a l if it is
going t o exist. Which in all probability m e a n s t h a t it will not be
as m u c h fun to send h o m e t o
your m o t h e r . We s u s p e c t this is
so because the t r u t h a b o u t gay
folks is never so e n t e r t a i n i n g and
c o m f o r t i n g as t h e m y t h s a n d
m i s c o n c e p t i o n s . (See excellent
article in T u e s . A S P 1 0 / 3 1 ) . It's
easy to be certain t h a t you
would n o t hire, h o u s e , or befriend, let a l o n e love, a freak in
Saran Wrap and bug-eye F o s t e r
Grants. It is m u c h h a r d e r t o
k n o w t h a i we are, by a n d large,
indistinguishable from Dick &
J a n e . Many Gays cling t o t h a t
p r o t e c t i v e a n o n y m i t y in fear of
t h e c o n s e q u e n c e s of being them-
selves o p e n l y . T h e p r i c e paid b y
m a n y gays for being " u n a c c e p t a b l e " o n such a basic level is a
devotion
to outward
appearances a n d " d e c e n c y . " We c o u l d
go o n cataloguing t h e effects of
o p p r e s s i o n , b u t t h a t was d o n e
well o n T u e s d a y .
T h e a n t i d o t e , of c o u r s e , is raising t h e level of c o n s c i o u s n e s s
which R o n n i e refers t o . An indispensable c o m p o n e n t of this is
e d u c a t i o n . Most of t h e s t r a i g h t
world, and s o m e of t h e gay, lives
in abysmal i g n o r a n c e a b o u t gays.
We m u s t write, speak, kiss, &
dance in the o p e n . We m u s t t a k e
t h e risks n o w , c o m e o u t and
"carry o n . " In this sense R o n n i e
is right; we m u s t be living, visible
c o n t r a d i c t i o n s of b o t h h e t e r o and
homosexual
stereotypes.
Only c o n t i n u a l e x p o s u r e t o u s ,
going a b o u t the business of o u r
lives happily and c o n s t r u c t i v e l y ,
will break d o w n t h e m a c h i n e r i e s
of oppression. B u t those w h o
live in the closet c a n n o t be
s h o u t e d o u t . As t h e air o u t s i d e
t h e closet grows m o r e b r e a t h able, m o r e folks will join us. As
m o s t of us w h o have m a d e it can
attest, it is a difficult b u t trem e n d o u s l y w o r t h w h i l e step.
jack anderson
Washington Merry-Go-Round
Chill in U.S.-China Relations
Washington—Warming Chinese
-American relations, which weathered t h e b o m b i n g and m i n i n g
of N o r t h V i e t n a m ' s supply lines,
are chilling again.
T h e i n t e r c e p t i o n of Chinese
s h i p m e n t s , according to a CIA
r e p o r t , has soured U.S. relations
with mainland China.
T h e r e p o r t reveals t h a t Chinese
freighters are successfully unloading an astonishing a m o u n t
of supplies at hidden a n c h o r a g e s
up and d o w n the North V i e t n a m
coast.
T h e supplies are u n l o a d e d o n
small barges and b o a t s , which
smuggle the war b o o t y lo s h o r e .
T h e ingenious Chinese, w e have
learned, even use huge waterproof plastic bags t o float supplies ashore.
T o disrupt Hanoi's s u p p l y line,
the U.S. Seventh Fleet has i n t e r
cepLed s o m e Chinese shipping.
But such a c t i o n , a c c o r d i n g Lo
the CIA, has only p r o m p t e d the
Chinese Lo renew their pledges
of s u p p o r t of N o r t h V i e t n a m
O n e strongly w o r d e d message
of s u p p o r t r e p o r t e d l y was signed
by Chairman Mao Ten-Lung himself. Such a rare message from
Mao lias the force of being engraved on the great wall of
China.
T h e CIA report, f u r t h e r m o r e ,
afl'irnih our earlier r e p o r t that
heavy U.S. b o m b i n g has failed Lu
halt the flow of supplies across
t h e n e t w o r k of rail lines, rouds
and trulls Lhat lead into N o r t h
Vietnam.
T h e CIA r e p o r t claims m o r e
than half of the war m a t e r i a l ,
which used to be s h i p p e d t o
North
Vietnam
before
the
b o m b i n g , is getting t h r o u g h .
Even the Air F o r c e , which has a
vested interest in d e m o n s t r a t i n g
its b o m b i n g raids are effective,
acknowledges t h a t m o r e t h a n a
q u a r t e r of t h e former s h i p m e n t s
are reaching N o r t h V i e t n a m .
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
A TEMPORARY LIFT
T h e N i x o n A d m i n i s t r a t i o n is
rushing t o c o m p l e t e a r e p o r t
before election day which s h o w s
t h a t U.S. prestige a b r o a d received
a
big if only
temp o r a r y — I i ft
from
President
Nixon's trips to Peking a n d Moscow
T h e United States I n f o r m a t i o n
Agency is now analyzing t h e
results of surveys c o n d u c t e d last
spring and s u m m e r in 15 countries. A c c o r d i n g t o s o u r c e s inside
USIA, t h e preliminary results
show t h a t U.S. prestige rose in
12 c o u n t r i e s surveyed following
the President's trip t o Peking last
F e b r u a r y . At t h e s a m e time, w e
are told, U.S. prestige d r o p p e d
in J a p a n , Mexico and L e b a n o n .
T h e White H o u s e is e x p e c t e d
to leak favorable sLatistcs from
the surveys before N o v e m b e r 7
But the White House will probably keep u n d e r wraps a n o t h e r
section of the USIA s t u d y which
indicates American prestige is o n
a d o w n w a r d trend.
T h e u p w a r d m o v e genera Led
by the President's historic Lrips
is only ii t e m p o r a r y
phenom e n o n say o u r U S l A sources.
T h e general d o w n w a r d drift of
American prestige abroad can be
expected lo continue into the
I y Hits.
COMPUTERIZED CONGRESS
In the IMst Congress, 436 representatives
w as l e d
190
hours or
five work
weeks
while their n a m e s Were read
slowly aloud Lo record their
vote. With push b u t t o n s on their
desks, t h e c o n g r e s s m e n c o u l d
have v o t e d and been r e c o r d e d in
five s e c o n d s each t i m e .
It now a p p e a r s t h a t Congress
will at last get voting b u t t o n s .
An e l e c t r o n i c v o t i n g s y s t e m hus
been installed a n d H o u s e c o m p u ter czar Frank R y a n says t h e
system will soon be in operation.
However, initial tests of t h e
system have backfired and R e p .
Wayne Hays, D-Ohio, w h o oversees the o p e r a t i o n , has told us he
d o e s n ' t plan to sign any of
R y a n ' s vouchers u n t i l t h e s y s t e m
proves A-Okay.
( T h e idea of installing electronic voting b u t t o n s first a r o s e
in 1869 when T h o m a s Edison
offered Congress his first invention—a telegraphic v o t e recording m a c h i n e . )
THE LANSKY M E M O S W A H S I N G T O N - T h e U.S. J u s tice Dept. secretly furnished Israel with Internal R e v e n u e and
Immigration Service m e m o s t o
help convince Israeli a u t h o r i t i e s
t o d e p o r t aging c r i m e lord, Meyer L a n s k y .
Lansky tried t o t a k e a d v a n t a g e
of Israel's strong refugee l a w ,
which offers a h o m e t o all Jewish refugees. But t h e Israeli authorities decided t h a t t h e law
was nol intended t o p r o t e c t fugitives from justice. Lansky has
been given a o n e - w a y t i c k e t b a c k
t o the United S t a t e s , w h e r e he
faces federal charges.
Among t h e U.S. d o c u m e n t s
supplied to the Israelis was an
Immigration Service m e m o linking Lansky lo . t h e n o t o r i o u s
gangster " B u g s " Siegel.
The m e m o q u o t e s an i n f o r m e r
named Benjamin Baron a s s a y i n g
t h a t Lansky " w a s co-leader with
Bugs Siegel of a gang e m p l o y e d
as ' p r o t e c t i o n i s t ' of a bootlegging c o m b i n e and...was involved
in m u r d e r a n d k i d n a p p i n g . "
A m e m o from t h e Interna)
Revenue Service s u m m e d
up
Lansky's career in these w o r d s :
" L a n s k y ' s history s h o w s t h a t h e
has been a criminal all his a d u l t
life. During t h e e n t i r e t i m e h e
was closely associated, b o t h personally and in his business rackels, w i t h m a n y o f t h e leading
criminals In the U n i t e d S l a t e s . "
PAGE 3A
view/leisure/previewT/eisure/previe leisure/preview/leisure/preview/leis
Movies:
Calendar
WSUA 640
Billy the Kid Was a Punk
b y P a m & Michael R o s e n t h a l
Alternative
Features
Service
This Week:
Election 72:
Friday, Nov. 3
City
Center
Acting
Co:
Richard
If, by s o m e c h a n c e , t h e legend
of Billy t h e Kid o c c u p i e s a cherished place in y o u r h e a r t , y o u
might find Dirty Little Billy an
intriguing p i c t u r e . O t h e r than
flaying
a singularly
dead
horse—the n o b i l i t y of t h e Old
West—it d o e s n o t have m u c h t o
r e c o m m e n d it.
Tuesday, November 7
S t a r t i n g at 8 : 3 0 p m .
Sheri-
dan's " T h e School f o r Scandal" at 8 : 3 0
pm
in the PAC Main Theatre.
WSUA and U n i t e d News S e r v i c e will p r e s e n t
Saturday, Nov. 4
Tickets:
$1.00 w / t a x ; $3.00 general admission.
the
most
complete
coverage
CCGB
Coffeehouse:
featuring
Kirk
City Center A c t i n g Co: Brendan Behan's
Ed-
wards, f o l k guitarist, good entertainment
and free coffee in the CC Assembly Hall
"The
Hostage" at 8:30 pm in the PAC
Main
Theatre.
Tickets:
$1.00
of
and
up
the National,
C o n t e s t s available in this
to
the
minute
State, and
Local
Even
t h e advertising
slogan—"Billy
t h e Kid was a
punk"—is a gross o v e r s t a t e m e n t .
T h e w o r d p u n k implies a surly
s t r e e t a r r o g a n c e t h a t is entirely
missing in Michael J. Pollard's
whiney,
dreary,
hollow-eyed
p o r t r a y a l . I t w o u l d have been
m o r e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of t h e film
t o p r o c l a i m , "Billy t h e Kid was a
clod."
area.
w/tax,
$3.00 general admission.
f r o m 9 - 1 2 pm.
Intercourse:
CCGB
Students for McGovern: present "Once to
Coffeehouse:
featuring
Ken
&
A r t i e , f o l k - r o c k , good entertainment and
Every Man and N a t i o n " , a political satire
free
at 8 pm in LC-23. Donation $.50.
coffee
in
CC Assembly
Hall
from
presents
Benezet
a
interview
this Wednesday
Listeners
9 - 1 2 pm.
live
are
invited
with
night
to
President
at 8 : 3 0
phone
pm.
in
their
We a p p r o a c h e d t h e film with
some trepidation, knowing that
its writers, d i r e c t o r a n d producers were all e m p l o y e d by t h e
same advertising a g e n c y , heretofore famous for p a i n t i n g Braniff
airplanes pink a n d crushing Bens o n & Hedges c i g a r e t t e s against
w i n d o w s a n d b e t w e e n elevator
d o o r s . Faced with this unpreced e n t e d incursion of advertising
i n t o filmmaking, we a n t i c i p a t e d
s o m e t h i n g sinister a n d threatening—pre-fabricated
entertain
q u e s t i o n s at 7 - 6 4 4 3 .
STB Film: " B u l l i t t " at 7:30 and 10 pm in
Live B a n d : " T r e k " in the CC R a t h s k e l l e r
L C - 1 . Admission $.75.
from 9 p m - I a m .
Colonial Quad Board F i l m : " D u c k S o u p "
Henway's:
plus other features at 7:30 and 10:00 pm
dance w i t h " S k i n , " beer, ex-
tras, in the
in LC-2. Free w/Colonial tax; $.50 w / o u t .
Indian Quad u-lounge.
$.50
Discography:
new time
cover charge.
.Sunday night
Capital District Gay Dance: sponsored by
the
Sunday, Nov.5
SUNYA
Gay
Alliance, al
9 pm
Crossword Contest Rules
11:15
This week:
in
m e n t with an insidious h o l d over
the lower reaches of t h e imagination.
As it t u r n s o u t , t h e film c o u l d
have d e s p e r a t e l y used s o m e of
the c o m p u l s i v e , a t t e n t i o n - g e t t i n g
energy t h a t is p r e s e n t l y going
into t h e promotional campaign,
c o m p l e t e with Billy t h e Kid butt o n s a n d hats. Dirty Little
Billy
is a long, w a n d e r i n g , painfully
a m a t e u r i s h film, filled with respect for t h e film-as-art, a n d a
t o u c h i n g e n t h u s i a s m for s o m e
a d o l e s c e n t ideal of " r e a l i s m , " as
though t h e a u t h o r s h a d b u t recently discovered t h a t t h e Old
West was a brutal, dismal place,
and c a n n o t restrain their eagerness t o share t h e exciting news
It m i g h t have been possible t o
develop a physical style t o suggest t h e grinding d e a d e n i n g tedium of t o w n life in t h e West; b u t
the ad-agency habit of p o s t c a r d
pictorialism proved t o o s t r o n g t o
break. Everything glistens all the
time. Mud shines steel-blue o n
people's foreheads; t h e stained
and t a t t e r e d walls are s o eyec a t c h i n g as t o .suggest a lucrative
line of s t a i n - a n d - t a t t e r wall-paper. Each rise a n d set of t h e sun
is a t t e n d e d with such mechanical
grandeur that you e x p e c t a n e w
C a m a r o t o appear over t h e horizon at a n y m i n u t e .
T h e plot is p r e t t y m i n i m a l ,
Traffic
Channing Hall (across from Draper Hall).
Donation $1.50 (buffet included).
UCB
Concert:
Dawson
the
Mary
Travers
and
Jim
STB F i l m : " B u l l i t t " at 7:30 and 10 pm in
in a b l a n k e t c o n c e r t , at 9 pm in
Gym.
Tickets:
$2.50
w/
$5.00 w/out.
University
Singers:
Colonial Quad Board F i l m : " D u c k S o u p "
lirsl
performance
plus other features at 7:30 and 10 pm in
ol
LC-2.
the season, c o n d u c t e d by T a m a r a B r o o k s
Morning Show:
Black Sabbath Bombs
Free g i v e a w a y s every m o r n i n g !
L C - I . Admission $.75.
tax & ID;
Records:
Start y o u r d a y r i g h t ! Listen t o W S U A
s t a r t i n g at 6 : 0 0 a m .
by Greg Shaw
Alternative
Featur,
Free w / Colonial t a x ; $.50 w / o u t .
Sports Schedule:
at 8 : 3 0 pm in the PAC Recital Hall.
S a t u r d a y , N o v e m b e r 4 at 1:()() pm
B a x t e r ' s Cafe: f e a t u r i n g
Hellstrom
" I l e a l R a y " the
Experimental
Arts
Dada art and e n v i r o n m e n t a l
Like G r a n d F u n k ' s
I'hnentx,
Much Sabbath
Vol I (WB BS
2 6 0 2 ) in a big d i s a p p o i n t m e n t . It
follows their best a l b u m ever,
Mauler of Hindity, which is o n e
of the finest heavy metal a l b u m s
e x t a n t C o m e t o think of it, t h e
same c o m p a r i s o n can be made
with G r a n d Funk a n d
their
Albany vs. Siena
Troupe,
t h e a t r e at 9
Listen t o ;ill the a c t i o n over W S U A .
p m , 8 1 0 Madison Avenue ( b e t w e e n O n t a -
Live coverage begins at I : 2 5 p m .
rio and Quail). Free!
previous
album,
/•.
1'lunhun
Funk.
What's t h e m a i l e r with
these old pros, are they gelling
too old? Passing s t r a n g e , I'd call
it.
"Wheels of C o n f u s i o n " begins
on a riff so tired y o u can't
believe they i n t e n d e d t o m a k e
an 8 m i n u t e s o n g of it, a n d a
lapse i n t o d o u b l e t e m p o near the
middle d o e s n ' t help m u c h (live
me t w o m i n u t e s of Uriah l l e e p ' s
" E a s y Living" over this any day
" T o m o r r o w ' s D r e a m " hah o n e
good c h o r d , a n d s t r e t c h e s it a
b o u t ;iH far as it'll go. If y o u can
bear t o hear y e t a n o t h e r singer
w a i l , " I ' m going t h r o u g h changes" as violins weep a n d pianos
pi ink, y o u might like tin; next
song, if you never h e a r d S t o r k
hausun, you might even be im
pressed by the pointless s y n t l u '
NU-er echoes of " F x " " S u p e r
n a u t " proves t o IM< the side's
salvation one of t h e few really
spirited outings on Ibe a l b u m
Movie Timetable
Off Campus
On Campus
Hellman (459 5300;
IFG
Towne
(783-5539)
Double Feature
Double Feature
Fox Colonie (459-!020)
Double Feature
"Fantasia"
Cine 1234 (450 81.
"Elvis on Tour
Fri&Sat:
7 : 3 0 , ') In
"Mr. Hulot's H o l i d a y "
Fri&Sat: 7 : 1 5 , 9 : 3 0
"Prime C u t "
"Busy Bodies"
Sat M a t i n e e : 2 : 0 0
FricVSat: 6 : 4 5 , 1 0 : 0 0
Fri&Sat: 6: 15, c ; ; 4 5
"War
"Love Doctors"
Know About
l r l A S . l l : 8:011
F r i & S a t : 7 : 1 5 , 9 : IS
"School Girls"
" E v e r y t h i n g You Wanii
Fri: 7 : 1 5 , 9 : 4 5 in LC 18
Colonie Center (4 59 2170)
B e t w e e n M e n cV
Women"
Fri&Sat: 8 : 2 0
Tower East
Circle Twin (785 3388)
"Funny Girl"
F r i & S a t : 6:4 5, 9 : 2 0
"Soul to Sou!"
Cinema / (785 1625)
F r i & S a t : 7. 50, 9 : 3 0 in LC 7
"Ryan's Daughter"
SUNYA Cinema
MadiSOn
(489 5431)
Double Feelurfl
" 2 0 0 1 ; Space O d y s s e y "
"Reefer
Madness"
Fri&Sat:
8:00
Delaware (462 4714)
Fri&Sat:
Fri&Sat:
8:00
Tour"
Fri&Sat: 7: to
"Cornucopia"
on side i w o
comes in s e c o n d , a n d " S n o w
b l i n d " a i n ' t b a d , if characterless
For bud you gotta wait
til
" L a y u n a S u n r i s e , " in which the
group's s t a n d a r d o n e c h o r d up
proaeh t o music it. translated
into harps and flamenco guitar
What makes t h e m think we waul
to hear this kind of slusbV Talk
a b o u t artistic h u b r i s ! " S t . Vitus'
Double Fealuiu
Double Feature
"Blvis o n
8:00
" B o h & C a r o l , Ted A Aln
Fri&Sat: 7:15
(no s c h e d u l e available)
in
LC-18
PAGE 4A
"Godfather"
"Fiddler on the R o o f
Fri&Sat: 7:00, 9:20
" M a r t i a n Space P a r t y "
S a t : 7 : 0 0 , 9 : 0 0 , 1 1:00
Sex'
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
"Emergency Ward"
"Fat
Fri&Sat: 9 : 1 5
Fri&Sat:
City"
9:15
D a n c e " is an a p t followup t o a
song like t h a t , a n d it's a l m o s t
refreshing until o n e realizes h o w
essentially boring il is in its o w n
right. But. y o u m u s t leave ' e m
smiling, and t h a t ' s what they d o
with " U n d e r t h e S u n . " It goes
t h r o u g h a few sections, most of
I hem interesting, and also a
d r u m solo
O k a y , so the album isn't all
that bad But it's n o t u p t o
Black S a b b a t h ' s s t a n d a r d , n o r
does 11 sound like the prime
work of a heavy metal g r o u p In
fact, 11 their next a l b u m is as
good
as I heir last
(Machine
Head),
I have a feeling Deep
Purple will wrest that title away
from them. I know a bit of
people w h o still say, "'•Machine
Head"
when I ask what new
albums t h e y ' r e listening t o , des
pile the fact il c a m e o u t almost
a year ago
Warner Bros has n o w acquired
the rights lo Deep Purple's first
three albums, on the defunct
T e t r a g r a m m a t o n label, a n d is
sued their highlights in a 2- LP
set called l*urple Pannages (WB
2SL 204*1 ), with liner notes
even T h e group was less diseip
lined and m o r e under t h e in flu
i-nce of p o p )a/./. back then, bul
they had their m o m e n t s " H u s h '
was a fun single, and s o m e of
these o t h e r s like " H a r d R o a d "
and " T h e S h i e l d " bear rediscov
ery T h e r e ' s also s o m e interest to
their
versions of
"Kentucky
W o m a n " (yes, tin- Neil Diamond
song) and " H e y . h m " (yes, the
folk r m k classic )
F o r songs like this, Deep Pur
pie was once considered prae
lically a h u h h l e g u m g r o u p , be
beve it or not But then w h o
a m o n g us can claim he didn't
m a k e a few wrong j u d g e m e n t s in
11)687
FRI DA'
3,1972
solutions
Student
m o s t p r o b a b l y because of s o m e
a m b i t i o n t h a t this film avoid t h e
"sterotyped" and the "obvious."
It d o e s . V e r y little is o b v i o u s
e x c e p t t h a t Billy B o n n e y r u n s
away f r o m his p a r e n t s ' h o m e stead a n d m o v e s in w i t h Berle
and G o l d i e , t o w n w h o r e a n d
gambler. E x a c t l y why h e d o e s
so, or w h y a n y b o d y does anything, is n o t s o o b v i o u s , a n d n o t
even very clear.
Press
N a m e , a d d r e s s , p h o n e n u m b e r , a n d social s e c u r i t y
num-
solutions
liquor
o
at
random
tips).
Dinners
must
the Albany
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II A a
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R ii ? I h
B V b
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three
be
claimed
S t u d e n t Press is
S o r r y , o n l y o n e e n t r y per p e r s o n will b e a c c e p t e d .
ASP Crossword Puzzle
2
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5. P o i s o n o u s Arachnid
11. R u s s i a n Mountain Range
it. Of t h e Underworld Goda
16. O r i e n t a l Sounder
17. King of Judea
11). RuBBlan Name
20. Church O f f i c i a l
22. A f r i c a n T r e e
2lt. Exist
25. European King
27. Ever and
29. Burmese Language
30. MuBlcal I n s t r u m e n t
y>. Roguish Poraona
36. Peer G y n t ' a Mother
17. Chose
39. S p a n i s h P r l a n d
r*o. S t r i k e - b r e a k e r
'12. Danube T r i b u t a r y
1*1*. I o l a n d Country ( p o e t , J
Incognita
15.
1*7. European Gold Coin
Scottish
Digit
W.
50. Bug
52. Dying
5<>. Bone
55. Tape Recorder Brand
57. Mother of the Oods
5H. Drink of Liquor
60.
Klck
62.
66. Inferior Substitute
60. Before Long
70. Set of Rooma
7 1 . Taj Mahal Site
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No. 8 By EDWARD JULIUS
r A t A x
until
eligible t o w i n .
&
L I
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aauaLi
uauaii
U S u K 1 0 u s
ciaarju
and
N o o n e w o r k i n g o n or for
(Solution lo lust week's pilule)
*
drawn
w i t h i n t w o w e e k s of n o t i f i c a t i o n .
Sieve Marvin
11
A
1
will b e
for t w o at t h e P a t r o o n R o o m in t h e C a m p u s C e n t e r ( n o t
including
Ciary M a r t i n u s
B
L
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T
Monday,
Albany
E a c h o f t h e t h r e e w i n n e r s will b e e n t i t l e d t o a free d i n n e r
Alan Balkin
H
by
the
c o r r e c t s o l u t i o n s have b e e n c h o s e n .
October 27, 1972
0 T ii h Q
V E A
H
8 S
A T
D A W
II
s U R A
El il 1 P 0 D
M A I II B N
S
s
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s A ulo M IS
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to
noon
Puzzle
Contest Winners
A P
r 0
?. Y
s 8
(CC
submitted
12
K-
1
office
be
ber must appear on your solution.
Next t o p a t e n t insincerity, t h e
m o s t d a m a g i n g thing o n e can
bring t o a film project is t h e
sincere desire t o be an Artist,
unaccompanied by a n y t h i n g in
particular t o say. With its a c h i n g
purtiy of i n t e n t i o n , r e m i n i s c e n t
of highschool literary magazines,
and o v e r w h e l m e d by a million
dollar plus budget, Dirty
Utile
Hilly is a p u n k movie
s T H A I T
K ir A a L
must
following t h e Friday that the puzzle a p p e a r s .
We s p e n d t h e w h o l e t i m e watching Billy h a n g a r o u n d t h e saloon, a l t e r n a t e l y bitching, sulking, a n d l o o k i n g pre-occupied by
inner struggle, while we wait for
him t o s t a r t d o i n g a n y t h i n g ,
even killing p e o p l e , if t h a t is t h e
m o s t i n t e r e s t i n g thing he c a n
c o m e u p w i t h . When Billy does
m a k e his first kills, a n d s o m e thing a p p r o a c h i n g a gleam c r e e p s
i n t o his eyes, t h e film seems
a b o u t ready t o get u n d e r w a y ,
just in t i m e for t h e closing credits.
As t h e film m e a n d e r e d along,
the o n l y thing t h a t engaged o u r
a t t e n t i o n was w a t c h i n g Pollard,
already well i n t o his thirties,
a t t e m p t t o p o r t r a y Billy a t age
16 ( r e m e m b e r t h a t Billy t h e Kid
died w h e n he was 21 ), T h a t
Pollard has always been t y p e d
for juvenile roles because of his
persistent baby fat a n d simplem i n d e d facial expression c a n be
seen as a reflection of the cult u r e ' s hostility t o w a r d s adolescents. Pollard's a t t e m p t t o mime
youthful
gangliness a n d confusion
winds u p l o o k i n g like
mental r e t a r d a t i o n if n o t outright decay, T h e effect is s o
i n c o n g r u o u s that it is hard t o
shake t h e impression l h a t Billy is
older t h a n a n y o n e else in t h e
east, including his parents.
ALBANY STUDENT
MEMBER
Puzzle
bj
1tt
l-
DOWN
1. Pita of Intoxication
2. Bitter Drug
3. S h o r t - t a i l e d Cat
k. C i r c u s
5- L i q u o r
Cuevara
6.
7. O t h o n Sp.
8 . "The Bad Seed"
v . I m a g i n a r y Small Town
10. Paahionable
11. New Zealand Muttonblrd
12. Female Camel
15. Nationality of 25-acrose
19. Thought Out
2 1 . Potpourri
Lisa
23.
26. Stinking
28. Appellation
30. Portificationa
31. Christian Holiday
32.
33.
35.
It
1*3.
'.6.
48.
51.
53.
56.
Toothed Wheels
Watery Blood
Love of Art
Room Setup
Harte
North Carolinians
Served Well
Row of Seata
Ankle Bone
Columnur Rock
Woo
59.
61.
Milne C h a r a c t e r
Long Por
To One S i d e
Jogging Quit
65.
„,
Grey
Military Person
Sailor
81st Element
u
67.
69.
72,
PAGI;
view/arts/preview/arts/preview/arts
Speculum Musicae
"Speculum Musicae," a new
group of artists whose repertoire
ranges from the great "dassic"
works of the early 1900's -- such
as Stravinsky's "L'Histoire du
Soldat" and "Pierrot Lunaire"
of Schoenberg -- to newly commissioned works, are performing
Thursday, November 9, 8:30
P.M. in the Main Theatre, Performing Arts Center, State University of New York at Albany.
Admission is $3. Box office is
open Monday through Friday,
11 A.M. until 4 P.M.; telephone
reservations accepted, (518)
457-8606.
To Speculum Musicae (a musical mirror), the new works they
perform are a natural evolution
from the earlier works of the
century and before, and they
believe that through! increased
"hearings, this music will come to
be as meaningful to audiences as
the well-known 18th and 19th
Century repertoire. The group
was founded in 1971 and has
performed at the Public Theatre
in New York, the Dartmouth
Festival of the Arts, the Berkshire Festival, Tanglewood,
Massachusetts, and at Lincoln
Center for the Performing Arts.
The concert is sponsored by
Music Council, the SUNYA student organization.
A Tribute to the Ballet Maya Capitol Hill Concert
by Elizabeth Jones
An offering was made to the
sun god Sunday afternoon in the
Arena Theater of the PAC. Performing dances of the Yucatan
both Pre-Columbian and modern, the Ballet Mayan of Ruben
Duarte presented an interesting
and entertaining program.
The first half of the performance was a complete Mayan
sacrificial ritual including brilliantly bedecked priests, priestesses, a slave, and a sacrifice .
The dancers performed the ritual
in red-tinted darkness, stepping
rhythmically lo drums and ankle
bells. The costumes were quite
spectacular; a colorful contrast
to the dark theater-in-the-round.
Suspense held the air as the
dancers performed the rites with
tight control and much dramatic
concentration. Creatly affective
was the Fire Dance, an offering
lo the "sacrificial alter" by a
soloist of the company bearing a
flaming vessel, donning a fiery
crown. Placing the vessel on the
floor to the mesmeric beat of
drums, lhe dancer proceeded to
dip his feet and hands into the
flames lo the fascination of the
audience. The company derived
these ritual dances from thorough research of Mayan civilization. The choreography was conceived primarily from the study
of modern Yucatan Indians who
have retained much of the PreColumbian Mayan culture.
There were a few flaws in this
otherwise excellent example of
anthropological enter! linment:
the use of a piano in the "ceremonial entrance to the temple"
was distressing, though understandable as a cultural smoother
for the audience. Also, certain
theatrical effects such as the
introduction of a romantic story
line to the ritual was unnecessary, though again, obviously
contrived for wider audience
appeal.
tTBBIETHEEEP
The second half of the program devoted to the dances and
songs of the Yucatan Region was
veiy different and equally entertaining. It was interesting to
note that the art of dance underwent the essential change from
oppressively religious form to an
expression of |oy, A warm cafe
atmosphere was immediately established in this pail as Pastor
Cervera serenaded lite audience
Willi some pleasing Mexican
ballades. The humorous antics of
lhe following Iwo singers created
a lelaxed an in lire Aiena
I heater. The |(>kes told in Spanish were somehow undeislood
and appiccialeil by .ill Allei
*''ine g'Mid-naiiiK'd nuisic, lire
il.nkfr icIuirieU with v.ui.ii urns
HI lhe Jumna lire lulk dance ol
Yucatan. Diessed in nopical
while and embioideicil flowers,
lhe dancers illustrated lhe Spanish llamenco influence "I ilns
local dance with energy and enthusiasm.
Dance to Atom Heart Mother
This Weekend-Julliard Theater
by Bill Brina
On-Campus: the Julliard
Theater Performances are supposed to be sold out but you
might still be able to get tickets
(returns) if you trv p "- .' lo
Soul, the excellent black music
flick, is playing at Tower East
(check out K. Daniel's review in
this issue), and UCB will present
Jim Dawson and Mary Trovers in
the Gym Sunday at 9 PM tickets are $2.50 with tax and
$5.00 without. Mary Travers is,
of course, the ex- of Peter, Paul,
and Mary. Jim Dawson migh t
not be as well known but he
should be; he's a pleasant, mel-
//
low, engaging performer who
was extremely well received in
his last area appearance (at
Union last month).
Downtown: Uncle Ray's will
resound the sounds of Coalition
this weekend. If you weren't
around the last time they were
in this neck of the woods you
really missed something. A little
more exposure and some better
original material and this band
could easily break through into
the big time -• two lead guitarists, two drummers, a bassist and
an organist supply a full, churning sound more than a bit reminiscent of the Allmans. Catch
them
before they become
Soul-to-Soul"
by Kevin Daniels
When viewing a movie of a concerl, most often the twenty dollar
cameras fail to capture the excitement of the audience and at the
same time most of the artist's performance. A classic example of litis
failure (and the biggest celluloid bomb 1 have ever seen) was the
"concerl for Bangladesh," which isn't surprising for the concert
itself was extremely boring. But now we have a film to stand side by
side in quality lo the classic "Monterey Pop." Yes, now we have
"Soul to Soul," a film m a d e of several American recording whileperforming on lour in Ghana.
"Soul to Soul" is an exquisite exhibition that features Ike and
Tina Turner, Wilson Pickett, Santana (with Willie Bobo on
lymbales), Roberta Flack, Eddie Harris & U s McCann, the Staple
Singers, the Voices of liast Harlem and many native dancers and
drummers, all in excellent form.
The intermingling of the cultural aspects of Ghana wilh American
performers on stage and off was extremely well done. Segments of
the film feature shots of the native Ghamans in the marketplaces, on
the ocean shore and even in old slave castles as Roberta flack sings
in the background. It's extremely effective.
Ike & Tina & the Ikettes alone are well worth the price of
admission as they sing the title song as the film opens and at the
close. Their set within the movie was an excellent showcasing of Ike
& Tina's blues roots. Pickett is poweiful, driving everyone in an
audience of thousands to their feel dancing, and Saniana's set
blended the feverishly staccato drumming of the bund itself with the
drumming of many members of the audience.
The beauty ov the Plains, the cities, the bush and the ocean blend
with the music. The contrasts of nature in Ghana luirn a peilecl
backdrop for some brilliant performances, which will be enhanced in
the showings by a 500 watt sound system.
"Soul lo Soul" will be featured by Tower Last Cinema lonilc
(Friday) and tomorrow night. It's a line alternative to another
weekend of the blahs,
No ASP Tuesday
There will be no edition of the Albany Student
Press this coming Tuesday. Instead the ASI' will
include complete election returns.
famous.
The 8th-Step will present Jay
and Lyn Ungar in a program of
footstompin' hand-clappin' music that varies from country to
folk and includes some of their
own original compositions. They
share vocals and perform quite
well on fiddle, mandolin, guitar,
harmonic, Jew's harp and assorted oddities. Once with "cat
Mother" and now with the "Putnam County String Band,"
they've performed at many folk
festivals and coffee houses
throughout the country.
At Siena: "The Cage," a play
written, directed, and performed
by former inmates about inmates, will be presented by ex
Beau B r u m m e l
(remember
them?) Sal Valentino & featuring four winsome female singers,
will open the show Saturday nite
for It's A Beautiful Day. IABD
features David LaFlamme on
vocals and electric violin, hacked
by guitar, bass, keyboards, and
multiple percussion to create an
effect that one critic (not this
one) compared to "pressed roses
in a book of Tennyson poems."
Not exactly your average rock
and roll band, anyway. The
show's in Gibbons at 8:00 on
Saturday; tickets at the door and
the price is $3.50 for outsiders.
In a rare fusion of movement
and music, SUNY/ALBANY's
Dance Council will present a
piece entitled "Dance to the
Atom Heart Mother" on November lOandll in the laboratory
Theatre, Performing Arts Center.
Admission to any of the two
shows each night at 7:30 p.m.
and 9 p.m. is free.
Based on the beautiful suite by
Pink Floyd, "Dance to the Atom
Heart Mother" is an exercise in
experimental
story-telling
methods. Dancers join musicians
in an effort to express waht
might be the consequences of
people not understanding one
another.
The piece is choreographed by
Maude Baum and directed by
Stephen Aminoff.
Poet Gary Snyder to Speak Here
Gary Snyder, author of four volumes of poetry and a major force
in the creation of the New American Poetry, will be at SUNYA, to
read from his works. The event, sponsored by the English department faculty-student Events Committee, is scheduled for this
Tuesday, November 7 (Election Night), at 8:00 p.m. in LC 1.
Snyder is one of the original members of the Beat Generation,
that group of iconoclastic American writers including Alan Ginsberg,
Jack Kerouac, Gregory Corso el al, who shook up the stuffy literary
scene of the 1950's; coming on strong with a spontanuous life style
and an insistent apocalyptic rhetoric. Snyder appears, under the
name of Japhy Ryder, as a Bodhisattva and wilderness saint in
Kerouac's novel The Dharrna Burns.
In recent years, he has emerged as one of the important talents
generated in the Beat movement. His volumes of poetry include
Riprap, Myths and Texts, The finch Country, and Regarding Wave,
He has also published a volume of essays, Earth House Hold.
A graduate of Reed College, Snyder now lives and writes in a
commune in Nevada City, California. He has spent some time in a
Zen monastary; is deeply versed in American Indian mythology.
Of his work he says: "As a poet, I hold the most archaic values on
earth. They go back to the late Paleolithic; the fertility of the soil,
the magic of animals, the power-vision in solitude, the terrifying
initiation and rebirth, the love and ecstasy <>f the dance, the
common work of Lhe tribe.
On lhe whole, lhe liallel
Mayan ol Ruben Duaile presented an iiiiiisu.il .irnl enjoyable
nM>e.iam. The sun god was
pi caset .
lundccl by si tiilriil l.i.\
|f u u u
"TJ
rk .ii .ilbany
U V U
Nov. 3 LC 18 7:15 & 9:45
photograph by phll cantor
from the conditions in Europe
of wars and armed conllicls as
during World War I, a self-proclaimed Illegitimate offspring of
a civilization which only a series
its legitimate children,
Dada is Ileal Kay al Baxter's
Cafe. Free.
THE LOVE GAME pi us
y
TOWED I N A HOLE
Nov. 10 LC 25-7:15 & 9:45
THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT plus
all films $.25 w/tux
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
Laurel & H a r d i n
Laurel & Hardy in THE MUSIC BOX
Nov.17 LC 18-7:15 & 9:45
c | j p anfj s a v e
Huiiip!uc\
TComing
H ^ ' B I G mS Decembei
U E P ' i THH
Al KR AN o'uiTN
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Sealer
(Cobble 1 . .
SOl'l
., Mil . ! i | , ;
of
Ol
.
the l!»."iil's posl
" i 12 J is
• i.l.tllOMS,
. I'.sling recomes out
hop years,
I
j
I
I
I
- .i Ver\ i n
* o * • • • • • * •
I
MR. HULOT'S HOLIDAY plus: Laurel & Hardy in BUSY BODIES
On the nearly opposite end of
the pole is the Modern Jazz
Quartet's The Leuendary Profile
(Atlantic HI) lii-'ili). This group
has reached a peak in terms of
quiet chamber jazz. Most of the
excitement is cerebral rather
than emotional, although John
Lewis's feigned funk is mildly
attractive. Milt Jackson is the
real hero here, where he is more
inventive than lie ha* been in
many years with the MJQ. His
soft, bluesy vibraphone litis in
:d.1 . oundj •Lewis's piano line
in a most (-movable \ishion.
Bassist Percy Ib-.iili .tin! percus
sionist (Winie I .>\ .H e, as al
ways, vei \ ,ii(. ui v.
Jimim
lb a.
. v Caf)
and is thoioughh educated in
the vocabulary of Charlie Parker.
Much the same can hi* said of
ex-Gillespie ite pianist Kenny
Barren, bassist Bob Ctanshaw,
and Jimmy's brother Teetie on
drums, Mtume, Jimmy's son, is
the conga drummer, and probably the mam -source of inspiration on the album since it its an
attempt to work in the rock
element Jimmy Heath's tenor
playing is as g<>i u> ' 'lis as ever,
bul bh soprano, and flute sutlers
from a scarcity of ideas and a
ripleii emu rol over
lack ol
.•ui i hi [\\v whole
the inslriimei)
I
MODERN COMEDY
capable of doing sonic pretty
interesting Ihings in a Sonny
Rollins vein.
W i l l i Some \er",
M i l l s al 1 l i l i e s , l b -
WHAT'S SO FUNNY?
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
PAGE 6A
ri iru u if u u u o
_ _
s t a i r itmversil v '>! in w
Dadaists to Play at Baxter's
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
"The Jozz Set"
h\ Arli'iu Scheurer
I'.vrn ,is jazz, blues, and rock
,ne coming together each hits
been able lo maintain its own
identity while being influenced
by other forms. Dave Hubbard's
new album called simply David
Hubbard (Mainstream .117) is a
good example ol' this. The
rhythm section sticks to a pretty
repetitive nick and soul rhythms
while Dave Hubbard plays some
very hot tenor above it. He is a
young eat. and has a lot of
learning lo do, but once he
begins to feel more secure with
ould be
instrument he
L'U.
~n u u t i u u
Ileal Hay. the Uadislic presenlalion of the llellstorm Lxperimental Arls Troupe, will be at
liaxler's Cafe, H|0 Madison
Avenue (between Ontario and
Quail) Sunday night, November
5, al 'I P'M'. The Troupe, consisting of 7 people, employs
poetry, music, dance, drama,
cinema, etc.; in their own words,
"whatever it lakes to gel the
point across." The point is
Uada: insanity in response to lhe
sanity which accepts the everyday devestation of human lives
and psyches, anti-Art In attack
on the techniques and praetiouers of the traditional Art
w h i c h hides behind idyllic
visions of reality. Dada was born
An evening of choral works by Ralph Vaughan Williams will open
the twentieth season of the Capitol Hill Choral Society. The concert
will be held at Chancellors Hall on Friday night, November 3, at 8
p.m.
Judson Rand, founder and director, announced that the following
works would be performed by the chorus and guest soloists:
The "Mass in G Minor"—an A Cappella work with four soloists;
"Five Myst.:cal Songs"—with chorus and baritone soloist;
"A Song of Thanksgiving"—with chorus, guest children's chorus,
soprano soloist, and narrator;
"The Lark Ascending"—with guest violinist and piano.
Guest soloists for the concert are:
Anne-Margaret Turner, soprano, who is appearing for the first time
with the Choral Society. She is affiliated with the Capital Artists
Resident Opera Company and is soloist at the First Church of Christ
Scientist at Delmar.
Marjory Thomas Fuller, alto, who last appeared with the Choral
Society in a 1969 performance of the Mozart "Manzoni Requiem."
She is a vocal professor at SUNYA.
Myron Taylor, tenor, is an active member of the Choral Society
and was tenor soloist at the 1969 Mozart concert. He is an associate
professor of English at SUNYA.
Gary Aldrich, baritone, is a former member of the Choral Society
and has been guest soloist in several concerts.
Leo Mahigian, violin, is concertmaster of the Albany Symphony
Orchestra and the Oratorio Orchestra that performs with the Choral
Society at some of its concerts. He is string teacher in the
Guilderland School District.
Jane Hallenbeck, piano, is accompanist for the Choral Society.
Harlan Wilbert, narrator, is an active member of the Choral Society
and has been active as an actor and director with various area theater
groups including the Albany Civic Theater, the Slingerlands Players,
the Latham Players, and the Episcopal Actors Guild.
The children's chorus was prepared by Patricia Randall, a member
of the Choral Society.
Tickets for the concert will be available at the door the night of
the concert adults $.'1.00; students $1.50. The concert will be
followed by a Dutch treat party at Lhe Ambassador for the chorus
and ull members of the audience that wish to join them.
I
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1
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*
• •••*••••*•*
LARGE NATIONAL I
( OMPANY SEEKS ONE •
ARI A REPRESENTA- •
LIVE SA1 ARY OPEN. I
S E N I O R OR POST- J
•
GRADUATE STUDENT J
PREFERRED.
I
CONTACT ROBERT •
! •
j I WENGER- 489-4300
PAGE 7A
•;
i'B
il
•i; I
;^r\7flN-72l
Face Lift for House?
«s»°
take an
ECONOMY TRIP
in sound!
I
rri5eoTF6TfeiNTHe
FM FRONT END FOR
TOP SENSITIVITY AND
SELECTIVITY.
SO HAVE I.
LET'S TURN
OFF THE
LIGHTS.
IT HAS AN EXTRA WIDE
TUNING DIAL WITH AN
OVERSIZE TUNING METER.
W A S H I N G T O N AP - The
Nov. 7 elections promise the
H o u s e a n e w l o o k if n o t an
ideological shift: y o u n g e r , possibly 100 new faces, m o r e Rep u b l i c a n s a n d several new blacks
and w o m e n .
R e p o r t s from Associated Press
n e w s m e n across t h e c o u n t r y also
s h o w t h e n e w 18 year old college v o t e is a factor in at least six
H o u s e races.
Strategists for b o t h parties
agree t h e R e p u b l i c a n s will pick
u p n e w seats, t h e R e p u b l i c a n s
c o u n t i n g on a net gain of 26s h o r l of the 41 needed to take
H o u s e c o n t r o l away from t h e
Democrats.
D e m o c r a t s figure the Republic a n s will gain 12 t o 15 m o r e
seats unless u landslide vote for
President Nixon carries in more
o n his coatlails.
R e p u b l i c a n s e x p e c t to win 1;
new seats i n the Sou th an ri
strengthen
the
RepublicanSouthern
Democrat
coalition
t h a t guides H o u s e action on such
ideological
issues as defense,
government
spending,
special
p r o g r a m s and busing.
The AP newsmen report t w o
black w o m e n a p p e a r t o have
elections
cinched.
They
are
Y v o n n e Brathwaite Burke, DCalif., co-chairman of t h e Democratic National C o n v e n t i o n , and
si ale Sen. Barbara J o r d a n , D
Tex
The only o t h e r w o m a n with
that g o o d a position o u t of 59
running is Elizabeth H o l U m a n ,
D-N.Y., w h o u n s e a t e d Judiciary
C h a i r m a n Emanuel Celler, dean
of t h e H o u s e , in the p r i m a r y .
W o m e n also have a c h a n c e of
w i n n i n g new seats in Maryland
and C o l o r a d o .
T w o o t h e r blacks given a
c h a n c e of winning o u t of t h e 3 9
r u n n i n g are t h e Rev. A n d r e w J.
Y o u n g of Atlanta, Ga., a n d S t a t e
S e n . J . O . Pattersor Jr., of Memphis T e n n .
T h e AP newsmen report the
i m p a c t of the new 18 year old
college vote is largely u n m e a s u r e d even by c a n d i d a t e s w h o
pin their h o p e s or fears o n it.
O n e q u e s t i o n is w h e t h e r stud e n t s will vote in college t o w n s
or back h o m e .
C a n d i d a t e s w h o could be h u r t
by a large s t u d e n t t u r n o u t include Fred Schwengel, Jr.-Iowa,
C harles
E. C h a m b e r l a i n ,
RMich., Marvin L. Esch, R-Mich.,
J o h n M. Z w a e h , R-Minn., Earl F.
L a n d g r e b e , K - l n c , and J o h n T.
Myers, R-Inc.
The Constitution
precludes
a n y o n e u n d e r 2 5 from running
for t h e H o u s e b u t nearly a d o z e n
c a n d i d a t e s are under 110.
T h e p r o s p e c t of as m a n y as
1UU new faces in the 135 member house doesn't mean voters
w a n t t o t h r o w that many o u t .
S o m e 57 of t h e new m e m b e r s
will replace senior c o n g r e s s m e n
n o t running for re-election because »f heavy r e t i r e m e n t s , redistricting a n d primary defeat.
B e y o n d the 57 d r o p o u t s ,
congressional
elections
every
t w o years normally bring in -10
t o 50 new m e m b e r s .
MASI.
How the vote wont four years ago .
by G u y l o r d Shaw
Associated Press Wriler
W a s h i n g t o n AP
President
Nixon said T h u r s d a y night " w e
are ready to c o n c l u d e " a Vietnam peace s e t t l e m e n t but " w e
are n o t going to allow an election deadline to force us into an
a g r e e m e n t which would be only
a t e m p o r u r y truce and n o t a
lasting p e a c e . "
" W e have reached a substantial agreement on most of the
s e t t l e m e n t , " Nixon said. " T h e
s e t t l e m e n t we are ready to conclude would accomplish
the
basic o b j e c t i v e s " he p r e s e n t e d
on May H:
I
A return of all prisoners of
war, " a ceasefire t h r o u g h o u t Ind o c h i n a " and the nghl of t h e
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•H
I PULLED
OUT THE
PLUG!
Courtesy of Knickerbocker News Union Star
Nixon Addresses The Nation
In his first nationally televised
political b r o a d c a s t of t h e c a m paign, Nixon declined " w e are
going trmtpn t h e agreement when
the a g r e e m e n t is right, n o t o n e
day before -- a n d when t h e
a g r e e m e n t is right, we are going
t o sign, w i t h o u t one day's delay."
SO HAVE YOU.
LETS TURN
OFF THE
LIGHTS.
i'"-jyy!|
NIXON
HUMPHREY
WALLACE
S o u t h V i e t n a m e s e to d e t e r m i n e
their
o w n future
"without
having a c o m m u n i s t g o v e r n m e n t
or a coalition g o v e r n m e n t imposed on t h e m against their
will."
W i t h o u t giving details, Nixon
said " t h e r e are still some issues
t o be resolved..."
N i x o n said h e has insisted t h a t
these issues he settled before t h e
agreement
is singed,
adding
" t h a t is w h y we refused t o be
s t a m p e d e d into m e e t i n g t h e arbitrary
deadline
of O c t o b e r
31st."
This
was a reference
to
Hanoi's c o n t e n t i o n
that the
United S t a t e s h a d agreed t o sign
a V i e t n a m s e t t l e m e n t p a c t by
that d a t e .
T h e nine-point agreement disclosed by Hanoi m a k e s n o reference t o an l n d o c h i n a - w i d e cease
fire. Rather, it says "2'1 h o u r s
after the signing of t h e agreem e n t , u cease fire shall be o b served t h r o u g h o u t S o u t h Vietnam."
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SHORT: The Three Stooges
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
T h e nine-point draft agreement disclosed b y Hanoi also
says t h a t all foreign
troops
would be w i t h d r a w n from Cambodia a n d Laos a n d t h a t military
activities in t h o s e t w o c o u n t r i e s
would e n d .
In his taped-in-advance television address, Nixon said s o m e
are asking " W h y worry a b o u t
the d e t a i l s ? " He provided his
own answer.
" W e are n o t going t o repeat
the mistake of 1 yb'H when the
b o m b i n g halt a g r e e m e n t was
rushed into just before an election w i t h o u t pinning d o w n the
details.
"We want peace - peace with
h o n o r - a peace fair to all a n d a
peace that will last. T h a t is w h y
I a m insisting t h a t t h e c e n t r a l
points be clearly settled, s o t h a t
there will be n o misunderstanding which c o u l d lead t o a
b r e a k d o w n of t h e s e t t l e m e n t
and a r e s u m p t i o n of t h e w a r . "
"1 am confident t h a t we will
soon achieve that g o a l . "
T h e President told t h e voters
that " t h e leaders in Hanoi will
be w a t c h i n g " t h e results of next
T u e s d a y ' s elections.
" T h e y will be watching for
the answer of t h e American
p e o p l e . . . t o this q u e s t i o n : shall
we have peace with h o n o r or
peace with s u r r e n d e r ? "
" A l w a y s in the p a s t , " Nixon
said, " y o u have answered ' p e a c e
with h o n o r ' and by giving thai
•same answer o n c e again on Nov.
7 y o u can help m a k e c e r t a i n t h a t
peace with h o n o r can n o w be
achieved."
Nixon referred in his 24m i n u t e address t o his j o u r n e y s
this year to Peking and Moscow.
He said his major goal in a
second term is " t o c o m p l e t e t h e
foundations
for a world at
p e a c e - s o that the next genera
lion can be the first in this
c e n t u r y to live w i t h o u t war, a n d
without fear of w a r . "
T u r n i n g to d o m e s t i c issues,
Nixon r e p e a t e d his n o new-tuxes
pledge a n d said o n e of his t o p
priorities in a second term would
be to c u r b the growth of the
federal g o v e r n m e n t by shifting
m o r e responsibility und power
buck t o stute a n d locul governments.
warn
PAGE NINE
^
—
—
—
•
«
C
^
g
M
McG Support Urged
b y D i a n e M. C y g a n o v i c h
T h e c a m p a i g n for P r e s i d e n t
d r a w s t o a c l o s e . F o u r m o r e days
a n d t h e n a t i o n will k n o w t h e
results of y e a r s of w o r k . S o m e
will c r y for j o y ; o t h e r s will w e e p
in s o r r o w . In A m e r i c a n politics,
as e l s e w h e r e , n o t e v e r y o n e can
s h o u t v i c t o r i o u s l y . All t h e statistics p o i n t t o w a r d a N i x o n win.
Yet, m a n y McGovern supporters
fight o n with h o p e . T h e prediction polls h a v e b e e n w r o n g before.
S u p p o r t e r s h e r e on c a m p u s
differ little from those in o t h e r
places with o n e major e x c e p t i o n .
Here t h e c a m p a i g n faces a m o s t
feared evil: A p a t h y with a capital A. S t u d e n t s for McGovern,
w h e r e are y o u ? At t h e beginning
of t h e year 4 0 0 s t u d e n t s volunteered.
Presently
100-150
work
daily
to
further
the
campaign.
Most average
3-5
h o u r s a week.
Does this mean t h a t S U N Y A
s t u d e n t s are anli-McGovern? T h e
leaders here d» n o t think this
t h e case. T h e y believe that the
m a j o r i t y of .students identify
with McGovern and will vote for
h i m . Why, t h e n , are there so few
s t u d e n t s actively participating in
t h e campaign?
T w o reasons often given inc l u d e studies and lui-k of cam-
paign e x c i t e m e n t . S c h o o l s t u d i e s
l i m i t the a m o u n t of t i m e available for e x t r a projects. Also
t h e r e is little e x c i t e m e n t in t h e
issues of t h e c a m p a i g n . V i e t n a m
has quieted d o w n a n d all o t h e r
m a j o r issues involve m a n y implications n o t easily seen b y t h e
p u b l i c . Because m a n y s t u d e n t s
d o n o t fully u n d e r s t a n d various
issues, goes t h e a r g u m e n t , t h e y
c a n n o t get e x c i t e d a b o u t t h e m .
T h e campaign leaders here at
S U N Y A believe t h a t outside of
V i e t n a m , t h e c o r r u p t i o n of t h e
Nixon a d m i n i s t r a t i o n and t h e
i n c o n s i s t e n t s t a n d s taken by
McGovern are t h e t w o major
issues. Within the n e x t few days
t h e y feel r e p o r t s concerning
c o r r u p t i o n in t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
as well as t h o s e a b o u t the controversy of t h e V i e t n a m peace
proposals will n o t die b u t increase.
When M c G o v e r n ' s c a m p a i g n
inconsistencies
are
weighed
against these r e p o r t s , McGovern
s u p p o r t e r s sec little d o u b t a b o u t
the o u t c o m e . If s t u d e n t s act a.s
pected, they will vote after c o m paring Nixon witli M c G o v e r n ,
n o t McGovern
with himself.
According t o the organizers » f
the McGovern campaign this will
m e a n - v i c t o r y for the D e m o c r a t s .
A l t h o u g h t h e t u r n o u t for c a m paign w o r k e r s h a s b e e n l o w e r
than expected the monetary
c o n t r i b u t i o n s h a v e b e e n good.
T h e M c G o v e r n t a b l e in t h e Campus Center has- collected a b o u t
$350.
Also t h r o u g h
various
o t h e r activities $ 4 0 0 has b e e n
raised. These events i n c l u d e d a
Charlie Chaplin m o v i e , the satirical d o c u m e n t a r y of Nixon—
Milhouse, a p a r t y a t H e n w a y s , a
beer blast a n d a guest speaker—
Allard L o w e n s t e i n .
M o s t of
these activities received s t u d e n t
support.
F r o m n o w until T u e s d a y m o r e
i m p o r t a n t a n d i n t e r e s t i n g events
are planned. T o n i g h t a t 8 : 0 0 i n i
LC 2 3 a play, " O n c e t o Every
Man a n d N a t i o n , " starring Piper
Laurie will b e p e r f o r m e d . T h e
A c a d e m y A w a r d n o m i n e e , Piper
Laurie, makes this well w o r t h
t h e 5 0 c e n t s a d m i s s i o n . Also
throughout the weekend there
will b e a canvassing of all the
s u b u r b a n areas.
Finally we have the activities
of election d a y . Busses will leave
from t h e circle t o McGovern
h e a d q u a r t e r s s t a r t i n g a t 8 a.m.
and ending at 7 p . m . P h o n e
canvassing will be d o n e t o rem i n d all registered D e m o c r a t s t o
vote. Baby sitters a n d drivers
will be needed. S t u d e n t s will act
a.s poll w a t c h e r s a n d h a n d o u t
leaflets. T h e r e will also be a need
for p e o p l e t o w o r k with the
s o u n d truck.
T h e organizers are h o p i n g for
5 0 0 volunteers. T h e need is
great. If you w a n t further in
formation or w o u l d like t o volu n t e e r please call Ki.'l 722-1 or
McGovern
h eu d q u a r t e r s ,
<iii:i-:n 13.
/McGovern
Answers Agnew
. » •
b y Brooks Jackson
Associated Press Writer
C I N C I N N A T I , O h i o AP - S e n .
George M c G o v e r n c a m p a i g n e d
through the Midwest Thursday
p r o m i s i n g higher i n c o m e for
farmers a n d saying h e w o u l d n ' t
let S a i g o n ' s V l i t t l e d i c t a t o r , " as
h e called P r e s i d e n t N g u y e n Van
T h i e u , s t a n d in t h e way of p e a c e
in V i e t n a m .
T h e D e m o c r a t i c presidential
n o m i n e e also said h e t h i n k s
h e c k l e r s w h o s h o u t e d and blew
whistles at Vice P r e s i d e n t S p i r o
T. A g n e w in San Diego Wednesday were planted by Republic a n s " t o m a k e us l o o k b a d . " He
a d d e d , " I f ever I saw a p u t - u p
deal, t h a t was i t . "
T h e candidate, accompanied
by h i s wife E l e a n o r , m a d e television and radio a p p e a r a n c e s in
Chicago, s p o k e t o an e s t i m a t e d
8 , 0 0 0 s t u d e n t s and faculty at
the University of C i n c i n n a t i , and
h e a d e d for Battle Creek, Mich.
for a n o t h e r television appearance.
M c G o v e r n r e p e a t e d , in a television b r o a d c a s t for Illinois and
Missouri, t h a t h e d o e s n o t think
it is his responsibility to try to
rally the c o u n t r y
behind a
s e c o n d Nixon a d m i n i s t r a t i o n if
h e loses the election.
B u t he said " I d o n ' t i n t e n d t o
lose this e l e c t i o n . "
" I d o n ' t think it's m y responsibility t o try t o rally the people
b e h i n d policies t h a t I disagree
w i t h , " McGovern said " T h e r e ' s
s o m e t h i n g m o r e i m p o r t a n t Ulan
u n i t y . T h e r e ' s the i m p o r t a n c e of
the t r u t h . T h e r e ' s the import a n c e of this c o u n t r y lacing u p
t o its reali p_ r.on bulnem
mas , . . tihp
h e cpnrru
orrupt
a n d d i s h o n e s t p r a c t i c e s of t h i s
administration...of keeping the
p r e s s u r e o n until t h e war e n d s . "
I n a r a d i o address r e c o r d e d in
Chicago a n d p l a y e d later in t h e
day o n t h e CBS r a d i o n e t w o r k ,
M c G o v e r n said P r e s i d e n t N i x o n ' s
farm
policies
have
caused
1 5 0 , 0 0 0 farms t o s h u t d o w n a n d
forced o n e million p e o p l e t o flee
rural areas.
H e reaffirmed p r o m i s e s t o app o i n t a " w o r k i n g f a r m e r " as
s e c r e t a r y of A g r i c u l t u r e , l o w e r
p r o p e r t y taxes, a n d take a c t i o n
t o raise farm i n c o m e t o 9 0
p e r c e n t of p a r i t y , the t h e o r e t i c a l
m e a s u r e of fair farm prices.
Aides a c k n o w l e d g e d this p r o b ably w o u l d cause an increase in
grocery prices.
A t the University of Cincinnati, M c G o v e r n s p o k e in an
echoing
concrete
fieldhouse
nearly filled t o its 8 , 2 0 0 capac i t y . S p r i n k l e d t h r o u g h t h e aud i e n c e were s o m e w h o held aloft
a b o u t half-dozen N i x o n b a n n e r s
a n d sporadically h e c k l e d McG o v e r n with p r o - N i x o n slogans.
M c G o v e r n , still a bit h o a r s e
d e s p i t e a regimen of h o n e y and
tea
to
treat
his
campaigns t r a i n e d vocal c h o r d s , said Presid e n t T h i e u is t h r e a t e n i n g t o veto
a p e a c e s e t t l e m e n t in V i e t n a m .
At
a telethon
appearance
d u r i n g the m o r n i n g in Chicago,
M c G o v e r n called T h i e u a " l i t t l e
dictator."
At
Cincinnati
he
called him a " b r u t a l and c o r r u p l
d i c t a t o r . " McGovern said if he
were president h e ' d tell T h i e u
" Y o u ' r e not going t o d i c t a t e any
more war."
university concert board presents
Jim Dawson
Mary
Travers
in a blanket concert
$2.50 with tax and ID
$5.00 with ID
Tickets
Writer
Washington — Richard Nixon
a n d George M c G o v e r n are agreed
t h a t t h e y offer " t h e cleaifcst
choice of this c e n t u r y " in presidential politics. L i n d a J e n n e s s
and J o h n S c h m i t z are agreed
that that's hogwash.
After all, says Mrs. J e n n e s s ,
the D e m o c r a t s a n d R e p u b l i c a n s
are n o m o r e than " C a p i t a l i s t
Party N o . 1 a n d Capitalist Party
No. 2 . "
S c h m i t z sees a similarity, b u t
says t h e D e m o c r a t s are "Socialist Party A , " and the Republicans are " S o c i a l i s t Party B . "
Mrs. J e n n e s s and S c h m i t z are
t w o of this year's presidential
c a n d i d a t e s . F o r voters with uncommon
political
appetites,
there is n o t only a choice b u t a
p l e t h o r a of presidential e n t r e e s
on next w e e k ' s election m e n u .
G r a n t e d . M c G overn
and
Nixon are, in the idiom of 197 2,
the only " v i a b l e " c a n d i d a t e s .
A n d c e r t a i n l y t h e y ' r e the only
ones with t h e cash to p r o m o t e
their s o a p b o x e s like soapflakes.
But while t h e t w o - p a r t y system is u n d e r far less stress than
it was four years ago — when
George Wallace w o n five states
and 9 million votes — there is
nonetheless an a b u n d a n c e of alternatives, provided you d o n ' t
mind s p e n d i n g a vote on a man
w h o can't win.
Third parties and offbeat candidates have been part of the
d r m o n c r u l i c stew ever .since the
Quids of J e f f e r s o n ' s day, t h o u g h
few have survived m o r e than a
general ion and m o s t less t h a n
that.
T h o s e in this year's c r o p m a y
not be as colorful as, say, t h e
LiOeofoeos,
the Goodies, the
Buck tails a n d H u n k e r s of times
past. Bui their names may be t h e
most p r e t e n t i o u s on record.
Consider, for e x a m p l e , the
Universal P a r t y , w h o s e universality has b r o u g h t ballot recognition for n o m i n e e Gabriel Green
only in Iowa.
Or t h e r e is Hep. J o h n G.
Schmil/.'s
A m eriean
Party,
whose broad-based claim to the
e l e c t o r a t e is parried from the
left by the People's Party. Less
a m b i t i o u s l y titled - b u t just as
ambitious
are the Socialist
Labor
Parly,
the
Socialist
Workers Parly and, of c o u r s e ,
the C o m m u n h i t P a r t y .
S c h m i t z h o l d s the American
P a r t y b a n n e r vacated by Wallace
because the c o u n t r y " n e e d s a
man w h o puts America
first."
B u t t h e America First Party has
a c a n d i d a t e of its o w n , J o h n V.
Mahalchik. At best, Mahalchik
w o u l d have t o settle for New
Jersey first, since t h a t is the only
s t a t e w h e r e h e is on the ballot.
S c h m i t z , w h o is running for
p resident
after
havi ng
been
d u m p e d in his California congressional p r i m a r y , appears the
leader in the t h i r d - p a r t y race for
ballot listings. His name could
a p p e a r in 34 states, though several are tentative due t o legal
entanglements.
T h e People's Party now claims
certification in 10 states, and
Linda J e n n e s s m a y a p p e a r as the
n o m i n e e of the Socialist Workers
P a r t y in 2 0 . B o t h parties are
pursuing c o u r t actions aimed at
expanding those numbers.
T h e Socialist Workers Party
has the distinction of two presidential
n o m i n eeg — b o t h
w o m e n . Evelyn Reed is a standin for Mrs. J e n n e s s in New York,
Indiana and Wisconsin because
of c o n s t i t u t i o n a l q u e s t i o n s over
age. Mrs. J e n n e s s is only 3 1 ,
whereas t h e C o n s t i t u t i o n p u t s
the m i n i m u m at 3 5 . T h e SWP
argues, h o w e v e r , t h a t the 20th
A m e n d m e n t e m p o w e r s Congress
t o waive the r e q u i r e m e n t , and
most states a p p a r e n t l y agree.
GRAUCHO - CHICO
HARPO - ZEPPO
Dr. Benjamin S p o c k
J o h n G. S c h m i t z
American P a r t y : Despite the
serious, conservative themes of
(ieorgc
Wallace's
unendorsed
successor,
this
mustachioed
t w o - t e r m congressman tells m o r e
jokes than any c a n d i d a t e on the
presidential l o u r Armed with
d o z e n s of o n e liners, S c h m i t z
People's Party: " I ' m indebted
to the J o h n s o n A d m i n i s t r a t i o n , "
says the o n e - t i m e b a b y d o c t o r ,
"Tor giving me an entirely new
and important career." Indeed,
Spock now devotes full attention t o his role as older statesman of anti-war activism.
Spock o u t s an i n c o n g r u o u s
figure a m o n g the ranks of the
New Left. He wears fine blue
suits with vest and tie, a p o c k e l
h a n d k e r c h i e f and a gold watch
chain. His h a i r is w h i t e and
grows ever t h i n n e r , b u t he is
t a n n e d a n d spry at age f>9refleeting
an e n t h u s i a s m
for
physical fitness which dates back
to his O l y m p i c rowing days in
the 1920*8
A visitor t o m o r e than 2 0 0
colleges c a m p u s e s in the past
four years a n d a veteran of
Washington
d e m o u s t rat ions,
S p o c k in 197 I inherited t h e
reins of what began in 190H as
t h e Peace a n d F r e e d o m Party.
Many of the p a r t y ' s former
a d v o c a t e s now are in George
M c G o v e r n ' s c a m p , hut Spock
says " y o u waste y o u r vote by
voting for D e m o c r a t e s or Republicans. T h e rich and powerful
control both parlies."
Still, he admits, " i t ' s going to
t a k e a long l i m e " t o build an
independent movement.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
Linda Jenness
Socialist Worker's P a r t y : A
one-time Washington secretary
and t h e n s c h o o l t e a c h e r in S p a i n ,
Mrs. J e n n e s s was e n c h a n t e d by
the C u b a n revolution a n d j o i n e d
the Young Socialist
Mliance in
1966. She was b o r n in El R e n o ,
Okla., b u t has lived in Georgia
m o s t of h e r life — a n d in 1 9 6 9
ran as t h e SWP C a n d i d a t e for
m a y o r of A t l a n t a . A y e a r later,
she ran for governor.
S h e has traveled in several
Latin A m e r i c a n c o u n t r i e s , inc l u d i n g a visit t o C u b a at Fidel
C a s t r o ' s invitation.
Mrs. Jenness calls for a " d e m o c r a t i c society w h e r e the p e o p l e
w h o live and work in it m a k e the
d e c i s i o n s . " A n d t h a t , she a d d s ,
m e a n s " t a k i n g c o n t r o l of society
(tut of the h a n d s of a m i n o r i t y
of millionaires...and reorganizing
p r o d u c t i o n " with
nationalization.
S h e refuses to designate either
Nixon or McGovern as " t h e
lesser of t w o evils" because " t h e
lesser-evil policy is a d e a d - e n d
r o a d . " She k n o w s she'll lose, but
expects
" t o see a Socialist
America in my life-lime."
L o u i s Fisher
Socialist
Labor
Parly:
A
Chicago
d ry cleaning
plant
w o r k e r , Fisher, f>9, calls for "a
new t y p e of g o v e r n m e n t , an
industrial g o v e r n m e n t . "
F i s h e r claims special appeal t o
young
people.
They
liked
G e o r g e McGovern, he says, " h u t
since he's been talking t o Wall
.-Street the y o u n g people are
turning away."
The SLP's
vice-presidential
choice is Genevieve G u n d e r s o n ,
a d i s p a t c h e r for the Minneapolis
Fire D e p a r t m e n t .
( . u s Hall
Communisl Parly: According
to the parly's newspaper. Hall is
s o m e t h i n g of an all American
success story. Born in a chilly
log c a b i n in Minnesota. Sell
e d u c a t e d . A lumberjack, then a
l< >i.W i
it M'jlni JII Ji JII H'.iji ii ili.ii !itin|ni j|unlnr, i l n n M n b J n i ;
3 STOOGES
CALLING ALL CURS
ABBOT & COSTELLO
HIGH FLYERS
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY
& HITS OF THE PAST
Friday, Nov. 3
7:30 & 10:00 LC 2
iJnniminrimrm
funded by s t u d e n t tux
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
calls himself t h e " A d l a i Stevens o n of the r i g h t . " A favorite: " I
did
not
oppose
President
N i x o n ' s trip t o Peking. O n l y his
t r i p b a c k . " Playing o n t h e similarity b e t w e e n his n a m e a n d a
p o p u l a r beer, his b u m p e r stick e r s proclaim: " W h e n y o u ' r e o u t
of S c h m i t z , y o u ' r e o u t of gear."
S c h m i t z s u m s u p his p l a t f o r m
in t w o lines: ' D o m e s t i c policy —
t h o s e w h o w o r k s h o u l d live
b e t t e r than t h o s e w h o w o n ' t .
F o r e i g n P o l i c y — D o n ' t go t o
war unless y o u i n t e n d t o w i n . "
He says N i x o n h a s sold o u t
socialism at a time when America is a target of i n t e r n a t i o n a l
c o n s p i r a c y . A n d " A n y governm e n t t h a t ' s big e n o u g h t o give
you e v e r y t h i n g y o u w a n t is big
e n o u g h t o take away e v e r y t h i n g
you've got."
T h e Socialist L a b o r Party can
dictate, Louis Fisher, is on the
ballot in at least eight states, and
the perennial e n t r y for the Comm u n i s t P a r t y , G u s Hall, lists 13.
Libertarian
candidate
John
llospers is certified in two states
a n d h o p e s for five by election
day
Here is a brief look at some of
these lesser-known
candidates
and their ideas:
y
will go on sale M O N D A Y N o v . 6
10 am
c. c. balcony
PACE TEN
Press
THE
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Doors open at 9 pm
$6.50 nontax
Associated
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^Djoajnolrinp jf'ItJrjloi jlijulc joliiniil. iji]ji ^t j!Hr3QlcJt3}!_)( ilU"^lfiio!PMjo
November 5
Beach Boy
The Third Parties...And Their Candidates
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Free w CC tax card
50' w/out
ndud Uv vtudant la*
steelworker, t h e n a Navy h e r o . A
baseball fan a n d o n e of t h e b o y s .
J. E d g a r H o o v e r called h i m " a
p o w e r f u l , deceitful, d a n g e r o u s
foe of A m e r i c a n i s m , "
T h e p a r t y ' s long-time general
secretary a n d a veteran w o u l d - b e
c a n d i d a t e , Hall, at 6 2 , says he'll
b e h a p p y " i f I can b e a t o u t the
o t h e r leftist p a r t i e s . "
His p l a t f o r m , h e says, d o e s
not advocate communism, and
indeed, t h e r e are o n l y t h r e e
p l a n k s : an e n d t o t h e V i e t n a m
war and d i s m a n t l i n g of t h e Defense e s t a b l i s h m e n t ; a "massive
a s s a u l t " o n p o v e r t y , including a
$ 6 , 5 0 0 i n c o m e for a family of
four; and e l i m i n a t i o n of racism.
J o h n Hospers
Libertarian P a r t y : T h e 54year-old c h a i r m a n of t h e University of S o u t h e r n
California's
philosophy d e p a r t m e n t is running for an office he d o e s n ' t
w a n t t o h o l d , for leadership of a
government h e h o p e s will shrink
away.
Libertarians, simply, believe
in the least g o v e r n m e n t possible.
" E a c h individual has the right to
exercise sole d o m i n i o n over his
own life so long as h e does n o t
forcibly interfere with the equal
rights of o t h e r s , " says the p a r l y
platform.
With that, Hospers adovates
amnesty lor draft evaders, legalization of marijuana, the right to
bear arms, and s t r o n g p o l l u t i o n
controls.
He o p p o s e s
public
schools, g o v e r n m e n t e c o n o m i c
controls, censorship and welfare
programs.
" O u r party is no m o r e right
than left," he says. "Conservaiives run very high on e c o n o m i c
freedom and very low on political freedom. Liberals are very
high on political freedom but
very low on e c o n o m i c freedom.
We run very high on b o t h . "
Some w o u l d call it a m i x t u r e
of laissez fairc e c o n o m i c s , avanle
garde m o r a l i t y a n d Jefferson's
suspicion of g o v e r n m e n t .
Hospers says his c a n d i d a c y
won'I accomplish m u c h except
to gain the party — which has
small groups scattered throughout the c ou n t ry — a bit of
publicity. He a n d running-mate
Tonic N a t h a n , a radio-TV producer in Kugene, Ore., are on the
ballot i JIII y in C o l o r a d o and
Wash i n g t o n ,
however.
They
h o p e to add Oregon, New Hampshire and Louisiana before elec1 ion day.
the
STADIUM
NOW
OPEN
Tor Swinging
Singles
&
Ski Clubbers
Free food
Live band
Sounds of the 50's
764 CLINTON AVE. f
>-•-•-» • • » • » • • » • • • • »'•••• <
PAGE 11
Booters' Larry Herzog For All American
Gridders Set For
be honest. How many A-average g o o d soccer players
are there? Usually, t h e best players have a B or less,
Believe it or n o t , despite the t e a m ' s p o o r record
Albany has a^ slight chance t o have its first All and there is n o way they can get into Albany,
American soccer player in Larry Herzog. In every except via EOP. The EOF program is the only kind
game this year, Herzog has done m o r e than his j o b , of semi-recruiting w e have, and w e have not had
much success t h e r e for t h e past few years-only o n e
playing t h e toughest, m o s t c o n s i s t e n t , a n d best
or t w o players.
soccer, b y far, t h a n a n y o t h e r player. He has drawn
QUESTION:
Why arc so m a n y soccer players a t
praise from m a n y s o c c e r a u t h o r i t i e s , including
O n e o n t a ' s Garth S t r a m w h o t h o u g h t he was one of Albany n o t o u t for t h e t e a m ?
Herzog: Lack of interest. T h e people in this s c h o o l
the b e t t e r defensive players in t h e S U N Y conference
are n o t interested in athletics. Every year w e g e t
a n d definitely t h e b e s t p l a y e r on t h e Albany squad.
fewer a n d fewer guys o u t for t h e t e a m , a n d I can see
Coaches from o p p o s i n g t e a m s have c o n s t a n t l y reit getting worse b e f o r e it gets b e t t e r
m a r k e d t h a t Larry is s o m e player. With this in mind,
as well as his b e i n g o n e of t h e co-captains of t h e
QUESTION:
What effect does t h e size of t h e
soccer t e a m , H e r z o g was c o r n e r e d for this exclusive
crowd have o n t h e t e a m ?
interview.
Herzog: F o r m e , t h e s i z e - o f t h e c r o w d does n o t
matter. I go o u t t h e r e to win in front of 7, 1 1 5 , o r
QUESTION:
L a r r y , t h e q u e s t i o n everyone is
8 0 0 0 p e o p l e . However, I k n o w t h a t a big c r o w d ,
asking in A l b a n y S t a t e is, w h a t is wrong with t h e
especially a t h o m e , would definitely stir u^ m a n y of
soccer t e a m ? Why does it have such a poor r e c o r d ?
the o t h e r guys. It's n o t t h a t we d o n ' t go o u t t o win
Herzog: T o a n s w e r t h a t q u e s t i o n , I would like to
in front of 7 p e o p l e , b u t y o u k n o w t h a t it's just
start b y m e n t i o n i n g w h a t ' s right with the team
very different in front of a full h o u s e . U n f o r t u n a t e because m a n y of t h e guys are doing the j o b , and
ly, the fans do n o t c o m e o u t , a n d in a w a y , I d o n ' t
deserve s o m e r e c o g n i t i o n . T h e t e a m ' s strong point is
blame t h e m . After all, everyone loves a winner, a n d
definitely its defense, w h i c h is obviously m o r e than
the people usually c o m e o u t to see a winner. But,
a d e q u a t e w h e n o n e considers our lack of successful
look at o u r football team. T h e y ' r e having a great
offense which places s o m u c h pressure on our
season, yet they d o n ' t c o m e close to filling t h o s e
fullbacks.
Our defense is as g o o d as any team in the small bleachers by t h e Phys. Ed. building. People
S U N Y A C with t h e e x c e p t i o n of O n e o n t a . I think here just d o n ' t give a d a m n if their team is 5-0 or
I K-1. This is a school w h e r e organized sports d o n o t
we have proved it by o u r performances in the
O n e o n t a a n d N e w Paltz games. O u r halfbacks, fit info t h e lifestyle of t h e average s t u d e n t .
QUESTION:
Larry, you p r o b a b l y k n o w t h a t y o u
George Keleshian a n d Karl Hacusing are highly
skilled; Leon Sedefian is also one of t h e better have been receiving votes for All American rating.
skilled players on t h e t e a m ; and Cliff Walzcr has got What is y o u r reaction?
to be o n e of t h e t o u g h e s t wings in t h e game.
Herzog. Truthfully, I a m surprised. I a m n o t a
You w a n t e d t o k n o w w h a t ' s wrong with the team. very skilled player. 1 have speed in m y favor, b u t
Well, t o begin w i t h , I believe t h a t a team with ;i that's a b o u t it. I am playing t h e game for enjoystrong defense, a t e a m with good offensive passing, ment, a n d if I wasn't on t h e varsity team, I'd be
and a t e a m t h a t s h o o t s well a n d k n o w s when t o playing intramural soccer. In o t h e r words, 1 am n o t
s h o o t , will win. O u r basic p r o b l e m s have been a lack out Tor personal glory, b u t instead to play well a n d
of i n t e r a c t i o n b e t w e e n t h e offense a n d defense, and win.
a lack of ability t o a d j u s t t o changes by o t h e r teams
QUESTION.
You have been shifted back a n d
during t h e game. I k n o w t h a t everyone is trying forth from offense to defense; from inside t o
hard, a n d t h a t we all w a n t to win, hut we have not fullback. Which position d o you prefer?
had a n y breaks, a n d we have not been able lo put it
Herzog:
I honestly prefer t h e inside offensive
all together.
position. To me, t h e m o s t satisfying part of t h e
QUESTION:
Why has the Albany soccer leant game is scoring a goal.
QUESTION.
Do you think that t h e defense is
been a p o o r o n e for t h e past few years'.'
greatly weakened when you are in the forward
Herzog: Well, first of all, I want everyone lo know
position?
that t h e c o a c h i n g is n o t t h e root of this problem
Herzog No.
T h e guys all like t h e c o a c h , and the losing has n o t
QUESTION.
Albany has the big universiti c e n t e r
been his fault. T h e basic long range p r o b l e m s are a
lack of i n t e r e s t in a t h l e t i c s on the ,.urt of the t o u r n a m e n t here this Friday and S i t u r d a y . What a r e
s t u d e n t s a n d a very weak recruiti ig progran . Let's our chances of sweeDine it?
by Nathan Salant
Crosstown Rival
always seem t o rise t o t h e occasion when needed in different
games.
by Bill Heller
As t h e h o m e season draws t o a
close t o m o r r o w against arch-rival
Siena, o n e t h i n g is a p p a r e n t ; it
isn't going t o be as easy as it
s h o u l d . Even t h o u g h t h e Danes
are 5-0-1 a n d Siena t h e o p p o s i t e
(0-5-1), this game has b e c o m e
s o m e t h i n g of a t r a d i t i o n in this,
t h e t h i r d year of t h e series. In
each of t h e last t w o y e a r s , , .AW*
bany has w o n an e m o t i o n p a c k e d , down-to-the*wire ballgame. This o n e c o u l d prove t o
be t h e same.
Reflecting u p o n where his ball
club is at this stage of t h e
season, Coach Ford frankly confessed t h a t he would have.found
it hard to believe his team would
be u n d e f e a t e d . F o r d cites t w o
big reasons for Albany's huge
success so far: lack of serious
and lasting injuries and proven
bench help. As f«»r key individuals in turning t h e season
a r o u n d . Coach Ford lauds Q B
John Bertuzzi as t h e n u m b e r one
man for his overall leadership v,
directing t h e Wishbone T He
also credits men like Ed Perka,
Bill Adams and McCoy Allisler
on offense a n d Frank Villanova
Vinnie Pierce, and Jeff O'Donnell
on defense Really t h o u g h , Ford
sees this as a team w i t h o u t stars,
but rather with individuals w h o
T h e big p r o b l e m t o m o r r o w for
Albany c o u l d be looking past
Siena t o w a r d Plattsburgh a n d an
u n d e f e a t e d season. F o r d is well
aware of t h i s : " I ' m d o u b l y
afraid of l o o k i n g past a t e a m like
Siena. T h e r e ' s a lot riding on it.
If we win, it'll just be o u r sixth
win, b u t a loss would really h u r t
us in future scheduling a n d local
recruiting."
Pick
Albany 38
Siena U
F o r d ' s c o a c h i n g stall" has been
s c o u t i n g t h e Indians for the last
six weeks What they've seen u p
t o n o w is a team with problems
New head coach Dick Mullock
has been innovating t o (he utmost, and thai may be his big-
gest t r o u b l e . T h e best t h e Indians have been able t o d o this
year is t i e Pace, a team A l b a n y
h a n d i l y s h u t o u t last week.
Defensively, Siena is e x t r e m e l y
big. T h e y play a 4-4-3 a n d have
t w o excellent tackles in Martin
a n d Purcell. O n e of t h e k e y
m a t c h u p s S a t u r d a y s h o u l d be
Martin a n d guard Bill A d a m s .
Siena's offense has been t w o
completely
di fferent
systems.
Originally they used a p r o s e t
with e x - C l e m s o n i t e Charlie Taffe
at t h e h e l m . Taffe is a great
t h r o w e r , w h o s e favorite targets
are fleet Anglum at split e n d a n d
King a t flanker. B u t Taffe w a s n ' t
winning, s o last week Coach
Hullock w e n t with Skip Carrk at
q u a r t e r b a c k a n d p u t in t h e Wisbb o n c - T . T h e biggest t h r e a t here
would be r u n n i n g back P o p o
Gonzales w h o was originally
w o o e d by t h e Danes themselves.
It l o o k s like Siena could go with
either offense, s o m e t h i n g that
gives c o a c h e s ulcers.
T h e best thing Siena will have
going for it is that Albany is the
big c r o s s t o w n rival This could
lead t o a psyched up p e r f o r m
ance by t h e Indians a n d a close
game. Realistically, t h o u g h , t h e
game s h o u l d be n o c o n t e s t . It's
h a r d l y e x p e e i c d that t h e Danes
would lei d o w n n o w P r e d i c t i o n :
Albany 'AH Siena I I .
goodn
Lackluster
by Steven J Katz
T h e Albany State J.V, .soccer
team wenl on the road twice last
week in an a t t e m p t to register
their first victory of the season.
The change in scenery did little
good however, as the Pups were
beaten twice. T h e two J a m e s o n
the road, o n e at Siena, the other
R
E
E
F
E
R
at Unio n , ia m p l e a d d t ' i1 I n the
frustrali o n t h a t has d i i m i n a l e d
the J.V, sin • e r r t e a m t h i s si'as l l l l
The lac 1 t h a t A l b a n y was s h u l
out both l i 'm r s w a s i n d i n i l I V I • i.f
the poo:r p l i l y l a s l w e e k
Tin. gi i m e a l S i e n a o n S a t u r d a y
was an i n l e v e n l f u l a l l a i r ' ['he
Sil'llil SI |tla< ! f a i l e d I n i m press h u l
the I)t l l l l 1 P l l p s e u l l l d i l l Kel
started m i di A l l i a n y I n s 1 1 I I A n
extra 1H I i f s p e e d .in d ,i l e u
good , h u l s w e r e l l l e i l e e i MVlfactors i n l l l i s c o n i e s 1 u f I W H
1 mlu we, g h l lea Ills
n a m e . ,1 111 n u n
W e d n esdi l y ' s
l i . n l I n It.' H i e l o w p o i i l l n l l h e
T h e game quickly lei 1 i n t o a
familiar p a t t e r n . Union m o u n t e d
a c o n t i n u o u s assault o n goalie
Henry O b w a l d , taking over 2 0
s h o t s in t h e first half. T h e score
s t o o d :i 0 after only 1H m i n u t e s
of play. Al tin 1 same t i m e Albany b a d yet to take ils first
e*
<
Sat. LC 18
TWELVE
T h e Union h o o t e r s p l a y e d a
c o n t r o l l e d game a n d they were
always in c o m p l e t e c o m m a n d as
indicated by t h e final s c o r e of
7-0. By t h e end of t h e game
Union h a d taken over 50 shots
on goal while Albany c o u l d m a n
age only five half-hearted att e m p t s , Henry Obwald, at goal
for Albany, was erratic, having a
SI
n
*
Saturday
Nov. 4 1972
9 pm - 1 am
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE
s h o t of t h e game. T h e ball was
a l m o s t c o n t i n u a l l y in t h e Albany
end a n d over .'12 m i n u t e s were to
elapse b e f o r e Albany t o o k i t s
first feeble s h o t on goal.
personal high of 39 saves while
m a k i n g a c o u p l e of costly mistakes a t t h e s a m e t i m e .
E5B
It's been m y h a b i t in the past to
inject a n o t e of o p t i m i s m into
my e s t i m a t i o n of t h e t e a m ' s play
regardless of t h e result of t h e
game. However, on Wednesday
t h e r e was a very little t o be
pleased a b o u t in t h e face of our
lackluster p e r f o r m a n c e . Coach
Maniccia's fine o n e - h a n d e d grab
of an o u t of b o u n d s s h o t was t h e
o n e highlight of w h a t proved to
be Albany's most d i s a p p o i n t i n g
Soccer Tourney Here
T h e first University Center
Soccer C h a m p i o n s h i p s will be
held a t S t a t e University a t Albany Friday a n d S a t u r d a y (Nov.
3-4 ). C o m p e t i n g will be t h e four
University Centers of t h e SUNY
system:
Albany.
Binghamton,
Buffalo, a n d S t o n y Brook.
Buffalo, S 2 a n d top-seeded,
will play Albany, fourth-seeded
at l-H-1, al n o o n Friday. At 2
p.m., second-seeded
Bingham
ton,
7 1 1 , a n d third-seeded
S t o n y Brook, 3-4, will clash. T h e
losers will ulav at 10 a.m. Satin
WORLD CAMJPU&j
l»amc of t h e season.
d a y , followeo by the championship c o n t e s t at n o o n .
A t r o p h y will he presented to
t h e t e a m c h a m p i o n by Neil
Brown, dean for s t u d e n t affairs
at Albany. T h e Most Valuable
Player will receive a plaque and
his school will receive a trophy,
which will be r o t a t e d in turn to
the school uf each succeeding
year's M V P Jack Guarneri of
the S t o n y Brook alumni association
will
present
the MVP
s w a r d s on behalf of the alumni
associations of t h e lour universities.
Discover the World on Your
SEMESTER AT SEA
1KKB^^_^^______^
Sails each September & February
Combine accredited study with
educational stops in Africa, Australasia and the Orient. Over 5000
students Irom 450 campuses have
already experienced this international program. A wide range ol
linancial aid is available. Write
n o * lor free catalog:
WCA, Chapman College, Box CC40, Orange, Cal. 92666
,,..,:; . ; W
Rathskeller
The Killer W e e d
(muled by w
season lor t h e .J.V. h o o t e r s . T h e
Pups c o u l d n ' t d o a n y t h i n g right
the e n t i r e game. Albany play
was listless and uninspired a n d a
charged -up
Union t e a m was
quick to capitalize on Albany's
shortcomings.
Pair
Live Band in
Campus Center
M
A
D
N
E
S
S
7,9,11 p.m.
Pups Drop
dish aw
Herzog: I believe t h a t in a n y t o u r n a m e n t t h e record can be t h r o w n
aside; t h a t a n y t e a m can beat a n y o t h e r t e a m . We have great spirit,
superior coaching, a n d , q u i t e frankly, w e have t h e definite potential
to b e a t a n y o n e of those teams.
T o s u m it u p , I refer y o u to t w o q u o t e m a d e this year, one by
Coach Wingert, t h e o t h e r by m a n y an o p p o s i n g p l a y e r :
Wingert:
" L a r r y is definitely o n e of t h e t o u g h e s t and finest
defensemen playing college
soccer this year. He gives his all,
ALL T H E TIME!
Opposing
players:
G o d d a m m i t , w h o t h e -—is t h a t guy wearing
n u m b e r 15? B o y , h e ' s s o m e t h i n g else o u t t h e r e .
He is s o m e t h i n g else. It's t o o bad t h a t we d o n ' t have eleven Larry
Herzogs o u t o n t h a t soccer field.
COURSE
3
ONCE APRAGGN PIP OFFER FOR THE COSTE OF TWO 6 PACKS
OF SCHAEFER BEERE-TO TEACH
A KNIGHT THE ART OF THE PANCE,
a
THUS HE ENTERED THE COURSE
ANP PROCEPETH TO PANCE
AMP THE KNIGHT PIP ACCEPT
THE CHANCE TO IMPROVE HIS
SKILLS.
W A J - U ^
^
"
^
V
"*-*-"'
S#V W
'
~ * L , „ , „ „ . , » . . „ . . ,„,«.« « H p. N » ..,.«™». «,. . L.„„n v.„„. P..
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
ANP ONCE AGAIN THE DRAGON
PANCETH THE KNIGHT AWAY.
PAGE THIRTEEN
Supreme Court Works With SA
A/f-AM/A Football
Grid Picks
By EUyn S t e m b e r g e r
by the Blonde Bombshell
D E N V E R vs. NEW Y O R K - I f
Denver had a quarterback t o go
with F l o y d Little t h e Giants
would be in trouble. Without,
the Giants get an easy o n e t o
rebound with.
WASHINGTON
vs.
JETSGiants couldn't s t o p Brown neither will the Jets. Kilmer, a fine
quarterback, but no Jurgenson.
Namath, if he gets blocking,
should have enough.; t o upset
Redskins.
•- •'• •• v
'
ATLANTA
vs.
L;A.-Rams'
Gabriel is not the old Gabriel.
Defense looked bad versus Oakland b u t so did Atlanta's. Atlanta
with a win moves i n t o first.
A t l a n t a will s q u e a k b y .
CHICAGO
vs.
DETROITD e t r o i t is pngry at B u t k u s and
their play will s h o w it. L a n d r y
t o best Douglas in t h e b a t t l e of
r u n n i n g q u a r t e r b a c k s . Chicago
t h r e e game winning streak to
end.
CINNCINNATI
vs.
PITTSB U R G H - A b a t t l e for the t o p
s p o t in AFC Central. Paul Brown
is l o o k i n g for a c h a m p i o n s h i p
League II
League I
but he will be denied as
Bradshaw leads Pittsburgh t o
win.
D A L L A S vs. SAN D I E G O Defense is still a key e n d Dallas
o w n s a superior o n e . San Diego
could use Thomas but h e won't
be there. Staubach is ready if
n e e d e d , but Dallas> shouldn't
need him.
MIAMI vs. B U F F A L O - M i a m i
still undefeated edged Buffalo
t w o weeks ago. It w o n ' t be as
close
even w i t h o u t
Griese.
S i m p s o n w o n ' t have a field day
against t h e " n o - n a m e " defense.
OAKLAND
vs.
KANSAS
CITY—The rivalry
continues.
K.C. always seems t o win, t h e big
o n e s and Oakland and Lamonica
seem t o lose t h e m . If Lamonica
goes b o m b h a p p y it will be easy
for K C . if not K.C. will win via
S t e n e r u d ' s toe.
Offense
Offense
C
G
G
TE
WR
WR
;QB
HB
HB
C
G
G
TE
SE
FL
QB
HB
HB
B. Pooler (EEP)
D. Gunson (EEP)
M. L o w e r y ( G D X )
B. Alston(EEP)
M. Evans (TXO)
D. Loverich ( G D X )
L.Marcus (GDX)
C. McCarg ( E E P )
B. T o n d a y ( S P A C E R A N G E R S )
J. N o b l e ( 9 t h F L O O R )
F. Herman ( K B )
B. Santandre (BPS)
S. Rodriguez ( 9 T H F L O O R )
L. Roberts ( 9 T H F L O O R )
B. Saperetein ( K B )
J. Brady ( 9 T H F L O O R )
B. Boggs ( K B )
M. Zener ( F R A G I L E )
Defense
Defense
DE
DE
DT
DT
LB
LB
MLB
S
S
SAN
FRANCISCO
vs.
G R E E N B A Y - T h e pack is back,
b u t S c o t t H u n t e r is n o t Bart
Starr. Spurrier or Brodie can
lead <19ers t o win.
D. S a p i e n z a ( G D X )
B. Davis ( I N D I A N S )
S.Finn (EEP)
J. C a r t e r ( A P A )
B. A x e l r o d ( G D X )
N. C o n t e ( E E P )
A. Nielson ( A P A )
K. S z y m u n s k i APA)
B. T o n d a y ( S P A C E R A N G E R S )
DE
DE
DL
DL
LB
LB
LB
J. R e n t o n ( K B )
R. E i s e n h o w e r ( K B )
G. G a l i e t t o ( K B )
F . H e r m a n (KB)
S. Cavanaugh ( F R A G I L E )
G. T o w l e ( K B )
B. M c D o n a l d ( B P S )
J. L o w e ( 9 T H F L O O R )
B. Boggs ( K B )
S
S
League HID
League I " A
Offense
Offense
QB
HB
E
E
G
G
C
FENCING
On S u n d a y , N o v e m b e r 12 at
1:00 PM, the S U N Y A Fencers
Club will sponsor a f e n c i n g
exhibition
combined
with a
fencing clinic in the Dance Studio of t h e gymnasium.
F o r m e r National Foil Champion a n d Olympic fencer R o b e r t
Russell will fence a series of
b o u t s in foil, epee and sabre
against SUNYA fencers and top
fencers from area schools and
clubs) Current third national
w o m a n fencer and participant in
the '72 Olympics Ann O'Donnell
will fence against six of the
area's leading w o m e n r e n t e r s .
T h e fencing clinic, o p e n to all
interested S U N Y A fencing en
thusists, will cover a w a r m - u p
and a fundamental session, followed by class work in each of
the three weapons.
F. P u t o r t i (STB)
L. F o r m a n ( G R E E N M T N . BOYS)
M. K e l t o n ( S T B )
T M a c A d a m ( G R E E N M T N . BOYS)
K. Kelly ( G R E E N M T N . B O Y S )
R. Matsil (STB)
G. G r u l e i U ( J U N G L E R O T )
QB
HB
E
E
G
G
C
W. H a l p e r ( G D X )
G. S u s s m a n ( J o h n s o n Hall)
B. Pape ( C o l o n i s t s )
T. MacAullire ( J o h n s o n Hall)
M. Collins ( G D X )
J. D ' A g o s t i n o ( C o l o n i s t s )
M. S t e i n b e r g ( C o l o n i s t s )
Defense
Defense
LM
LM
LM
LB
LB
CB
CB
All S U N Y A fencers, s t u d e n t s ,
and faculty arc cordially invited
to share the benefits of having
Mr. Russell a n d Ms. O ' D o n n e l l
visit us, whether you w a n t t o
participate actively in the clinicfir ju.st watch the e x h i b i t i o n and
clinic.
Fiero (Green Mtn. Boys)
Mazarello (STB)
Sommers (Jungle Rot)
L u p o (Green Mtn. Boys)
L a p p (Aces)
F r i e d m a n (Jungle R o t )
F r i e d m a n (Green Mtn. Boys)
LM
LM
LM
LB
LB
CB
CB
M. Bishop ( B C )
D. B a l s a m o ( P o t t e r )
G. R o t h s c h i l d (Colonists)
J. S c h n e i d e r ( P o t t e r )
J. M u n n e S ; G D X )
B. G o l d s h e i n ( O Y - O Y S )
J. C a n e s l r a r o ( G D X )
o n e p o i n t lead t o win the regatta.
T o p s k i p p e r and crew for the
e v e n t w e r e A l b a n y ' s Chris Follows and Larry Desautels. Charlie
Bowman
and
Melanie
H a m m e r were skipper and crew
in A l b a n y ' s second
division.
Nancy Pupish and Chris Mini
t o n n a w e r e the a l t e r n a t e crews.
T h e t h r e e s c h o o l s racing RMC, A l b a n y , and McMasters
finished in that order.
N o v e m b e r IN-1U, the sailing
team sails o u t of M a n s t College
in 1'oughkeepsie fur I h e Marls t
F r o s t b i t e Regatta.
Yacht Racing
Royal Military College in Kings t o n , O n t a r i o was the scene of
sailing team activities this past
weekend.
Moderate
t o light
winds unci rain left Albany with
a three p o i n t lead over RMC on
S a t u r d a y . When racing r e s u m e d
on S u n d a y , in m o d e r a t e
to
heavy airs, two final races were
held and RMC ended up with a
TOWER EAST CINEMA
who has brought you
Great Feature Films Commercials
Shorts
and Coming Attractions'
Courts are traditionally t h e
least known and
understood
branch of g o v e r n m e n t . T h e i r
m y s t e r i o u s nature results from
the c o n d i t i o n s o f t h e i r operation.
There is l i t t l e
or no
communication
between
the
people and t h e i r c o u r t s .
T h e S t u d e n t A s s o c i a t i o n Supreme C o u r t is n o e x c e p t i o n .
This b o d y of s t u d e n t s , app o i n t e d b y the P r e s i d e n t of SA
and a p p r o v e d by C e n t r a l C o u n cil, has n o m e a n s of c o m m u n i cation with t h e r e s t of t h e student b o d y until t h e y actually
hear a n d d e c i d e a case. Chief
Judge T e d S a l e m feels t h a t a
basic lack of c o n t i n u i t y such as
is found in t h e C o u n c i l or t h e
Executive b r a n c h is o n e of t h e
reasons for t h e c o u r t ' s s h r o u d e d
presence. " T h e c o u r t o n l y m e e t s
when n e e d e d . We d o n ' t m e e t us
a group unless t h e r e ' s a case
present or we h a v e t o decide
whether wo have t o h e a r a c a s e . "
Even t h o u g h the c o u r t is little
seen or heard it d o e s serve s o m e
i m p o r t a n t f u n c t i o n s w i t h i n the
S t u d e n t A s s o c i a t i o n . Salem says,
" T h e p u r p o s e really is t o act as
an arbiter b e t w e e n the p o w e r s ;
an arbiter b e t w e e n the P r e s i d e n t
and the Council t o k e e p everybody in line and t o m a k e sure
they d o n ' t d o s o m e t h i n g t h e y ' r e
not designated t o d o . 11 also
serves as a laison b e t w e e n individuals and t h e S t u d e n t Association that we have h e r e . " Salem
feels, " t h e r e is no way a s t u d e n t
could a p p r o a c h
the
Central
Council and really be h e a r d . It's
very difficult to d o t h a t . . . I!'
it's an u n c o n s t i t u t i o n a l q u e s t i o n ,
he obviously c a n ' t ask t h e C o u n cil to renege on it. So h e has to
c o m e to u s . "
C o n s t i t u t i o n a l l y , t h e r e is n o
limit to the n u m b e r of judges on
the c o u r t , b u t p r e s e n t l y there
a r e six: T e d
Salem,
Peter
Coughlin, Rich Wright,
Rich
Matsil, D o u g K e r n , and Jay
Fisher. T h e last four
above
judges have been on t h e c o u r t
for a b o u t t w o w e e k s . Salem has
been on for o n e y e a r , and in that
time has sat in o n o n l y four
cases. He says t h a t the c o u r t has
heard only a h a n d f u l of cases in
the past six y e a r s and usually
about t w o cases a y e a r .
gories. "Cases we've heard since
around
1 9 6 6 have definitely
been cases relating t o the power
of SA to designate m o n e y . For
e x a m p l e the Washington bus
case where the c o u r t allowed the
Central Council to authorize
funds t o send groups to Washington. " A n o t h e r major aspect of
our c a s e s , " Salem c o n t i n u e d , "is
elections. People are always protesting elections. F o r instance,
Myskania. We had a referral for
t h a t last year and there are
a b o u t three cases on file a b o u t
it. . . We
also
handled the
case last year of Nydia Rivera
protesting the elections. . . There
are also cases a b o u t what an
agency of Central Council can
do and not do. For example,
WSUA had a case a couple of
y ea rs
ago
r r g a rding
their
power."
Salem says that most of the
cases brought to the Supreme
Court are initiated by individual
s t u d e n t s . The procedure for this
is very simple. One need only go
to the Student Association office and a.sk the secretary for a
referral form. The completed
form is sent to Salem who asks
the judges if they waul 10 bear
the case, If Ihey do, a date for
the hearing is established at the
m o s t convenient nine. The court
doesn't hear every case that is
brought up Salem pointed out
that, "if there is a case totalis
absurd or not raising something
in our jurisdiction then we have
- In
Eve
the option
court has that opti
Salem feels 111,
.if the
causes of the
our Is almost
anonymous
existence is that
people are not aware o it. " T h e
major problem is thi
people
just don't realize that the court
is available to them to appeal
t o . " O t h e r than letting students
know that the court exists there
really is no way for them to get
involved in court procedures
Salem says, "A< a l l y t h e o n l y
• whe:
partH
students I
ourl ;
the
pate on lb
i b e r s h i p is o p e n t
ben
n die beginning •
the s t u d
the
Despite t h e small n u m b e r of
cases, Salem has f o u n d they can
be classified i n t o o b v i o u s catu
"The major problem is that people just don't
realize that the court is available for them to
appeal t o . "
SATURDAY, NOV. 4
9 pm
CAPITAL DISTRICT
GAY DANCE
"\
donation $1.50 (buffet included)
' *
Sponsored by SUNYA Gay Alliance
nduU by student tax
auiHHiiniBiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiuiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiimHUiMiiii iiiiiiiimiimm mi
Albany State Cinema
T h e Albany w o m e n ' s JV tennis
team ended their fall season h\
h e a t i n g Mohawk Valley on October I!). This gives the n a i l e r s a
I'niiil mark of fi-1. T h e girls
defeated
Siena,
Ful
M o n t g o m e r y , Cobleskill, H u d s o n
Valley and It.P.I T h e only loss
w;is t o P o t s d a m ' s Varsity team
Gil AND OPENING TONIGHT
As for the legislative branch,
Salem " w o u l d like to see (it |
have a greater role in government. Not thai Michael domineers it. .Michael
necessarily
dominates it because be is MI
callable I think a lot of people
are awed by Mike and they
necessarily give deference to his
opinion and let him lead the
way " Salem thinks " t h a t the
Council has been lax in the last
couple of years.. Council needs
lo do ,1 lot more for the s t u d e n t s
and...the Court has an obligation
to make sure the Council realizes
it should. My personal feeling is
thai Council can do almost anything they w : . i ui der ihe Constitution and they a e not doing
.-nough. One aspect of Llie relationship wilh the Council is lo
actually encourage t h e m Lo do a
cniiiuntcrf on pufic I 6
T e d S a l e m . Chief J u d g e S t u d e n t Association S u p r e m e Court.
CHANNING HALt(across from Draper Hall bus stop)
Tennis
now adds a new dimension to
campus moviesTower East Cinema
Sweet Shop
In every government, there are
certain relationships b e t w e e n the
branches, Salem c o m m e n t e d on
the court's
relation t o the
Executive branch of SA. " W e
have an obviously close relation
with Mike
!#mperft
because
he appointed us. He respects us;
we respect him. We act as a
check on him just as we would
act as a check on any legislature,
. . That's a b o u t as far as it goes
aside from maintaining a certain
rapport b e t w e e n the president
and the judges.
Salem
explains last
year's
Executive-Court
troubles:
" T h e r e were three or four members on the c o u r t in the beginning of the semester and Mike . .
. did not a p p o i n t new members
until December. By the time
thai came about [Chief J u d g e )
Carl Stevenson was obviously
fed up with the c o u r t and lost
enthusiasm for it. It [ t h e c o u r t ]
just never got off the g r o u n d . "
Salem feels that " t h i s left a
bitter
taste
in
everybody's
m o u t h about the C o u r t and of
course the relationship with the
Executive. Everyone feels now
thai we are hostile to Mike or
that we are his lackies because
its one or the other. It was a
mess last year. 1 don't think
we'll see a repeal this y e a r . "
Mi
REEFER MADNESS
'Women cry for it, Men die for it'
A Serious Film Made in 1936 Concerning the Evils of Smoking Cannabis
(Marijuana to the Uninformed)
Students for McGovern sponsor
a Political Satire by j h e Living Newspaper Group
Argyle sleeveless
Orion" acrylic sweaters
in navy/red/white.
s
- M, L,XL.
$
Plus: The Firesign Theatre in their new film
Once to Every Man and Nation
"MARTIAN SPACE PARTY"
Starring Piper Laurie
13
written by HOWARD KOCH author of
"Casablanca" and Orson Welles' Martian Invasion
academy award nominee for
"The
Hustler"
I
Sat Only
PAGE FOURTEEN
Fri. Nov. 3
LC
23
so-
8 p.m.
L
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
75
°w/tax&
ID
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Funded by S t u d o n ! Tax
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AT STUYVESANT PLAZA
LC 18
7 9 11 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
ALBANY ST'JDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
PAGE
FIFTEEN
Uptown: Improvements Coming.. . Soon
Volume LIX, Number 44
continued from page 3
Continuing with layout, Mr.
Tisdale was asked why the Qym
is so far removed from the rest
of the Campus. His reply was
purely logical. If a line is drawn
around the outside of each
Quad, a large square results with
the Podium neatly in the center.
This is the so-called Academic
Area. The Planners did not feel
the Physical Education, the
Infirmary or the Services
Buildings should be within the
Academic Area. Further, it enables the Gym to be the hub of a
wheel with the tennis courts,
football and soccer fields, and
varsity field totally surrounding
it. Merely a matter of practicality.
What of the parking lots which
are under heated debate right
n o w ? Mr. T i s d a l e answered
simply that distance is a very
relative term. Using the same
Hypothetical Academic Area,
the Planners did not want the
pollution and congestion of
automobile traffic to interfere
with the normal operations of
the University. The lots at State
and Dutch were built as close as
possible to those Quads as practicality allowed. Also, other colleges are so poorly planned that
lots are much further away; in
fact, students at Michigan or
Ohio State are not even allowed
to bring cars on campus. We are
extremely well off in terms of
where we can park our cars. As
for Indian and Colonial, the
completed version of SUNYA,
not finished due to lack of
money, called for two lots, each
one a two story covered structure that would handle the cars
at Indian or Colonial as well as a
Grad Quad that would be built
on the other side of the lot. The
present lots are merely patch
jobs until the structures can be
built.
As for the often heard statement that Albany State was
originally in tended for a
southern climate, like Miami,
University
of New
York at Albany
November
8,
1972
Special
Nixon Carries Forty-nine
President Grabs
521 Electoral Votes
Story Page 3
Mr. Tisdale responded, "Well of
course we were all big boys,
those of us whoworkedon it, and
we knew damn well what the
temperature was here in Albany.
I lived here for many years...now
there's no validity to those
rumors at all, though there is
understandable reason to believe
t h i s . " He continued that
whether one was standing on
Campus, or somewhere else in
Albany, the winters aren't "fit
for man nor beast" to be walking the streets anyway. He said
that he realized that there was a
wind tunnel side effect of the
enclosed Quads with the towers
but that it was merely unfortunate.
There is a more basic point as
to why the Uptown Campus was
built at all, instead of simply
extending the Downtown Campus. Mr. Tisdale said in effect
that it all boiled down to massive bureaucratic red tape involved in purchasing the many
small tracts of land required to
accomodate the extra 10,000
students anticipated in the extension. Before Uptown, there
were 3,000 full time students of
which 30 were graduates The
present plans call a breakdown
of 80%-'2U% undergrade to ip-ad"
students, with a gradual shift
toward graduate study.
Mr. Tisdale concluded by assessing the goals of the University in relation to its present
function. Is the Campus functioning as a University should?
Answer, yes. Is it functioning as
well as a University such as RPI?
Answer again, yes." But is it
functioning as well as it could
given the present state of the
physical campus? Answer obviously no. But that is not to say
that the campus isn't always
ms^
-:\
-r'li&F"*-.
i'yjajf lOlBfL.
•WW
'r-v
When this campus was first being planned over a decade ago, the idea of accomodating the extra 10,000 students as an enlarged
downtown campus was considered. But problems inlierent in purchasing the many small tracts of land that would be required forced the
University fathers to build elsewhere.
PAGE SIXTEEN
State
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Ticket Splitting Keeps
Democrats In Control
Of Congress
undergoing improvements, that
within two years, we will be
functioning better than we were
the year before. Everybody here
is working towards that goal.
That'includes teaching, food service, etc.
Walter Tisdale believes in the
University he helped create. We
will improve he says, but as we
are, we are already better than
others our size.
Story-Page 5
Supreme Court...
continued from page 15
lot more and be a little more
active in everything...[the other
relationship] is that we sit as a
check on the Council's actions.
The Council usually has not
done anything so outlandish as
to warrant a decision except
may lie the strike, and we decided it wasn't so outlandish...that the Council never gets
into trouble means that maybe
it's not doing enough in a lot of
areas. It should get into trouble
once in u while; experiment a
little more."
As for SA in general, Salem
feels that "we've been in a period of Executive dominance.
There's nothing the mutter with
that, however, I think that the
government should be a little
better balanced. The Council is
moving in that direction and the
Court is part of this, too. We
| the Court | sit docile because
we only hear cases that arc
brought to us. Last year we were
a little more meek. We were
afraid of asserting ourselves to
our fullest capacity. I think
that's no longer true."
Finally, Salem said, "Our purpose is contingent upon the purpose of Student Association. 1
don't think Student Association
is responsible enough to studenU
and I think that students aren't
satisfied with their association...There is a void between
the students and that great big
organization of SA. The Court's
purpose won't be fulfilled until
Student Association's purpose Is
better fulfilled and that is being
closer to the students,"
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1972
Richard Nixon flashes smile after greatest landslide victory in U.S. history.
Environmental Bond
Gains Approval
Story-Page 6
A Krupsak Victory
Highlights Local Races;
Sfraffon, Kelleher Win
Story-Page 4
SIOUX FALLS, S.D., Nov. 7~McG0VERN MAKES STATEMENT--Sen. George S.
McGovem, Democratic Presidential Candidate, reads letter of concession to audience in Sioux Falls,
Tuesday night. (AP Wirephoto)
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