Light On the Coming of...

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On the Coming of...
Light
" T h e t i m e , " as e m c e e Harold P. B r o w n ( R o b e r t
Verini) says, " i s 1 8 8 8 . . . a n e p o c h of scientific
b r e a k t h r o u g h a n d technological i n n o v a t i o n . " At this
point in history t w o men w e r e waging a fierce b a t t l e
for c o n t r o l of the electrical power—and
the
minds—of the A m e r i c a n p e o p l e . On t h e o n e h a n d
T h o m a s Alva Edison ( R o b e r t C h a n i n ) , t h e Wizard of
Menlo Park and a legend in his o w n t i m e , struggling
t o maintain b o t h his r e p u t a t i o n and his already
o u t m o d e d direct electrical c u r r e n t ( D . C . ) . On t h e
o t h e r : T h e venal and c o r r u p t George C. Westingh o u s e (Roger M o r a n ) , w h o , in his a t t e m p t to c o r n e r
t h e m a r k e t with a l t e r n a t i n g c u r r e n t (a-c), will s t o p
at literally n o t h i n g . T h e c o m p e t i t i o n b e t w e e n these
t w o businessmen takes place on all levels of s o c i e t y ,
lies, half-truths and m i s i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s being t h e
o r d e r of t h e d a y ; u l t i m a t e l y it leads t o " T h e Main
E v e n t , " the s h o c k i n g c o n c l u s i o n of D. M o l m o t h ' s
play T H E G R E A T A M E R I C A N L I G H T W A R ,
playing Wednesday t h r o u g h S a t u r d a y , March 1-<1 —
evenings at 8:30, S a t u r d a y m a t i n e e at 2:;}0— with a
special benefit p e r f o r m a n c e o n S u n d a y the 5th at
7 : 3 0 , all on the Main Stage of the P.A.C.
War!
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESSVol. LIX No. 13
Friday, March 3, 1972
$30 Telephone Charge
Disputed by Students
by A l Senia
T h e t e l e p h o n e hanging on the
wall of y o u r suite cos! -you and
y o u r suitema 1 es an e x t r a th irt y
dollars during t h e past t w o semesters and o n e of the ways you
might want to use that p l u m e is to
call up and thank J obn Hartley,
the Vice-President of Management
and Planning, for the extra cost.
It was Hartley w h o o p t e d t o
include an e x t r a f i f t e e n dollars
charge, divided equally a m o n g
you and your s u i t e m a t e s (or
r o o m m a t e s ) on y o u r r o o m bill
this past August and again in
J a n u a r y ^ Ostensibly, the m o n e y
was slated to cover the cost of a
p h o n e subsidy that was d r o p p e d
by the S t a t e of New Y o r k . Or at
least, t h a t is w h a t s t u d e n t s o n this
c a m p u s were told in a m e m o r a n d u m released August 5 by Robert
A c q u i n o , S U N Y A Bursar.
Director J a m e s M. L e o n a r d ' s cast of 25 a t t e m p t s
to
recapture
the
peculiarly
American
" c a l c h - a s - e a t c h - e a n " a t m o s p h e r e of t h e T e c h n o l o gical R e v o l u t i o n . Bryan T u c k e r plays t h e i n c o r r u p tible Referee of T h e Main E v e n t ; Victor SalTrin is
electrical e x p e r t Soul h w i c k ; Bernard F e r s t e n b c r g
p o r t r a y s George WeHlinghou.se, J r . ; K e i t h S m i t h is
Westinghouse h e n c h m a n T. C a r p e n t e r S m i t h . A
q u a r t e t of n e w s m e n , w h o s e s c h e m i n g for circulation
b u i l d u p c o n t r i b u t e s to the general m a d n e s s . i s port r a y e d by Eileen Kelly, Steve Ami no IT, Leslie
Bergson and Craig Lucarelli; t h e wire services are
represented by S a n d y Chevlin (A.P.) and Nora
Gibson (U.P.). T e c h n i c i a n s for T h e Main Event:
J e r r o l d Brown ( T i m e r ) and J o e l Gross ( E n g i n e
R o o m ) . T h e wives of America are lypefied by
Bertilla Baker (Mrs. F l o r e n c e S t y l e s ) , S t e p h a n i e
Rogers (Mrs, J o n e s ) , Holly F i l t e r , Christine C o t e ,
G e r a l d hie
Kitl/,
Barbara
Launer,
and
Carol
T u n z t n a n ; electrical wholesalers are i m p e r s o n a t e d by
Ted Ores/., Allan Kessler, arid J o e Riley
The
musical a c c o m p a n i m e n t is provided by I hi' celebrated
Star-Spangled
W a s h b o a r d Band
(Greg
llaymes, Klyde
Dimes . Don
Dworkni.
Paul
J o s s m a n ) ;NnI Friend I Loins Seorca ) 'Die Hand will
be working with lunes o|' the period as well as
original composihoiiN by Klyde and Bill Polehinski.
But the subsidy was never officially t e r m i n a t e d . T h e m o n e y
didn't go t o the t e l e p h o n e company. And now s t u d e n t governm e n t officials are arguing that
Hartley never had the a u t h o r i t y t o
collect the m o n e y in the first
place and are calling on SUNY
Chancellor Ernest Boyer to o r d e r
a refund.
T h e p r o d u c t i o n ' s technical scope can only be
described as t i t a n i c , supervised by designers Koberl
Donnelly (.sets) and J e r o m e 1 lanley I light nig), w h o s e
long list of a c h i e v e m e n t s includes such impressive
credits as I'KTKH PAN, ( ' A M I N O H E A L , and
H A R R Y , NOON A N D N I G H T , c o s t u m e s were
c r e a t e d by Elaine Y o k o y a m a , w h o has won m u c h
praise lor her work on E N R I C O IV ;uu\ T H E
EMPFROR'S
NIGHTINGALE
Graphics
were
created by Dim Moslian, slage m a n a g e r is Henry
K nivila.
T H E G R E A T A M E R I C A N L I G H T WAR is an
e i r u / , a s m a s h i n g , exciting p s e u d n - d o c u m e n t a r y
h o r r o r show
dealing
Willi events a r o u n d
the
tin II ot the c e n t u r y bill with a direct relevance t o
I he p r o b l e m s of today
Tickets are going very
q u i c k l y , so hurry over to the P A C Box office ( 1 1 1
daily) lor reservations or purchases.
N o t e T i c k e t s for the Wed. S a l . run are $1 with
s t u d e n t s tax. $ 2 w i t h o u t , T h e S u n d a y night benefit
is to raise m o n e y tor the I n t e r n a t i o n a l C h i l d r e n ' s
Theatre Conference
A S.S.I T E.J. c o m i n g
to
S U N Y A in J u n e , c o n t r i b u t i o n s Tor that o n e perl'or
inance are $11).00 ( p a t r o n s ) .\tu\ $5.1)0 ( d o n o r s ) .
State University of New York at Albany
Peculiar Problem
T h e scenario began this past
J u n e ' when the SUNY trustees,
according t o their official " S u m mary of a c t i o n " a u t h o r i z e d Chancellor Boyer " t o take i m m e d i a t e
steps to d i s c o n t i n u e the p r o c e d u r e
w h e r e b y S t a t e Universily subsidizes t h e cost of probiding telep h o n e service in d o r m i t o r y r o o m s
located in residence halls on S t a t e
o p e r a t e d c a m p u s e s . " What, this
m e a n t was Lhat Boyer had t h e
a u t h o r i t y - i f he d e s i r e d - to o r d e r
the fifteen dollar per r o o m s t a t e
subsidy cut o n all SUNY c a m p u s edLo o r d e r the fifteen dollar per
r o o m s t a t e subsidy cut on all
S U N Y c a m p u s e d (including, of
course, Albany S t a t e ) .
This presented t h e S U N Y A administration with a peculiar p r o b -
Photos by Jay Rosenberg
lem. With r o o m bills d u e t o be
mailed out in early A u g u s t , a
decision had to be reached as to
w h e t h e r t h e e x t r a costs of the
subsidy s h o u l d be added to stud e n t s ' bills. T h e cost averaged o u t
to about t w o dollars ;;nrl fifty
cents per s t u d e n t (using a six man
suite as the .nean.)
J o h n Hartley t e l e p h o n e d Mr.
Harry K. Spindler of SUNY Central A d m i n i s t r a t i o n to d e t e r m i n e
w h e t h e r or not the extra cost
should be included. Hartley says
Spindler told him to go ahead and
add the charge because official
word would soon be f o r t h c o m i n g
through administrative c h a n n e l s .
And so, on t h e basis of Spindler's
verbal " a s s u r a n c e " t h a t t h e subsidy would be d r o p p e d , Hartley
decided to charge s t u d e n t s the
extra m o n e y .
" T h e trustees m a d e a decision
that subsidies were t o be elimin a t e d ' " J o h n Hartley explains.
" S o we p u t it ( t h e e x t r a c o s t ) o n
the bill...They (Central Administ r a t i o n ) seemed t o be leaning in
that d i r e c t i o n . "
Hartley e l a b o r a t e d in a m e m o r a n d u m sent on J u l y 21 t o Dr.
Clifton T h o r n e and Mr. R o b e r t
Stierer :
" T h e situation on the Albany
c a m p u s " , the m e m o says in putt
is s u c h t h a t .
we ( t h e Business
Office and t h e Office of S t u d e n t
Affairs) feel t h a t an o p t i o n c a n n o t
be given to s t u d e n t s to refuse
t e l e p h o n e service and the time is
so short before the fall s e m e s t e r
billing goes out that the decision
has been m a d e now to increase
th - o o m rate by $lfi a s e m e s t e r
per tel. ,
"...pro-rated to t h e
n u m b e r ol s t u d e n t s useing t h e
telephone."
And
further on, the m e m o
s t a t e s : "Mr. Spindler says t h a t
the Central Office will provide us
with a m e m o r a n d u m covering this
change ly'Central Office will provide us with u m e m o r a n d u m covering this change b u t we are proceeding on the basis of his telep h o n e c o m m u n i c a t i o n anticipating that we will receive a written
m e m o r a n d u m s h o r t l y . T h e timing
does not allow us t o hold up our
decision."
The
memorandum
concludes
with these w o r d s : " I f for any
reason the Central Office changes
its mind, we will have to m a k e
adjustments in t h e second semester billing b u t at this j u n c t u r e we
are making what seems in our
judgement to be t h e most logical
and rational d e c i s i o n . "
Interestingly, t h o u g h Central Office a p p a r e n t l y did change its
mind, the " a d j u s t m e n t s "
thul
Hartley's o w n m e m o r a n d u m promised were never f o r t h c o m i n g ,
S t u d e n t s w e n t right on paying the
extra cost on their second semester r o o m bills.
And, a p p a r e n t l y , not e v e r y o n e
agreed with Hartley's logic and
rationality. At least o n e administrator, Neil Brown, Dean for Student Affairs, was k n o w n to have
strongly disagreed with Hartley's
decision and t o have urged him t o
wait for t h e official written word.
" I n a meeting with Mr. Harley last
s u m m e r " , says B r o w n , " I was
strongly o p p o s e d t o t h e institution of this fee until specific
writted insrtuctions were received
from the Central Office."
S t u d e n t Association President,
Mike L a m p e r t , w h o is spearheading the drive t o have the
m o n e y refunded t o t h e s t u d e n t s
asks s i m p l y : " W h e r e ' s H a r t l e y ' s
authority?He had n o a u t h o r i t y to
do t h a t . "
Lamperts Letters
But r e g a r d l e s s of w h e t h e r or n o t
Hartley h a d t h e a u t h o r i t y , t h e
immediate p r o b l e m c o n f r o n t i n g
s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t officials is
trying to get t h e m o n e y back. T h e
m o n e y does n o t go to the p h o n e
c o m p a n y — i n s t e a d it is placed in
the hands of t h e S t a t e D o r m i t o r y
A u t h o r i t y ' s income fund. T h u s , it
is used to pay off c o n s t r u c t i o n
b o n d s - n o t t e l e p h o n e bills.
L a m p e r t has written two letters
t o Chancellor Boyer asking for a
refund. He argues, in a letter sent
c o n t i n u e d o n page '1
graphic by Jon Henry
Students Arrested at Stony Brook...
pa9e
3
Legislators Look at SUNY's Budget... page 7
Telethon a Smash Success... ™* 5
y
Students Busted
At Stony Brook Protest
Telephone Charge
continued from page 1.
o n December 13th, that a similar
situation occurred at Plattsburgh
in the fall of 1 9 7 1 , and that "the
Central Staff earlier this year instructed the campus administration at Plattsburgh t o refund the
money...".
Lampert never received a reply.
A second, shorter letter was s e n t
t o Boyer on Fevruary 22 asking
not only for the refund, but for a
five p e r c e n t interest fee "for t h e
six m o n t h s t h e Bursar has had o u r
first semester m o n e y " . This req u e s t has not received an answer
yet either.
H a r t l e y , meanwhile, claims t h a t
his actions were " p e r f e c t l y in line
with w h a t the board of trustees
said". "With the c u r r e n t fiscal
crises we are in,"'Hartley claims,
we c a n ' t afford to pick up on the
s u b s i d y . " He claims t h a t he has
written
a letter t o
Spindler
arguing t h a t his position "is perfectly d e f e n s i b l e " and t h a t " t h e r
is n o reason to refund the money."
So, t h e Central A d m i n i s t r a t i o n
finds itself c a u g h t between t w o
o p p o s i n g forces—the s t u d e n t gov-
ernment and the local administration. It appears word will be
coming s o o n ; M- William Anslow
of Central Administrate:" claimed
that Spmuler has prepared a reply
tor the Chancellor and that it is
bemg reviewed. He refuses t o
c o m m e n t o n its c o n t e n t s until
Boyer signs' it and L a m p e r t receives it.
Anslow also states t h a t t h e only
reason o t h e r SUNY c a m p u s e s did
n o t follow A l b a n y ' s lead find d r o p
t h e subsidy was because t h e instit u t i o n of t h e wage-price freeze
m a d e this impossible. He claims
they " w o u l d have followed s u i t "
w e r e it n o t for t h a t freeze. It was
A l b a n y ' s early billing p r o c e d u r e
a n d t h e fact t h a t some ( t h o u g h
n o t allj^rpom bills were sent o u t
in late J u l y t h a t caused S U N Y A
to escape the freeze—and hence,
d r o p the subsidy.
But uniformity will .soon be
achieved. Initial guidelines have
been modified; besides hiking
r o o m rates, and boosting t u i t i o n
last week, S U N Y trustees t o o k a
further action—they d r o p p e d the
p h o n e subsidy. Statewide.
by Robert H. Mayer
Benezet Addresses
Senate on Tuition
Janet Hood, Student Health Service Director
Janef Hood Telh Students:
"Every Child Should be Wanted
I
by Glenn von Nostitz
) Dr. Janet Hood, Director of the
S t u d e n t Health Service, told a
gathering of w o m e n ' s liberationists T u e s d a y night that, "Whenever children are u n w a n t e d by
loving p a r e n t s , abortion may be
the lesser of two evils. There is
n o t h i n g else that can be said in
favor of i t . " The remarks were
m a d e in an i m p r o m p t u speech to
a b o u t thirty members of the
S U N Y A Women's Liberation Caucus.
The peech p r o m p t e d a rather
hostile
response From various
m e m b e r s of the audience during
a later q u e s t i o n and
answer
period. During the speech, Hood
asked her audience, "What are
you
seeking
to be liberated
f r o m ? " and went on to refute
m a n y >f the liberationists' most
sacred tenets. She maintains that
females " a r e a sex object only if
you w a n t to be a sex o b j e c t . " She
feels t h a t females have as equal a
c h a n c e to d o anything they w a n t
as males, and perhaps a m o r e
equal c h a n c e , claiming that it is
One way you miy with to use your suite phone is to call
Vice-President Hartley (above), thanking him for the $30
fee.
DAVE BRUBECK
80
& THE
« « « * «
L I V E
C
that
«,„, many
„,„„., women
« . . are
. « ""simply
s i m n l v nnot
ot
i n t e r e s t e d " in the professions, she
says t h a t she "is the only o n e "
who is still utilizing here medical
knowledge in a job. F u r t h e r m o r e ,
she cites the fact that there are 75
women doctors in the Capital
Dixtrict who are no longer active
in their field, and says that this is
one of the reasons there are so
few
women
professionals.
" T h e y ' d rather play golf", comments Hood, and she feels that
"this is not a good c o m m e n t a r y
on women in this field."
The health service chief drew a
strongly negative reaction when
she said that "females can do
everything they want to d o " and
that most females do not c o m p e t e
"fair and s q u a r e " with men because they pose more of a risk to
employers. Males, she claims, are
often steadier workers because
they "are not out with the cramps
e v e r y 2 H d a y s , " and that because
of this, employers are entirely
justified in hiring males over females. She wrapped
up
her
remarks on women's liberation
saying that males and females
h a v e U ) c o m p c L o evenly, and that
females should not be given
s p e c i a i treatment,
II
area of " c o n c e p t i o n preventi,
term H o o d uses because "il
m o r e a c c u r a t e than birth eu
trot."
H o o d claims t h a t she has been in
the forefront of the movemenl in
provide b e t t e r c o n c e p t i o n control
facilities, and t h a t she was in the
fight " w h e n c o n c e p t i o n con I ml
was a t a b o o s u b j e c t . " She feels
that
"every
child should In
w a n t e d " and she adds t h a t , "1 am
a pediatrician by training, ami
have seen e n o u g h u n w a n t e d chtl
d r e n . " H o o d ' s personal phi In
sophy on the subject is that "tindecision to bear a chile] should be
that of the w o m a n involved."
Dr. Hood listed the specific MM
vices presently being offered ,n
health service. Most important of
these is i n f o r m a t i o n . T h e service
offers s t u d e n t s information un
c o n c e p t i o n p r e v e n t i o n and the
staff is willing t o talk t o students
a b o u t any p r o b l e m s they may
have. H o o d claims that she has
talked many h o u r s with students.
and has also given speeches In
groups t h r o u g h o u t the c a m p u s
T h e health service also gives
a p p r o p r i a t e referral when aliui
actually easier for w o m e n to get
tion or " b i r t h c o n t r o l " is sought,
into medical schools than men.
but H o o d stresses that the service
Hood characterizes herself as a
does not d i s t r i b u t e " t h e pill" Sin" l i b e r a t e d " w o m a n , in that she
Main Focus is Prevention
says t h a t the health service also
does whatever she wants t o d o .
The main focus of Dr. H o o d ' s " d o e s pregnancy s c r e e n i n g " and
She was o n e of three females
a d m i t t e d to her class at Yale speech, however, centered a r o u n d they assist s t u d e n t s w h o are preg
Medical S c h o o l , and, pointing out what health service is doing in t h e nant o u t of wedlock. Last y<
she says, the health service di i l l
with 4 3 o u t of w e d l o c k pregnan
cies; giving advice and helping
with plans.
Dr. Hood says that the health
service " u r g e s s t u d e n t s to call
their p a r e n t s " , but she stresses
t h a t the health service does mil tin
the calling itself.
T h e health service stall' IIIMI
treats venereal disease has! year
403 VD cases were treated, and
Hood says t h a t VD can now he
treated w i t h o u t parental pernus
sion, " t h a n k s to a law recently
passed by the legislature "
The
health
service
director
envisions an eventual birth control
clinic, a l t h o u g h there are MM
definite plans for one now It'
addition to the University, II"1
clinic would serve tin* AI ban \
C o m m u n i t y , and would he funded
mostly by o u t s i d e sources.
Solidarity With the Movemenl
Although m a n y of her view
ipoints may be a n a t h e m a to the
strict w o m e n ' s liberationists, I.)r
H o o d did e x p r e s s - s o l i d a r i t y with
many of the m o v e m e n t ' s central
goals, including equ«' pay ana"
recognition for doing the same
jobs as m e n . She also feels that
w o m e n s h o u l d be, and in most
cases are, allowed to do whatever
they desire to d o , as long as they
-possess the p r o p e r Qualifications
SUPERSTAR
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Ver*io» .» Cm
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${jmA
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PAGE 2
hill, which was soon s u b s t i t u t e d by a new bill i n t r o d u c e d by N a t h a n
Wright S e n a t o r Wrighi'sbill slated t h a i ,
' T h e S U N Y A Senate strongly objects U, lhe definition hy t h e Board
of Trustees of upper and lower divisional s t u d e n t s in the new t r u s t e e s
tuition policy, and (be use of this differential as the basis of t u i t i o n
and further asks the trustees to rescind this decision and devolve the
a u t h o r i t y of this defintion to lhe local c a m p u s . "
This bill was passed by lhe S c u t a t e and p r e s u m a b l y will he passed
along to the trustees ami t ' h a n c e l o r Boyer.
There was one o t h e r bill that was passed, but not without d e b a t e .
The bill stales that lhe chairmen of a d e p a r t m e n t shall consult the
d e p a r t m e n t when making a decision on renewal of t h e term
a p p o i n t m e n t of a teaching faculty m e m b e r . Michael L a m p e r t argued
against llic hill, saying that the decision would have such great impact
on the person that t h e r e , " n e e d s to he safeguards against arbitrary and
capricious d e c i s i o n s . "
Senator Ulrich Czapski was m o r e " r a d i c a l " than L a m p e r t , and said
thai the chairmen should n o t m a k e the decision at all. Czapski said
(hat the decision should be m a d e by t h e d e p a r t m e n t with c o n s u l t a t i o n
wilh the c h a i r m e n . However tin; a r g u m e n t s could not sway the c r o w d ,
and lhe bill was passed.
MONDAY IS
DOUBLE THE "STEAKS" NITE
AT T H E
ORCHESTRA
IT 7 30 PM IN THE SUNVA GYM
"*"»
* J,l*llnH $4 WITH PROOF OFAM
$2 WITH TAXSJ^
11 A
Nineteen
s t u d e n t s from
the
S t a t e University of New Y o r k at
S t o n y Brook w e r e carted off t o
..Jj4iiv •
jail M o n d a y night in w h a t was
referred to hy the police as a
o " c l e a n and easy o p e r a t i o n . " T h e
K . • • • *s»SMa
arrests were in response to a n
all d a y l o n g take over by s t u d e n t s
w h o said they were part of the
Red Balloon Collective and dem a n d e d thai the university p e r m i t
a s c h e d u l e d " n a t i o n w i d e radical
c o n f e r e n c e " . A s p o k e s m a n for t h e
collective stated that the university w o u l d refuse permission for
by Neil S c h w a r t z b a c h
the c o n f e r e n c e unless the sponsorPresident Bene/.el s p o k e at length on lhe new tuition increase in his
ing irroup p u t up o n e million
message to the S e n a t e early this week. " T h e tuition policy is a very
dollars b o n d agwnsl possible damsignificant change in c o n c e p t as well as d e c r e e , " h e said " W e are seeing
ages. He w e n t on to add t h a t the
a re I urn In the concept of higher e d u c a t i o n as a cost benefit
d e m a n d for bond was " a r b i t r a r y , "
c o m m o d i t y rather than a primarily wide social benefit and the reason
and " t h e y seem to feel thai whenseems to be that there simply isn't e n o u g h
m o n e y in t h e public
ever poor and working people gel
sector "
t o g e t h e r (hey cause rape, d e s t r u c
Uene/et went on in say thai the concept of regionalism is leading
I ion and violence
We waul a
higher ethical inn u> becoming "a m a i l e r "I where you can gel it
peaceful c o n f e r e n c e and we will
" S l u d e n t s are not going In he the c i t i / e n s and participant* of o n e
not he ml imidaled by administrainstitutional e d u c a t i o n a l experience so much .is they are going to be
tion threats of violence".
self educated and enl repeneurx " He d i e d lhe "university w i l h o u l
T h e s t u d e n t s hud h e m negotia
walls", linve-shrotened programs, anil pooling of resources as e x a m p l e s
ling with lhe ailinuiisir.il ion for
of the current I rends
s o m e two weeks anil by Monday
On the Hut inn increase in particular, liemv.ei said that " t h e shifting
the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n luid still rejec
of the cost to the student increasingly reflects b o t h an Kastern
led plans for lhe c o n f e r e n c e .
concept of higher e d u c a t i o n and
a federal concept of ethical i o n . "
Members said they hud mailed out
He added that lie strongly disagrees with this concept :"I think its
7 ,()()() invitations to c a m p u s e s
wrong, but until we find some way of s l o p p i n g defense b u d g e t s of
across the nut inn and that then$ 1 2 0 billion a year.
we're finding that you can't have guns and
was no way they could cancel the
butter and e d u c a t i o n
c o n f e r e n c e since .some 1500 stuIn response to lhe tuition increase, Michael Lampert i n t r o d u c e d a
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
*<*•
by E d d y Trink
In an exclusive interview with a
food service e m p l o y e e w h o w o r k s
on S t a l e Q u a d , il was learned thai
all is n o t well as far as working for
FSA is c o n c e r n e d . As n o t e d in an
article in this paper last week,
food service on S l a t e Quad is
"terrible"
from
an
outsider's
point of view. However, s o m e
FSA e m p l o y e e s claim thai work
ing for Footl Service is almost as
bad as having to cat whal they
serve!
One of lhe major gripes of the
FSA workers is that as a result of
;i light budget, e m p l o y e e s are
asked to work extra hard in case
of absence ol a fellow worker. For
e x a m p l e , if a s t u d e n t w h o works
in a (iii.id kilcfien is out lor onv
3
reason or a n o t h e r , FSA does n o t
call in a n y o n e else to fill in. As a
result, the o t h e r kitchen employees are asked to work e x t r a
hard wilh no h o p e of e o m p e n s a lion. That is, they get no e x t r a
m o n e y for the additional work
put in. A n o t h e r concern of FSA
e m p l o y e e s is thai if a s t u d e n t
begins working for I hem as a
freshman for $ 1 . 8 5 an hour, il is
almost a sure Ihing thai he or she
will be earning the same a m o u n t
of m o n e y four years later,
11 was also learned I bat this
reporter's
previous
contention
that c o c k r o a c h e s are infesting t h e
Slat"' Quad cafeteria was indeed
true, It was revealed ibal lasl
week a "nest " o l C o c k r o a c h e s was
destroyed in lhe quad kitchen,
A p p a r e n t l y , no preventive mens-
Boston Bus Trip
SATURDAY, MARCH 11th
$Q75
m 4.76
^ T
W
LEAVES 7:30AM
TAX
|
tickets o nsale:
MARCH 7-10 IN CC LOBBY
f
Bring a Buddy, Bring your Girl, Bring a good appetite
57 FULLER ROAD
[lleiweeii Centra) Ave. and Wathington
438-7646
Ave.
intention)
SUIM.-MON. 11:00-9:00...FRI.& SAT. 11:00-9:30
•-RIDAY, MARCH :
1972
When a s p o k e s m a n for the university was q u e s t i o n e d as t o w h y
the school seeked police aid h e
replied, " s i m p l y as a way to solve
the technical p r o b l e m of moving
15 p e o p l e . " He also said t h a t t h e
university will do whatever is
necessary to protecl the m e m b e r s
m e m b e r s of the university c o m munity.
M o n d a y night's incident seemed
to tlo n o t h i n g lo resolve lhe problem. Members of the Red balloon Collective said they still had
plans to hold their c o n v e n t i o n . A
s p o k e s m a n for S t o n y Brook said
that the university still h o p e d t h a t
lhe c o n v e n t i o n would be called
off. Me a d d e d that he did n o t
know what action tin? university
would take if the d o n f e r e n c e ,
scheduled l o begin Friday, were
held.
|
P
$5 with Colonial tax; $8 wilh student tax; $10 all others
Cohmml
Quad limnd
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
fundv<l hy student
tax
ures for controlling these p e s t s
have been taken. If you are also
w o n d e r i n g why your food is
s o m e t i m e s dried o u t , it is because
of inefficient heating ovens which
are s u p p o s e d to keep the food
w a r m . Instead, they supply so
m u c h heat that they lend to d r y
up everything p u t in t h e m .
At the m o m e n t FSA e m p l o y e e s
on S t a l e Quad are having t r o u b l e
wilh their e m p l o y e r s on the t o p i c
of punch-in time. 11 seems that
FSA a t t e m p t e d to gel their workers to punch in fifteen m i n u t e s
later than usual o n e day last week,
claiming thai the time was used
by the e m p l o y e e s to eat. Mowever, the S t a t e Quad workers
t h r e a t e n e d to s t o p work if lhe
lime was not restored. The employees feared thai lhe lost time
would further reduce their "miniscule p a y c h e c k s . " In fear of a
work s t o p p a g e , FSA restored the
d e d u c t e d linn' and as of the moment lhe issue has not been
settled.
SUMMER JOBS
....RETURNS MIDNIGHT
PLUS
Inc.tax
T h e 19 s t u d e n t s were charged
with third degree criminal mischief, a felony, and third degree
trespass. T h e y
were
detained
overnight at the C o u n t y police
headquarters.
About Hours and Job Conditions
ORDER 2 STEAK DINNERS AND SAVE
^
turn it u
Il In.iok only 15 minutes lor the
pol
to cordon off .!() spectators
crowded around lhe buildings
main entrance, enter the buildings, and escort
(he demonstrators from the Red Balloon
Collective to about 15 waiting
pal ml cars and a paddy wagon. As
they beaded for their cars, lhe
police were met w i l h a barrage of
snowballs and r o c k s which were
being t h r o w n at t h e m and their
cars by s u p p o r t e r s of t h e arrested
s t u d e n t s . Several police cars w e r e
d e n t e d by r o c k s b u t no o n e was
injured. O n e m e m b e r of the collective, David Appel, said he had a
l u m p o n his head from a c o p ' s
:lub.
Food Service Workers Complain
EVERY MONDAY 5 to 9 P.M. (EXCEPT HOLIDAY)
2 Top Sirloin Stuaks
2 Bakod Potatoos or
2 Ordurs ot Frunch Ftios
2 Ordurs Si/zlur Toast
2 Salads
2 Bevoruyes
d e n t s were e x p e c t e d t o s h o w u p .
T h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n claimed t h a t
the collective could n o t provide
a d e q u a t e plans for security, h o u s ing, h e a l t h , parking, and liability
insurance.
After several hours of discussion
with R o b e r t Chnsen, vice-presid e n t for s t u d e n t affairs and J o h n
Burness, assistant to the college's
president J o h n Toll, the s t u d e n t s
barricaded d o o r s wilh e v e r y o n e
still inside. When the s t u d e n t s
were informed that they were in
violation of a university o r d i n a n c e
a b o u t half of t h e d e m o n s t r a t o r s
left. T h e universiy then o b t a i n e d a
t e m p o r a r y restraining order from
State
Supreme
Court
Justice
Charles U. Thorn, barring the disruption of the university operation. When s t u d e n t s refused t o
leave the c a m p u s security police
b r o k e into the office by cut ling a
huge hole into lhe office with a
lire axe. T h e d e m o n s t r a t o r s then
retreated into a conference r o o m ,
which they barricaded with office
•£
Guvs & Gils needed for summer
employment et numerous locations throughout the nation Including National Parks, Resort
Areas, and Private Camps. For
free information send self-addressed, STAMPED envelope to
Opportunity Research, Dept
SJ0, Century Bidg., Poison, MT
59860. APPLICANTS MUST
APPLY E A R L Y . . .
PAGE 3
NEWS BRIEFS
International
B E I R U T A P - Syria followed u p its first air strike
against Israel in nearly t w o years with a vow t o d a y
t o retaliate against all f u t u r e Israeli a t t a c k s .
M o r t a r s a n d b a z o o k a s o n the Syrian side of the
cease-fire line shelled Israeli positions in the occupied Golan Heights for m o r e than eight h o u r s
M o n d a y night, and the Israelis struck back Wednesday with an air and artillery attack on guerrilla
c a m p s a r o u n d seven villages in s o u t h e r n Syria. The
local governor r e p o r t e d six guerrillas and four
civilians were killed.
It was the first time s i n c e j u n e , 1 9 7 0 , t h a t the
Syrian air force has been in action against the
Israelis.
M O S C O W AP - Sheik Mujibur R a h m a n visited
Lenin's t o m b today and then held his first official
m e e t i n g with C o m m u n i s t p a r t y chief Leonid I.
" T h e people of Bangladesh have on their side the
s u p p o r t of the Soviet Union and o t h e r Socialist
c o u n t r i e s , the s u p p o r t of friendly India, of all
progressive forces of our time w h o sincerely wish
you great successes in all spheres of life," Kosygin
told Mujib.
Kosygin called for a peaceful s e t t l e m e n t on the
s u b c o n t i n e n t . He declared, " c e r t a i n foreign circles"
had given s u p p o r t " t o the Pakistani r e a c t i o n a r i e s , "
meaning the United Slates and China.
Soviet leaders gave Mujib the t r e a t m e n t normally
reserved for a close ally. He was lodged in the
K r e m l i n , an h o n o r accorded only highly regarded
foreigners.
T h e prime minister ol Bangladesh arrived Wednesday seeking i m m e d i a t e and long term aid for his
impoverished, war-ravaged n a t i o n . A Soviet mission
is already in Bangladesh looking things over.
P A R I S AP - French c u s t o m s agents seized 9 3 7
p o u n d s - 4 2 5 kilograms-of p u r e h e r o i n a b o a r d a
s h r i m p boat t o d a y .
T h e F r e n c h Finance Ministry called it the biggest
haul in history and the Paris office of the U.S.
Narcotics Bureau said this a m o u n t w o u l d be e n o u g h
for a o n e - m o n t h supply for every American addict.
F r e n c h officials placed no value on the drugs. T h e
U.S.
Narcotics
Bureau
said
importers
pay
$ 1 0 , 0 0 0 - $ 1 2 , 0 0 0 a kilogram for 80-90 per cent pure
h e r o i n . This w o u l d p u t the price at dockstde at
$ 4 , 2 5 million to $5.1 million. Users pay up to
$ 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 dollars a kilogram when it Ls finally
diluted and split up for retail sale. This would raise
the value t o $ 1 0 6 . 2 5 million.
Marcel Boucan, 5 7 , the captain of the 60-ton
s h r i m p b o a t Caprice cles T e m p s , sought to c o m m i t
suicide by leaping into the water in Marseille port
w h e r e the ship was taken for a search, authorities
said. He was pulled o u t of the water and revived at a
hospital. Police said he had written notes saying thai
his family and crew were not involved.
Ministry sources said the seizure rami- as a tinresult of a long watch on Boucan, w h o was
identified as the former captain of a ship k n o w n to
have been engaged in cigarette smuggling.
When the Caprice left Villefranche, two c u s t o m s
b o a t s overtook her and fired warning shots across
her bow when she refused to s t o p .
National
WASHINGTON AP
Amnesty
resisters and deserters was u p p o
Pentagon and the American Leu
could wreck I he armed I u r n s
' Vietnam <lr,,
I today by Hi
'• They said
"1 defame lb
millions who served h o n o r a b l y and without proles!
But Sen. Kdward M. K e n n e d y , I) M.i.ss., said three
days of hearings before his judiciary s u b c o m m i t t e e
has not convinced him there is yet a p r e p o n d e r a n c e
of evidence or logic to cause the nation cither to
reject amnesy out of h a n d or grant it c o m p l e t e l y .
"We must m a k e o u r ' decision based less on our
personaljHujudiceN and beliefs than on what will be
in the interests of a nation that m u s t find Home way
to bind up the w o u n d s caused by this w a r , "
K e n n e d y said.
Term Papers For Sale!
Telethon 7 2 :
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A move is under way in a small
but g r o w i n g J n u m b e r o f states to
c u r b what is becoming a success" ful service industry in college
t o w n s from the Ivy League to the
Pacific Coast - merchandising
term papers on the open market.
In the California Legislature, the
New York courts and the massachusetts attorney general's office,
p u b l i c officials backed or goaded
by college authorities are moving
against young entrepreneurs who
are ge-tting rich by churning out
o t h e r people's homework.
Ever since a pair of pioneering
brothers launched a Boston term
p a p e r factory 18 months ago and
e x t e n d e d its operations t o 49
o t h e r branches nationwide, more
than 100,000 papers have been
sold t o students and the number
of c o m p e t i n g firms is proliferating.
" I am helping students ovecome
the busy work and repetition and
wasted time of going from shelf to
shelf and page to page doing term
papers in which no learning is
involved," says Ward Warren, 2.'!,
who with his brother, K e n n e t h .
27, founded Termpaper Research
Unlimited Inc.
I
The brothers say they did $1.8
million worth of business last
year.
Termpapers Unlimited and the
other advertise openly in campus
newspapers - "Are you cramped
for time? Let us help y o u , " reads
one ad- and reach students who
pay from $2 lo $6 a page Tor
d o c u m e n t e d research on topics as
varied as Aztec social structure to
Zambian foreign policy.
Th e papers are composed by
g h o s t w r i t e r s , including moonlighting faculty members, graduate s t u d e n t s and technical writers
• many with M.A. and Ph.D. degrees - who sign agreements relinquishing their rights to their
Wnrlf c
Born too lata for
their own timai
Uncommonly
significant for oura.
ifti
WXJLW
mm?warn
Tower East Cinema
March 3 (only)
7:00 & 10 pm LC 7
"We've given these trained people a better way to make m o n e y
and the students have access t o a
clearing house for i n f o r m a t i o n , "
said Ed Whalen, 29, a former
English instructor who is vice president and chief editor for Creative Communications Consultants
in Urbana, 111.
T h e ghostwriters get anywhere
from $2 to $5 a page for their
products.
This view - and the practice of
peddling term papers - is the
target of a measure introduced by
California
Assemblyman J i m
K e y s o r t h a t would make it a
misdemeanor to sell term papers
to students in higher e d u c a t i o n
institutions.
"This bill is against the sellers
and not against s t u d e n t s , " said
Keysor, a Granade Hills D e m o crat. "I think getting it passed
could be a little tough because
people will argue you can't legislate morality."
T h e r e a c t i o n of educators and
a d m i n i s t r a t o r s t o the term p a p e r
business has been mixed, ranKinB
from violent o p p o s i t i o n to phi| 0
sophical re-evaluation of the efficacy of t e r m p a p e r s ,
Harvard D e a n of Students Ar
chie E p p s calls t h e term P ap e r
c o m p a n i e s " a blot on the conscience of A m e r i c a n institutions
of higher l e a r n i n g " and an official
a t S o u t h e r n Illinois University
said t h e firms reflect "a breakd o w n in the relationship between
faculty a n d s t u d e n t s . "
On t h e o t h e r hand, David J
C a r s o n , dean of s t u d e n t s at [Jabson
College in
Massachusetts
Ward Warren's alma mater, sees
t h e t e r m p a p e r companies as i(
s p u r Lo n e w t h i n k i n g .
" P e r h a p s t h e r e will he , u n i l >
serious a n d beneficial gains out or
all this if it causes some revaluation of the w h o l e process {(|
which t e r m p a p e r s are a pari," he
said.
and
by Bui-burn H. Will
mechanics
of
WHdwood's autistic children
Mike L a m p e r t , D e a n Neil B r o w n ,
J a c k S c h w a r t z , a n d Terry Wilbert
individual
acts
in
the
found
and
Individuals, in the a u d i e n c e and
in the T e l e t h o n , helped t o m a k e
dent
Telethon
'72 was
T e l e t h o n ' 7 2 t h e success it was.
tin' success thai over ten m o n t h s
WABY and WSUA stayed with the
ol"
preparation
face
Brody b r o u g h t in t h e m o s t m o n e y
with a $ 2 2 5 total figure.
Gifts c o n t r i b u t e d
by area mer-
program through the night h o u r s ,
chants sold to the highest b i d d e r
throughout
the
and
in true a u c t i o n fashion, and the
hour
levels
to
All
ma rath on
on
the e n t e r t a i n m e n t , technical, and
mechanical
face
warranted.
moved s m o o t h l y
t w e n t y I our
themselves
with s t r a w b e r r y c r e a m pies. B o b
enthusiastic c o m m u n i t y and stusupport.
Such n o t a b l e s as Bill Polchinski,
hundred
s h o w itself.
to
produce a
high quality event.
other stations announced a
running
total as they
publicized
the event. Mayor Corning d o n a t e d
$ 1 0 0 , while Barney Fowler took
items ranged from a $ 1 8 5
ware, a n d a desk t o a c a r t o n of
two pies in the face and c o n t r i b u t -
Caravelle
ed
yards of silver velvet.
fifty
dollars. Many
students
wed-
ding gown, t w o sets of Corningcandy
bars
and
two
President
Much ol* the credit Tor the Tele-
remained a w a k e during the early
Bene/.et o u t b i d all c o n t e n d e r s in
thon belongs lo J u d y Avner and
m o r n i n g to c h e e r on t h e perform-
the first a u c t i o n of the evening.
Mike Plolzker, co-chairmen o l ' t h e
ers, w h o reacted with even b e t t e r
program. T o g e t h e r with a nucleus
acts. T h e O d d Quad b o u g h t vari-
of fourteen c o m m i t t e e
ous
chairmen,
Unsellables
in the
auctions
Throughout
and their a l t i t u d e spurred up the
hour
they organized all aspects of the
bidding.
maintained
show
" E v e r y o n e really w a n t e d T e l e t h o n
from
its publicity
to
actual stage setting. While
the
these
s t u d e n t s were responsible for the
overall c o o r d i n a t i o n , a b o u t seven
h u n d r e d people c o n t r i b u t e d
time
As
Judy
Avner
said,
span,
the
entertainment
an excellent
performance;
pollack
twenty-four
the
three
level of
witty
the Galloping G o u r m e t ,
Larry and the All-Stars, Bill Pol-
and
chinski, the e x t r a o r d i n a r y voice of
by
J o h n S i m i n o , Art Ginesberg - and
lo work, and t h a t ' s the only rea-
well-done
son it d i d . "
STB a d d e d a spark to the evening.
others
Claudine
quality.
T h e pie-throwing was the single
biggest money-raiser of the s h o w .
pieces
per formed
and
Ron,
Totly
contributed
too.
Most are fully clothed, naturally
posed with flowers and pets, bul
* g f
Jfyp.
like the
i n c o n s i d e r a t e behavior of
the fickle soda m a c h i n e and t h e
fuse
that blew
in the
at
8 flO when
worth
of
one
morning
full
hour's
entertainment
in
the
stranded
Ronald MacDonald and Miss Peg-
Telethon
gy from R o m p e r R o o m all tlonat
themselves on stage c o n d u c t i n g an
ed their t i m e .
i n p r o m p l u sing-along with a sur-
staff
snow,
was
S h o w , and WABY'.s Pete Williams,
Telethon
total
spiraled
steadily t h r o u g h Kriday night and
finally,
late Saturday
afternoon,
kept
and
suddenly
the children
the
found
the snowfall
away
for
the
first half hour of the K i d d i e PorI ion, it was w o r t h
the price of
passed Ihe 1971 record of $ 7 , 0 0 0
admission
with a $ 5 5 0 check presented by
s t u d e n t s playing the F a r m e r in the
FSA.
before
to see t w e n t y
college
With
thirty
minutes
left
Dell with Miss Peggy and cheering
the
official
closing,
the
Ronald
showed
$98-11,
and
real live children finally a p p e a r e d .
MacDonald
until
some
everyone m a d e one lasl effort to
And imagine t h e snack bar when a
break
distraught
$10,000. Students
rushed
G o F o r girl b u r s t in
to the slage with dollar hills, the
Saturday
radio
for
creampuff to go • i m m e d i a t e l y - for
and T e l e t h o n
a pie Ihrow beginning upstairs at
announcers
phone-in pledges,
s o m e are nude.,.
spotlight
early Friday night. But the biggest
crisis occurred S a t u r d a y
pleaded
'72 broke $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 within
fifteen
night and d e m a n d e d a
that same m o m e n t .
m i n u t e s of ii.s deadline, T h e total
T h e d e m o n s t r a t o r s said they
p e r p e t u a t e d t h e degradation and
e x p l o i t a t i o n of w o m e n .
There was m o r e c o m m u n i t y sup-
official a m o u n t now s t a n d s some-
port
where in excess of $ 1 0 , 2 2 5 .
and
faculty
participation
than ever before, and the s t r e n g t h
of
" W h y d o n ' t y o u have any photos "f the male b u y e r s " " yelled
one of the d e m o n s ! r a I o r s .
Mul even with all Ihe
prepara
lion and s u p p o r t , T e l e t h o n work
ITS
Miss Buskin
consulted
n-nli
o t h e r m u s e u m officials nntl .in <l
lo post the d e m o n s t r a t o r s ' 1,-H.I
of protest next lo lie- display, .mil
lo close il on March V wlla ll iI n t e r n a t i o n a l W o m e n ' s I lav .
" E a r o u t , " said Mi-. Sand
Ihi- d e m o n s t r a t o r - , dispersed
high
p l a n s " were set with d i s t u r b a n c e s ,
prised pianist. When
discovered
their
"Uesl
Ihe student
contribution
ber
of
acts,
the
huge
ALBANY TAXPAYERS'
ASSOCIATION
working
laid stall', and the overflowing c r o w d .
T h e spirit and a t m o s p h e r e of Tele-
BIRTH RIGHT
I
was
apparent from ihe increased num-
thon were t r e m e n d o u s
GRAND OPENING SEASON]
JJ|V**
the
David Allen, host of Pick a
The
N.O.W. Closes
Whore Exhibit
Ellen Sancjor, national secretary
of the National Organization of
Women, and about a dozen other
women marched outside the museum Wednesday where the EJ .
Belloeq of French origin and be
lieved to have died in 19.18, pllo
tographed the girls in New Orleans
brothels.
to
R h o a d e s , Odd Q u a d ' s rendition of
blackboard
B E R K E L E Y , Calif (AP)- The
University of California Art Museum agreed to close for one day a
display of prostitutes' p h o t o graphs ufter the exhibit was picketed by women's liberationists.
Hector,
T e l e t h o n ' 7 2 had its celebrities,
Kile •live alternative to ab< rf ion
r r o f i l ; non denouunal u.nal
free: no charge
Mini i ii 'i i a wiMi i a mi
V
AI
!..' (until shed
.Id l .' 1 111
h,iw U (»<)
"1 don'l
think we'll ever forget i l , " say Ihe
co-chairmen,
11's nice lo care. And, in this
increasingly bitter and impersonal
• . - . . . - •
world, il's reassuring to see h o w
many do.
The A L B A N Y T A X P A Y E R S ' A S S O C I A T I O N is a watchdog organization set up to see that
the city of Albany spends its money wisely and provides reasonably good services. Wo ' w a n t
to make our government responsible in its spending and responsive to the w i s h e s of the
people.
We can use help in many areas-research, writing, addressing and mailing, supplying advice to
House Restsutmi
Chinese American Foods
citizens w i t h questions, and many other areas. We can also use any and all contributions. If
i;
Finest Cantonese Dishes |
you w o u l d like to help, please sond in the coupon. We will send you the latest issue of THE
WATCHDOG (our monthly n e w s p a p e r ) , and lot you know when our next membership
meeting is.
$.50 w/St<nn Oujul f:.iul...S 1 w/out
Plus: follow the bouncing
ball "I'M AN OLD COW
HAND"
PS: The Cowboys & Ind-1
ians class will especially
want to see THE WILD
BUNCH, the men of the.
old West, operate
to t h e
T e l e t h o n , and t h e r e were over a
With ;i record $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 for C a m p
sixslage managers, and a treasurer,
The National Antiwar Confer- a n t i w a r move m e n ! .
ence sponsored by the S t u d e n t
High school s t u d e n t s ,ii theenn
Mobilization Committee last week ference voted on a national limn
decided on April 22 for the next school speak-mil against the vv;ir
antiwar demonstration. T h e de- on April 19. T h e speak uui will
monstrations will take place in consist of assemblies, r;il'tii*>, ,md
New York City and Los Angeles, discussions in classes,. The ciniter
calling for the immediate with- enee also voted on launching an
d r a w a l of all U.S. forces and e d u c a t i o n a l c a m p a i g n m which
material from Southeast Asia. The teach-ins would be held mi cum
Leach-in held Friday night showed puses and educational
mater ml
that while the troops are being a b o u l the war would be di.vlnhu
withdrawn, the bombings by U.S. ted.
planes have increased. It showed
T h e S.M.C. is also in the process
the U.S. now using an " a u t o m a t e d of building t h e Ilarnslmrg demon
battlefield'" in which an average of s t r a t i o n t o be held April I!' in
.'100 Indochinese are dilled daily s u p p o r t of Dan Berrigan.
while
U.S. casualties
have
A n y o n e interested in Working
dropped. All this has been d o n e to
on t h e April 22 demonstration
give the impression the war is
should c o n t a c t Lewis at 7-6063,
winging down and to s t o p the
work
A Smashing Success
Serving 7 Days a Week
Mail to:
ALBANY TAXPAYERS' ASSOCIATION
11:00 am to 10:00 pm
or Reservations and Catering call: 370-0160
P. O. Box 8087, Albany, N. Y. 12203
Name: .
Address:
I
Phone:
The particular area that I would like to help in is:
PAGE 4
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY. MARCH 3,
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 5
FOR SALE
F o r sals - B o b Dylan Collection
CLASSIFIED
13 records/ 8 Posters books and
PERSONALS
Dear R.T. Happy Anniversary - 19
L O S T : Green ski h a t w i t h green
m o n t h i l Love, M.F.
a n d w h i t e p o m p o m has sentimental
value. Please r e t u r n . Call 472-8700
Pictures - $ 3 5 call 489-4306. Ask
Dear C L H . Likewisel Love, M r .
CAM
L O S T : A n orange hat and black
leather gloves i n b o w l i n g alley, if
f o u n d please call B o b b i , 4 5 7 3 0 9 1
For sale - 1 9 6 5 Mustang Conv.
Now...More
Virile
T w o complete stereo systems i n
excellent
condition.
Steve
457-3072.
HOUSING
Super
Experienced,
Stud
Capitol Correspondent
L O S T : R o u n d wire-rim glasses in
CC Leave at CC Desk. Reward.
N o one wishes y o u a
A r e y o u e seniorTWe w e n t , y o u r
apartment f o r next y e e r l l ' T h r e e
bedrooms - near t h e busline - Call
Dawn
457-5135
or
Peggy
457-4164.
Income Taxes Prepared: Experienced 489-3239 days or Eves:
436-1069.
Frank and Joanne are l o o k i n g f o r
an unfurnished a p a r t m e n t available
April-May
1 br., $ 1 0 0 / m o . , i n
Washington
Park
area.
Call
465-3039.
roommate
Apartment
WAITED
Summer sublet furnished apartment near bus $ 1 8 0 . 4 8 2 - 5 6 3 2 .
459-1180.
Typist-Secretary, Part time. Hours
arranged. Shorthand or speed w r i ting preferred b u t n o t absolute req u i r e m e n t . D r . H o w a r d F l i o r l , SS
328. 4 5 7 - 8 6 8 0 or 4 3 9 - 3 3 5 4 (evenings).
1972 S T U D E N T J O B OPPORTU
N I T Y B O O K L E T l o r Capo Cod and
the Islands. Complete list of businesses requiring summer employees.
Send $ 2 . 0 0 t o : S T U D E N T JOB
O P P O R T U N I T Y B O O K L E T , R.R.
1, B o x 1 1 C, Orleans, Mass., 0 2 6 5 3 .
blue
b i n d e r , Tuesday, please call 7-4056.
FOUND
day. Love, the other Half.
Fiction
books,
many
$.35-$.50 each. Call 436-4523.
SONY T C 3 6 6 3-head tape deck.
Some tapes included, excellent cond i t i o n $ 1 7 0 . Call 674-2779 after
6:00.
T w o people, any c o m b i n a t i o n , t o
not t o o good. F. Scott Fitzgerald.
Do
y o u want
a fast
chick?A certain C.Q. named Ingrid
is action - she swings t o a distant
beat. Can y o u be the drummer she
for an audition. M O M P.S. - Please,
Female roommate wanted immu
dlatoly. Beautiful spacious apart
mont t w o blocks f r o m Draper on
Willott St., O w n largo furnished
r o o m for S41.25 a m o n t h . Call
4 6 5 - 3 0 3 9 aftei 5 : 0 0 p.m.
Will the t w o girls w h o met m e ,
David, i n northern Israel this summer, please cantact me at Univ. Of
Hartford
(Diane
and friend)
203-242-1724.
programs and facilities m a y suffer,
Republican
Assemblyman
w h a t d o t h e real p o w e r s — t h e s t a t e
Henderson
decried
legislators- think
lump
WANTED
Ride W a n t e d : t o H a r t f o r d , Conn,
area,
March
10. Call
Phylis
4574006.
Film:
"Whatever
Happened to
Baby Jane? F r i . a n d Sat. March 3
A p a r t m e n t wanted f o r fall- Furnished, 2 bedrooms, near busline.
Call 4 5 7 - 7 5 0 0 .
lege
A R T SHOW
students
residing
C o u n t y are invited t o display and
sell their paintings, sculpture, jewel
ry
creations,
candles,
woodcraft,
and macrame.
to have y o u r creations viewed by
Us
the p u b l i c a n d to convert artistic
talent i n t o earning power.
P.S. Me l o o , Love Laura
on the
budget
arc
UK,(100
as
SUNY
diverse
as a r e
students.
Some
that
He s t a l e d that
legislators want t o
know
"more
clearly
money
in t h e budget
be
h o w the
is g o i n g t o
spent . . " H e n d e r s o n ,
the T e m p o r a r y
Si t i d y i n g
Stale
head o f
Commission
Campus
Unrest,
highly
Ion
fiscal h e a r i n g o n t h e b u d g e t .
Jonas
| H Nassau
head o f the Joint
thai
Education
has n u t been
offered
Assembly man
Kdwyn
Mason critically question
SUNY's
use o f f u n d s .
Most
spoke
I he
state's
Democratic
A.
Herbert
Posner ( I ) Q u e e n s )
dislikes
t h e use o f
appropriations.
member
legislators
budget
that
Meyerson
he h a d " . . . f i l e d
r e q u i r e that
I'osner,
Chancellor
tant!
that
the majority
the
Governor
project...
party and
do..."
in particular,
$250
that
Meyerson
" t h e $1
million
I>11
w o n hi
to
and
faculty
would
faculty/student
have
been
eel l o r
does
was
SUNY
that
he
legislation
to
work
loads...,"
an
increased
favor
Mall
for many years." He
with
said
"...support
mandate
who
meet
Bayer,
South
could
lived w i t h o u t
impor-
t w o suits t o
t h e b u d g e t be b r o k e n
down,.."
planning
deem
committee
studying S U N Y ' s budget, claimed
State Sen
Fredrick
The lawmaker, a
o f re-
grams
I don't
also
lump sum
o f t h e fiscal
c l a i m e d t h a t " t h e r e are m a n y p r o that
was
during a
feel
enough funds. Others, like upstate
Republican
critical o f S U N Y
Legislative C o m
o n Higher
SUNY
County)
Company
( G u i l d e r land
2 0 a n d 1 5 5 f r o m 1 2 : 0 0 t o 2 30
Work
will
for a reordering
be viewed
and pui
chased b y t h e public and Sunday.
i n d M o n d a y , M a r c h 6 f r o m 5:00 m
9 : 0 0 p.m. A n entrance fee of $3.00
w i l l be required of all exhibitors.
t o public; spoil
of
slate
priorities listing education, mental
ratio if t h e C h a n
n o t present
c o n v i n c i n g h i m that
figures
faculty m e m
For
additional
information
Mi
tiers a r e w o r k i n g a s u i t a b l e
City
items.
The N e w York
lawmaker
claimed
that
was c o n s i d e r i n g s u b m i t t i n g
hilion
lo
roll
Asked
legislation
will
legis
the tuition
whether o r not such
stood
passage,
any chance
Meyerson
depend
clout
hack
he
that
of
s t a t e d , " that
upon
the
students
political
and parents
give t o s u c h l e g i s l a t i o n . "
Another
legislator
for
ii r e s t r u c t u r i n g
but
in a d i f f e r e n t
w h o culled
o f priorities,
manner
than
Meyerson,
was A s s e m b l y w o m a n
Constance
Cook
(H Tioga
Tompkins County)
the
Assembly
llilllee,
years,
been
Kducal ion C o m
staled,
reestablish
" t h e Slate
priorities
t h e Slate
,i h i g h
and
C o o k , head o f
must
m t h e past
University
priority
has
The
m i in h e r
of
report
that
some
g e l is " m i s u s e d
and misspent...."
Jonas staled " I w o u l d
rather
have t h e state p u t in m o r e m o n e y
" . . . t h e m i d d l e class w h o s u p p o r t
t h a n raise t u i t i o n . " T h e l a w m a k e r
the State
Univeristy
are b e i n g
c o n t e n d e d t h a t " R a i s i n g t u i t i o n is
c o u n t e r p r o d u c t i v e . . . , " because i t
taxed t o o m u c h . . " Mason cited
w o u l d only discourage students
"...excessively
ornate
building
f r o m going t o school or encourage
p r o g r a m s . . . " as an e x a m p l e o f
t h e m t o d r o p o u t . Jonas declined
w a s t e f u l spending.,
t o c o m m e n t w h e r e he i n t e n d e d t o
f i n d t h e $ 2 0 m i l l i o n In- f e l l D i a l
T h e A s s e m b l y m a n decried what
SUNY
needed.
The lawmaker
he t e r m e d t h e " p e r m i s s i v e n e s s "
f o u n d at S U N Y . l i e f e l l t h a t c o e d s t a l e d that t h e r e a r e o t h e r a r e a s
where
money
is a v a i l a b l e a n d
echoed his colleagues
''V c o n
t e n d i n g " . . . i t is a m a t t e r o f p r i o r i
lies..."
Vhen asked w h e t h e r o r
•Assemblyman \\. Mason
nol t h e S U N Y budget w o u l d be
CUl,
t h e Kong Island
legislator
s a i d , " I f t h e S U N Y b u d g e t is c u t ,
d o r m s were o n e such e x a m p l e o f
it
w i l l be c u t o v e r m y o p p o the
university's
permissive all i
sition."
Lu.de. S t u d e n t l i v i n g h a b i t s w e r e
and
further
commented
that
however,
demands,
including
into account
all h a d I i .
when con
"SUNY
in
budget
that
featuring poems, photos and essays
a" on the theme of Springtime.
there
tinned,"
if
funds
f o r SKI-IK
necessary
\lletl
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
there
he e o n
is a lack
ported a 1 ml ion
increase
based
u p o n ability t o pay He c o n t e n d e d
that
" A flat
i n c r e a s e is r e g r e s s i v e ,
I d o n o t s u p p o r t i t , " H e felt
tuilion
should
be a r r a n g e d
progressive i n c o m e lax
critic
s y si e m ,
Mason
of
Assemblyman
Kdwyn
i R Delaware,
l o o many
a
amount
of
money
Willi
instruction
that
Mason,
Oswego,
is s p e n t
on
l o o htlle
left
While
ad
"
graduate
weni
of
here
on to
that
s t a l i n g , " We must
change
the ap
p r o u c h t o financing higher education. ..education
on
ability
should
t o pay...in
be b a s e d
order
a n d fine
to
arts
lias
a great
harmed
He
said
A s a final r e m a r k , h i '
money
hike
should
is n o l
be used
Senator
that
County
Republican
R o n a l d S t a f f o r d also
SUNY
needed more
fell
money
R e f i l l hi ica n
Assemblyman
I o n Jonas, head o f the J
In-live C o m m i t t e e
and Republican
Senate
Higher
head
budget
ICclti
Senator
of Ihc
Kducalion C o m
m i l t e e b o t h felt t h a i
Rockefeller's
recommendation
SUNY
Mil
I Legis
o n Higher
Stafford,
w a s l o o lean
is c u t t o o m u c h , " a n d
intimated
that
Jonas,
for
from
there
were
other
areas i n t h e s t a t e t h a t c o u l d he c u t
instead.
T h e Senate
Higher K d u
cat i o n C o m m i t l e e c h a i r m a n
tinued,
" I realize t h a t
great
univeristy
order
l o continue
must
is
con-
w e have a
system
than his colleagues'. T h e St. Lawrence
('(in n t y
labeled
increased
Assemblyman
faculty
salaries
as " n o t m o r a l . " H e c l a i m e d
the " a u t o m a t i c
strangling
that
i n c r e m e n t s " were
the private
universities
because t h e y c o u l d n o t m a t c h t h e
SUNY
s a l a r i e s a m i w e r e therefore
losing
professors
lawmaker
dating
to SUNY. The
d i d n o l feel
faculty
work
that
loads
manwould
necessarily correct, inequities.
Haley,
speaking
on the tuilion
hike, warned that the t u i l i o n must
be
earmark ed
f o r operating ex-
penses o r else i l w o u l d
up
by bonds.
be eaten
In concluding his
remarks, t h e Assemblyman stated,
being
foolish.. . "
Warren
Counties)
head
committee
upon
saying
deep
philoso
the
finance
Lo c o m m e n t
of
the
only
SUNY
that budget
a powerful
legislator,
m a y have a great deal t o say a b o u t
into
more
Anderson
hearings w e r e c u r r e n t l y b e i n g h e l d .
Anderson,
how
and pound
of
refused
the status
budget
sink
wise
On a
Senator
and in
t o c u t e d u c a t i o n . it
penny
a privileged class."
( K - B r o o m e , Delaware and Sullivan
t o have i t , w e
fund i l . " l i e contended, " I l
is r i d i c u l o u s
intelligently."
t h e budget
SUNY's
axe
may
appropriation.
W h i l e it is n o l p o s s i b l e t o d e t e r mine
exactly
SUNY
will
h o w much
finally
money
vm\ u p w i t h ,
several
things
phieal n o t e , S t a f f o r d indicated his
parent .
SUNY's
belief
o v e r t h e past y e a r s is c o i n i n g l o a
that
education
would
help
l o solve Hie g i a v e fiscal a n d s o c i a l
hall,
crises c u r r e n t l y f a c i n g t h e s t a l e .
increasing
Assemblyman
(1) K i n g ' s
the
Chester
County),
Kducalion
St r a n h
a member o f
and
Ways a n d
shifting
slowed
SUNY
do
become
massive
priorities
system's
is n o t l o n g e r
ap-
growth
a n d ever
taxes o f necessity
the
have
growth.
looking for
m o r e funds t o e x p a n d and expert-
"What we want is a university, not a privileged
class."
-Assemblyman IX Haley
Nassau
"SUNY
budget
He went
o n l o say that " W i t h t h e
he s a w
system
a u nuab/.afion
claimed,
is s h o r t
of
tile
the
money."
budget,
S U N Y is a c t u a l l y g o i n g t o r e c e i v e
h a s t o o less
money
than
last
year."
" T h e law
( R o c k e f e l l e r ' s budget
recommeu
" T o o much
programs
like
,"
of
New York
such
foolishness..."
that
" T h e university
future,
b u t is b e i n g
b y . ineffectual
contended
county,
He
it is a c r i m e t o
the people
Mason
e x a m i n a t i o n s are
"SUNY
and c o n t i n u e d , "
support
thai
S U C al
enumerate
the problems
nuts and kooks
have
f o r s o m e decreases
more
budget
said
budget,"
w o u l d be a t t e m p t s l o m i l S U N Y ' s
iirts
and
money
different
" I ' m n o expert o n
l o r nonsense
be a n
axe ap
for
adminis
Univeristy
a
thai
he d i d n ' t
SUNY's
situation were s o m e w h a t
dispropor I lonal e
administration
Stale
Schoharie
C o u n t i e s ) , feels
are "
t rat i n s
many
the S U N Y
is spent
will
justified
Ronald
noted
thai
meal
"...a tuition
cation,
money
effort
lli.il
like a
a
careful
needed..."
T h e lawmaker sup
q u e r i e d as t o w h e t h e r o r n o t t h e n -
"There
".. veiy
stati'd
"
thai
thai
of
i n t e r e s t , t h e n t h e c o u r s e s h o u l d he
claimed
r e c o m m e n d a t i o n C o o k ad
in
" The
" in dealing with
dropped
maker
FRIDAY, MARCH 3. 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
,"
more
K O I 1 were
claimed
'" . . b e l i e v e
proach.
the course
contended
that
lawmaker
appropriations,
for
c u t t o o h a r d . S h e also
fell
1 0
determine
loads because s o m e
w h e t h e r i i is e s s e n t i a l l o r p r e s t i g e
the univeristy
research
mandate
f o r professors.
or
of
.some
She s u m m e d u p her discussion b y
contact J.ff Ro4 i( ri, CC 334 or 457 2190.
to
many
that
mill
milled
Anyon* wishing to contribute in any way,
a r e less t h a n
enrolled
within
been
budget
It will be contained u an insert with the regular ASP.
for S U N Y , " bill d i d admit
she f e l l
that
has l o e v a l u a t e a l l c o u r s e s
which
students
the
Annual Spring Issue.
Posuer fell
work
lo
budget
nulling,
Cook supported a " h o l d the hue
legislation
l i e s l a t e d , " I t h i n k that t h e S U N Y
for
sidermg other budgets.
Clint on
t h o u g h , l i e c l a i m e d that he w o u l d
support
Upstate democrat Daniel Haley's
concerns
" W h a t w e w a u l is a u n i v e r s i t y , n o t
cited
faculty
there
Hie s t a l e ' s h u g e d e f i c i t
o f per
Mason
regulations
hleiiis ul' t h e ghettos
a n d moves
indication
that
o n e " . . . s h o u l d lay d o w n rules a n d
10 s t u d e n t s
ami Sullivan
r e f o r m s as w e l l as
the only
f e r e d t h e r e h a d e n r o l l m e n t s o f less
welfare, t h e health crisis, t h e p r o
On March 17, the ASP publishes its
nidi
2 0 0 Courses o f
nol
i n issiveness
than
that
be t a k e n
al t e n d a n c e
o f S U C at P o t s d a m
eated
159-5570.
WBKXKmnaBEnwwxxK&
low
the high
He c l a i m e d thai an a u d i !
Ira S m o l o w l t z , A r t Show Chairman,
towards prison
decried
and appro
" She claimed
other
legislator
courses
A
moiisly
num-
ber o f hours.
h y g i e n e a n d d r u g p r o g r a m s as v e r y
rates.
Students should bring their work
Trust
called
Activities C o m m i t t e e .
4T R
claiming
legislators, like A s s e m b l y m a n M i l
important
This is a n excellent opportunity
iorod b y the A l b a n y County Youth
7:30 PM and 10 PMj
1
LC 1
I Friday and Saturday!
s u m budgets
i n Albany
March 5 f r o m 3 : 0 0 to 7:00 p.m.
Movie:
King Kong
Vs.
Godzilla
Charles
t h e use o f
AM col
Love,
Wo all love y o u John, oven if y o u
are a lazy S.O.B.
'••••••••••••••••••••••••^
County
"SUNY has too many nuts and kooks...."
ANNUAL
You're a big bluff...John...JOHNW A K E U P ! Eng. 382 - " W h o n I
take a course, I like t o do woll it it.
I d o n ' t take it just 'cause it's easy."
Wait... Y O U w i l l die in your OWN
shit. Noh, Neh.
controversial
views
SUNY's
p.m. o n Sunday, March 5, 1972.
Black Brothers and Sisters; party
in Irving Hall Friday, March 3,
Admission $ . 5 0 .
money
Steuben
b e c a u s e o f t h e m it was i m p o s s i b l e
budget?
most
Dear John Letter:
P.P.P.S. Mo l o u r , Love Scott
NY
YAA yY o
I t e p u ib.lnl c u
Hpuoonn ri ioorr ou d
tl b
liy
v the
u SHIUI M
, .n,o.u., u
PAGE 6
pro-
t o be s p e n t .
con-
and 4 . L C 2 3 . 7 and 9 : 3 0 p.m.
Branch), C o m m u n i t y R o o m , Route
PARTIES
with
measures,
had
W A N T E D : One w i l e . Ago 18-19
yrs. No experience nucessary. Call
Bill 7 4985.
o f .SUNY's
$.50.
P.P.S. Me three. Love Boh
W A N T E D : Three- live bedroom
houso or apartment f o r next semester. Call 457-5057.
As
noted,
Dear John,
RIDE
m o r e e a s i l y see w h e r e
is
lion,
Froe admission
WANTED:
Drinking
partner
(malo) A n y age Call Joanne O t t o
in Monands; D A D is doctor. My fav
is w h i s k y sour.
can
because
Levitt's
funds provided in S U N Y ' s budget,
ator
Basic-H a n d all Shaklee organic
p r o d u c t s , also i n f o r m a t i o n about
u p c o m i n g p a r t y , available f r o m Gail
457-7810.
to N a t i o n a l Commercial Bank and
«
all
be b r o k e n d o w n s o t h a t l e g i s l a t o r s
and learning
and while
that
priorities.
w r i t e Box 130, 179 Partridge S t .
to moot w i t h tho public.
WANTED:
Lionel
Trains
kinds. Instant Cash 4 3 9 - 5 1 0 9 .
administrators
o f the scanty
warn
structuring
marches for iff you're man enough,
someone; take her o f f my hands.
For sale: Panasonic digital clock,
A M / F M Radio. Cost $ 5 5 . V . G .
Condition.
$ 3 0 . Call Brad 457 5231.
T h e Rod Cross Bloodmobilu will
bo o n campus Tuesday March 7
f r o m 1 0 a.m. t o 4 p.m. in the
Campus
Center
Ballroom. Call
4 5 7 - 7 7 2 5 o r 4 5 7 - 6 5 9 4 for information or appointment.
!es w i l l be sold and are encouraged
W A N T E D : Accoustical yuitar, call
Scott 7 8 7 5 5 .
t e n t i o n that the slate budget m u s t
living
Arthur
State
at
of
miller
swinging
fall 1972 $ 4 5 4 8 2 - 5 6 3 2 .
Wanted: T w o b e d r o o m apartment
near Washington Park l o r summer
and next year. Contact Michael
7 3 0 6 0 or 7 3 0 1 6 .
ODDS^EIMDS
Birthday?Get
share r o o m in furnished apartment
3-room apartment t o sublet f o r
May. June, J u l y , August
$190 a
month
with
furnishings • call
4 5 7 8 7 3 9 or 467 8 9 8 3
evenings
only.
echoed
costs
can describe i t , it's yours. (Found
out a cane! Billy's w o m a n .
For sale: 1 185 SR x 15 Radial
• Goodyear 2 155 SR x 15
Radial Snows - Pirelli Call Dave 74985.
lawmakers
Comptroller
F O U N D : G o l d man's ring If you
Oscar - Have a good weekend, b u t
Traveling Partner,
A M P E X Storeo cassette playerrecorder, X A M - 5 E speakers, excellent c o n d i t i o n . $ 9 0 . Tapes $ 2 . 5 0
each. Joel - 472-4445.
• •»••
For Sale 6 3 V W . Very good cond i t i o n . N e w fan. Gen. Tires, R H Ski
Rack A s k i n g $ 4 0 0 . Call 457-7924.
Two
t o de-
to m a k e realistic o r i n f o r m e d cuts,
Dearest A n d y , Please come t o
Cortland soon. I love y o u - Y R F .
Students d e t e r m i n e price that artic
WAITED
threaten
posed $ 4 8 1 m i l l i o n
Fr. n i g h t o n p o d i u m ) Call 7 4056.
for f a l l . Close t o bus
W A N T E D : Someone t o teach me
I N T E R N A T I O N A L JOBS - Europe, South A m e r i c a , Asia, Australia, U.S.A. Openings i n all fields Social Sciences, Business, Sciences,
Engineering, Educaiton etc. Alaska
construction a n d pipeline w o r k .
Earnings t o $ 5 0 0 weekly. Summer
or permanent. Paid expenses, bonuses, traval. Complete current i n f o r m a t i o n - o n l y $ 3 . 0 0 . Money
back guarantee. A p p l y early f o r
best o p p o r t u n i t i e s - w r i t e n o w ! ! !
International
Employment, Box
7 2 1 - N 3 6 2 , Peabody, Massachusetts
0 1 9 6 0 ( N o t an e m p l o y m e n t agency).
notebook,
T o 54 Poo Cohan - Happy B i r t h -
a n d female
route. Call Gail or Pam: 4 5 7 - 7 8 6 7 .
French.
Hebrew
Napper 7-6581 or 7-3358.
Science
students
brand new. Hard b o u n d , 1 5 titles
Wanted:
conversational
LOST:
Little Girl.
State Stereo reveiver. $ 5 0 0 . Call A l
$ 1 . 5 0 each. Paperback, 2 0 titles -
Whiplash New country-funk and
rock, soul band. Specializes in L.
Russet, Band, and original material.
For clubs and parties. Call Mitch
462-9446.
HELP
1 7 0 0 Solid
While
system
monstrate t o protest the spiralling
SUNY,
happier birthday than I d o t Love,
Sale M c i n t o s h
prevent the educational
from becoming elitist..."
by V i c k i Zeldin
More
is aiming t o
please U. Call T o m 7-5034.
Markie:
For
Income taxes prepared. Student
Fees 438-1315.
State Legislators Speak
for Gary.
2 8 9 A u t o Trans $ 1 5 0 482-0097.
SERVICES
Critical Eye Cast at SUNY's Budget
LOST
that
planners."
SUNY's bud
datum
for SUNY
same
as
for
lioyer
tins s t a t e d
f o r U.I72 is t h e
1 i)71
Chancellor
(hat because o f
Means
lack
Committees
of
party
Me s t a t e d ,
the
budget de"I
can't say
it ( t h e b u d g e t ) is l o o f a t . i n
terms
of
enough
I'hiimi'd
education
lo
go
however
there's n o t
around.
that,
"
lie
"minority
m e m b e r s w o n ' t have a n impact o n
(he
budget...there
n e g o t i a t e d salary increases, an ud
possibility
ditional
Slrauh
H.OOO s q u a r e feet o f n e w
decried
o f the minority
in influencing
cisions.
Dial
power
is n o p r a c t i c a l
o f affecting
indicated
thai
change..."
lie d i d n ' t
d o r m space p l u s a l a r g e c o m m i t t -
believe t h a t
t h e budget
w o u l d be
ment t o the system's
cut a n y m o r e
than
currently
dental
school^ S U N Y
medical a n d
us i l
is a c t u a l l y
stands, b u t a d d e d t h a t w h i l e t h e r e
r e c e i v i n g $.')() m i l l i o n less t h a n l a s t
w e r e t h e s a m e d o l l a r s as last y e a r ,
year.)
there were m o r e d e m a n d s .
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
m e n I h u t is m e r e l y l o o k i n g f o .
e n o u g h m o n e y l o survive. Legisl a t o r s have t u r n e d t h e i r i n t e r e s t s
to prison r e f o r m , health a n d drug
programs and (he problems o f the
p o o r w i t h a resultant l o w e r i n g o f
priority
for SUNY's
requests,
l a w m a k e r s h a v e felt t h e w r a t h o f
their
constituents
at i n c r e a s e d
taxes and are t h e r e f o r e e x a m i n i n g
m o n e y appropriations w i t h a fine
t o o t h c o m b . Il w o u l d appear that
a n era o f A l b a n y S t a l e s a n d S o u t h
Malls w i l l never again be t o l e r a t e d
by t h e n e w l y trained m o n e y conscious legislators a n d their constituents.
PAGE 7
N.Y. Red Squad Suppresses Dissent
Courtesy of Liberation News Service
The Laughing Cavalier
In
an
interview
Assistant
an
in
last
to the Director
A S P editorial
Tuesday's
of Food
concerning
ASP,
Peter
Haley-
Service, chose to
Food
Service's
answer
administrative
In N e w York t h e y call t h e m selves the Security and Investigation S e c t i o n ; in o t h e r cities t h e y
fjo by t h e n a m e of t h e Anti-Subversive S q u a d , t h e Intelligence
Unit, the Civil Disobedience Unit
or o t h e r aliases. Most everybody
calls t h e m t h e R e d S q u a d .
If y o u ' v e ever been to any
d e m o n s t r a t i o n y o u ' v e seen t h e m
there—straight-dressed
middleaged m e n k n o w i n g l y eyeing everyo n e or trading slightly menacing
of t h e Gay L i b e r a t i o n F r o n t Filed
suit against t h e N . Y . R e d S q u a d
to s t o p it from further infiltration
i n t e r r o g a t i o n , e l e c t r o n i c surveillance a n d t h e use o f informers.
quips
have
with
people
before. Then
indifference
and
the
towards
its e m p l o y e e s . T h a t
ASP welcomes
though, that
Mr. Haley
is as i t s h o u l d
his c o m m e n t s .
neither
denied
It
is
be
several
t h e r e are t h e i r n o t -
raised
in the editorial.
Rather,
he a s s u m e d
one in o r d e r , a p p a r e n t l y , t o s i d e s t e p several
In
regard
student
ment
to
workers
of
the
without
marked,
hen
dinner
lik.
a n d dress
want
to
workers,
hours
work?"
workers
The
which
anil
which
lor
them
was
to their
inade
would
its
have
evinced
in
thai
o l lab,,,
which
employees.
re
employees
made the growth
inevitable. Companies
listen
between
Hale\
asks
mentality
the one which
do
Quail
c o n c e r n i n g t h e rearraime
change
employ
I n ,i
capitalist
to consult
workers
They
exist
until
management
the workers
is n e v e r
obligated
themselves
form
into
a
collective
which
regard
student
^ SPLIT- LEVEL
When Nixon
newsmen
21,
Edgar
writer
Snow,
and
since
them.
in Peking
the
journalist
documented
tion
a n d his party
arrived
Snow,
with
i' I W U g h l o
b u t su re,cry w a s
W h e n w i n'd r e a c h e d
s u c h a llline, as a R e d A r m y ,
was a l l o w e d
into
win
leaders
was n o t a m o n g
of
year
much'
it
him (Nixon)"
had
a
medical
learn
1,1
'
China
w h e r e he l a l k c d
and
1'ie.hlers
T h e Chinese m i s l e d S IOW, e o n ,
l i i m I'm liis , i h j c c l i v i t y
Star
l)i;;
China
which
Hevolulion,
Ihe Liiltl! March ami
Mao O d d l y .-nuuejl | h , , |
in
Chinese
A l
k was
before
relumed
lihill,
d,
|„
llL
il
in I
Production
warren
Manager
wishart
"I
Sports Editor
atari abtiay
Photography Editors
loan nioffji,
Stovil ri
1
Editorial Page Editor
llary fil i iarr|i
Advertising Manager
jell nidtjeni
Associate Advertising Manager
lindii irailii
Business Manager
phil mark
Technical Editor
llubliitl PtaaintiH
Assistant Technical Editors
ta'iMi koern.n
phyla, p o m .
Advertising Production
loin 'h-iili",
ilrl'V sus'.lli.n.
Graffiti Editor
la liieanutiil
Classified Advertising Manager
a l l y luil elhoiij
Circulation Manager
nil Wl n lit
Exchange Editor
Hon
lor a dozen
"I
conceived
o p i ii
China
tiughl
lo
I'r
eats a n d w h e n
s
Ki.ml
lions
Ihe
wilb
make
have
pre
r
whal
pretty
al
all
of
soon
I,
11)70
;""»!''
Snow
Chairman
M a o , an
never
before
i , , ail
A n d o n D e i - ] ,H o f I h a i
he h a d a f i v e h o u r
couvcrsn
l i o n w l l h M a o w h i c h was I n p o u i l
I h e w a y l o m o r e reeenl events
Spenkllie, o f M a o , S n o w
an
April
maillizille
einlnenl
would
I !I7 I
reporled
Issi
f
" l i e said Ihiil
shortly
adnul
Republic
lo
China
representative
of American
of a
broad
spectrum
a m i press o p i n i o n f r o m | h c
nitlll.
I h e m i d d l e a n d I h e 1,-11 I I , .
' ,,
1|Ml,
po
,.„r,V|,r
s u t l i i n s W i l l i A i i i e r u - a i i o f f i c i a l s al
II"'
blithest
level. Inch,dm,. Mr
Nixon "
Il
win-
seemed
has w r
managemem
worker,
without
.,
I , , , I | n - e a h ,,
ilunk
when
.itivm,
is
••,, h o m e a m i e a l a
those
were
to determine
If
w h o work
bleak
a qtuik
i
concerned,
if nine
management
is e v e i
is u n w i l l i n g
n ol student
workers
Hill III ill ||,,,| S'llOW
n a l m o s t ., d o / e n
»;
» " y " I " ' h e n openly
l h
"'
»"•"
>•> « « " » «
""<>*•
'I'l'"
'
"
V
u
would
dedmtcd
lm
to .urepi
ihe
I'"
,r
w
„(,wv.
Msmhua,
b e t „,„..„. ,,,-ess ,,„,-„
w s m
n't
7
,
-,,,
' " " "
K
"
1
""• '•••"•-»»i.i
"^»."»-v
,,
| (
(•»,„„,
„lr„
»•
,„,,
slamls
o u l as
„
s l
„
, J,,,',
Z
tactics
have
t h e years
PACK 8
I I seems necessary
l
-,,,,
M
'
«'•••*i
";',•
•
m e t h o d s — a n d are t h e first ones t o
admit
it. They
responded
to the
anti BOSS suit w i t h an a f f i d a v i t o f
the
ties a r e b o u n d t o be u n d e r
BOSS freely a d m i t s
wiretapping
switched
"undercover
the unit
to
methods
to
ing i n f i l t r a t e r s ( R e d Squad people
division
R e d S q u a d m a n w h o has b e c o m e
t h e F B I w h o w e r e o n l y r e l y i n g <m
most
demonstrations
N e w Y o r k e r s recognize
are s p e c i a l l y t r a i n e d t o i n f i l
informers (people
an ad f o r t h e C h e m i c a l Bank
Black
were
the
moonlighting
caption,
national
"What
hanker
an
with
unlimited
vision c a n d o f o r a business
unlimited
potential/'
with
inter-
But
with
Finn-
people
to
This
is a l l t o " s e c u r e i n f o r m a t i o n r e l a t ing t o the activities o f any person
a serious
problem"
m a y pose a t h r e a t
to
a
crime
For
or
more
BOSS
imformation
case—or
to trade
police
on the
informa-
t i o n o n local R e d S q u a d s — c o n t a c t
The function o f the Intelligence
(of which
BOSS
is t h e
i m p o r t a n t p a r t ) is i n g e n e r a l
M a r t i n Stolar, one o f the lawyers
on
t h e case,
at
64 0
Broadway,
New York, N.Y. 10012.
w h o wt>re p a r t
people including three people w h o
Finne-
of
of
to infiltrators.
conduct
ministration."
Irate an o r g a n i z a t i o n ) long before
to wiring
eaves-
is l i k e l y l o r e s u l t
life, properly or governmental ad-
who
from
electronic
in
or rhetoric
w a s us-
in t h e a f f i -
ranging
groups"
k n o w n . T h e organization
silver-haired
at
activities
closer
or g r o u p w h i c h
o r g a n i z a t i o n s i n N e w Y o r k is w e l l
Probably
Finnegan—a
prominent
a n d t h e close surveil-
t o cameras
t h e m o s t f a m o u s e x a m p l e is J o h n
so
employed
BOSS' reputation for infiltrating
s o m e o f tiie agents have be-
slick,
operators
BOSS
with
scrutiny.
was an a m a z i n g l y f r a n k r e s p o n s e .
00's
secmust
record y o u r other activi-
davit
the
Department
use o f t h e e q u i p m e n t
political
by d e f i n i n g t h e i r a c t i v i t i e s — a n d i t
during
and surveil-
The other
t h e m , w h i c h means i f y o u have a
their o w n (Ihey were required t o )
their
an o r g a n i z a t i o n
and
nn
de
a i d e d t o sell o u t ) . I I is w . - l ' n o w i
al
Panthe.
Lion-in
fact
Panthers
to
I'.nty
h.'lim
I :i
ihe N.Y.
.it i t s i n c e p most
.»l t h e
w i n > wen- m i trinl had
even j o i n e d
most
the Panther
assigned
Thai i.-. p r o b a b l y t h e
famous
case
b u t (here are
communications
"H
does
f r i t f u t n orn.
It it the tfwcial tile
on d i m n t t n . "
from
"Automated War"
pi'upli'
purl nit-nl.
iiliolhi'i
plii-nM-
T o I In- K i l i l i
'l'ii(Jl'llui|-
wilh
recently
many
viewed
others
I
I h e slides
" T h e A l i l o m n l e d War" pill
by
NAHMEC
Philadelphia
Research
(_Wlnlc
lis
in
content
new, I found
lis
heavy
"rurpniiilr
r.-sj.i m s i h i l i l y "
offered
purl
all I n n w i l l i n g l y
I n sup-
tins kind o f hideous c o n t r o l
of potential
lor
threats.
public
Perhaps Ihe
d i s a s s o c i a l i n n is
n
lev. I I «
i l l i ' i l i n a i-nllrs.-
wr
" n lli-wspiip-
mi i l n - p i i i l r s s n i -
laiin-s
in- i l u y a n i l l o i r !
i-iiini- in l i
us I h e c o i l -..• w a s c a n c e l l e d . W h y 7
Heciiise
lhal
;ne
Iln-
a i l m i n i M r a l i n n said
could
but
notice
cnmpnnyine,
each s l i d e so t h a i
be t e r m e d
evidence
a
lapel H o u s e
it
documentary
Ah, So
rather than propaganda.
While not intendinn to influence
of
others,
I
a response
from
our laciilly
anil
II
•h
Malheniallt's
inosl
n p r o s l i l l l l e d , alhi-il
cases
unwillingly,
b\
H i , , , , - n l l e m p l i i l B I " d e l u d e us m l .
false
s.-ciiiiU
I
wuuld
also
Iln,-.-
years
Why I ' l l
s c " NuW
N i x o n is I h e r e , l l u - nnsiver
Id be s e l l ' e v i d
C h es. is a
I liilie.llau,e T h e r e it.
nljui,
endure???
I h r e e d a y s l a t e r w h e n I'resiHene/.el
announced
that
i n ( I I Ihe demands
make
and
wasn'l
worth
yjii'i'ii
a p p r o p r i a t e d at least l t i t h o u
o f an o f f i c e
aboul
an
can
T
acb whal???
economics?'.*': 1
colonial
shil,
history???
and
wlial's
worse
III.
lhal
' F u n d e d by S.A.
much
The
m
Belliiierently yours
lhal
it less ele
T o the Editor:
Hopefully
„ ,
P o t
,
sciousness
SllOtS
i"
play
T o I lie E d i t o r :
Tallinn
always
put
shots
to
al
l'"SA
lias
be a f a v o r i t e
the shock o f the bin c i t y
home
(memory
can
funny tricks on a body, huh
had
calmed
down
lo
write
his
article.
we usually
per
for d o o m
Ihe lype
destined
if we a p p r o a c h i l w i l h
of melodramatic
self
I l n - pasl l e w m o n t h s , m y s e l f
I'mhleousness w h i c h y o u r r e p o r t e r
and
other
concerned
students
h a v e m e t w i l h e x e c u t i v e s o f h'SA
on rcducinc, l h .
loiinl o f paper
induliics in
I f N e w Y o r k e r s are p r e o c c u p i e d
w i t h S u r v i v a l , i t is a t r i b u t e t o
p r o d u c t s used i n F o o d S e r v i c e
them
Ve
lhal
Ihey
l o reasonable sutiuesliolls and very
willinH l o cooperate. By Ihe l i m e
l l n s l e t t e r is p u b l i s h e d , t h e p a p e r
themselves,
they
have
learned
cnoue.li m i l t o w a i t f o r a n y o n e
else t o d m t h e m o u t . V h e l b e r it is
c u p s used d u r i n i i l u n c h s h o u l d be
r e p l a c e d by e j a s s w u r c , a n d h a r d
o u t o f n u e e s s i l y o r n o t , t h e y have
h a r d e n e d alone, w i t h t h e c i t y , a n d
slyiofoam,
in l b ' '
Discussions o f related
s u c h as r e e y c h n e , l-'uud
indeed
so s t u b
biiruly
for
If
presisl
f o u n d l h a l l-'SA is i p i i l e r e c e p t i v e
are possibly
self-reliant
women
they
the lllosl
buried
admirably
anitreuate o f m e n a n d
in l l n s n a t i o n , l u a l i m e
w h e n all polities are t h e p o l i t i c s o f
Service cans a n d r e m o v a l o f k . ' i c l i
frustration,
Ihey are N e w Y o r k ' s
up,
|„,si
|
m u s t a r d a n d sail p a c k e t s , a r e
eutituiuiiU'
Willi
developments
c o m i n u soon
One should
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
con-
severely
c a i i c i t i e s , a n d i l is o n l y
l-'SA is n o l t h e evil e x p l o i t i v e
nuhlcins
'""•'•
too
lhal
la.slic r e u s a b l e b o w l s w i l l be I h e
.,ln.nb
Mayer's
N e w Y o r k is i n a d e s p e r a t e a n d
u e j y c o n d i t i o n , b u t i l is a c o n d l
l i o n shared by most other A m e r i
near f u t u r e
I,I.„
Hob
was n o t
Hob?). S t i l l , i l m i g h t have been
b e t t e r i f he h a d w a i l e d u n t i l he
seemed
substitute
(
b y
sporl of students S o m e t i m e s w i l h
ijooll reason, sometimes n o l l l o w
e v e r , i l has b e e n P Y K ' s e x p e r i e n c e
Km
'„„,
U o d
o n his trip
c o r p o r a l i o n that
c e i v e it is
tin
Sl„i
Big City
Marshall N. Toplansky
Hi
rii( ECP
KRIDy\Y, MARCH 3, 1972
M a r k Plant
ill
Rican
is
a
lhal
i.s M u l l
e v e r y o n e o n t h i s c a m p u s k n o w s II
II
the
is b u l l s h i t
When y
ep
midsl o f n b u d
| | „ . r e l e v n n l eniii-.es a n d , h . l v ,
realize
and d i d some-
Chairman,PYK*
in Ihe
Puerto
who
.Sincerely y o u r s .
t h e first place.
of a
Puerto
This
as m u c h
A
line,, h u l by r e a s o n a b l e d i s c u s s i l m s
as I h e y
education
half
bcginiiinji.
mediocre
that
y o u pay twice
lor
li,
l o r I h e .salary
ty''?'.''.' T h i n k
tuition
ha'
dollars
Complete
be
am
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
l a n c e ' 1 N o , it is t o o l a i c f o r I l u l l
tbinij about i l .
wa.s a d d e d l o t h e
solid
b e | j i n i l i r l | | n o l m a d e b y n a m e cal .
impor
is a
sll-ps
obviously
o l ' primary
il
nl
wash',
is
lull
all s m a l l
problem
Is I b i s t h e t y p e u l ' u n i v e r s i t y
e d u c a t i o n that w e are d o o m e d l o
,
$1,0011 is m i n i s c u l e
m p a r e d l o t h e uross w a s t e
t
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
an-
ihi-
pinfes
w i n ' know
n
111 s i i l v n i | i
people
ics
W i t h o u t d o u b t , t h i s s c h o o l has
i | , , . n m s l messed u p p r i o r i t i e s o l
any u n i v e r s i t y i n t h e c o u n l r y
I h a v e been l a k n i c , C h i n e s e fur
sini-i- lasl yi-ar. A i l n i i l
llli-si-
problem
establishment
lhal
I'u.Tlii lliians
Depart m e n t o f Puerto K i c n n S l l l d
',',, | h , - E d i t o r ;
li'llly,
o r d e r I n hiivp a it.'jmrl n u n I w h i c h
lull-professor, a n d $1,1)00 l o r the
autl
s l i i i l e u l s 111 P h y s i c s , C u i n p u t
tin'
I n 111"' I ' l l l i l i -
between
sii.nl
would
h o p e t h a t I l n - slides w u u l d p r u m p l
nl'
sliHip
. - l i n i ' i l 21",
common
den
lie-
Ihe
lu
purs'hascs n l p a p i - r r n i m l s has nV
Chiiu-M-" l ) u
s l r i i t o n is l o n i ! u o i i e .
h
and
Ihe
afford
llavi-
I n sniin-l l i n n ;
like
J•/ o n ' ; „ u s e m e s t e r s a l a r y f o r i h e
Km ihe insult
help
nol
linppi-ns
ii'li'vniil
T h e menial balance o f Ihe ailmini
Paul S m i t h
not
Su whal
i.'iilly
t o see i t a s e c o n d l i m e . O n e
thai
Hi,il
i n an i l i - i l i . - n l a
mi iln campus.
so
appreciate
.,
I h i ' ovvr iiwcl
n-wspnp.-rs
M-II|I
Sincerely,
could
illir
wlii'ii-
i/'-tl
c j i n m i 1 In- I;
I
implications
must
.iri-ii
l l n s M T I I I . - I I n In-
I-IIII w e l l a p p l y . 'I'l'i-linic.-il s k i l l s
anil f i n a n c i a l resources have I
i
time
was m i l c o m p l e t e l y
in o u r Blihini'-s-s l ) r
SHUT
b o o k s o n C h i n a w o u l d no o n I I ,
Inp
okay
B O S S has t r i e d a g r e a t v a r i e t y o f
because o f " t h e i r
over
i is b o l l , „ ,
M
with
explosives,
which
Gradually
,,,„,„.,.,
II,use
h
dealing
of
i ,
a m i | o d a l e I h e h.-sl a c e , i , n i l u l
' " ' - " ' I * -'««.
' - ''
,
of
"xperience
of
.mud
, his
-inlcd ,
by K i l o
A l t e r r e c o u n t . , , ^ b r i e f l y , „ , . his
tions
his
lance
testified
liBBii
v "
,„„,„,,,
,i
,1,
.earn ,.„. ::::"":"'
vz-z::::
r,;."" ""• • '
ih-bvercd
for
taries."
„,,,
s
equipment.
by
smaller
Chinese Kcvol,,,,,,,,
-
< hinc.se
i4stvfriinti.nl
rcnicsentn
lues
M-,,,,.
r s,
P"»"IUi
I es, • '
""""',"
w n i H ' s e a n d AiMi'iii-aiVh nl l e n d . . . I
ll„- f l u
'
lallRlulKl'S a n d r e a d a l l I I V . ' I
w o r l d O f a l l b i s b o o k s /(.-,/
hkelo,
Z'Zl v;'~
„
u l w „ h l „ s ,le
' , ,
s
w
, l l ,,
,,,,,.,„lilry
" . U n i t e d S,
1,,-iw
o f ,1 ,s c o m a ,
w l n e b have b e e
'',
**'
U"ltv..« f r o m
" v c M h e world, uicludninnany
'»«;""
We h c l l - O
w.lleerlanilvmow,
S
all the b u g g i n g
lance
a n d arc t r e a t e d l i k e v i s i t i n g d i g n i -
into
were
w h o s e s k i l l s " i n m y o p i n i o n " have
|,„.„d
iv.endsbip
agent
assigned t o t h e F a m i l y w a s c h o s e n
the
trial
,„.„,. t l | u , A r i „ , „ , „ , ,
,lcs. I,.
w i n c h h e w o r k e d , „ his 1,1,-,,,,,,
" ' - . . C h i n a are far
r
„
The
said, they increased the n u m b e r o f
male m o d e l . He once appeared in
Computer
too.
T h e y can
t h a t a n u m b e r o f I h e IU>SS ag • s
of
dles
mikes
in the c i t y
who
members
the Police D e p a r t m e n t w h i c h han-
body
walk i n l n a n y precinct
as a
f o r Peace, a n d a m e m b e r
B O S S is a l s o t h e c e n t r a l s e c t i o n o f
w a l l s I r y m g I n gi't i n t o
demonstration
discover
phones,
BOSS w i r e t a p p e d
the street a n d pick a key p o i n t in
p a r Is.
to
bugged r o o m s a n d cars, a n d used
bank)
a d e m o n s t r a t i o n , dive in a n d split
be f o u n d
People
and groups
photography
w h e n n o t o n o f f i c i a l business,
Abbie
persons
evidence o f their illegal a c t i v i t i e s . "
dropping
according to one uh-
o f the
a
Because o f t h e i n c r e a s e o f r a d i c a l
lhal
gan,
o n the Red
late
firebomb
aetivites
down
can
a film
to
server, " c u p s an- tearing d o w n t h e
drive
fact has an i n t e l l i g e n c e d i v i s i o n o f
making
1970, about
enrps.
would
its w o n ) .
a group of New York
in
investigations
people." They
and swap c o m m e n t s .
m a i l b o x ( t h e Post O f f i c e in
(six people w h o w e r e c a u g h t
"initiate
activities a n d associations o f those
knuckles and " h e a l the shil out nl
him
meal
might,
„,,I,„-o„l,;,|,|,.
"W Snow sslandards. and show
|,,|,.
lilical
••Poke in f . n ,
.iuK.in.it H.ilK
I don't
especially
'""" r
, ::,"|,,lll|y "»•
<'h.
»"«" l"'"Ple
l h a l Ins m a n y w r . l
mils s h o w
i,
.
.,
, """"'"" l" I
'Vi. w e r e
I h e uuy
o f Ihe People's
visitors
is
and then
„'S
"' ' '"""'••""...lllnis-m
w h o a c c o m p a n i e d , ) „ . p r „ s , d e „ t as
1 cell-lira
"'
HI
don't.
to
B O S S is an e l i t e
every
in
m
are g o i n g
In New Y o r k .
that m a n y
workers.
lomtnellted. " W h o knows
-idem,,! all llie c n m p a r a l l v c China
October
people
that
awat,
the
ur
along
the
t h i n k t h a i t h e r e j.s a n a g e n t b e h i n d
.,, u n c i lines I
'
American
meals.
"l'»"-sibiliry,a
China,
vear
,, , 1 , , / e n
d o n o t eat at a l l . o r o n l y e . u
an effort
""eaten
h o n o r rarely u n r u l e d l o visitors l o
and
male and
have been
meals
student
service
workers,
if
network
w i t h i t are g r o w i n g so r a p i d l y
conclusions
Willi
about
('ommunisls
October
ol
llu-y
lor food
Student
The
stalking
of
used k a r a t e a n d brass
Service.
Last
be o r w h o c a u l
any
Oil
lor
troops
.r- y
called
lime
shock
. B ,
that
service.
worker,
must
the
Trust
returning
also denies
long
student
o f t h e Peace m o v e m e n t i n H M i H , it
Seel
. n e l g. n. e a..d
time
changed. " A t Ihe beginning
I n t h e case o f t h e F a m i l y
Moreover
workers
i,,ken ,,gains.
punchiards
furthermore,
M y tunc
who
believe
walcbed
in
empathy
clashed
('hinese
some
Tea Editorial ofllce o l the Albany student Prasi n localod in
Campus Center 326 of the State University of New York at
A l b a n y . 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany. New York
12222. The ASP may be reached by telephone at (5 IB)
4 5 7 2 1 9 0 . The Albany Student Press subscribfls to Ihe
Associated Press, College Press Service, and Liberation News
Service, and Is
funded by mandatory student lax.
Price for a subscription Is seven dollars per year or four
dollars per semester.
C o m m u n i c a t i o n s are printed ei space permits and are tublect
to editing. Editorial policy of the Albany Student Press Is
deuesvrtrvMHvy trw t a m o s tat Board.
'lillll(''1
going lo work
y e a r s , 1 speak
as a j o u r n a l i s t
experts
anion
In r e g a r d t o t h a t , M r . Hales
have
lived
a (ileal
so-called
Service.
despite
Q u a d , every
Quad,
meal."
said
I liave
workers
sixties, its tactics since that
h
the paranoia
active
have been w a t c h e d b y i t ) since t h e
t e
and
of
p e o p l e w h o have w a t c h e d i t ( a n d
come almost celebrities.
mil
"lonial
hiMs. s o m e t i m e s
China
Food
to student
an
and
raises ever
I have seen o r
l o r the Chinese people
News Editor
maida criiiiihiii
Associate News Editor
ulenri von . i n s t i l /
Features Editors
John burnish
dubbin r i a l a m o h i i
Off-Campus News Editor
bob mayui
Associated Press Editor
ilan.iv loss
A r t s Editor
'.leva a m i n o f l
Assistant A r t s Editor
i hi
MlM
( :
what I have o b l a m e d f r o m reliable
Chinese,
with
in
that in-
T h e f u e l is t h e n
forgot.
sources,"
Snow
off
a wholesale
someboiK
as be saw
ks a n d a r t i c l e s
feigned disbelief.
promised
Service
has h a d q u i t e
c l u d e s 2 0 f e d e r a l a g e n c i e s s u e . as
had
in
l i l f i I. a n d l ! l ? l l , attain re
reported only whal
Food
" " • ' I plan, despite the la, t thai all meals m i g h i
(,'himi
Ihe r e v o l u t i o n
lays
Perhaps he just
form
Bureau
to
numerous others.
B O S S ' is c o n s i d e r e d
low-key
c o m p a r e d t o t h e m u c h m o r e aggressive a n d t o u g h C h i c a g o R e d
S q u a d f o r e x a m p l e . B u t t h e f a c t is
the files i n t h e i r i n c o n s p i c u o u s
H u d s o n S t . o f f i c e i n c l u d e dossiers
o n an e s t i m a t e d 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 p e o p l e
in N e w Y o r k
right n o w . T h e
c i t y ' s s q u a d i n c l u d e s 2 0 0 - 2 5 0 overt
agents w h o go l o p u b l i c activities
like demonstrations (no) c o u n t i n g
i n f o r m e r s a n d undercover agents
who
i n f i l l rale
organizations).
T h e i r b u d g e l is e s t i m a t e d at a b o u l
$:i m i l l i o n .
raises o f t e n Ji
never c o m e t h r o u g h . Haley
at C o l o n i a l
si,eh
some
huge intelligence n e t w o r k
have
helped
and l l l l d e r s l a n d i n u ; in II'«• h i .
I
w e s t e r n r e p o r t e r s w h o I ack in I h e
.'Ill's w e r e d e n y i n g D i a l i h e r e was
published
"I
lleil
for
promised
female, was laid o f f . Surely M r . H a l e y
His experi
i n t r o d u c e A m e r i c a I n i h e Chinese
raises
w o r k e r s w h o have n o t received
years e m p l o y m e n t
Service
summer
revolutionary
mt'mlinjj
porting
senia
three
I'ood
with Mao
ence there became a h o o k
Snow
al
through, Haley
student
in t h e f i l l w h i c h
came out ill Ihe U n i t e d States
Editor-in-Chief
come
many
a r y base i n Y e n a n i n n o r t h w e s t e r n
nil
him.
lie
the r e v o l u t i o n
Tse T u n e , a n i l o i l i e r
revolu-
k n o w n t h a t " M a o w o u l d lie h a p p y
talk
lone,
C h i n a t h a t S n o w w a s i n il r e c o v e r
inn, C h i n e s e P r e m i e r C l i o n K n | , a i
Swiss v i l l a g e o f K y s i n s .
to
live
trip,
w h o had
at age 6 6 , d i e d
w h o last
hi
Ihis
unsuccessful.
c a n c e r K e b . 10 a l his h o m e i n t h e
Snow,
hoped
cover
that
w o r k e r s are f e w , a n d that
raises a r e I r e u u e n t l y
American
the Chinese
1 ,).'.6,
of
Feb
charge
not
alter
in
Red
career. A c c o r d i n g t o a n u m b e r o f
area a n d f o r m t h e l o c a l l i n k s t o t h e
Hoffman,
the
are
DIPLOMACY'
Old China Hand, Edgar Snow, Dies
to
als
Squad, Panthers, a lawyer,
cannot be ignored,
In
and
every large o r m e d i u m - s i z e d u r b a n
Recently
system,
who
lh.
f a k e pre.wilh a TV
jocular
questions.
Indian
business in this c o u n t r y
in this c o u n t r y
union
at
a
working
is p r e c i s e l y
unions
hour
the
later
"What
they
dispute
and management
consulting
necessitated
remark
the recent
a
called)
cops." They
to look
N.Y.
S p e c i a l Services—as i t u s e d t o b e
times
manage
the
( o r BOSS—the
was
r\
points
seen
Squad
so-oonspicuous cronies w h o some-
unfortunate
nor conceded
they've
I n recent y e a r s ,
egan is a diversion.
also
. , ,, . i r <,A
a d d U n i t I1 H A
|lcl|)1.
.suspect
Mr.
Mayer
w a s a w a y t o o l.»ili».
Sincerely,
Michael . I . Antonueci
PAGE 9
* I.
m- •
- •
w
The Plot: We Gotta D< Something! The Play:
SB
Photos by Jay Rosenberg
Graphics by Jon Guttman
by Michelo Kiintor
I.ISlh
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ol
Slaved
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Willi
"Ni'Ws.lllHIl"
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!
n — »
Geology Club w i l l meet M o n . , M a r c h
6 at n o o n in ES 2 3 6 . Everyone welcome!
INTERESTED FOLK
A 9 yr. o l d lost b o t h his l e g s - o n e
The University Symphonic
student needed for 1*2 hours between
_ 1 Mr A
9—12 a m on schooldays for
ionship
semble
compan-
Students experienced w i t h kibbutz
life will be guests at a Jewish Students' Coalition dinner Sunday, March
5. Come at 6 p m , CC Assembly H a l l ,
Deli dinner i n c l u d e d , especially if
y o u ' r e planning a t r i p to Israel y o u r self.
and help in getting around at
Cotonie
Village
School.
Please call:
Dr. Rooney, School of Soc. Welfare,
472-6773.
PEACE & POLITICS
The Muskie
Study
Group
MAJORS & MINORS
will
Attention:
Community
Service
4 and March 5 at Sheraton Inn
and come n o w . Held in R o o m 207
cal Caucus. Will
Draper Hall
tion
Community
(students,
staff,
faculty)-
and
Service:
Fall
'72
Mon.,
April
10— F r i . . A p r i l 14 f r o m 9 - 5 daily and
loquim:
7 - 9 Wed., A p r i l 12 For further info
Comparative
Mrs. Helen
Tues., March
floor
7 at 7 3 0 in CC first
lounge
'United
Front
Topic
Dimiproff's
Against
Facism.'
Ad
The dept
of Romance Lan
guages gave her a positive fRcommen
daliun,
bui
reversed
Ihis decision
by
higher
has been
decisions
On
vance readings available f r o m M H o w
March 13, Mrs rnanh-hlhiu Will apear
ard in H U 309 or CC lobby
before (he University Council foi Re
Tues
noon.
hire tintf Tenure to apjjeal the reversal
Although students are noi permuted
lo attend
SUNYA
Draft
Counseling
Hours:
the meeting
many
of us
w o u l d like lo show nor suppo'f by
lues. 1 0 - 1 , 7 - 9 . Wed. 1 2 - 3 , fhurs.
our presence outside the meeting
1-5,7
appeal w i l l lake place in A l J 243 on
9.
Marrh
Young
ested
Republicans:
anyone
in campaigning
inter-
fur Nixon
m
13
I he exai i
posted HI the \\^)
I his
lime w i l l he
nounced in the ASP and ovei WSUA
A strong show o l support could be
at
crucial, so please attend
Free
transportation
find
A n y ijues
Irons call 4 7 2 7771
lodging provided.
will
present
'Stone
the CC Assembly Hall. A l l are wel-
Applu
McC/oskey
campaign,
contac
Hennmgs at 4"*2 6 3 5 2
Volunti
especially needed for the New
ions
from
present
soph
II
gram <tr
now being accepted in H U
333
deadline foi application is
11
March
the English
Honors
Pro-
Iheie will he an irifnrnia
shire primary
Photos by Jay Rosenberg
Wed , Maich H in BA 21 1 <it 4 p m
The next majoi anti-war
Literature
Dept
SUNYA
fencing
team
will
hold a
will
sabre match vs. RPI o n Sat., March 4
March
at 1 0 : 3 0 am in the Dance S l u d i o - 3 r d
thousands
we've
changed
the?
ifept
H|
1.1
i H,it H p i
can end i l .
will pies
it Mark
poetry
i Wed ,
Ihe HU Ii
House Circuit presents Felix
p m and A l i c e
gether
of
be an i n f o r m a l get to
Hispanoamericanos
Spanish students
and
eveiy W " fs Y o u can
come al a n y t i m e
betweei
2
preferably a r o u n d
3 prn
t w i l l he
held in the CC Cafeteria
chance
to speak
4 pm
p m i n the CC Cafeteria. Sponsored by
for
out
for the
leprechaun!
St. Patrick's
party
on March 17. Watch for details.
Day
I t's gonna be a big o n e !
E x p e r i m e n t a l theatre auditions
day
.it
7 3 0 in Arena
Mon
Theatre lor
Battlefield.'
Boston
Bus Trip!
Sat , M a r c h 1 1 .
Tickets
on sale March
lobby.
gone 1
Buy
ihem
7-9
before
in CC
they
are
'72 w o u l d like l o thank
then
suppm t
Please
send pledges payable to
reletlmn
Box 107? A A , S U N Y A
H u n k s again'
Ski Ride Board
72.
cuming son
ii in the Campus Cenle
If any faculty ate moving oi are in
Ihe process of replacing a rug at h o m e ,
Colonial Quad Board Mohawk
boggan
party
Sat , March
To-
4. Wine!
House
Buy
tickets on the Colonial
w o u l d very much appreciate a more
line
tonight
usable
rug
$1 0 0 w7 studenl tax. $.25 for bus.
Room.
R o o m dimensions aie 15' x
oi are simply generous. Chapel
lot
Ms Litnary Meeting
dinner
$.50 w / Colonial
tax,
22'
I n t o desk
Cafe International.
dent
Wanted
Watch
giant
number.
'Picnic on the
TELETHON
foi
Crisis 5300 training session March 8
al 8 p m . Call 4 5 7 5 3 0 0 for r o o m
Tins is youi
Spanish and meel
people.
everyone
Levins a folk
CCGB.
Unbelievable!
There w i l l
immediately:
Pa: nters. tail
ors, and builders, for the St ite Umver
'Troilus
siiv theatre p r o d u c t i o n < if
and Cressida.' I I y o u liavi I Mil
nil
talent, we want y o u Call
436 1 751 or / 7542
fry
like il '
tion is A p r i l 2 2 in N.Y.C. and I. .A By
ihe
Coffee
floor G y m . Spectators w e l c o m e !
demonstra-
course of the war. By the millions we
am. For info call Phil at 2 7 2 - 6 3 5 3 .
Kassel o n piano. F r i . , M a r c h 3 f r o m
IniporatdPI meeting l o i all FSA stu-
omores
is free.
guitarist on Sat., March 4 f r o m 9—12
Prof. Berkley Peabody of the
»
A n y o n e interested m w o r k i n -
Main Theatre of the P A C . Admission
lore on Tues., M a r c h 7 at 7 3 0 p m in
Col-
building and <tn
New Hampshire this weekend call J i m
7-8822.
Club
Triantifillou
was considered for tenure in the Spanish dept.
Russian
come. N o admission charge.
8 at 7 p m in H U 2 9 0 .
This vear
Study Group meets
Dorothy
speak on 'Irony in Arms,'Wed.,
Rights.
stein o n F r i . , March 10 at 8 : 3 0 in the
8-11
call 457 4 8 0 1 or visit LCB 3 0 A .
Marxist-Leninist
transporta-
Call
Philosophy and the Humanities
216. Bring y o u r lunch (and problems)
Caucus on Women's
a concert
Flower' a f i l m based on Russian folk-
Registration
begins
- w e e k l y lunch o n Weds., 1 2 - 2 in BA
SUNYA
provide
meals.
355-8704 or Carol 4 6 3 - 6 8 9 7
for
"look at the record
and see.
( March
Lounge at 7 : 3 0 . T h e topic w i l l be
Women
present
Girls! M i x e r at Pi Lapiba Phi (RPI
'Meditations
Readings w i l l be available in advance
will
frat) o n Sat., March 4 f r o m 9 p m - 1
T o w n e for N.Y. State Women's Politi
For info, call 457 4801
Band,
featuring w o r k s b y C o p l a n d a n d Bern-
Urgently needed: M e n a n d w o m e n
group sessions have started. Be wise
Seacoast.'
cert
Wind En-'
f o r m e r l y k n o w n as t h e Con-
to volunteer t o babysit for 4 hours on
meet Tues., March 7 in CC Fireside
on the Maine
WHAT TO DO?
workers
March
of Indian
quad.
Mon ,
6 al 8 3 0 p m , Indian uoad
22 Willet St. Live
' entertainment each F r i . evening f r o m
H p m . This week Walt S m i t h p e r f o r m s
blues and traditional
ballads.
Admis-
sion $.75. Coflee and d o n u t s o n the
cafeteria.
Caucus
on
SUNYA
Women's
Meeting
Rights
on
Maich
[wo
U
f i l m classics'
'The Son of the
1? 3(1 1 3 0 in H U 291) toi w o n
Sheik'
w i l d V a l e n t i n o and 'The
U n i t y rind stafl.
Rush'
w i t h Chaplin w i l l he shown in
Gold
I C 5 on F n . and Sat M a t c h 3 and -1
We have Shabbas Services i
,11 / 3 0 a n d 9 3 0 p m
Reporters
nje
wanted:
Anyone
Steve Husch
w i l l pi,iv keyboard, Admission is $ 75
inn
ested in doing news l e p o i t r m i lot tl
ASP,
please t a l l Glenn V o n N n M n ;
Free Music
/ 4981.
The
Italian-American
Student
Allieiicini)
post
Rounds,
,\ \,i//
Alli-
by .Joel Chadahe, « in ,1 10 p m
latter
p i , , w i n d • •oseuihle 1 o u c e r t l in
the -
ol
nit! Mo.
M()
unge o l ihe PAC.
in.
w i l l sponsm ,i le< h u e by
Sl.-ve A i H I o , t o m i e i I • ;.,, ,
the
Ii
(. h.,n
m Amen..in
Civil
Rights I eai|uii and n o w .isststanl lo
N.Y,
presents .1
• oil.
ance I L ' A I I I M I I . ' . J tlegli Student! Il.ilo
man
Store
mncert environment.
Bo.ml ol I d u r a t i o n , 00 Man h
o n Sat.. Man h -1 ,ii 7 3 0 p m , the
Junior
Class oi Albany
showing ihe f i l m
High School is
'Wait
Until
Dark.'
Albany High is Unalnd at 14 1 Western
23. Wan h lm t l '
Ave
Admission w i l l he charged ami
baked goods w i l l he sold.
U l i M a r c h 1 7. the ASP publishes its
Lucille,
We felt your energy
coming in strong.
The Cast
Annual
N7Ea&totj>[email protected]
<3AN FKMUI tt*
Spring
Issue
It w i l l
fu.itote
poems, p h o t o s , and essay, .ill o n ihe
theme of Springtime. A n y
wishuu)
lo c o n t r i b u t e in any w a y . 1 o n l a c l Jul I
Rodyeis, CC 334 01 4 5 7 2 1 9 0
lu.kel info
of
the group is
Saturday.
LatinoAmericanos
la U n i o n 1
1.1
11.
Melissa 4 8 9 1367 01 Jeff
and time is 8 3 0 p m . Sponsored by
Cong. Beth Emeth
Youth
Group.
la noehe. Rruhai hei hall, I n i e i m . i i o n a l
fick-etji foi Italian
Student I ounge.
winetastmy
party
will no on sale Wed. and HUM-,, n ihe
Protect
with Clark Gable and Jeanette Mac Donald
•
Your
|P Y I I
Campus
Cenlei
Student
I A 21 /
10 0 0
Open to all I'nviumniiititally
,1! Italian A n i n (can
Alliance
1 an he obtained t'luti U n a .11 A l d e n .
I or i n t o , call Gina .11 -171' 5 4 5 0 .
Bttm: F,ros,dt-s ,.«•., s.„ui.i> ...
OFFICIAL NOTICE
r l i u r y M.ill K m . .< I / ,
Wi-nilv
;'H/:<M
in
and
International
Student
Identification
C s n f e . i r u . i t t j i i . i h i i ' >> s s | . | / .
Ihnse graduate
Alumni
Quad:
R,ip
C i m l i . i l C o u n c i l Hi.|i s . r
llldlrl ,11 <l (ill p m i,, W,i
j^.75 BOTH NIGHTS with tax an<HD_$l 3 0 wjthoirt j
not
students
i an*ivi>d
through
wvho have
referendum
ballots
Hie mail may vole on [lie
l e t a i t ' t i d n m by obtaining a ballot ,M
Ihe USA o i l u e in CC 1 111 l u m i 9 30
..in to 3 3(1 p m I m l . i v . M a n h 3 Y o u
(1932) j
I
$.50/ night with current tax and ID I
from
willingness to w i n k
I 1
... 1 ,ill
r i i i i i h i i ' 1 '>."i:i.
TACZ AN.TUC I K MM
desk
t 0 9 . V I V . I il v i n o ' Also tickets
concerned people (Jung ideas 01 jits) <i
H (111 | i m in W
with William Powell and Myrna Loy
Environment
club meets eveiy Monday at 7 pin in
THE THT1H MAM :
presented by albany state cinema
The
Match
438 4 8 8 0 . l e m p l e Beth B n o t h . Acad
I o e i / . i . Una Moitosl M a r / a 7. 7 3 0 de
(1936)|
I ADMISSION:
Voices
emy R d . , A l b a n y . D o n a t i o n is $2.50
Friday, March 3 at 7:30 & 10 in LC-25
Saturday, March 4 at 7:30 in LC-18
The name
Four
must have proof
of graduate
IMPORTANT:
(he
deadlines h»i
•iubuultinq ( i l . i l i l l i i i ' he ponied in
Ihe ASP .lie 11 pin on 5 unlays and 1 1
of identity
status
studenl
111 r a i d
.uliliess
cannol
and
proof
m ihe t o i m o l
,md y o u i
he o n
ihe
j
con,', I
present
m.iiling list used by USA when they
pin on Wednesdays!
Iniiil.'il hy MmliJiil l.i
PAGE 12
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 13
Doesn't Matter But
Prophefs Capture Commissioner's Tourney
by Kenneth Arduino
H i e AMIA basketball season
c a m e t o a close last S u n d a y night
m t h e best of League I, t h e
P r o p h e t s , played t h e best of
League II, t h e L i b e r a t o r s , in t h e
commissioner's tournament. The
Prophets won out 49-47.
High scorers for t h e P r o p h e t s
w e r e Bradley Biggs w i t h 19 pts.
a n d A n d y T o u t m a n w i t h 13 pts.
while high scorer for t h e losing
L i b e r a t o r s was Ross with 12 pts.
It was Ross whose last second
j u m p e r gave the L i b e r a t o r s un
u p s e t victory over A P A in t h e
semi-finals the previous night.
•» §
APA was favored in t h a t game as
it was a League I t e a m which was
looking for a n o t h e r s h o t at the
League I c h a m p s , the P r o p h e t s .
Also t h a t evening, t h e P r o p h e t s
easily b e a t the Z o o m e r s to go into
t h e finals.
Buoyed from their last second
victory the night before, t h e und e r d o c Liberators s t a r t e d off fast
with 6 quick points. It seemed to
m a n y of the more than 2 5 0 spec-
Dones Edge Cortlan
By Lloyd Fishman
AMIA News
1) Wrestling - T h e AMIA Spring Wrestling T o u r n a m e n t will b e
held o n March 1 5 , 17 a n d 1 8 . A m e e t i n g of all wrestling
c a n d i d a t e s will be held o n M o n d a y , March 1 3 at 3 : 3 0 p . m . in CC
3 7 5 . E n t r y blanks m u s t b e r e t u r n e d by M o n d a y , March 8 t o CC
356.
2) Free T h r o w — T h e AMIA Basketball Free T h r o w c o m p e t i t i o n
will be held on S u n d a y , March 12 from 1:30 p . m . t o 4i:30 p . m .
T h e first forty t w o - m a n t e a m s t o sign up will b e eligible. A
m e e t i n g of all teams will be held on T h u r s d a y , March 8 in CC 3 7 5
at 3 : 1 5 p.m. Entry blanks m u s t be r e t u r n e d by March 8 in CC
356.
3) Swim Meet - T h e AMIA Spring Swim Meet will be held on
March 22 « 2 3 . E n t r y blanks m u s t be r e t u r n e d by March 16 to
CC 3 5 6 .
t a t o r s t h a t un upset might be in
t h e making.
But the P r o p h e t s figured that
the Liberators wore playing over
their heads and played confident
und steady ball. T h e lead kept
changing h a n d s often, with no
learn gaining more t h a n a five
point lead. Both teams were play
ing good clean basketball with
n e i t h e r t e a m going over t h e foul
T h e s t e a d y play of the P r o p h e t s
enabled t h e m t o hold a small lead
in the second half b u t the Libera
t o r s lied late in t h e g a m e a t 32-112.
But then the b u b b l e burst and the
P r o p h e t s moved nut in front to
win a n d b e c o m e the c h a m p s .
T h e stigma t h a t A l b a n y c a n n o t
win o n the road was s h a t t e r e d
Vednesday night as t h e Danes
defeated C o r t l a n d 7 5 - 7 3 . T h e fact
t h a t t h e S a u e r s m e n were ineligible
for a bid, was s o m e w h a t evident,
as their p l a y i n g was e r r a t i c .
T h e Danes got off to a slow
start, m a k i n g n u m e r o u s mistakes
and were d o w n 16-10. T h e fact
that J o h n Quattrocchi picked up
three quick p e r s o n a l s d i d n ' t help
either. B o b Rossi ( 1 8 pts.) and
Reggie S m i t h ( 1 5 p t s . ) then t o o k
charge, a n d p u t o n an 8 p o i n t
s p u r t at the e n d of t h e half t o
forge A l b a n y i n t o a 4 0 - 2 9 halft i m e lead. T h e l a t t e r p a r t of t h e
first half l o o k e d like t h e Albany
of old, as t h e y w e r e h i t t i n g their
shots a n d m a k i n g crisp passes.
In t h e s e c o n d half, t h e Danes
l o o k e d as if t h e y w e r e still in the
locker r o o m . With only t w o min u t e s gone, Q u a t t r o c c h i picked up
his fifth p e r s o n a l , a n d soon after,
Dave Welchons g o t h i s f o u r t h .
With its t e a m leaders on the
b e n c h , things l o o k e d hopeless.
However, T o n y Tcdesco c a m e t o
the rescue. T e d e s c o , a little used
guard most of t h e year, hustled at
b o t h ends of t h e c o u r t , and displayed fine defense, c o n t r i b u t i n g
eieven points t o t h e cause, all in
the second half. He and Harry
J o h n s o n helped give A l b a n y nine
straight points, and a 64-53 lead,after Cortland closed within t w o .
Cortland, however, never gave
up. Beating Albany inside and off
the boards, they forced t h e Danes
t o go into a 2-1-2 zone. T h e Red
Dragons closed to within o n e ,
with 2 57 left in the game, and
Bob Antin p u t t h e m into t h e lead
at 1:49, with t w o free t h r o w s , , as
Welchons fouled o u t . Sixteen seco n d s later, Reggie Smith hit B o b
Curtis under the basket for a t h r e e
p o i n t play. Cortland tied it u p a
half m i n u t e later, and the excitem e n t was a b o u t t o begin.
Albany then w e n t into a m i n u t e
long stall, and with 5 s e c o n d s left
in the game, Rossi hit a 20-foot
j u m p e r , reminiscent of t h e g a m e
against Hartwick.
After calling t i m e o u t , C o r t l a n d
Women Cagers
Enter SUNY Champs
by A l a n D . A b b e y
Prophets Top Zoomers
Well the men of the basketball team a r e n ' t goin^
a n y w h e r e after their season ends t o n i g h t , but the
Albany W o m e n ' s Basketball team is.
Even though they finished the season with only a
5-5 record, the m e m b e r s of the w o m e n ' s basketball
t e a m are going t o t h e S t a t e t o u r n e y , being held at
O n e o n t a this weekend, by virtue of their victory
over New Paltz last week. Not all the w o m e n ' s
teams in the SUNY conference are going so this is
no small a c c o m p l i s h m e n t .
Barbara Palm
the
coach
of
the w o m e n ' s t e a m ,
is
very pleased with I he way the I cam has been
p e r f o r m i n g this year, and pleasantly surprised.
" N i n e of the twelve w o m e n were inexperienced
before this y e a r , " she declared. She praised the
entire t e a m , b u t singled o u t freshman Tara V a n d e r
Vere. " I f she plays for four years, she'll tear o u t all
the r e c o r d s , " said Palm.
T h e W o m e n ' s swim t e a m is also going to have a
busy post-season, as t w o of their n u m b e r are going
to the
SUNYAC
Champs
al Kredonia
this
weekend.
p u t the ball in play with 5 seconds
remaining. As the buzzer w e n t
off, A n t i n sunk a 2 0 footer. T h e
official ruled no b a s k e t , t o t h e
distaste of fans and players. Dcspite obscenities by A n t i n , the
decision s t o o d and A l b a n y walked
o u t with their victory.
Abbey Road
Off The NCAA!
•——oo—a• two*—iBacaagqoooB Alan D. Abbey
The o u t r a g e has b e e n d o n e , a n d all a p p e a l s h a v e
been e x h a u s t e d , b u t t h e anger remains.
Because of a small oversight o n t h e p a r t o f t h e
Athletic D e p a r t m e n t , which was m a d e o n l y because
the N C A A d i d n ' t b o t h e r t o let its c o n s t i t u e n t s k n o w
of an interpretation of an unfair rule, t h e G r e a t
Danes e n d their season tonight against Marist, a n d
not in S o u t h h a m p t o n or Bvansville ( t h e sites for t h e
NCAA College Division C h a m p i o n s h i p s ) .
T h e actions of t h e N C A A s h o u l d b e d e p l o r e d a n d
c o n d e m n e d by all. N o t only is t h e p r e d i c t i o n rule
unfair in itself, but t o n o t let its c o n s t i t u e n t s k n o w
of an interpretation of the ineligibility rule is t h e
worst h o r r o r of t h e m all. For t o o long t h e life of
every college athlete in the nation has been held in
the arthritic sweaty palms of the NCAA.
T h e time has c o m e . T h e NCAA m u s t be m a d e t o
realize t h a t no longer will such heavy h a n d e d ,
autocratic decisions, made in the confines of small,
smoky r o o m s , be allowed. T h e people affected by
the NCAA's ruling m u s t soon realize t h a t they are
having their life's blood sucked from t h e m .
T h e NCAA does n o t care a b o u t t h e m . T h e N C A A
does n o t w a n t to k n o w from the appeals of a small
University tucked u p in the b o o n d o c k s of N e w
York State. They are o u t only for p o w e r and
m o n e y . Power of t h e worst sort. T h e y are o u t for
the power of yvs and no, life and d e a t h . T h e p o w e r
to deny a team of its rightful place in a post-season
t o u r n a m e n t . Only sick m e n could w a n t such power.
T h e Albany Phys. Ed. D e p a r t m e n t did n o t h i n g
wrong. They are guilty only on a technicality. T h e
/*
©IW
N C A A m u s t be pleased to no end. T h e i r p o w e r rests
in their love of the technicality, the b e a u t y ( t o
t h e m ) of b u r e a u c r a c y , the tangle of rule within rule,
and t h e maze of i n t e r p r e t a t i o n after i n t e r p r e t a t i o n .
T h e real victims in this deal are t h e players on t h e
G r e a t Dane basketball t e a m , a n d t h e s t u d e n t s of
Albany S t a t e . Coach Richard Sauers has n o w h a d
the p o s t s e a s o n rug s w e p t from u n d e r h i m for t w o
straight years.
This c a n n o t go o n .
Two In Post Season Tourneys
Matmen in NCAA
Brothers Phil and Larry Mims of Utica will represent Albany in (he
NCAA College Division Wrestling C h a m p i o n s h i p s this weekend al
Oswego.
Phil, a junior ret captain who poasted an 1 1 2 record in the I5H
p o u n d weight class this season, will d r o p d o w n t o 1130 lbs. lor the
NCAA's. Larry ;i i s o p b o m o r e , had the team's best r e c o r d , 12-1-1 at
112 lbs. He will go at CM in the tourney, providing an ankle injury
suffered in last w e e k e n d ' s SUNY Conference 1 C h a m p i o n s h i p s has
healed.
Albany finished a "disappointing s e v e n t h , " according to coach J o e
Garcia, in the conference meet. T h e highest place achieved by an
Albany wrestler was fourth, reached by Phil Mims, 1 5 8 ; T o m Horn,
167; and Doug Bauer, 177.
oooccooccooeoso&oocooooococcooa
S Big Dom Says
WE DIDNT INVENT THE SUBMARINE... WE JUST PERFECTED IT!|
WALT'S SUBMARINE SANDWICHES
U M Cfllllliil A v i i i u i u
JH'.t D n l . I I in Sum:
<lli:i I m y St Imnisitixly Road
A l b a n y , Ni'vv Y m k
A l h . m v , N i w Yuri
I .ilh.mi, Now Y o r k
Phone 1HX
Plume <1H9
iv.'/n
0 Vi'tsctiiriun sub
Bologna
C o o k e d sjilumi
L u n c h e o n nu-iil
Cheuso
Provulotie . .
Popperoni .
Boiled hum
limn c u p p o c o l o
(It'noii saliuni
$.iif>
HI")
HC>
N!)
HI)
!ir>
mi
/Mb
from Big Dom's
Italian kitchen...
HOT S U B S
....
Meal hi II w/sniuT
IVpi>.'ii mi w/siitii'»' . . .
lliili.HI iiusiim' w/smu-i'
Al 1. AMOVE S U B S :
w/Pruv.
w/Kri.'il peppers-extra
w/lliil | epper rnix<'xlrn
.$.«()
$.H5
DO
Pliunci
.
have to
783t)2M
T u n a fish
$.D<JS
Mixed eold n i l s
!)«.)N
Amerii-an sub
OilQ
Italian sub
1.000
Rons! heef
1.0'JN
C o r n e d beef
1.098
Turkey " w h i t e "
1.0'JO
Venetian
1.09S
Hi)! D o m ' s d o u b l e special
I.MS
( 18 slices assorted eold cuts) 0
II)
I
15
A
handicap
doesn't
10
bea
hangup.
If you need rehabilitation —
or know someone
who does—write to
HURRAH, Box 1200,
V\tehington, H C 20013.
Swimmers in
SUNYAC
(Senior Bill Mart, and
Len Van Kyn, will lead
;wimming learn into
Al hie tic Conferences
ships al Buffalo S l a t e
sophomoK
the Albany
the S U N Y
ChampionKriday and
The Dane swimmers finished the
season al It-10, their best ever.
Brian Kelly, the only s w i m m i n g
coach Albany ever has had, rates
host
Buffalo
State
a
heavy
favorite in the S U N Y A C m e e t .
" T h e y art by far the s t r o n g e x t
t e a m , " be said, " w i t h ( W e f i o
O n e o n t a , and Cortland b u n c h e d
al the next level." Kelly feels his
Albany squad has a good c h a n c e
to beat o u t at least t w o or three
clubs in the 1 I team field. T h e
Danes are c o m p e l inn in the conference meet for the first lime.
Individually,
Marl,
a
backstroker, and freestyler Van Ryn
are A l b a n y ' s best bels to place
high in Buffalo. Hart, a four->ear
veteran, holds school records in
the 100-unri 200-yeard b a c k s t r o k e
1HE
CR4NBERRY B O G
RESTAURS
HURRAH
Help Us Reach and Rehabilitate
Americas Handicapped
The Slate-Federal Program of Rehabilitation Services. U.S. Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare.
The Advertising Council.
10% discount for sub parties (20 or more)
PAGE 14
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 15
Two Film Reviews: The Hospital"
and
"Maidstone"
\\
So much of THE HOSPITAL is provocative and
exciting that it is with regret I must report that the
film fails. What is most ironic is that the responsibility for the good things and the very bad things
are precisely in the hands of the same people: writer
Paddy Chayefsky and director Arthur Hiller.
Hiller, who did so much to turn that leaden lump
of a book LOVE STORY into an even deadlier film,
was probably the wrong man to tackle Chaycfsky's
original screenplay anyway. It's a very different
script, a black comedy focusing on the ineplncss
and confusion thai reigns in major melropolilan
hospitals today. The overworked, underpaid staff
must tackle a mass murderer of doctors and nurses,
the angry predominantly-black community, and a
series of bunglings in and around the operating
room that should make the A.M.A. livid. With so
much crisis going on - which Chayefsky means very
often to be played for laughs - Miller's heavy
directorial hand is all loo pervasive. Scenes of high
comedy are played out far loo long, with the
resultant impact lessened considerably. The ediling
is not nearly sharp enough; this often picaresque
script is generally given the treatment of hundreds
of other slick Hollywood movies when in the hands
of someone genuinely creative like Robert Altman it
might have come close to a masterpiece.
What's worse, when Hiller doesn't do the film in,
Chayefsky does it himself, basing much of the story
on the tiresome personal relationship between a
patient's ex-acid-head daughler (Dianna Rigg) and
the suicidal, alcoholic, impotent head of medicine
(George C. Scotl), who by Ihe way is cured of Ihe
latter problem by way of a six-second orgasm,
surely some kind of a record. Whenever Ihe film
finally gets il together and begins to move us,
Chayefsky is unwise enough to introduce long,
boring speeches of exposition which fail to convince
and which grind the proceedings down to a screeching halt.
There's a greal deal In savor here. The acting is
excellent - with Scolt brilliant, as always - except
for Diana Rigg, who plays Ihe ex-acid-freak in a
manner which convinces me that she's rather have
been in any one of a ihousand other places rather
than in front of ihe camera. Some of the insights
into medical malpractice are chilling and refreshing.
WWTB
FIND OUT
March 7th in i.C-24
at 5 and 7
hear
mum
About midway through Noman Mailer's Maidstone, I gave up trying
to understand what it was all about, a failure not due lo my level of
intelligence, and tried to think if I'd ever encountered a more pathetic
attempt ai a movie. It was no contixl-Mttidstcme is a catastrophe I'm
the whole of its interminable Icnglh-lOU mi miles of souped-up home
movie which should have been kept at home lo scare uninvited guests
into an early departure.
Mailer wandered over here to hype his move, to defend il against
some of the critics who didn't understand, to "brainwash" a
prospeclive audience before Iheir allendance.This is understandahle-when such a brilliant and radical departure as his is lo be
presenled before a naive and unaware audience, il might help lo oiler
a preview, so as not lo astonish Ihe soon-lo-be-enlighleneil minds.
Mailer's film theory evolves from his philosphy lira! the professional
era is doomed and Ihe amateurs shall succeed to the throne. Ihe
intense, committed amateur can create a work of art Ihal is as stirring
as he who has done il for a lifetime; Mailer, the amateur has offered
his challenge lo the moviemakers. (What docs Mailer think ol Ihe
amateur writer'' Why doesn't he continue as a professional writer since
it is only stifling his multitalenled spirit'.')
In Maidstone, we have Mailer, friends, family and film crew, on
Long Island in '68 for improvisations on a Iheinc. The lliemc; Norman
T. Kingsley. (played by Mailer), director of meaningful erotic films . is
making his latest movie about a brothel. NIK is also being considered
as a presidential candidate since his works have changed lire social
pye
f u n d e d by s t u d e n t fax
In the People's Republic of
China, President Nixon and
some 300 Americans that
accompanied him encountered
what appears to be an advertising
and
merchandising
vacuum.
The many signs at the airport
and along the broad streets of
the capital are often almost exclusively political slogans. For
example, on the road to the
airport a sign reads, "Resolutely
support the people's struggle in
Asia, Africa and Latin America,"
Maidstone comes lo an end. NTK hasn't been assassinated. Mallei
explains lo Ihe crew what a gieat llinik Ihe) \ e done, foul hits Mallei
Willi a hannnei. fhey fight. Il'.s a leal light. bin il's been done he I lei
in ihe movies. Mallei's wife scieanis and citises. His son cues loin
says. "Ibis is nothing hut .1 scene in a Hollywood whoiehouse tiiovie,
I'p yollis. Up \0111s." Ihe movie ends. Most ol llie audience has let I
long ago. Ihe icviewei had to slick 11 oul Al least he cot in Ibi liee.
I'oi a different view' ol ihis movie, lead llie screenplay, hoi one
thing. Ihe dialogue is uiideislaiidable. II 11 wetc .1 l.uilitiil luuscnplion. Ihe ink would he binned. Mallei's descnpiion ol wh.n is being
seen is iiiipicssise. A good « nlei can make any siilqecl iiileieslmg.
Norman, slick lo being .1 good wulei. Voin punted view "t lb''
woild (sesisl and all) is lai siipeuoi hi youi usual. I he piolessionals
slick as lhe\ 111115 he. al least keep us awake.
Truman Capote's
IN COLD BLOOD II
$.50 members...$1 non-members
while another at the Gate of
Heavenly Peace Square in downtown Peking announces, "The
Chinese People warmly support
the struggle of the Indo-Chinese
people against the U.S. imperialist."
There arc absolutely no equivalents of the billboards, newspaper ads and radio and tv spots
that urge the people of other
countries to buy particular
brands.
There a few parallels for the
publ'c service ads that try to
persuade Americans to give up
smoking or get cheeked for
breast cancer. Smoking, incidentally, is not considered a health
hazard by most Chinese.
A bright young woman who
works for Hsin Hun, the New
Forest' fires burn
more than trees.
China news agency, and was
assigned as an interpreter for the
visiting American press, thought
hard when asked, and could
come up with only one firm
example of China-style public
service ads. She recalled that the
government had posted signs
some time back during an influenza epidemic urging citizens
to get flu shots and to eat a soup
which was made from certain
roots and thought to be a flu
preventative.
Brands are not important
under China's communist system. The government is the proprietor of practically all shops
and stores, and private profit is
considered immoral and is almost non-existent.
Four kinds of bicycles are
produced, but the government
does not care which brand
people buy, and hence docs not
advertise them.
With cigarets it's the same way.
China makes 20 brands, including Panda cigarets manufactured in Shanghai, but it does
not promote any one brand
ahead of the others. Cigarets are
not wrapped in cellophane, ns
they are in most countries to
keep them fresh. But China's
Great Wall brand cigars do come
in cellophane wrappers.
China's biggest newspaper, the
Pvopk'n Daily, printed in five
cities and with a circulation of
3,000,000 (and a readership of
many limes that number because
it is passed around and posted
on bulletin hoards), carries not a
line of advertising.
One of the few street signs
even vaguely enticing is a picture
billboard at a movie theater on
the main boulevard, the Street
of Lasting Peace. The sign says
that, for $.06 for adults and
$.04 for children, one can see
two feature films, "The Yellow
River" and "The White-Haired
Girl," and a newsreel of the
Afro-Asian
Friendship table
tennis competition.
But when one of the reporters,
walking with his interpreter,
pointed to a shop and asked
what was sold there, the interpreter said he guessed it was a
barber shop, but had to look
inside to make sure. There was
no sign or striped pole outside to
tell even a Chinese what it was.
Shop windows have attractive
displays of such items as
clothing, fabrics, clocks, mirrors
and a window-full of big Thermos-type
bottles used
by *
Chinese to make tea.
Shelf displays in a grocery included such items as cans of
chestnuts (in syrup), candies,
cakes and bottles of hawthorne
juice.
A big food market had displays
of many food items superior to
what is generally found in the
United States. There was a
whole counter of ring-necked
pheasants (feathers still on),
with rabbits not yet skinned
hanging nearby. There were live
turkeys, a dozen kinds of sausages and a fish counter with a
six foot carp on display, as well
as
pool slashing with live
18-inch red snappers.
A huge display of apples,
oranges, potatoes, squash and
other vegetables was heaped
against a backdrop of a picture
of a terraced hill with a factory
in the foreground. Chinese
characters read, " Develop the
economy
and
insure
the
supply." On the opposite wall, a
similar sign said," Political work
is the lifeline of economic
work."
Next to a counter filled with
two dozen of the Chinese equivalent of tv dinners—plates
heaped with raw vegetables and
meat ready for cooking at $.20
to $.50 each depending on
whether a helping of noodles
was included—was a single sign
that said,"For health, clean the
knives." Apparently it is a reminder to clerks slicing meat and
filling the1 plates.
The only sign on the outside of
the big market was a notice
listing business hours. ForHhe
convenience of workers on the
night shift who sleep days, some
stores are open round the clock.
The heavy padded blue coats
worn by many Chinese for protection against the cold winter
here cost only $12 for the plain
model without artificial fur
collars. A warmer style coat with
an inner lining of what appears
to be dog fur is priced at $90,
and bargaining is out of the
question because all prices are
set by the government.
An interpreter was asked if
anyone could afford to buy such
an expensive coat. He pointed to
a man crossing the street and
said he was wearing one.
Told that the man must be a
capitalist,
the
interpreter
laughed at the ridiculous notion
that there still could be one
capitalist in China.
Myths about newspaper advertising:
•jiasjnoA* SmAofua qsiuij pire dn apis iq8u jaded JtioA iunj 'a[niMireaiv\[
•|[BD B sn 3AI3 'jaiiB aj,noA sares s,ii
ji }ng JOJ Supjoq aj,noA jeqM IOU A|qBqojd are sjadedsMau 'JUBM noA" jn6ure|3 s(]i JI '||pg
suopdruiajui Supejun jou
'sMau SB re pa>(oo[ SJB spB jadBdsMau 'saSessam [BiaiaiuiuoD jaqao Aueui a>prun '"pej uj'
•ABMAUB JI o: uopuaire Aed []IA\ ajdoad 'SA\au Supsajaiui pire Supioxa jsoiu s/spo] jo a|ppiiu aq;
in 'si it SB paieniis 'paopou 31 ia3 oi uA\op apisdri ps ire liru 01 aAeq noA 3UIABS IOU a\3f^ '
The Subjective Filmgoer
il
SpOnSOred by
by Richard Dudman
Chief Washington Correspondent
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
mores of a generation...A power fill group ol people minlit waul lo
assassinate him...()i inigh I not...
Camera. Action.
Aclion'.'Thal's when things happen. Well. NTK unci views '.nine
women, lie lalks about politics. Rip Tom (What' \ V li.it' A pro
fessional actor - ' What's he doing hole'.') fishes in a lake. He in I en lews
some more women. And some men. And v, omen. I Inter viewing begins
to become a technique, a la (iodaid. heic. Should techniques he
allowed in an improvisalioi')
What else happens'.'A parly In the pool What could he the dullest
loveniaking evet filmed. A women reporlei in a low cut gown. Sortie
movie making. The woman's gown gels so low thai a breast pops out.
and she caresses her microphone. A dream sequence which has as
background sound a woman moaning in passion...I think it's passion.
The same sounds could have come from anyone forced lo Ml through a
movie a lew I lines.
EDITOR: ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION
ECOTAGE. (E-ko-tazh), n. |MnE, ecology and sabatage, from Gr. oikos, a
house, and. logy, to study; and saboter, to damage machinery with wooden
shoes]. The branch of tactical biology that deals with the relationship between
living organisms and their technology. It usually refers to tactics which can be
executed without injury to life systems.
Advertising has long way to go in China
Reprinted with permission pending
of Crain Communications, Inc. from
Advertising Age, February 2B, 197?.
<sN/v\oa aaisdn aovd SIRL
NHni jsnr noA aia AHM
sav HHdVdSMHN ifioav
S3HVD AdOaON HI
Saturday, March 4
at 7:30 & 10 in LC-7
Print Advertising Association, 211 East 43 Street, Now York, NY 10017
Jewish Students' Coalition
PAGE 16
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 17
FORUM
Save Bella
by Larry Simonberg
Associated Press Writer
Albany, N Y ( A P ) - L a s t - m i n u t e efforts to save Rep. Bella Abzug's
congressional seat were purposed at the Capitol Wednesday by a group
o f women active in politics.
The group included about 20 Democrats and Republicans, many o f
them from the Albany area, spokesmen said. They conferred w i t h
aides involved in the remapping o f congressional districts, including
James Cannon, Gov. Rockefeller's liaison man in Washington
" I feel that the situation has improved very much over the original
plans," Assemblywoman Constance Cook, R-Ithaca, said in a telephone interview.
" I made my point t o the leadership some time ago. I think the ears
are bending a little b i t . "
Asked why she, as a Republican, was supporting the outspoken
Manhattan Democrat, Mrs. Cook said, " W e are working together in
several different ways, through several different organizations, to get
more women into o f f i c e . "
It has been an open secret in Albany fur weeks that Mrs. Ab/.ug was
a likely target of the mapmakers. As a result of the 1970 census, the
state must lose two of its I I seats in the House of Representatives,
one of them from Manhattan.
Assemblyman Francis J . Boland, R-Binghamton, the chairman o f the
Joint^ Legislative Committee on Reapportionment, would not concede
that a final agreement on the district lines had been reached. But he
confirmed the reports that Mrs. Ah/.ug's district was being squeezed
from all sides.
The district of Rep. Edward Kock, a Democrat, is evidently lo he
extended south into Ahzug territory. Democratic Rep. John Murphy
is also likely lo have his Staten Island dislriel extended into lower
Manhattan, which Mrs. Ab/.ug now represents.
The reapportionment bill is expeeled lo be ready ncxl week li
remains to be seen whether protests from Mrs. Ahzug and others, on
her behalf, will create more favorable boundaries for ;i primary race
against one o f the oilier incumbents.
"Our position was thai Bella was. en titled l o a fair shake," said Ross
Graham, one of the leaders of the women's group.
She said the officials the group conferred with had agreed the
burden o f losing a seat should he shared by the other congressmen.
Carol Bellamy, another leader of the group, said the fact that (here
are only two women members of congress from New York should he
taken into account, along with the feelings of various minorities.
The women promised continued "nagging" and said members of the
New York State Women's Political Caucus would meet on the malter
in Albany over the weekend. Mrs. Abzug is scheduled to address the
caucus Sunday morning.
The other lost seat is to come from the Bronx, where Democratic
Reps. Jonathan Bingham and James Scheiier are expected lo be
thrown together.
Abolish Forced Feeding?
There has been considerable debate recently over
the regulation that students who live in dorms must
eat in the dining halls. Proponents of the mandatory
meal plans have argued that the regulation is
essential if Food Service is not to go bankrupt, and
that there are prohibitive sanitation problems inherent in allowing students to cook meals in the operations, and prescribing the new paths to follow,
it was recently recommended that the FSA aid all
dorms.
Opponents maintain that Food Service is here to members of the c o m m u n i t y , especially students in
serve the students, and that the monetary matters experimental projects are judged economically and
are of secondary importance. Furthermore, they physically feasible. Surely there are ideas for imquestion the belief that cooking in the dorms is proving the Food Service operation that would not
entail a gigantic overhauling of the present kitchenunsanitary.
cafeteria setups on the quads, nor a huge cash
It is with this in mind, then that we ask the
expenditure. For example, a recent news article
question, "Should Mandatory Meal Plans be Abo
described offering natural foods in place of regular
lished?
b y J o h n H a r t l e y , V i c e - P r e s i d e n t for
M a n a g e m e n t a n d Planning:
A t first glance, the prospects of a voluntary meal
plan seem slim. Facilities for dorm cooking are
severely limited and the accomodations offered
w i t l i in reasonable distance from campus do not
seem viable. Consider, for example [he large number
of graduate students living on Alumni Quad, who
voluntarily elect a meal plan. Forecasts of ihe
conditions ensuing w i l h abolition of Un*-mandatory
program are frightening. An increase in rodent and
roach infestation would be the first sign of over
extended facilities, but there certainly would be ihe
first sign of overextended facilities, bul there
certainly would be others. This generally bleak
prediction is also borne out by reports of the Slimy
Brook experience w i t h a voluntary plan.
" W h a t ' s the m a t t e r w i t h you? T h e P r e s i d e n t ' s e n d i n g u n e m p l o y m e n t !
D o n ' t y o u r e a d , o r are y o u one o f t h e m d a m n r a d i c a l s ? "
New Emphasis on Speech Clinic
bu,Mar!ene Ravit
The University Speech Clinic
continues this semester as a service to registered students who
have difficulty wilh oral communication. This semester emphasis
w II be placed on assisting those
students who will be entering student teaching, since il often becomes uppartenl that everyday
speech habits are not appropriate
for classroom use.
The program encompasses diagnoslic evaluation and therapy for
problems associaled with errors in
speech sounds, disordered voice
pat I ems, inadequate
language
skills, stuttering, hearing losss, and
Unfortunately, this sorry state of Ihe alternative
indicates that mandatory meal plans and Food
Service are here to stav- But although requiring a
meal plan seems inevitable, this does not mean that
the present system must haunt us until some
workable voluntary system is found.
Complaints about Food Service, and its parent
Faculty-Student Association, are about as common
complaints about the weather Studenl gripes about
dorm food are part of (hi- American college tradi
lion. What's more, this is an accepted condition of
life; everyone complains, but no one seems to do
anything about it.
In reviewing the shortcoming* of the present
Speech and Hearing Association.
Therapy is carried out by graduate
students in the dpailnient under
the director's supervision.
Should
l h . ' need arise
tor
treatment or evaluation not avail
able at the clinic, referral is manto the proper agency.
Any member of the university
community wishing h i t.;ik<' adv-anlutfc of tin' services nl'IWrcl by I litclinic may contact Mrs. Mnrnn in
Humanities :|K-I, Monday-Friday,
'.) a.m. noon, telephone l.r>7-K:l!Mi.
foreign dialect problems. In addi
I ion, any prospective student
teacher wanting an informal evalu
ation of his speech is invited to
come.
The clinic is sponsored by the
Deaprtmenl of Speech Pathology
and Audiology and (here is no
charge for Ihe service. Evaluation
initially is dime by the rlirecturol'
ihe clinic, Mrs. Lynn H. Mnran, a
Lecturer in Speech Ptilhuiogby,
who holds a Certificate of Clinical
Competence Irom the American
Teacher Evaluations
Wrangler thinks Americans
spend too much for clothes.
And Wrangler's doing
something about it.
They're giving you
what's so hard to get
these clays. What
you pay for.
Wrangler Jeans
& Mr. Wrangler
W Sportswear
Wfnwmhrr llii' "W" is Silent
Tower East Cinema
t>n--citl<:
The
Three Stooges,
Road R u n n e r ,
Little Rascals,
and
lovable
Betty Boop
'.»
ALBANY, NY
PAGE 18
ALBANY STUDENT HRESS
March 5 LC-7
7:30 & 9:30
FREE
with state quad card
8.50 without
FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 1972
in providing f o ^ d service to
universities only when such services are on a mandatory contract
plan. Their experience has shown
them that a wholly cash operation
cannot be successful from either a
quality or financial standpoint
unless high prices are charged.
In addition to the financial
questions raised by the abolition
of mandatory food service contracts, there are a number of other
problems which might also be
caused by this action. Experience
has shown that when students are
not on mandatory board contracts
there is likely to be an increased
incidence o f cooking in rooms
which brings about problems o f
insect and roden) control, of
smoke and grease, of stale food
odors, and o f garbage disposal.
Cooking in rooms also adds to the
cost of electricity, and increases
the workloads of custodians in the
dorms.<ln limes when the State of
New York has severe budget restrictions, these increased costs,
although somewhat intangible, are
still items for consideration.
So, on balance, while it might be
preferable socially for students to
have the freedom to eal meals as
they choose, I do not think that
the abolition of a mandatory
board charge would be financially
or environmentally practical w i t h
the food and dorm setup we
currently have here in SUNYAlbany.
I
and anyone else interested
The only chance to take your senior portraits
for your yearbook
is this year!
Starting March 5
NOSTALGIA IV\
featuring
ALMART STORES
I'CTIS stales Hint il lias but two
purposes; "...one, lo publicize in
formation ainone, students that
previously flowed alone, an ineffective grapevine, and t w o , to
si
K" : l 1 ' " faculty and aclminislra
tion the likes and dislikes of slu
dents." Jon Roman, a member of
UCTIS's coordinaling committee,
maintains thai Ihe data collected
'"> teachers and courses would mil
be l l s , , < l
'"' p r o m o t i o n and tenure
decisions or curriculum reform,
Instead, Roman emphasizes that
any information gathered would
be used solely by students I " help
them determine what courses lo
lake the fill owing semester twin's
lions iihoui Hit' amount ol wriileu
work, reading assignments, papers,
etc. would be answered for .1
studenl before he registered lor .1
panic 1,11 course.
While Central Cornell approval
is hoped lor III lie- 1le.11 I n l i n e .
UCTIS still has two problems, l o
overcome The first is Ihe fear of
Ihe faculty that am inliiriualioii
gathered could I
w<l againsl
Ihein. However, UCTIS 111,11111.mis
thill once the "clearly defined and
Il tided objective" ol the group is
publicized, the fears of the f.iculU
will heallev.aled
The second problem is one 111 il
has plagued other public service
groups 111 Ihe .illSl UCTIS Is III
need of student volunl
s II is
hoped tlt.it if UCTIS can establish
,1 working force of I 51) lo 'J.'ill
students, Ihen ihe process of gath
ciing information will be made so
easy I hat results could be pub
lisheil next semester for pre
regis! ra I ion lor Ihe S|
g, 1117,1
semester
Interested sll ' its who would
like additional information eon
ccining UCTIS should eoulacl ,)ou
Roman al Hi7 HHia
I do not think that mandatory
meal plans for resident students
should be abolished. The management of food service in virtually
any institution, particularly in colleges and u n i v e r s i t i e s will confirm that it is very d i f f i c u l t to do
an adequate job o f meal planning
unless the numbers of people to
be
served
are
pretty
well
established in advance. Naturally,
with mandatory board contracts
these numbers of people are
known and thus the planning job
is much more positive and definitive than it would be if all meals
were on a cash basis. This in turn
leads to operating economies
which serves to keep the cost of
purchasing, preparat ion and serving down.
While ji would perhaps be
desirable for students to have a
free choice as to what meals they
were going to have on campus,
under such circumstances it would
not be possible to sustain the kind
of food service which is currently
provided. Because of the inability
to plan precisely and the inevitable drop in volume, prices for cash
meals would he considerably higher
than prices students are paying
under mandatory contracts. A n d
the quality of food would probably not be as good. These observations are borne out by conversal ions with professional food
services, such as SAO A and
ARA-Slafer, who express interest
CLASS of73
by Eddy Trink
Renewed interest in campuswide teacher and course evalua
lions has been sparked by the
formation of a group called
UCTIS (Undergraduate Course
and Teacher Information Survey).
The objective of UCTIS is to
provide all students with informalion regarding all courses and
teachers at the State University of
New York at Albany. At Ihe
moment, Ihe group has the need
ed funds lo initiate such a survey,
bill lacks sluilenl volunteers and
Central Council approval to enter
classes.
Citing a study by I'urolnl and
Magoon of Ihe University of Delaware called " T l i i . Validity of Sin
(It'll I Run Course Kv.ilual ions,"
dorm fare with good results at one American
university. The forthcoming Kosher Kitchen, which
involved some renovation, is also a step in providing
something more than starch and roast beef to Food
Service's captive audience.
Bul primarily, reforms are needed in the basic
contract feeding. Food quality seems to have
declined in the past year, but what has been done to
restore it? Certainly, the rise in meat prices brings
its problems, but this does not explain the boring
starch set before residents students each each night.
Nor does il explain the mystical procedures in
turning anything into some sandwichable salad.
Food Service is the only part of the FSA which
makes a decent financial showing, and Ihe surplus
from the contract feeding supports many o f FSA's
shaky operations in other areas. It would absolutely
not be loo great a request lo see some improvement
in the mandatory meal plan using some of that
surplus, so that the residents could see some positive
results from their shouldering such a large financial
burden for Ihe entirety of FSA. However, to expect
such reforms to come from Food Service itself
seems a bit too optimistic, although it has shown
some responsiveness to student gripes.
Unfortunately, a viable voluntary meal plan has
not yet materialized. However, to continue the
present inadequate system of mandatory plans
without change would he tremendously delinquent.
Could Food Service survive as now operating with
out its captive audience'' [f students are forced lo
live with a mandatory plan, il is lime they saw some
positive change.
by Carol Hughes
So...
PLEASE
MEORMATION
Love, the staff of
£
L
I
SEGJ% UP NOW
AT THE
DESK.
%
TORCH 73
W*W>K>w»S>»>KK^>^^
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
>>v*»>w*>>>>>:-^^^^
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
A'M
PAGE 19
New Hampshire
McGovern Predicts Close Race
ALBANY
STUDENT
PRESS
By Walter Mears
AP Political Writer
Sen. George McGovern is forecasting a cliffhanging
finish in t h e New Hampshire presidential p r i m a r y as
he a n d Sen E d m u n d S. Muskie begin their final
drives for votes in the March 7 balloting.
Muskie a n d McGovern, virtually certain t o b e the
o n e - t w o finishers in the Democratic race, both
p l a n n e d five days of New Hampshire campaigning
until election eve.
" A small n u m b e r of votes one way or the o t h e r
can decide this election," McGovern said Wednesday
night in asking .some 8 0 0 University of New
Hampshire s t u d e n t s for s u p p o r t ,
" I d o n ' t think it's going to bo at all surprising if
this election here turns o u t to be , . . a cliffhanger,"
the S o u t h D a k o t a senator said.
McGovern's strategists c o n t e n d that if Muskie *s
New Hampshire campaign is t o be judged a success,
t h e Maine senator should poll substantially m o r e
than a majority of the vote, in a race with five
n a m e s on t h e Democratic ballot and an active,
expensive write-in campaign under way for R e p ,
Wilbur D. Mills of Arkansas.
It is part of the primary election gamesmanship
for a political manager to set the opposition goal
high while keeping his own public claims modest
and m o r e easily attainable.
But an o u t c o m e approaching t h e kind of cliffhanger McGovern envisioned would be n major and
u n e x p e c t e d boost for the underdog entry from
S o u t h Dakota.
State University of New York at Albany
Vol. LIX No. 14
SUNY Administrators Enjoy Luxurious Living
BUT
DON'T
by Vicki Zeldin
WE &
ft* ,
•EMf
Capitol Correspondent
Despite all t h e cries of "fiscal c r i s i s " a n d "fiscal c o n s t r a i n t s , " t h e
stale of New York manages l o p a y h e a l t h y salaries a n d p r o v i d e plush
h o m e s for m a n y of its a d m i n i s t r a t o r s .
S t a l e Education Commissioner Ewald B. Nyquist, receives an annual
salary of $ 5 1 , 5 0 0 . Along with t h i s salary goes a $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 e x p e n s e
a c c o u n t — $ 5 , 0 0 0 for expenses and $ 5 , 0 0 0 for t r a v e l U n g - w h j c h he
does nol have to account lor. N y q u i s t ' s salary is"$ 1,500 higher than
New Jersey Governor William T. CahiU's— w h o is the third highest paid
governor in Ihe U.S.—and is well above t h e $ 3 8 , 0 0 0 received by
California's e d u c a t i o n c o m m i s s i o n e r . ( T h e Governor of Tex.is receives
$ 5 5 , 0 0 0 and is Ihe second highest paid stale head beaten only by New
Y o r k ' s $ 8 5 , 0 0 0 a year Nelson A. Rockefeller.)
Kennedy Write-in Drive Organized
C o n c o r d , NH ( A P ) - N c w H a m p shire voters were urged Tuesday in
100,000 letters to write in the
name of Sen. Edward K e n n e d y ,
D-Mass., in New H a m p s h i r e ' s
firstin-the-nalion presidential primary next week,
" U n i t e d D e m o c r a t s for Kenn e d y , " h e a d q u a r t e r e d in Silver
Spring, Md., said in letters received in h o u s e h o l d s t h r o u g h o u t
the stale that even though K ennedy " d e c i d e d n o t to seek t h e
Democratic presidential nomination... if t h e citizens of N e w
Hampshire
call
for
him..that
e x a m p l e will he followed by millions of Americans across the
c o u n t r y a n d Sen. K en nedy will
answer o u r c a l l . "
T h e letter, signed by Robin Picker, said t h a t only K en nedy " c a n
rally t h e p o o r , t h e blacks, t h e
y o u n g , the old, the farmer, tin*
laborer a n d the middle class i n t o a
winning c o m b i n a t i o n . "
Only K e n n e d y , Ficker said, " h a s
the s t r e n g t h , the sensitivity, t h e
personal qualities of leadership to
be a great p r e s i d e n t , " adding that
" e v e r y poll d e m o n s t r a t e s thai
K e n n e d y is the o n e Democrat
w h o will surely heat Richard Nix
on in N o v e m b e r . "
None of the Republican or Democratic c a n d i d a t e s , t h e letter said,
" c a n inspire o u r people and lift
the nation o u t of its d o l d r u m s ,
Sen, K e n n e d y c a n . "
K e n n e d y ' s office in Washington
said Ficker, a c a n d i d a t e for Congress, is operating w i t h o u t a n y
a u t h o r i z a t i o n and that K e n n e d y is
still not a c a n d i d a t e .
As if this seemingly high salary and large expense a c c o u n t were n o t
enough, Ihe stale also provides a house for ihe c o m m i s s i o n e r . T h e
house, located on Fiddler's Lane in Loudonville, was purchased in
1950 for $ 0 0 , 0 0 0 . !t cost $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 to build, and w a s appraised at
$ 1 2 5 , 0 0 0 by t h e slate prior t o its purchase. T h e state also picks u p
Ihe l a b tor m a i n t e n a n c e a n d landscaping of t h e m o r e than 10 acres o f
grounds as well as paying for reiinovating and heating bills.
T h e stales of California, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan were all
found t o provide n o t h i n g o t h e r t h a n a salary and e x p e n s e s for their
e d u c a t i o n c o m m i s s i o n e r s . But, t h e m o s t interesting thing a b o u t this
Loudonville h o m e is that N y q u i s t doesn't even live t h e r e . A l b a n y
S t a t e President Louis T. Benezet resides t h e r e instead.
This is the $200,000 house provided for the State Education Commissioner Nyquist. However, Nyquist
does not live in i t ; S U N Y A President Louis Benezet does.
There will be 3,016 regular delegates to the convention which opens in Miami Beach
July 10 to pick the 1972 Democratic standardbearer and his running mate. It will take a
simple majority, or 1,509 votes, to get the nomination.
"...the State of New York has somehow found that it
can afford to pay its top education brass
George McGovern
Republicans: Kennedy Can Grab
Deadlocked Convention
by Gregg Herrington
Associated Press Writer
Republican strategists, looking
over their shoulders at an increasingly tight battle for t h e Democratic
presidential
nomination,
keep seeing Ted K e n n e d y .
Several of t h e m e n close to
President N i x o n ' s campaign for
re-election say chances are good
a n d getting b e t t e r that t h e D e m o
c r a t s will no into their convention
in Miami Beach next .July w i t h o u t a
clear-cut front runner. T h e result,
they say, could be a massive shift
of s u p p o r t to the Massachusetts
senator.
The
N i x o n strategists interviewed agreed Edward M. Ken
nedy is serious at this point in
declaring he is n o t a presidential
c a n d i d a t e this year. They also
agree Sen. E d m u n d S. Muskie of
Maine is leading t h e c r o w d e d field
for t h e D e m o c r a t i c n o m i n a t i o n .
But they tlfio said it's t o o early
to predict u Muskie n o m i n a t i o n ,
expeetally tn light of w h a t they
sen as increasing strength for Sen
H u b e r t H. H u m p h r e y of Minnesota a n d , t o a lesser e x t e n t , Sen.
PAGE 20
<&r£mlttt WiUaoj* GeveTDater
more than the Governor of New Jersey."
SENATOR MUSIOEA
^UST WOW WILL XOU \
UNIFY AMERICA?
J
-~~~
If—I—^
"g.Mp
George McGovern of S o u t h Dakota and Mayor J o h n Lindsay of New
York.
" K e n n e d y is in an awfully good
position if he wants to make a
m o v e , " said J a m e s Allison, former
d e p u t y chairman of t h e Republican Naitonal C o m m i t t e e and now
a political consultant
" H e can ride through as a nonc a n d i d a t e while the o t h e r s eat
each other up, Allison said. "If he
thinks Nixon is vulnerable, he can
go. There is some thinking he'll
c o m e off the bench and I think
really deep down many Repuhli
cans fear him the m o s t . "
One G O P strategist closer to the
Nixon campaign than Allison said,
"If I were pinned to the wall, I
would predict Muskie will be t h e
n o m i n e e . But the chances for n
t r e m e n d o u s tioup at that convon
tion are good. It's n o t unlikely
they'll go the convention without a
clear-cut w i n n e r . "
"If they go though four ball o t s , " he said, " w h o knows what
will h a p p e n ? And, of c o u r s e , if h e
Tuesday, March 7, 1972
-me
Benezet, w h o can hardly be considered a welfare or p o v e r t y case
himself, receives a yearly salary of $ 4 0 , 7 0 8 along with a $ 2 , 0 0 0
e x p e n s e a c c o u n t . Tallying this all u p , Benezet ends u p with a b o u t
$ 4 3 , 0 0 0 plus an all e x p e n s e paid $ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 English style house
c o m p l e t e with a h e a t e d swimming p o o l .
If Benezet lives in N y q u i s t ' s h o u s e , then where does N y q u i s t live?
T h e Education C o m m i s s i o n e r has his o w n h o m e in t h e A l b a n y s u b u r b
of Kuera Bush wher he prefers t o live. T h e state does n o t p a y for this
h o u s e , b u t he could live in a state financed house if he so desired.
Close o n N y q u i s t ' s heels is S U N Y Chancellor Ernest L. Boyer. T h e
university head brings in $ 5 1 , 2 7 5 a year along with s o m e $ 1 0 , 0 0 0
(tax a c c o u n t a b l e ) for expenses, and he t o o is provided with a h o u s e .
Boyer, like his s u p e r i o r , had chosen not to live in his h o u s e , a 13 r o o m
brick h o m e at 4 0 Marion Ave. in A l b a n y . Late last s u m m e r , according
lo a SUNY s p o k e s m a n , he did o c c u p y t h e residence.
Located off Western Ave., t h e Marion Ave. h o m e w a s valued at
$ 0 8 , 0 0 0 when it was purchased in 1 9 5 2 . In 1904 some $ 1 5 , 2 1 0 was
spent for r e d e c o r a t i o n and repairs. In 1070, a year before it was
reoccupied, t h e s t a t e spent s o m e $ 0 0 , 0 0 0 on t h e house. A b o u t $ 0 , 0 0 0
was spent for redecorating, a n o t h e r 2,000 on utilities, about $ 2 , 8 0 0 in
telephone bills and s o m e $ 2 , 0 0 0 was spent for maintenance, O n e full
time and o n e pari t i m e h o u s e k e e p e r were employed at a cost of
$ 1 2 , 5 0 0 . Repairs on t h e s t r u c t u r e ' s slate roof ran a b o u t $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 . A
targe sum of motley was also spent t o guard ihe unoccupied s t r u c t u r e .
WA£?
Until this time, I lie house remained unoccupied except for an
occasional university guest because Boyer chose not lo move from his
Slingerlamls h o m e after lie assumed t h e Chancellorship in 1070. T h e
house was, and still is, used for univci sily-wide meetings, and
according lo a reliable source, m a n y of ihe l o o m s in t h e house were
converted in in lounge areas lo a c c o m m o d a t e ihese conferences.
According lo ibis sou i r e a n d several ot her p e o p l e w h o have had recent
contact with (he Chancellor, he does nol live at Ihe Albany h o m e
c o n t r a r y lo ihe SUNY s t a t e m e n t . . A n o t h e r source indicated that Ihe
chancellor did indeed slay al Ihe Marion Ave. address, hul thai he still
maintained his Slingerlaiids residence as well
An a t t e m p t , by Hobart Republican Assemblyman E d w y n Mason, t o
end t h e practice of providing h o m e s for s l a t e officials was killed in
c o m m i t t e e last year. l i e has not decided w h e t h e r to m a k e a n o t h e r
a t t e m p t this year.
wanted t o , that's where K e n n e d y
c o u l d c o m e in a n d pick u p t h e
marbles. You k n o w , the ' t h e people wanl m e ' a p p r o a c h . "
A deadlocked c o n v e n t i o n would
be an event in itself because of a
recent history of locking u p t h e
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
n o m i n a t i o n before
conventions
o p e n e d . T h e last time either p a r t y
cast m o r e than tine ballot to pick
its n o m i n e e was 1962 v.hen Democratic delegates voted t h r e e t i m e s
before
settling
on Adlai
E.
Stevenson.
SUNY Chancellor Ernest Boyer is provided w i t h a home, located at 40 Marion Ave. in A l b a n y , but, like
his superior, Boyer has chosen not t o live in his official house.
FRIDAY, MARCH 3, 1972
Although it has been found necessary t o raise tuition rates at S U N Y
schools and to c u t d o w n projected e n r o l l m e n t s for t h e system a n d
hold back on new a n d developing p r o g r a m s allegedly because of a lack
of funds, t h e S t a t e of New York h a s s o m e h o w found t h a t it can
afford t o p a y its t o p e d u c a t i o n brass m o r e t h a n t h e G o v e r n o r of New
Jersey receives, a n d t o provide t h e m with mansion-like h o m e s t h a t
they often d o n ' t even use.
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