Action On Environment Urged

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FRIDAY, MARCH 26,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGES
FIVE
CENTS
off campus
rivci^ciM
i s OTT
campus
Prottct Yoir EivirointitContact Those People
Action On
The State Senate
Majority Leader—Earl Brydges
Minority Leader—Joseph Zaretski
Senate Finance Chairman—Warren Anderson
Environment Urged
by Mat Heyman
and Rick Morse
Environment has been labeled
the issue of the 70's. Issue implies
campaign, campaign implies political rhetoric. Beyond the rhetoric,
beyond
the neutrality
of
"environment" in contrast to
more controversial issues such as
the Southeast Asian War, the implications are the same; time is of
the essence.
In order that our environment
may be salvaged now and not in
some imaginary time in the future
the most viable course of action at
the present time is to bring pressure on the State Legislature. This
summary of some of the environmental issues on the state level is
being offered as a guide to action,
a suggested course of action
would be either writing or calling
legislators or taking advantage of
our location and visiting these
people. A show of support will be
critical to the passage of legislation.
lems. The Ways and Means Committee of the Assembly is proposing a $4.7 million cut in this
department's budget. The enforcement capability of the DEC as
well as its field services will be
severely hampered. (Further information is available in FA 218.)
Most important to contact are the
chairmen of the Senate Finance
Committee and the Assembly
Ways and Means Committee.
Bill No. 2816Introduced by Mr. Harris
The future of the Adirondack^
area is a vital conservation issue. A
new York State Temporary Commission has finished u comprehensive study of the area and made
many stringent recommendations
concerning control and development of the Adirondacks. Most
important in their eyes is the
quick establishment of an Adirondack Park Agency to exert control
over this valuable area. There are
opposing interests: timber industries, group camps, and land
"developers" in general. Public
support for an Adirondack Agency is vital. Contact your Assemblyman and Senator as well as the
Governor's office at the Capitol.
Department of Environmental
Conservation Budget Cut
This department, which was established last year at the height of
"environmental" concern, is the
only state agency available for
action on environmental prob-
—••••••••«•
'
The above bills are presently in
the Committee on Conservation,
and will need a great amount of
public support to move out onto
the floor. Time is of the essence.
»••••••••••••••••••»—•
Y o u ' v e Got It,
We Wont It!
Join the
Ebenezer Howard Project
Assemblyman John Smith
New York State Assembly
Albany, New York 12224
by Tony Haul
An ASP Feature
Have you ever wondered why
record albums are so expensive? It
seems many students have and
some are getting together to try
and get a non-profit record co-op
going on campus. Think it's impossible? Well it mighl be, but
arrangements have been made and
the "People's Record Store" has
emerged in the basement of Anthony Hall on State Quad.
Although there are definitely
many problems involved, the Anthony Hall "Conspiracy for The
People" is selling many albums for
a mere $1.55. All " D " Albums
that would normally sell for$3.57
in the bookstore will go for $3.00
and "E's" for$3.50'.
Stores similar to this one have
been set up on the Stony Brook
and Buffalo campuses and are
thriving, it seems there might be
some problems here at SUNYA
because the S.A. has contract with
FSA that stipulates that the Student Association cannot license
anybody to sell items on campus
that are also sold in the bookstore. The organizers of the co-op
who, for the time wish to remain
anonymous, replied that, "if the
l'\SA was truly serving the students here to the best of their
abilities, they would either permit
the running of our alternate,
cheaper coop or lower their
prices to sound u lot more like
ours".
It. may be noted here that
the Bookstore makes slightly
under a dollar on each record they
sell. (Because of the absurd pricing in the Bookstore it's probable
that more records are stolen than
bought thero anyway.)
by Vicki Zeldin
-rosenberg
The Co-op people stressed thai
although they still had to deal
with Capitalist companies and distributers they were starting at the
lowest level to cut out profits and
serve the people.
"If students would get together
and organize their resources and
potential they would realize that
without that much effort they
could cut prices on all items they
blindly buy from stores making
absurd profits". The Food Co-op
downtown was sighted as a definite example of this.
The students also implied that
they foil KSA had entirely too
much power in deciding what
Bring a friend and drive to
..
.
500 "Women's Libites" and their supporters marched on the Capitol to protest legislation aimed at
restricting the abortion law.
—cltow
Legislature May Force
Milne School to Close
Launderease
24 washers
(0drlfl„
10 drieri
252 Ontario Street
MM
/ fully support your efforts to defeat legislation
attempting to place new restrictions on women's
light to abortion. Women's political power should
be fully mobilized to protect and extend women \
rights and lo get more women into city, state, and
national political office. We cannot depend on men
to speak for women 's needs.
ISellaS. Almtg
Member of Congress
Record Co-op To Open
Come visit with us in suite 300 or 309
Give us a call at 457-8327
by Stephanie DiKovics
K. Daniel Haley
Senator John Doe
New York Stale Senate
Albany, New York 12224
For giant loads, drapes, 9'xl2' shag
rugs, try our TRIPLE LOADER:
22'A minutes with only '/& cup of detergent
Monday, March 29. 1971
Women's Lib
Marches on Capitol
John Beckman
Andrew Ryan
William Steinfeldt
J. Edward Meyer
Thomas Mclnereney
Peter Berle
Francis Griffin
Herbert Posner
Mary Anne Krupsak
Want to look "clean clear through"?
in Mohican Hall on Indian Quad.
State University of New York at Albany
John Flynn
Walter Langley
Martin Knorr
Nicholas Ferraro
James Powers
Jeremiah Bloom
Donald Halperin
How to Address
Bill No. 4231 Introduced by Mr. Berle
This bill amends the civil practice law and rules in order that a
citizen or group of citizens may
bring legal action against anyone
who pollutes, impairs or destroys
the air, water, or other natural
resources or the public trust of
the state or which invades or is
reasonably Iikely to invade the
rights of the citizens of the state.
This bill provides for no out of
court settlements, forcing court
decision rather than "under the
table pay-offs." It also provides
for a cost ceiling on legal fees for
the plaintiff. This would he a very
important asset to environmental
interests in the state.
Vol. LVIII No. 26
Assembly Committee on Conservation
Clarence Lane
Richard Marshall
Peter Costigan
William Sears
Glenn Harris
Benjamin Gilman
Fred Droms, Jr.
Frank A. Carroll
Neil Kclleher
Members:
Bill No. 2817 Introduced by Mr. Harris
Vice-Chairman—Theodore Day
Albany Student Press 4
The State Assembly
Speaker—Perry Duryea, Jr.
Majority Leader—John Kingston
Minority Leader—Stanely Steingut
Way 3 and Means Chairman—Willis Stephi ns
This bill prohibits the sale or
distribution of household detergent products in New York State
with a phosphorous content in
excess of three per cent of the
total weight of the product.
This bill prohibits the discharge
Political' rhetoric about "envir- of mercury or mercurial comonment" is too well known; we pounds from industrial and compropose to end it on the students' mercial operations.
part.
The Future of the Adirondack.*
Senate Committee on Conservation and Recreation
Chairman- -Bernard Smith
William Smith
Douglas Barclay
Bernard Gordon
Dalwin Niles
James Donovan
Leon Giuffreda
Ronald Stafford
M
students do on this campus and
thai if "We're going to accept that
kind of shit now without establish ing our own self controlled
institutions iu combat our own
exploitation we were doomed to
complete domination from big o r
ganizations."
" So help supporl the record coop and get yourself some good
music. The Co-op has a stock and
can gel, the album of your choice
within two weeks by order. The
store is open in the basement of
Anthony Hall, starting Monday by
the following schedule: Monday,
7-10 p.m.; Wednesday, 1-5 & 7-It)
p.m.;and Friday, 1-5 p.m,
JUNE G R A D U A T E S
JOBS A V A I L / M A J O R C I T I E S
CALIF-ARIZHAWAII
Protoasionul/Traitioo positions
currently availablo in all Molds.
Available positions m o n i t o r u d
duilv & rushed to y o u wmikly
For full i n f o r m a t i o n packant),
including a 4 weak subscription
on currently available jobs, plus
sample resumes, salary & cost
o ' living comparisons, & aroa
executlvo recruiters d i r e c t o r y ,
send $9 t o :
JOBS I N T H E S U N
Bon 133-Lu Jollu-Clilif 9 2 0 3 7
cating them in the local schools, liowlei unhealed thai Milne was
ratlin lliari paying such costs."
probably a more heterogeneous
Albany's campus school, ttic
A pari of lire rationale for Ihe school ill.in many of the public
Milne School, may he forced to bills was given by an unidentified schools.
close Ihis June if Iwo bills being stale legislator, "This bill recogHvidenlly mil only Milne's adconsidered by the state legislature nizes thai Ihe schools (campus niinislralors feel Ihat the school is
are passed.
schools) serve little purpose for worthwhile. A petition signed by
The bills, S2')I5 and A.1465, if colleges and are essentially just members of Albany's teacher edupassed, would ai'fccl the nine another form of local schools." cation program currently being
oilier campus schools currently in The hills are also obviously aim- circulated stales, "We believe that
operation around Ihe slate.
liter attempt to slice a little more Ihe experiences available lo us al
Campus schools are supported money off ihe SUNY system's Ihe Milne School are vital to our
by ihe budget of Ihe stale univer- already hacked budget as the legis- education; in fact mosl of us agree
sity. The school is run by, and is a lalure attempts to lie together one thai these experiences constitute
part of Ihe university. Passage of final total budget for passage.
Ihe most beneficial portion ol'oui
Ihe two bills pending in both
"We lliink we're doing a good program and I ha I they should be
legislative houses would require job here," stated liowlei as he
increased rather than curtailed."
the public school districts in outlined what he considered lo be
which campus schools are localed the advantages of the campus
lo absorb the costs of these school. "AppioMinalcly I'M) stllschools oi let them close down.
dent icacheis pel yeai Main al
The Albany school dislrtcl Milne, as well as between 500 and
would have to be willing and able hOO students who conic In oblo pa) abottl S.?H5,(KM) lo keep serve leaching procedines here,"
lite Milne School in opcralion.
he s.ud liowlei also noted thai
II .i public school distitel de- Ihe school has a vattely ol special
cided lo keep a campus school innovative piogiatns. In pat titular
he inenlioiied Milne's science prolimning, they would have lo pas
Ihe dlflcicnccs between I hen pu- gum ili.il. "ahum 5S school dispil opei.iliug expenses and Ihe lncts have conic lo obseive."
liowlei also explained how I lie
slate aid pei pupil lo ihe dislncl
appioxunalelj -Hill Milne siiidenis
In lite slate's LH netal Hind
•\ccouling i" t'Italics liowlei, (giades S I J | aie selected. "Many
people lliink Ihul we 011I5 lake
i,,i,l,HI
HUi
|-J
,il M i l l i e .
II i s
ilniiliilii Mi.ii ihe school districts Ihe vet) hiighiesl student. ilus is
will pul up Ihe hinds In keep the 1101 so." he claimed. Ihe school
schools iiiniung Ihcodoic bos- leceives about 21)1) applications,
sleek, supervising piincipal al rutin which only ')} students per
Milne, noted in a lellei lo Ihe guide can be selected. The applipaienis of lite school's students cants aie administered an I.Q.
dial "Some school ilislncts (New lest, the lesulis of which are
I'all/. and I'olsdatn) aie consider- divided 111I0 six equal groups. The
ing withdrawing llieir students lop scoring students from each
I'roposed legislation may force the closing
from Ihe campus schools and edu- subdivision are then admilted.
University.
Allei a inarch from Diapei Hall lo the steps of Ihe
Capitol,the Demonstialion on Abortion, sponsored
by Ihe Women's Sltike Coalition diew a crowd of
approximately 500 on Saturday afternoon. The
crowd, composed mostly of women under .15.
listened lo speakers attack Ihe new legislation which
would restrict abortion law.
One of the more vehement speakers, known only
as l-'U). described Ihe rally as "one way to deal wilh
our ptg-o-cnilic legislators." She urged active and
coinmiiled support towards the women's lib movement, especially in gelling women elected to office.
She fell Ilia! the mosl effective means of attaining
control ovei one's own body was to be elected and
therefore responsible for making the laws. With
colorful language, she attacked the legislature saying. "We've had enough of deuvonsiiattons and it's
ahoti 1 time we lluew these uiotbei fuckers oul ol
their '.cats." Continuing lo employ racy language
which she mockingly called "offensive to those sensitive police." she was temporarily thwarted when ihe
microphones were mined off. The crowd's response
10 the absence of a microphone was a chain of "off
Ihe pig." A lew minutes passed during which Flo
continued lo speak and then use of Ihe microphone
resumed. Ho ended hei addiess wilh her statement
thai "we have pioved 0111 sinceiity wilh this
masochistic march on this chilly day."
Delia Abzug, tentatively scheduled lo speak at the
rally, was not present. Instead, her statement
pertaining to Ihe strike was read.
Assemblywoman Constance Cook also made a
statement in person, I ha I there is a need lo "gel
women into office; only then will we be in a
position lo really protect out interest,"
The crowd slowly dispersed alter the assemblywoman's statement. Less than two-thirds of the
original crowd was present by Ihe conclusion of ihe
rally.
of the Milne School, which is owned and operated by the
PAGE 2
MONDAY, MARCH 29,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
MONDAY, MARCH 29,1971
Council "Rap" Session
Reviews Photo Service
Easter Bus Service
May Become Regular
by Eric J o s s
F o r s t u d e n t s leaving c a m p u s for E a s t e r V a c a t i o n ,
G r e y h o u n d buses will b e leaving from t h e circle o n
T h u r s d a y , April 1 for N e w York City a n d o n
F r i d a y , April 2 for N e w York City, Utica, Syracuse,
R o c h e s t e r , Buffalo, B i n g h a m t o n , a n d O g d e n s b u r g .
Buses will b e provided as needed. T h e only requirem e n t is a m i n i m u m of 3 2 passengers p e r bus.
AH buses will r e t u r n t o S U N Y A o n S u n d a y , April
11 e x c e p t t h e B i n g h a m t o n a n d O g d e n s b u r g runs.
T h e s e trips will r e t u r n t o t h e Albany b u s d e p o t
unless t h e r e a r e e n o u g h s t u d e n t s t o fill a b u s going
directly t o t h e circle. In t h e event t h e r e a r e n ' t
e n o u g h s t u d e n t s t o fill t h e Ogdensburg b u s , t h e trip
will b e c o m b i n e d with either t h e Utica o r S y r a c u s e
runs.
F o r those going t o N e w York City, r e b o a r d i n g
passes will be issued for use at Port A u t h o r i t y . T h e
pass indicates a specified time for r e t u r n t o A l b a n y .
Passes will also b e used in d e t e r m i n i n g t h e n u m b e r
of c o a c h e s needed. It is necessary t h a t o n c e a
r e t u r n i n g t i m e is designated, it m u s t be kept.
One-way tickets will b e sold and r o u n d - t r i p tickets
are good for a n y G r e y h o u n d b u s r e t u r n i n g from N e w
Y o r k City t o A l b a n y , either t o c a m p u s o r t o t h e
d e p o t . Tickets will b e sold across from check-cashing from M o n d a y thru T h u r s d a y beginning a t 10
a.m.
—solomnn
Proposed Deferred-Tuition Plan
Aimed at Saving on Education
This service is s c h e d u l e d t o c o n t i n u e every weeke n d beginning after Easter vacation only if t h e
r e s p o n s e is favorable. O n e final note—inter-state
tariffs are going u p 5% o n April 1.
by Bruce Detlefsen
AP Education Writer
Correction
In t h e F r i d a y , March 2 6 edition of t h e A S P t h e page o n e story
entitled " A l b a n y Coalition Sets Spring P l a n s " e r r o n e o u s l y s t a t e d
" a m i n i m u m i n c o m e of $ 6 , 5 0 0 for a family of four in V i e t n a m . "
It should have read " a m i n i m u m income of $ 6 , 5 0 0 for a family of
four in t h e U . S . "
An official of t h e state's business c o m m u n i t y proposed Thursday that N e w York a d o p t a " d e ferred-tuition" plan for public and
private colleges aimed at saving
MOTORCYCLE INSURANCE
Craftsmen & A rtists Needed
MABOU is opening a new store in Saratoga early in
April. Jewelry, clothing, sculpture, prints, gift items, &
any unique objects will be bought or consigned.
Please Contact:
Same Day FS-1
Barry Scott 462-9796
90 State St., Albany
P R O F E S S I O N A L T Y P I N G SERVICE
IIIM ScleclrnVy/itu/riter
V.x/irriciift'tl lit ult types of
Ihictiirul
Dissertations
,ililr
Mark or Elizabeth at 785-9713
i..hi
:,ill 4 6 2 6 2 8 3
H.m.-s
D;iv or Evening
Jeans. Slacks. Shirts. Vests. Jackets. Socks. Western Wear. Boots.
tax dollars and helping parents
escape astronomical
education
bills.
" Y o u ' v e got t o be a millionaire
to educate your kids in college if
you t r y t o do it o u t of y o u r o w n
p o c k e t , " J o h n J . R o b e r t s , executive vice president of t h e E m p i r e
State Chamber of C o m m e r c e , told
a news conference at t h e Capitol.
Robertssaid the deferred-tuition
system would enable t h e s t u d e n t s
themselves t o charge p a r t o f o r
even all of their tuitions against
their future earnings.
A key consideration, t h e chamber said, is that " n o s t u d e n t
would be denied a college education because of financial inability
to meet that c o s t . "
Moreover, the s t a t e m e n t continued, "if it is true that a higher
education adds t o t h e ability of
the s t u d e n t t o earn a higher income in his lifetime, then for
what better expenditure could h e
possible b o r r o w ? "
Moreover, the CUNY and S U N Y
tuitions also would reflect true
costs, meaning they would c l i m b
substantially beyond t h e basic
S t a t e Univei. ity charge that will
be $ 5 5 0 as o f n e x t fall.
Such a s t e p for t h e two publicsystems
undoubtedly
would
p r o m p t e n t h u s i a s m from some
s t a t e g o v e r n m e n t officials who
long have e s p o u s e d higher tuition
charges.
In his letters, R o b e r t s proposed
t h a t t h e S t a t e University "would
no longer b e selling a 'cut rate'
t u i t i o n in c o m p e t i t i o n with private c o l l e c e s . "
T h e r e f o r e , h e a d d e d with the
present gap b e t w e e n public and
private college tuitions substantially n a r r o w e d , " s t u d e n t s would
be free t o c h o o s e a college based
on excellence, r a t h e r than cost,
and private colleges and the Slate
University w o u l d be on a more
equal footing in their ball . fur
survival."
R o b e r t s c o n c e d e d I ha'. there
m a y be h u r d l e s h e did n u t foresee.
In a d d i t i o n , h e p o i n t e d o u t that
the s t a t e p r o b a b l y would have to
float a large b o n d issue to launch
the p r o g r a m , since there would lie
a time lag before a significant
a m o u n t of m o n e y was paid back
Two New CWL Coures for Fall 71
The Department of Comparative well as an investigation of
and World Literature is offering terms " B a r o q u e " . " C l a s s i c i s m " ,
two courses which were o m i t t e d
CWL 5 1 0 , " S e m i n a r in Nan;
from t h e catalogue. These courses, M o d e s " , is a n examination
taught by Dr. J. Szoverffy, are functions a n d forms of n a m
both worth :) credits, and are
discourse in oral a n d written I
offered Tor Fall, 1 9 7 1 .
ature. T h e textual malenal i
CWL 191, entitled " L i t e r a t u r e may c o m e from international I
and Culture in 17th c e n t u r y Eur- tali.', traditional epic
il tneili
o p e " , will feature readings from narratives in Latin. French, I
French,
German,
Italian, a n d man, a n d English.
Spanish literature. Mutual relationFor further information, pi
ip between literature, art, music, contact
Dr. Szoverffy al
> i.l social forms, (;,.>»,-» and H-KI5. All courses are. o f c o i u s i
poetic forms will all play a pari, as English.
Dream of days t o c o m e - o f r a i n b o w s , butterflies, a n d daisies.
—potskowski
French Black Literature Course
To Be Researched by Alexander
by H o w a r d Mahler
Douglas Alexander II, Proles-sor in Lhe D e p a r t m e n t
of R o m a n c e Languages, has received a S u m m e r
S t i p e n d for Young H u m a n i s t s from t h e National
E n d o w m e n t For Humanities F o u n d a l i o n . His object
is lo research French Literature in c o u n t r i e s o u t s i d e
of F r a n c e especially in Old F r e n c h West Africa
Senegal ( Dakor, D a h o m e y , Guinea, Ivory Coast,
and possibly Morocco a n d t h e R e p u b l i c of t h e
Congo are o n A l e x a n d e r ' s itinerary.
Alexander plans t o discuss trends in French Black
literature. Investigations of t h e Negritudo t h e m e ,
black i d e n t i t y , a n d t h e anti-colonialism t h e m e are
p r i m a r y topics. Pending on budget allowances these
discussions m a y be tape recorded.
Tex I purchasing is a n o t h e r goal of t h e trip. Much
of t h e literature p r o d u c e d in Africa is unavailable in
the United Stales.
A c o u r s e e n t i t l e d "Black L i t e r a t u r e of F r e n c h
E x p r e s s i o n " will be created from t h e o b t a i n e d
literature for Spring of I 9 7 2 at S U N Y A .
T h e long range goal is further research in West
Africa, N o r t h Africn, Madagascar, Quebec, and
Haiti. Haiti has a t w o h u n d r e d year literary h i s t o r y .
Madagascar is t h e h o m e of M.A. Cesare, a r e n o w n e d
French p o e t . H e n c e tlie research goal is not necessarily Black literature, b u t French literature outside
of F r a n c e .
A l e x a n d e r n o t e d that during t h e li>.'H)'s F r e n c h
translations of A m e r i c a n Black writers such as
Langslon Hughes a n d Claude McKay had an impact
on Black s t u d e n t s from Africa s t u d y i n g in F r a n c e .
T h e impact will be further u n d e r s t o o d t h r o u g h
research o n t h e F r e n c h Black literature.
Dr. Alexander will travel alone lor o n e m o n t h
before r e t u r n i n g t o t h e United States. Mis s t a t u s is
tourist a n d is " a b s o l u t e l y a p o l i t i c a l . " He plans t o
visit areas outside of cities, u n t o u c h e d by t h e
t w e n t i e t h c e n t u r y . He h o p e s t o receive a o n e year
grant in o r d e r t o c o n d u c t further research a n d
cover an e x p a n d e d s p e c t r u m of French L i t e r a t u r e .
Stranded
from Europe?
Section III International
will accommodate all those
whose flights were cancelled
m
ABORTIONS '
» EXPERT CfcriFIED GYNECOIOGI5TS
• CHOICE OF TOP PRIVATE HOSPITALS
AND PRIVATE CtlNICS
• APPOINTMENTS SCHEDUtED WITHIN
24 HOURS
• TRAVII ARRANGEMENTS AVAIlAElfE
• TOTAL COST BELOW $250
FOR EARLY PREGNANCIES
FEE INCLUDED
C A l l IITIIIR OIFICE FOR ASSISTANCE
i ? 0 1 ' 3 3 1 3738 ' 2 1 2 ' 805-1311
N,.v- Ynik A V i l i u ' l Reli-ridl Ag«n<y
Only
A L L Panasonic
'LISTENING PLEASURE
YOU CAN AFFORD"
Contact:
Bob Burstein
457-5028 or
346-3360
Wiwr*nbw tl.i "W" ll 11W.
~ ~ " •''-••'»l'''»«i««wWa^ggM-«|
Do yourself a favor:
Join Campus Center
Governing Board!
Applications
available
for 1971-72
at CC Information
Desk
March 29th-April 2nd
Due 5 PM April 2nd in CC 364
If y o u w a n t t o get y o u r pre-registrafion over with quickly a n d Busily there lire a few
things you should know. T h a i ' s the word from Assistant Registrar Donald Bunis.
Fin- o n e thing, if y o u have a n y d e b t s o u t s t a n d i n g with a n y d e p a r t m e n t , t h e library,
infirmary, o r bursar's office, y o u won't be able lo pre-register. S o , pay u p ! N o
pre-registration if you forget y o u r s t u d e n t ID, either.
If it's fall courses y o u ' r e after, bring a new salmon striped program card. Have filled in
wilh ink y o u r n a m e and s t u d e n t n u m b e r , a n d advisor's signature. Fill o u t t h e white
s u m m e r prc-registration cards t h e same way. l n c i d e n t l y , y o u can pre-register for s u m m e r
and fall at t h e s a m e lime. An area for s u m m e r pre-regislnition will h e in t h e Colonial
lounge.
T h e published alpha-seiiuenee will b e adhered l o strictly this pre-regislration, with o n e
c o r r e c t i o n . T h e information sheets distributed should read, for t h e d a l e April 2 3 , Br-Bz.
You might be interested to know that you can c o m p l e t e Iwo semesters worth of work
in certain courses offered this s u m m e r . Interested? Gel yourself a S u m m e r Bulletin in
r o o m 120 of t h e A d m i n i s t r a t i o n Building.
to book a flight.
Almart Stores
cited t h e r e c e n t a m e n d m e n t s t o
t h e c o n s t i t u t i o n s o f P h o t o Service
a n d Sweet Fire as e x a m p l e s o f t h e
C o m m i s s i o n ' s u n d u e e x t e n s i o n of
its jurisdiction.
Next t o be heard was a m e m b e r
of t h e s t u d e n t b o d y w h o w a s
contesting t h e recent appropriat i o n of funds t o Sweet Fire. T h e
s t u d e n t felt t h a t since Sweet
Fire
was o p e r a t i n g u n d e r a n invalid
c o n s t i t u t i o n as o f t h e last issue, its
bills for t h a t issue s h o u l d n o t b e
paid with S t u d e n t Association
m o n e y . A brief e x p l a n a t i o n by
Dave Neufeld h e l p e d clarify this
p o i n t , a n d t h e s t u d e n t w a s given
t h e o p t i o n o f r e s u b m i t t i n g this
c o m p l a i n t in c o m m i t t e e o r a t t h e
n e x t Council m e e t i n g .
Dave Neufeld then r e p o r t e d t h a t
the washing m a c h i n e p r o b l e m o n
S t a t e Quad has been basically
r o n e d o u t . F S A h a s agreed t o p a y
for t h e repair of t h e m a c h i n e s ,
and laundry service is being res t o r e d by B&M D i s t r i b u t o r s .
T h e m e e t i n g e n d e d with a discussion as t o w h y such a stalem a t i n g of Council's functioning
should have t o o c c u r as a result of
absenteeism of its m e m b e r s . T h e
c o n t i n u e d d e l i n q u e n c y by several
representatives was m e n t i o n e d .
by Tracy Egun
Store In T h e Stale
There's still t i m e
D u e t o t h e lack o f a q u o r u m ,
the
Central
Council
meeting
s c h e d u l e d for T h u r s d a y , March
2 5 , w a s r e d u c e d t o a n informal
forum for discussion.
A significant p a r t of this quasilegislative r a p session w a s o c c u p i e d b y a review of C o m m u n i cations Commission.
Questions
c o n c e r n i n g t h e p i c t u r e selection
and
compensation
policies of
P h o t o Service w e r e of major imp o r t . Dave Peck d i r e c t e d a t t e n t i o n
to t h e p r a c t i c e of s t u d e n t p h o t o graphy e d i t o r s possibly m a k i n g
e x t r a m o n e v t h r o u g h t h e selection
of an i n o r d i n a t e l y high n u m b e r of
their o w n p r i n t s for p u b l i c a t i o n .
An answer t o this charge c a m e
from a m e m b e r of P h o t o Service
w h o referred t o t h e lone h o u r s
p u t in b y s t u d e n t p h o t o g r a p h e r s
for relatively small c o m p e n s a t i o n .
Steve Gerber, c h a i r m a n of Comm u n i c a t i o n s Commission, agreed
to look i n t o this in greater d e p t h .
T h e P h o t o Service q u e s t i o n w a s
followed by a s t a t e m e n t of disapproval b y Mike L a m p e r t d i r e c t e d
at C o m m u n i c a t i o n C o m m i s s i o n ' s
a p p a r e n t a b d i c a t i o n of its constitutional responsibility. L a m p e r t
More Facts on Pre-Registration
I n The M i n i Mall At
M o b n w k Mull. Schenectady
'Pel ( f > I H I 3 1(1 4(134
O p e n 10 0 0 a i n T o '•• 3 0 p n
Monday Thru Saturday
NOISE POLLUTION
DOES IT BOTHER YOU?
MEET THE PIONEER FAMILY
THEY D O SOMETHING ABOUT IT.
*******
Inloinwilinn AI>oul tEGAf. NEW YOIW
Wrangler Jems ft
Mr.Wrangler Sportswear
PAGE 3
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
ASP TECH STAFF
launches
(M) P I O N E E R
SEE & HEAR THEM AT LAFAYETTE
Spring Offensive
Wednesday, April 14th
at 7 PM
LAFAYETTE
CC 3 2 3
Associate Stores of Seiden Sound
Anyone interested in joining the
Albany
ASP Technical Staff is welcomel
^*****n****************»******»»***i***f***********f
******>•
RADIO
ELECTRONICS
79 (cntril Ave.
4 02-8501
Schenectady Glens Falls Pittsflckl Colonie
141 ErU Blvd.
MMI11
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4W-14H
45»-7U«
PAGE 4
A
Bod
good
Play for
an O l d
Lady
is a
play about an old m a n , an
woman,
have
and
ever
a
flowerman.
wanted
aforementioned,
night
at
7:30
Frankonis
the
the
has already
apply
an
Wednesday,
Assembly
March
p.rn,
Melvile
March
Lower
as
Pya Industrial Pollution
Sailing
"La
p.m.
available at
Club
7:30
in
CC
Question
Charlie
his
for
now
another
Meeting
Wednesday,
Lounge
ol
Bowman
course
find
have
on
in the Physics
p.m.
Will
will
meeting
31
the
(Monday)
March
Thursday
State
pre-vacation
music.
It
night,
Quad
Flag
relaxing
starts at
April
Room
1
in
for
a
evening
7:30 and
First
4:30,
SUNYA
begin
DRAFT
March
All
of
Spring
The
Tuesday,
3 0 at 7 : 3 0 p . m . i n S A
"La
Residencia
nounces
at
8:30
S t u d i o ot the
Thursday
Gym.
in
the
this
Forum -
Dance
at 2 : 3 0 in P a t r o o n
Wed., March
announces
meeting
April
for
on
1 9 7 1 in C C 3 1 5 at 7 : 3 0
the
undergraduate
ledge
ol
Spanish and w o u l d
the Spanish D o r m
like
next
Science
For
157-7838.
monthly
March
Quad,
30
at
Schuyler
more
Brinq
7
Rigorman
with
on
the
and
-
31st,
How
Eat
Roc.
It."
call
Club
courses
in
the
for
lew
7:30
CC
from
w i l l give a talk
to
Catch,
April
2,
fee
pi.ins
for
1st,
for
8:00,
29,
mation
115.
Aldun
April
the
Biology
Biology
Clufi,
248.
Student
next
year's
Sec,
fruits.,)
tors
The Albany Student
P r e s s is p u b l i s h e d t h r e e t u n e s p e r w e e k
d u r i n g t h e a c a d e m i c y e a r ( e x c e p t d u r i n g recesses) b y t h e S t u d e n t
A s s o c i a t i o n o f t h e S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y o f N o w Y o r k at A l b a n y . T h e
S t u d e n t A s s o c i a t i o n is l o c a t e d i n C a m p u s C e n t e r 3<1G a t
1400
Washington Avenue, Albany,
New York,
1220J.
Subscription
p r i c e is $ 9 p o r y e a r o r $ 5 p e r s e m e s t e r
S e c o n d class m a l l i m j
p o r m i t p o n d i n g , Baltston Spa, N e w Y o r k .
iiffj
ihiisirairrm
mi
person.
received
contact
lor
1971
Thy Will Be Done
t,,l
Wednesday'
21.
Mexico,
is
Inlnrosled
students
through
Inter-American
Richardson
Hall
pus)
Olhce
or
the
CIDOC
may
iheCentei
Studies,
ol
by Vicki Gottlich
I 79
IDowntown
An ASP Column
cam
International
S t u d i o s , SS 1 1 1 .
studying
Registration
guages,
will
later
than
further
Lloyd
Seniors:
other
linguistics,
together
ES
Interested
cultures,
anthropology—and
infor-
Lininger,
of
Attention
8.
be
no
Once upon a time, there was an extremely modern country hidden
away in the small foothills of New York, bounded by a thoroughly
modern road and a thoroughly dead river. The country was known for
its futuristic architecture and way of life in which the people were
.supposedly free to choose their daily schedules. Socialistic in nature
(everyone supposedly was equal), the country was ruled by a king
who presided over the running of many committees. It was a lovely
country— sunny, but a trifle windy.
One day, as the snow was beginning to thaw and the sun was
beginning to hang around with a little more consistency, and it
seemed closer to spring, the housing office decided it was time to look
towards housing for the future generations expected to arrive in late
August. Among their papers, the officials found petitions from several
buildings asking that they bo allowed to house both male and female
citizens.
"Co-ed? How can that be? It seems to me that many members of
one sex don't know that the other exists," said the first official.
"Maybe we should let them live together, then. They might learn
something," said the second official.
"That's immoral!" chorused the other officials.
"It's against the highest housing laws of the world, those created by
the Dormitory Authority. You can't have members of the opposite
sex sharing the same bathroom," reminded the third official.
"No! No!" cried the second official. "Not in the same suite. Across
the hall- Ihe same lounge—as neighbors, hut not in the same suite. It's
what llu* people want, and we arc supposed to follow the wishes of
the people, Look ul nil the signatures on these petitions."
"You're all wrong. The people don't know what they want. These
petitions, are not I lie voices of the majority, jusl a perverted
few voyeurs, 1 say,"said Ihe first official.
on
to
t h e m ail
minority
d r e n ? or overseas? See R u l h
Mathematics,
b u r n or
Richard
l.m
education,
putting
teach
in
oilier
in,i
Black
L i g h t , ED
\]y
3952.
board
All
lor
ii w h e n
packets
are
interested
option
request
April
in
and
be
write
lor
held
inienftlod
or
Elections
officers
in
March
M.in:h
30
ul
M.iif h
31
Iniiti
4
p in,
/
for
(Pros.,
V.P.,
eleven
Sena-
in
April.
running
to H . S . A .
Monthly,
4!)<)
Ouos
Cuernavaca,
for
p.m.
17-May
instruction
Department
157
7:15
to apply
lilo applications
beginning
to
1971. F o r
in
year
handing
in
WILL
OPTION
Y o u t h
KOSHER
next
THERE
KOSHER
Graduate
dealing
Albany
Counselor.
answered.
or
April
offer
f r o m 8-9 a.m.
the
per
be
March
welcome,
and
Beeter,
218
semester at G u a d a l a j a r a
NEXT
or
All
CC
BE
things,
Insurrection
A
t«
fewer
avail-
year
(RA
t o be Meld M o n d a y
["uusdav
i.,iM
March
meal
on
plan
Fellowships
M a r c h 291 ti a n d
30th
al
A p.m.
April
March
31
being
earlier
prison
\2
II
Rally
lot
May
l(il)Hl
ot
Auburn
t i n - A t i h u r n (> , , i .
punished
iifi?
.is
ri.|„,.„,i
revolts
Call
I,,,
I/Mil
CC
Interested
bibb
inn
in
Acting
stndttiil
•iiy n in
planning
,,. ,
,,.,
study
with
the
Language
pi
in S p u n ,
Freshmiin
Program
r !..
I I In
...ul
1(1711
ll
in,,... a,i,,,„,,,i, ,
Portugal
.•I
,,, , n ,
IIIIM'
tin
Students
and
Summer
<|..ii||.
,i
.in,
!,
1,'..!•,•( 1
wi
fly
1 i h . n i sv
Oceans
In.
D.C. Call
14.
-
State Prison
are
333
WHICH OF THESE SPECIAL INTEREST
MAGAZINES SPECIALLY INTERESTS YOU?
Cily
Wis
ml,,.,
the
students
m a y be
Meeting
0114.
Na
Madison,
in W a s h i n g t o n .
7bl
soon
by
in
Party
New
They will plan, among
YEAR.
Conference
a
lion
and assistantships
next
discussed)
Wednesday
l o ') p . m .
now.
holding
consul
will
graduate
is
housing
promise
There
act
able
333
$3,000
don'I
fellowships
Fuesday,
of
broken
if
should
-
29,
Fellowships
b<! a n o t h e r
administration
International
(YIPPEEII)
should
Day
Discussion
Dr.
Admissions
,,t
Meeting
in B i o
three weeks beginn-
from
for
$5.00
on
6:15
12, and
should
Prepare,
in the
will
29,
'villi local industrial p o l l u t e r s al
Speaker:
p.m.
Just fill in and
T h e y
It.,,,
,1.'.
return the coupon
spent
»
n
hi'lint,
ti.
till.
I',„l.
vi'lln
Il
a
1 I.I :;.
,,i
Cintnl
l»v,
new
llu*
citizens.
II,,
ni w i s
l.m
of
m o d e r n ,
1
Polish
day.
M..i
guaranteed basis
Hith
il
.„
.11 /
magazines
body.
Instead,
with
special
they're
they
try
try
geographical
every-
please
Not
"special
Whatever
to p l e a s e
lo
interests.
called
zines.
don't
people
surprisingly,
interest"
your
age,
sex, f i e l d
study, avocation, pastime, intellectual
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religious,
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political
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for
there's
I itii.ny
forum
on
coduros
I'.m
ni
i
svi'l
Library
I' •
the
Open
the
they
knew
Hi,'
t'.imiMi
I .....,.,.-
,i
lop
pro
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not
a
Kill,,., I'.i.v.-.
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special
published
Andrew
the
SST.
S
svill
who
shore
your
special
than
-v
I,
s|....,l
lications
in
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U.S.
special
today.
ono
under
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-
guarantee:
each
if
al
and
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Sovoral
lhat
not
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unquestioned
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A n iConoeloiliC j o u r n a l , . |
p l.licrtl ami i o c . n l t o r n
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including bi».l
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8 .iiiini
1 year
J4.80
,4
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and
To
covering
carefully
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magazine
hero
it. S e n d
you choose
jusl
1,11
in
no money
will bill
Ihe
sun,
4
'
•"-'
o.isu.-s
(v
t N
°'°;
You
order
only
nuisl
-
the
" '
Magazine
DOB
THllffllVHSITY
HAWAFUTUKT
send
payment
""""•"
Auditions
»,,,,
y„
Italy
A
Funny
Way
to
,.,l
t„
rinng
Ih,,
Happunetl
On
I,,,urn
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• - - - - - - - - - - - . ,
Selection Ni.tssoik
,'
P.O. D o n 5 9 5 1
I
Clinton
J
l o w , , 52732
P l i ' a s e e n t e r my
indicated below
ut Patina,
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you.
on m a g a z i n e s m a r k e d
MSN
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your
•
'
I..
coupon
the
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you've
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Biology
the
interest
order,
relurn
zines
it.,
Evaluation
may
selections
to subscribe
lubutipl.omil
|D
t|„.
Special
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lnt,„,„,
l«l«.il
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J M S I U M llMIUM
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NEED HELP?
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A loumcil ol DII.K.,1 t o n .
torn M m h w . i . o i (11 a
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il -
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»,,„
yout
i
reminded
the
and
the
c o m p r o m i s e d .
co-ed,
not
(hat
others
of
the
feared
sanity
demanded
continuation
they
partially
and
official.
an
was
entire
wide,
T h e y
will
was
which
were
newcomers.
the
knew
if
be
cry,
of
a
of
the
their
liberal,
T h e y
w h o h
the
of
whole
granted
liLiilding,
the
the
the
entire
bill
and
should
be
m o n o l i t h ,
valley.
seven
the
the
sided
people,
a huge
b o t t o m
complained,
being
T h e y
country,
Tower,
be seen o v e r
and
K.A.'s
people.
desires
'he
Kaslinjin
c o e d ,
K.A.'s
a
c o m m o n
the
not
over
could
lo
T h e
be
raised
and
building,
outrage
floors
they
officials
The
were
officials
lo
did
done.
applications
The
officials
buildings,
arrived
were
wishes, regardless of
s o V *
T h e
of
d o w n
arbitrarily,
the second
people,
normally
the
with
d r o w n e d
especially
meanly,
' money
j
seivic,,
.'.in
al
pr.isul.-
.1
s.tlr
It'Uill ultenmliv,. In yum pruli
li'in with minimum insi .im
delay.
518-78VKIrsl!
si't.s
>j|«i<
Open 7 diiys j week
the
moral:
because
II
subscription
special
meaning
| , ,,
N,. V V
immedi-
lhat specially interests y o u ? O n e that
been
ill
satisfied,
sitv
took
there
/
|,\
the
under
entirely
refund
111 a l
S|„,ll-,|,l,.,l
subscribe
interest
and
guarantees
any
of
-
specified,
you're
publisher
cancel
ate
or
rales
to
majority
safety
He
for
assigned
Ihe
in
the
ihe
c o m i n g
waves
Kaslinan
living
protests
of
of
of
quarters
the
I lit*
warm
applications
T o w e r
The
regardless
K.A.'s
and
for
officials,
the
o f
" I
the
lold
official.
so
building,
passive
stone
by
and
apathetic,
brick
by
arose
concrete,
in anger.
and
They
threw
Ihe
interest.
best a r e presented here. Y o u m a y
to a n y
the
people's
T h e
20,000
he
cruelly,
you
il.„
by
M a n Ii
over
il
the
co-ed
pieces
There are
Me
and
T h e
the
adamant.
Kmalty,
to
came,
biggest
listen. Their
tore
people
that
fourteen
weather.
|„ ,
the
SSTOP
satisfied.
society.
sessions.
endanger
was
• ! • • • , . .
of
per-
second
ltcsidci.ee
Clinstilli-
several
w o u l d
people
right
K.A.'s
The
house
•
the
for
It
official
lie
the
between
with
taller
,|.' .iipolicies and
tastes
philosophical
you,
sn.'Mly
ill
maga-
occupation,
location, hobby,
litfbtl.n . Man I
lo
futuristic
link
co-ed.
i lii
second
parts.
only
•'I'lhH
question
housing.
people
buildings
only
Clul
the
of
Tin*
the
T h e n
magazines on a
idea
responsibility
the
any of these
debated
the
Will
to subscribe to
Some
PAGE 5
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Room,
Abortion
p.m.
7:30
The dealine
improvement.
meet
a p e r i o d of
ing A p r i l
Ball-
will
Students
housing
Swim
Thursday
(Jr. S a u n d e r s w i l l g i v e a l e c t u r e o n
packets!
the
way.
Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Soviet
is o n e o f
Wonslolen
"Tuna
its
evenings
p.m.,
information
on
emi-
The
March
Guest
Society
Organisational
30 al
Mud.
22-25}.
first-
Saturdays
Kim
to
2nd
really
Monday,
room.
year.
Hail,
your
w i l l speak
classes
their " p a r a d i s e " . Hear h i r n , Wednesday,
are
April
on
all
know-
SUIMY
J e w s t h e U S S R has a l l o w e d t o leave
students,
have a
is
instruction
office.
Rigerman-recont
USSR
experiences
system.
an-
for
2nd. They
swimming and stroke
G.
from
hand
urged
Espanola"
meeting
female, w h o
Tuesday,
March
final
or
floor.
Association
in
Cafeteria.
31
Lounge.
Political
1st
friends are
male
Dutch
Undergraduate
a
interested
live In
Campus
and
Leonid
gre
to a t t e n d .
coffee
be Israeli D a n c i n g
April
the Colonial Quad
members
Indian
w i l l be h e l d at
S U N Y A
March
COUNSELORS
A n organizational Meeting
Come
Canarsie
Banquet
Thursday,
rear of
a n d d o n u t s a r e f r e e as a l w a y s .
T h e r e will
Annual
- April
Pre-Med-Pre-Dent
be
from
There's n o need to slay o u t in
cold.
Please a t t e n d .
Foundation
G u i t a r C u p is c o m i n g
29th
Spring Weekend (April
week-
finally
sailors?
tonight
29.FA217,8:00p.m.
out!
The
the
Desk
lions will be
The
again,
Info
MONDAY, MARCH 29,1971
Committee
at
Hall.
State Quad
the C C
imun.
sub-titles.
31, 7
G o v e r n i n g B o a r d f o r 1971-72 w i l l
to
April
2nd.
movie
English
year,
d u e back in CC 3 6 1 by 5 p . m .
10:00
exciting
award-winning
with
Steinmetz
next
Center
1,
Experimental
The Spanish Club will present
for
Campus
L o u n g e . O n e M e m b e r per suite m i n -
Production.
Spanish
M/S
for
to-
March
Caza"
Melville-
m e e t i n g for all w h o wish
for
Applications
the
Arena.
b e e n cast
A n
Living.
interest
you
are
PAC
Co-ed
old
If
to be o n e of
auditions
in
director.
Theatre
MONDAY, MARCH 29,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
housing
T h e
n u m b e r
officials
peoples'
two
tries
till
will
finally,
be
harder.
done
there
or
was
listen
nothing
to
left.
the second
offical
PAGE 6
MONDAY, MARCH 29,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
THE ASP SPORTS
*«w» nunmo-T
by Robert Zaremba
Sports Editor
Three major State teams will be heading down the Thruway and
stopping off nt Long Island to play some local colleges there over the
upcoming Easter Holiday vacation. The teams making the trip will be
the Varsity Baseball, Lacrosse, and Tennis squads.
The snow has been gone in the big city and its suburbs for quite a
few weeks now, and the green grass should be a most welcome sight
for the SUNYA athletes who have been battling the white stuff up
here, with no real end in sight.
The Lacrosse Team, losers in their opening scrimmage against RPI,
have yet to escape the confines of the SUNYA gymnasium. The
Baseball team has likewise been condemned to playing baseball on
basketball courts. The Varsity Tennis squad in the meantime has been
thus far spending their spring inside some gym somewhere in the city
of Albany.
Ken Fishman and the Varsity Tennis Team will try out their backhands against downstate competition,
as they and the Varsity Lacrosse and Baseball Teams make a trip to Long Island over this vacation.
—potskowski
All three teams will certainly appreciate some sunshine and fresh air
and would also appreciate some support from Long Island dwelling
Dane supporters.
800 View Judo Tournament
The Fifth Annual East Coast
Invitational Judo Tournament
opened in the SUNYA Gym at
about noon yesterday. Robert
Fountain, Tournament Director
and State Judo Club Instructor,
started the exciting yearly special
off with the U.S. and Japanese
National Anthems. Then, the
younger aged Junior Judokas took
the mat to start the competition
off.
After the Junior finals, everyone
was treated to an excellent Airado
(self-defense murshall art) demonstration featuring two black belts.
The next major event brought on
the Senior men's white and green
belts. The Albany Judo Club did
extremely well in taking a first
and second place in the men's
middle weight division, and a first
place in the men's lightweight
division. The honors went to Jon
Kerbs, 1st place; and Randy, 2nd
place(middleweight), and to Jack
Ludin, 1st place (lightweight).
In the brown belt competition,
Albany had three competitors
e n t e r e d , M i k e P a v y , Kevin
Kazacos, and Doug Salomon. At
press time all three were still in
doubt of the final results, but
things looked especially good for
Pavy, who had already won his
first two matches.
To: New York City
Thur 4:00 Lv. New York City
12:00,4:00
3:00,4:00,6:00
Thur 7:00 Ar. Campus
Fri - 3:00, 7 : 0 0 '
h:00, 7:00,'):00
Fri
Ar
To: Utica/Syracu8e
Rochester/Buffalo
Friday
Lv
Ar
Utica
Syracuse
Rochester
Buffalo
Sunday
12:30 Lv
2:15
3:30
5:40
*
7:10 Ar
Buffalo 11:20
Rochester 12:50
Syracuse 2:55
Utica 4:10
Albany 0:00
To: Utica, Ogdensburg run
Friday
Lv
Ar
Sunday
Campus 3:45 Return
via Regular run
Regular limes
to Depot
as commercial run
(unless sufficient volume)
To: Binghamton (regular route)
Lv
Ar
Friday
Sunday
Campus 2:45 Return
via Regular run
Regular times
;it 5:.U)
as commercial run (may have to arrive at Terminal)
Tickets sold across from Check Cashing
Mon &Tues
10- I
Wed
10-2
Thur
10-4
Fri
10-4
GO GREYHOUND
.and leave the driving to uil
The Albany Stale Judo Club saw a full year of practice and
preparation bear fruit as they threw many an opposing Judo player
yesterday, and took several medals in the tournament competition.
—benjamin
"THIS WEEK ON WSUA 640"
Thursday ill 8 pin:
"THE DEBATE OF THE CENTURY"
Holly Fricdun
(women's rights
activist)
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
:
PAGE 7
Harlem Dance Theatre
Baseball, Tennis, Lacrosse Squads to visit L.I.
Lv
MONDAY, MARCH 29,1971
vs.
Barney Fowler
(we nil know who
he is)
Baseball : April 7, vs. Brooklyn
College, ;t p.m. April H, vs. SUNY
at Stony Brook, 2 p.m.
Lacrosse : April !), vs. C'.W.
Post College, I p.m.
Tennis'. April 7, vs. Brooklyn
College, :i p.m. April S, vs. SUNY
at Stony Brook, 2 p.m.
The Topic: Liberation from Whut?
Recorded life as it happened ai the Sheraton Inn
Towne Motor Inn, Downtown Albany, last Wednesday night.
WSUA 24 HOURS A DAY
The SUNYA Gym will close lor
regular recreational use on Friday,
April 2nd, at I 1 p.m. It will be
opened during the Easter recess
from H a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. On
April 12th, the gym will be reopened lor recreational use at the
normal hours.
The highly regarded Dance
Theatre'' of Harlem, under the
direction of Arthur Mitchell, will
perform at Union College's Memorial Chapel, Friday, April 2.
This exciting young company,
whose dancers average 19 years of
age, has been the talk of the dance
world almost from the day in
1968 when it was conceived by
Mitchell.
A principal dancer and the first.
black soloist with the New York
City Ballet, Mitchell turned his
attention to forming a classical
dance school and company in
Harlem after hearing of the death
of Martin Luther King.
He pursuaded Karel Shook, the
ballet master of the Netherlands
National Ballet to join him in
Harlem and opened the school
that attracted mostly novices in
classical dance.
In less than a year, the Dance
Theatre of Harlem opened its
doors to the public and by last
fall, it had won critical acclaim for
performances throughout the
northeast and on tour in Bermuda
and the Caribbean.
The company of 24 young black
dancers made its official broadway review earlier this month
(March) to enthusiastic reviews.
The program ranged from neoclassical to modern with the numbers choreographed by Mitchell
stressing ballet techniques.
When begun, only students from
the immediate surroundings in
New York were attracted and
only three of the original pupils
had any prior dance training. Now
three years later, there are more
than 800 enrolled, and the school
and tile company are viewed as
one of the brightest developments
in the dance world in recent years.
The performance at Union is
scheduled for 8 p.m. and is open
to the public with no admission
charged.
Ear To The Thunder
by Arlene Scheurer
* Blues Magoos—Gulf
Coast
Bound (ABCS-710) Blues Magoos
have been around a while and
they appear now to be gaining in
stature. This album explains why.
Their sound is full and refreshing,
and even, at times, overpowering.
"Tonight the Sky's About to
Cry" contains some insinuating,
Latin rhythm with a very catchy
melodyj especially the chorus,
which has Peppy Thielhelm's
beautifully shouted vocal over a
chanted backdrop. The vibes solo
is relaxed. It is written in 3/4, an
unusual meter for blues.
"Can't Get Enough" builds in
layers from multi-rhythmic per
cussion, to bass, to fuzz guitar, to
vocal and finally to ensemble with
voices. Some cornball overdubbed
tenor by Pee Wee Ellis is sandwiched between two vocals, followed by an extended rhythm
orgy that goes nowhere. Ellis returns with another bout on tenor
and comes out better, staying
away from the trite phrasing that
made up the totality of his earlier
effort. The piano and vibes begin
to improvize together, but they
appear to be too concerned with
keeping out of each other's way
to do much. What tomes nexL is a
series of soft tenor runs exchanging with some of John Lliello's
vibes, the latter eventually going
out on his own. Most notable is
the excellent guitar accompaniment of Theilmnn who gives the
band (hat extra kick.
"Magoo's Blues" builds around
an up-and-down bass run encircled
by an AABAA structure followed
by a strange bastardization of
"Take Me Out to I he Uallgame," u
return to the theme with an added
vibes flight after which the hull is
handed to Eric Kas for a lew bars
of chorded piano, Theilheim for
some energetic guitar, 'IJiello, the
group's premier soloists, on vibes,
Ellis for a series of flaming, falling
shouts, and finally » ride oul on
the melody. A goody composition, excellent meiily execution,
This Latin-blues-soul group wins
some tough arrangements, and
solid musicianship.They have a lot
of drive and abundance of energy,
The Magoos are vaguely in tinmold of Santumi and, in fact, by
comparison come out the better
group. Their music does not con
vey that canned and packaged
feeling thai Sanfana often does.
On the contrary they are loose
and vital. It will be interesting to
see this group as it grows an(1
grows.
Buddy
F'Mv-ClumnvH
(Bell
CY4110) This album is easy
listening, but still contains a satis*
tying amount of integrity, Tricky
devices arc kept at a minimum
and Fite's resourceful guitar is
kept in the forefront. There is
little evidence of commercial
shackels and so the artist spins out
with bright improvizations with
apparent ease and comfort.
All material is pop in nature,
and the intent is the AM knownothing stations of America, but
Fite transcends that. His electric
lines seem almost to leap from the
record while the ballads, such as
"Raindrops" have a bittersweet
quality. I find his sound and
a p p r o a c h in "I Can't Get
Started-" very similar to that of
Django Rheinhart. He makes good
use of both short, but brisk runs,
long and langorously slow passages ending both with a quivering
trill on this song. There is only
bass and drums behind him and he
takes full advantage by stretching
out. When an orchestra is added,
Ha P p i n e S S
as in "Have You Met Miss Jones"
it is unobtrusive taking a back seat
to Fite.
"Wave" seems quite suited to
Fite's style and he seems inspired.
He also shows little promise as a
writer of Changes. "Evil Ways"
has Fite's guitar floating softly
over a background of violins.
With few exceptions Changes is
a tasteful, unpretentious, jazz-pop
album. Buddy Fite is obviously
put up to compete with many
guitarists attempting to fill the
gap left on the popular scene as a
result of the death of Wes Montgomery. He might not be able to
handle the competition, but it's a
lot of fun listening to him try.
This year about
115.000 people wont
listen to Smokey
IS » G-uY BEING KIPNAPPED DURIHG
HELL WEEK . . . gy A 5 O R 0 R I T Y '
*^1
Don't be one of them.
Kick-in-the-ASP
TS YOUS
Remember, only you can prevent fores! fires. '"'Qj'
| his issue of the Albany Student Press is a Satirical,
I uu'sty put oul lor Slate Fair.
And we need stories.
II you would like lo write lot this Farce, contact Dan
Williams ai the ASP office, 457-2190; or al his dorm,
457-501').
Advurtisinij contributed to the public rjood
by the Albany Student Press.
PAGE 8
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
MONDAY, MARCH 29,1971
FIVE CENTS off campus
Fowler vs. Friedan;
Liberation from
by Aralynn Abare
Barnett Fowler, "leading male chauvinist of the
Capitol District press," and Betty Friedan, "the
Witch of Salem of the women's liberation movement, " locked horns Wednesday in a battle ranking
with the Frasier-Ali bout.
Albany Student Press 1
What?
"We are finding our power," she affirmed, "and in
less than five years ofthis movement, we took the
sex discrimination provision in Title Seven of the
Civil Rights Act...and we said it must be enforced."
Sex discrimination can no longer be the only kind
of discrimination that is considered moral, fashionable and a joke in America."
Vol. tVII No. 27
State University of New York at Albany
Wednesday, March 31, 1971
Committee Tells
Anti- War Plans
Abortion
by Susan Gordon
Billed as the woman s answer to the "Fight of the
Century," the debate was sponsored by the Women's Press Club of New York State for the benefit
of its scholarship fund. Tlie topic was "Liberation
From What."
Friedan's final argument was for the "inalienable
right of women to control her own body, and her
own reproductive process."
"What do we need liberation from'.'" she asked
again. "The obscenity that the male hierarchy of
one church could threaten excommunication to any
woman who dares to ue her right under the law lo
get an abortion. We accept the legal definition dial [a
felus| becomes life when il can be born and live
outside llie body.
"llie outrage, the instill lo women by these
"friends of the felus, friends of life...who place the
life of an unborn felus. over the life and soul of any
woman old enough to bear a child."
"How llie hell I gol her, I don'l know." were
Barnett Fowler's opening words, lie emphasized his
surprise, font weeks aflei he was asked lo 'speak lo
llie piess club,' lo discover lie was lo debate with
Belly Friedan, unknown to him al llie lime.
"Now...I know that she's not only a greal lecturer,
bul she's a dam good wiilei, llie creator of a best
seller" be added.
"Not against all..."
Betty Friedan
-rosfiihcrg
The first round was Frictliin's, who immcdiulcly
set the groundwork for her attack, "liberation from
what'/" ,he hegan, "from anything than denies the
women ol this country or the world I heir full
personhood. I can'l make il any simpler ihan that,"
"This is a massive, unfinished revolution of American women towards full equality, human dignily.
human freedom and our own Identity in the Family
of Man...It is the biggcsl, mosl important, faslesl
growing movement for basic social change in this
country...." "It is unique., Il deals not with a
minority...but with an oppressed majority. Women,
over 507/ of the population of the U.S.; 55%ul'lhe
adult voting population in this slate are no longer a
silent majority.
"In the pasl few years, we have found our voice
and we are confronting not only with words, but
with decisive actions llie institutions that have
oppressed us."
Friedan charged thai l-'owler, in his columns, ma le
a "dirty joke" of the problems of women. '"I he lad
that one can even try lo make a joke about the
interests of women." she said, " is I ho essence of
whal we need liberation from."
"No need for mace or tear gas lo keep women
down, just Ireal 'em as a joke and send 'em flowers
on Mother's Day. You see, il hasn'l been necessary
lo use mace ot leai gas hi keep women down in
America. We have been invisible people, like llie
blacks were invisible men. You know the black was
an invisible man il you could say "Here, boy" lo a
45 year old man al a railroad station."
She emphasized thai men, in general, were not llie
enemy, but "fellow victims." "The inequities, the
obsolete sex roles which make men die ten years
younger because I hey have had to suppress so many
tears and fears, and bear too much of the burden...
but I know a male chauvinist pig when I see one."
"I am nol agamsl all facets of Women's Lib," be
offered. "Nonetheless. I am here on llie negative
side as the devil's advocate...! do not think Women's
I.ill is directing major efforts in the right directions....If s a horse riding oft in all directions,"
l-owlei expressed a desire lo see "an organization
such as Ibis, do a hit of specific lifting, nol
concentrate on downgrading an eslahlishmenl...This
is not going lo happen by 10,000 females lying up
traffic in New York City, or by vicious attacks of a
hundred customs and beliefs, lo which millions of
women subscribe...I slill believe in motherhood,
immaculate or otherwise."
The "lalk of one Miss Grace Atkinson" dominated
a pari of his argument, bowler commented on Grace
Atkinson, another prominent Women's Lib figure.
He said, "...Miss Atkinson's utterly strange, utterly
tasteless, ulteily ghastly opinions leave me chilled.
She as a Women's Lib leader does llie movement a
disservice."
Barnett Fowler
—w.wnhcrg
SUNYA
Fowler condemned "militancy with no regard ' >
the righls of others." "Is il logical lo have Women's
Lib on the Slate Campus al Albany." lie asked,
"demand by April Fool's Day. free examinations for
all women in the university community'.'" "Is n
logical to demand free abortion services I'm any
women ovei IK years of age withoul parental
permission, then refuse lo listen to the adniiuislialoi by drowning oul hei answers?...! have an idea
thai a university is a spot to incubate ideas, not
embryos." He tell, however, that society had an
"obligation lo llie girl forcibly raped, .!').()()() of
llicni last yeai."
"If militancy is to be used, lei us use il in fields
which truly need il. Alcoholism is one...I have seen
Women's Lib lighting for the privilege of drinking al
men's liars, hut I have heard nothing of lighting llie
problem itself."
"II OIII llieinc is liberation, then, by Cod, let the
efforts of Women's Liberation be mililanlly directed
lo free society from live spirochete. I'm not saying
Women's Lib is responsible for venereal disease. I
am saying any encouraged feeling in the field of
sexual license inexhorahly leads to such."
Referring lo students, be suggested, "If total
sexual freedom is such a necessity, and children are
considered a waste by-product, go to a vet and gel
spayed."
I spoke lo a woman about ibis meeting and she
chuckled. "I don'l believe in llie movement," she
said. "I've lived well over the .10 year age. And so
far during my life I've been pretty much able to do
whal 1 wanted."
—rosenberg
The theme of immediate withdrawal of all U.S. troops from
Southeast Asia marks the spring activities of the April 24th
Committee on this campus. The Committee hopes to provide bus
transportation from SUNYA to help enable the student population to
attend the March on Washington on April 24 th.
Mark Belkin, head of the April 24th Committee, explained that the
Student Mobilization Committee has temporarily disbanded on our
campus, and along with other political organizations, has merged
under that nonpartisan title of the April 24 th Committee so as to form
the broadest possible coalition of all peopie opposed to U.S. military
involvement in Southeast Asia. | Locally this includes former members
(jf the SMC, the Young Socialists Alliance, the Albany Pence Center,
and the Albany Coalition for Peace and Justice.] Nationally, NPAC,
National Peace Action Coalition, has announced a calendar of spring
antiwar activities,all planned as "legal, peaceful and orderly
manifestations of oppostiion to the war." They are as follows;
Local demonstrations to mark the assassination of Martin
Luther King, Jr., an ardent opponent of the Vietnam War.
Mass march on Washington, D.C. and San Francisco in
support of the demand for immediate withdrawal of all
U.S. forces from Southeast Asia.
Demonstrations on campuses and in communities around
the country to commemmorate the Kent State and
Jackson State massacres.
(Armed Forces Day): Civilians will make this Solidarity
Day with antiwar GI's by joining them in peace activities
at military bases.
Whereas the April 24th Committee here and NPAC nationally
support the single demand for immediate withdrawal of all U.S.
troops, the People's Coalition for Peace and Justice (locally the
Albany Coalition for Peace and Justice) supports three demands; 1)
Immediate and total withdrawal of all American troops from
Southeast Asia; 2) Guaranteed annual income of $6500 for a family of
four; and 3) Free all political prisoners. The PCPJ has scheduled
national activities throughout May, with a mass assembly in
Washington on May 2.
The April 24th Committee feels that the single demand of
immediate Iroop withdrawal will not impose the acceptance of the
other two demands. For the sake of unity within the movement, the
People's Coalition for Peace and Justice has endorsed the April 24th
action, although they will still carry on their own May activities.
What distinguishes the April 24fh mass demonstration from the
November 1969 Moratorium in Washington is its comprehensiveness.
It is supported not only by high school and college students, but by
local communities, labor unions, legislators, a separate United
Women's Contingent, and Third World People, including Blacks,
Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Asian-Americans and native Americans
whose various organizations comprise the Third World Task Force, all
of whom oppose the war as a major source of many of our domestic
economic and social troubles.
In addition, a new influence on the antiwar movement are American
GI's. According to Belkin, a significant factor since the Moratorium is
the growth of an antiwar movement in Vietnam. U.S. failure in
ground war seems to have lowered Gl morale. The fact that the
antiwar movement is no longer isolated to the student community
should increase news coverage and have an added influence on the rest
of the public, if not the administration.
This, the site of the proposed West Podium Extension, may remain as it appears now. Prospects look glum
for the project.
-chow
West Podium Future
Deemed 'Uncertain9
by Bob Kanarek
Imposed savings by the State
Legislature on next year's budget
may cause the scrapping of plans
for the West Podium extension.
President Benezet termed the project "very uncertain," yesterday
at a faculty information hour.
Building on the extension is
presently scheduled to begin in
the fall. To be completed in three
years, the extension would provide added space for classrooms
and would alleviate the acute
shortage of space in the Campus
Center.
The President directed the bulk
of the hour to explaining other
effects of next year's probable
budget situation. He staled that
the projected total number of
students al SUNYA by 1980 is
22,000-2:1,000. Terming the budget cutting a possible "blessing in
disguise," he indicated that a cut
in admissions was necessary and
cited 15,000 as a seemingly more
Due to inconveniences caused by the lack of a completed dining room, Indian Quad residents will be
receiving a 10% board rebate from FSA. This is the kitchen.
—goodman
realistic figure for leveling-ol'f. He was unable to make any definite
claimed that the quality and im- statement on the situation beyond
provement of the university is saying that if Milne were closed
more important than its size and this June by the Legislature, it
number of students.
would prevent the completion of
The fate of the Milne School a study being conducted by
was also discussed. Legislation, SUNY on its effectiveness. Viceintroduced by the Governor, that President Phillip Sirotkin assured
would mean the closing of Milne the faculty however, that in case
and nine other campus schools of the school's closing, its faculty
like it, is currently being consi- would maintain their jobs in the
dered by the legislature. Benezet university.
Board Rebate Slated
For Indian Quad
by Al Scnia
Residents of Indian Quadrangle will be receiving a
ten percent rebate on their board payments from
Albany State's Faculty-Student Association. The
action climaxed a weekend of negotiations among
representatives of the quad government, Student
Association, and FSA.
Confirmation of a twenty percent rebate for room
has not yet been forthcoming from the SUNY
central dormitory authority. However, Quad president Barry Bashkoff said the chances "look good"
for quad residents.
Students on the quad had been withholding more
than $21,000 from the Bursar's Office in room and
board payments while action was being uwaited. It
appears that the payments for board (meals) will be
made promptly now that FSA has acted. Bashkoff
indicated that the students had very little trouble in
convincing FSA management of the legitimacy of
their complaints, which for the most part dealt with
the inconvenience caused by lack of u dining area.
He said the students had "very little trouble with
them" (FSA) even though the fault lay more with
the building contractor then with the corporation.
Attontion will now be focused on the central
administration, which will judge the merits of
granting a room rebate. Bashkoff said he was
pleased by the results of u recent meeting ho
attended with two administrative representatives.
The complaints were felt to be legitimate; action has
been tabled while SUNY central works on cutting
the budget.
While the residents await Chancellor Boyer's anticipated approval, forty one students will continue
withholding room payments.
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