White Students: Insensitive and Blind

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PAGE 8
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 15,1971
FIVE CENTS off campus
White Students:
Insensitive and Blind
"THEY ONLY BOUND VS.
An ASP Column
Albany Student Press
by Margaret Griffith
../iiiilini, Ctiltirmlti Daily, /Wi'J, CI'S
Proposed SA Constitution:
Executive Overlord
An AST Column
by Hoh Warner
The nt-wly proposed constitution of Student Association is, in
general, democratic—certainly in comparison to the present
constitution, lis basic flaw, then, is not with the legislative or
judicial branch, but with the executive. Under lllis constitution,
which will be voted on this Thursday evening by Central Council,
the President of Student Association is given too much power,
Under Section :i (Executive Departments) of Article II, the
President has the right to recommend lo Council his plan for the
reorganization his branch. "These plans shall go info effeel only
upon the consent of a majority of the Central Council."(Editor's
italics). This is the only place in the entire constitution where a
majority of the Council needs lo approve a presidential action,
except for a simple bill, of course.
Thh provision, in effeel, makes it relatively easy for the
President lo create, destroy, or alter the bureaucracy of Sludenl
Associaton. Il would also make it easy for him tit appoint
whomever lie wishes to positions by merely creating new positions
as he sees fit, which is patronage, a most powerful weapon for any
incumbent. Neither does this provision say how positions are to
be filled. This would be the prerogative of the President and a
majority of the Council,
The second part of Section ,1 stales thai: "The President shall
have the power lo constitute the policies and the procedures of
the executive branch which may be rejected by a li/:i vole of the
Central Council." By this provision, Council musl muster '>l;l of
its members lo reject instead of tipprntv "the policies and
procedures of the executive branch." This is a hit of constitutional gimmickry al the expense of Central Council. Council should be
wary of these Iwo provisions, so thai il doesn't sign away its
powers, as the Congress of the United Stales lias done in foreign
policy.
The proposed constitution, should it pass CunlralCouncil, will
be up for referendum early this spring II will have lo be approved
by a 2/3 affirmative vote will) al least 15% of the sludenl body
voting. If you believe that Sludenl Association is of any
consequence whatsoever, il is suggested thai you obtain a copy of
Ibe proposed constitution and make your views known
SUPPORT Assembly Bill No.
1293 so thai New York State
residents will not have lo fight
in an illegal war.
Notii c e
The I'cucc Corps will he on
campus Feb. 1517. Interviews
will lie held in lhe Placement
Office in the AdiniirMrnlion
llldg. There will he an ii formation tunic In the CC Lobby. A
film will lie shown Tuesday,
Feb. 16, at 7:30 PM in LC-2.
Where is racism going? It's quite obvious that take out National Defense Loans to fulfill their
every white on campus gets uptight and goes financial obligations. Their parents have certain
through a change when racism hits them dead in the financial contributions they must. meet. So you see
face. You seem Lo be oblivious that Black people we're not here on a free for all ride as you would
have become belligerent toward every white, and like to believe.
Before the E.O.P. program came into existence,
you have the nerve to question why Blacks demand
certain rights and why Blacks are so snotty. It's not every white reaped the benefit of Black peoples tax
snottiness, it's hostility projected towards every- paying dollar. You were not barred from the State
thing symbolizing whiteness. The pictoral image of Universities, and all the so-called inexpensive eduthe word is far from Lhe imagery we have so long cational facilities were made known to you. Before
defined it to mean; chastity, honorable, purity. The 1968 there was no more than a handful of Blacks
falsity of the word and the connotations pjreeived attending S.U.N.Y. and now you're getting spasby Blacks when confronted with whites stimulates matic attacks because some Blacks are reaping.some
his feelings of frustrations causing him to rebel of the benefits from the taxable dollar. You've
against, his stagnation, which the while oppressor castrated and emasculated the people and now that
they are healing from the cuts and wounds from
has long upheld.
Don't speak of liberal whites because if you have their mutilated minds and bodies, you have the
been fed racist ideologies since the time you could nerve to want to rob them of their few requests. Are
speak and differentiate colors and come to the you some greedy child that must have an equal
conclusion that white is superior, and have upheld share of everything? We've been under servitude for
this theory for centuries, what makes you think that four centuries and if we request you lo serve us, it's
I'm going to believe you're going to let me achieve your obligation. Roles can be reciprocated and 1
equal or more social status than you? You manipu- believe the problem is that you can't accept the
late and pull the strings in every socio-economic change.
As far as dressing, no one tells you to walk around
aspect, noL only on SUNYA, hut in every non-while
nation. You've exploited all Black people and have in your filthy dungarees seven days. Black people
reaped lhe glory. Blacks could he millionaires if have just been taught to be clean; it has become
they could come into the white community as you quite obvious that the stigma of Blacks being
do in the Black, and write a novel or devi'lop a shiftless, lazy, and dirty has just been a means of
sociological or psychological theory on lhe white projecting your innate qualities. If you'd take off
psyche. But you developed the thirteenth parallel in your jeans and acquire some finesse, possibly you
which all Blacks were barred from crossing. What I can look as beautiful as my Brothers and Sisters.
mean by crossing, is given the opportunity to
The question is not where
achieve upward mobility.
acism going
Don't speak of E.G.P, students as having more should he phrased as why have I as a whili"been so
money than some whiles. Why should you question envious of Black? Why am I out to destroy them?
thai fact when in essence you're cognizant Ihat lhe And why should 1 question his actions?
slalrmenl is as trivial and nonsensical as the person
The answers aren't hard to find, since you are
who shiled il. l-'irsl of all, many of the students in •supposed to be psychologically and educationally
E.O.IV are not on full scholarships, lhey too musl superior to Blacks figure il oul.
FLY, BABY, FLY!'
Wednesday, February 17, 1971
Housing Picture
Improves
State University of New York at Albany
Vol. LVII No.10
Senate Awaits
Budget Decision
by Peter J. Coughlin
by Joan L. Zuckernian
President Benezet reported to
the University Senate on Monday
that he is still "sweating it out" as
he waits to hear of the legislature's decision on the budget.
Rodney Hart. Director of Admissions, delivered a report on the
undergraduate admission situation
in which he pointed to an increase
in freshman applications for 1970.
He said that only a small number
of acceptance and rejection
notices have been sent out, and
that the rest will be sent after
they receive the complete results
of the Regents Scholarship Exam.
For the first time at Albany
State, the number of students in
the freshman class will not have to
be limited because of a lack of
housing space. According to a
letter from the Housing Office
that is being sent to the incoming
class of '75, "we are expecting to
open a new residence quadrangle
on our uptown campus and with
other vacancies, should not experience difficulty in accomodating
any undergraduate student desiring to live on campus."
As of January 29, the Processing
Center had received 11,631 applications for admission in September 1971. According to Rodney
Hart, the new Director of Admissions, 2*100 new students are expected to be admitted. 1200 will
he freshman, 300 will be EOP
students, and 900 will be transfers. Since freshmen are no longer
required to live in University housing, not all of these students are
expected to apply for dormitory
rooms. With the 1100 new beds
that will be available with the
completion of Indian Quad, space
can be provided for 1600 new
on-campus students.
Twenty-four hundred new students will bring the Albany student body to 13,000. The campus
was originally designed to accommodate 10,000 students, and the
question is not whether there will
be enough living space, but how
much farther the faculty and academic facilities can be stretched.
Reporting on the SUNY Senate
m e e t i n g in Buffalo, Joseph
Norton told of a proposal for
"roving students." Under this
program students would take
courses throughout the SUNY
•ystcm. Also discussed there was a
proposal concerning state wide
governance by students, faculty,
and administration.
An issue that provoked controversy centered around the rejection of transfer credit for ROTC
courses. Senator Kendall, ex
pressing particular concern, tried
to bring to the fore more complete details and finally seconded
• motion to hold discussion on
the issue at the next Senate meeting.
The Graduate Academic Council
reported that the recommended
Ph.D. programs in Library Science
and Anthropology have been
approved—effective June 15,
1971. It was also noted that prelaw advisement is given on campus
by Robert Gibson, despite an
earlier statement that there was
no such service available.
Registration
Apathy?
Is the proposed Sludenl Associjiion constitution ;i sound, democratic document or is it a while
elephant?
Grarj Student Dance
Friday, Feb. 19,1971
ONLY $1.50
BKUBACHER DINING ROOM
from () pin I ,im
Sponsored by the
Brubacher Association of
Graduate Students
all area graduate students invited
Band with free beer
The Deadline for
Applications for Waivers of
The Student Activity Assessment
Is Wednesday, Feb., 24, 1971.
Applications are available
in CC 346.
BUFFALO AP
Eric County
election officials said Tuesday
they're disappointed that so lew
IK tt> 20-yi'iu-olds have registered
Lo vole.
They said Unit of the 150,000 in
that age bracket in the county,
only ;i,000 have registered so far.
Election Commissioners James
R, Lawiey mid Edward J. Mahoney said in a statement:
"Quite frankly, we in the Board
o f Elections have heen disappointed al the lack of interest
on (he part ol' IK, 10 and
20-yeiu olds" lo register.
"Many reasons have been sugHosted I'oi this apathy," they said,
"but we feel I lint for the most
purl the young people are disenchanted because of the fact that
the U.S. Supreme Court's decision
does not allow them to vote until
l!)72, which will he the first
federal elect ion."
The Supreme Court approved
the lower voting age for federal
elections, but left it to each state
to fix Lhe minimum age limit for
state and local elections.
In New York, voters will be
asked this fall whether they want
t o a p p r o v e a constitutional
amendment granting 18-yoar-olds
the right to vote in state and local
elections.
Discussion was varied concerning a proposed "Outstanding
Teacher's Award." The proposal
provided for a stipend of $2,000
each for the selected teachers. The
award was labeled as a necessary
incentive by one Senator, while
others questioned its claimed
effectiveness. Certain specific objections were raised including:
selection of committee members
who were nominated would be
entitled to choose their own successor; the award could be given
to the same individual for two
consecutive years; and no specific
qualifications for nominees were
listed. The bill was sent back lo
the committee to be rewritten.
-photo service
The meeting ended with an
expression of sympathy concerning the death of Robert
Fairbanks, a late member of the
Graduate School of Public Affairs
atSVNYA..,
t
PAGE 2
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
from the Scranton Report...
i
m
l
*n
FDA to Raise Iron Contents
Some Fear Adverse Effects
Investigation: Who Is 'Tommy the Traveler'?
^ ^
w
The following are excerpts of the Scranton Commission
Report
on Campus Unrest, in particular, Hobart College and incidents
related to an untrained undercover agent, Thomas Tongyai.
Part 11 will be printed
Friday with Commissioner
Rhodes
conclusions and
recommendations.
The ASP thanks Curtis West, editor of The Herald Hobart
College, Geneva, N.Y.. for his aid in obtaining this copy of the
report.
^ _ _ ^ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ — — — -
MEMORANDUM
AUGUST 10,1970
TO: Governor Scranton, Commissioners and Staff
FROM: Joseph Rhode , Jr.
SUBJECT: Investigation of Hobart College
PERSONAL HISTORY OF THOMAS TONGYAI
M o m l u a n g Singkata T h o m a s T o n g y a i N ' a y a u d h y a
was b o r n J a n u a r y 1 4 , 1 9 4 4 in A l a b a m a . His father
was a native of Thailand serving in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s
A r m y , working with a r m y intelligence d u r i n g World
War II. After t h e war, t h e T o n g y a i s m o v e d t o B u c k s
C o u n t y , Pennsylvania. I n J u n e , 1 9 6 2 , T o n g y a i w a s
g r a d u a t e d from high school with average grades. In
S e p t e m b e r 1 9 6 2 , Tongyai enrolled a t a s c h o o l in
New Mexico which offered r o d e o courses. In Dec e m b e r , T o n g y a i r e p o r t e d l y d r o p p e d o u t of school
because s o m e Mexican-Americans were harassing
h i m . F o r six m o n t h s T o n g y a i w o r k e d in t h e Western
U n i t e d States for a t o u r i n g r o d e o s h o w . His career
e n d e d when h e was h u r t in a r o d e o .
into joining the Weathermen faction of SDS. He
explained that t h e y were t h e only people doing
constructive things.
Soon after t h e November 16 march in Washington,
Tongyai told a s t u d e n t at Hobart College that he
had taken a very active role in the D u p o n t Circle
rally a n d s u b s e q u e n t march on the South Vietnamese Embassy.
T o n g y a i spent a great deal of time at Hobart
d u r i n g the fall term especially in connection with
Newsreel Films of Buffalo, New York. He would
bring films and leaflets, often yelling "Kill t h e pigs,"
whenever p o l i c e m e n t were shown in the films. They
r e m e m b e r him because he often advocated the
b o m b i n g of university buildings, violent revolution,
the o v e r t h r o w of the United States government, and
t h e beating and killing of policemen.
I n S e p t e m b e r 1 9 6 3 , h e e n t e r e d Delaware Valley
College of Science and Agriculture in Pennsylvania.
Completing only o n e o r t w o semesters at t h e
college, he did n o t receive a degree.
T h e years from 1964 t o May 1 9 6 9 were s p e n t
going from j o b t o j o b . In August 1 9 6 7 , he s t a r t e d
work for Shearing C o r p o r a t i o n , a veterinary d r u g
c o m p a n y in N o r t h e r n New Jersey as a salesman.
Following this Tongyai, his wife and his three-year
old s o n , moved t o u p s t a t e N e w York near t h e t o w n
of Penn Yan. H e moved from Pennsylvania t o N e w
York. I t was in 1967 t h a t Tongyai was first seen on
various c a m p u s e s in t h e Western New York area. It
is r e p o r t e d that Tongyai possessed unusually strong
p a t r i o t i c feelings for t h e United States.
TONGYAI'S ACTIVITIES ON THE HOBART CAMPUS
In the following school year (1969) Tongyai
b e c a m e more widely k n o w n at Hobart and William
S m i t h . In November of t h e following year Tongyai
bragged of his role in the D u p o n t Circle rally. He
told s t u d e n t s that violence was the only way t o
achieve the goals of revolution. Tongyai said that
the best maneuver in Washington would have been
t o get " a pig in the c o r n e r and kick the shit out of
h i m . " T h e r e are m a n y instances of Tongyai saying
he wanted t o kill policemen. Once he took a
d u m m y grenade and said h o w he wanted to throw a
real o n e i n t o a c o p car and kill the police in it.
It should be u n d e r s t o o d t h a t m o s t students, soon
after coming into c o n t a c t with Tongyai, became
aware of his e x t r e m i s t tendencies and were wary of
h i m . Their feelings were that he was mentally
u n b a l a n c e d and dangerous.
On March 3 ( 1 9 7 0 ) Tongyai attended a student
meeting which was called to decide if a student
" w a l k - i n " on a closed faculty meeting would take
place, A b o u t 100 s t u d e n t s meeting in Albright
A u d i t o r i u m were split as t o t h e appropriate action
t o take. When the meeting voted on several alternatives, Tongyai tried t o vote. T w o student leaders,
Susan Connally and Richard Wasscrman, approached him a n d made sure he d i d n ' t vote. However, at
4 : 0 0 p . m . Tongyai walked into the faculty meeting
with the rest of the s t u d e n t s . By this time Tongyai
was k n o w n to most of the s t u d e n t s at Hobart. Most
assumed that he was a regional organizer for SDS
from Buffalo.
At the second R O T C sit-in Tongyai was present
for most of t h e time. T h e H o b a r t S t u d e n t Assembly
passed a m o t i o n barring all outsiders from the
c a m p u s . During the d e b a t e on this motion, it
became obvious that it was precipitated primarily
because of T o n g y a i ' s presence at the sit-in. The
m o t i o n was passed and Tongyai was asked t o leuve
by a variety of a d m i n i s t r a t o r s and students, but he
remained. T h r o u g h o u t the sit—in, Tongyai advocated violent acts, especially such as breaking windows
and b o m b i n g the offices.
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continued
CAMPUS ACTIVITIES A N D KNOWN SIGHTINGS
FALL 1967
First r e p o r t e d t o be at Keuka College in Penn Y a n ,
N e w York. He visited with an organization called
t h e " P e a c e G r o u p " which consisted of a b o u t t e n
w o m e n . At this time p r o t e s t usually took t h e form
of picketing. Tongyai allegedly tried t o have t h e
G r o u p take m o r e radical action. This s e e m e d t o set
a p a t t e r n in T o n g y a i ' s meetings with s t u d e n t s
a r o u n d t h e state. He w o u l d usually take a position a
little m o r e e x t r e m e than the s t u d e n t s with w h o m he
was talking.
FALL 1 9 6 8
Tongyai b e c a m e widely k n o w n at m a n y u p s t a t e
New York campuses. T h e r e are m a n y r e p o r t s of
Tongyai being at Cornell University.
Tongyai was seen at Syracuse University in
Syracuse, New York. His main c o n t a c t was t h r o u g h
the " P e a c e and F r e e d o m P a r t y " and the local S D S .
Tongyai was again seen at t h e University of Rochester. He was associated with the local S D S a n d
b e c a m e an unofficial regional traveler (organizer)
for the organization.
Tongyai made his first appearance at Hobart
College in Geneva,NewYork. He went to the first or
second organizational meeting of the H o b a r t Student Movement, a s t u d e n t activist group similar t o
the S D S . He was accepted at once because of his
p r o n o u n c e d ties with the SDS.
On May 6 there was a c o n f r o n t a t i o n in front of
Coxo Hall, the H o b a r t a d m i n i s t r a t i o n building,
between a Hobart s t u d e n t a n d Tongyai which led to
a harassment warrant being sworn o u t .
F r o m this time until t h e J u n e 5 incident there are
no reports of T o n g y a i ' s presence at Hobart. On June
f) Tongyai led a police drug raid on campus, which is
described later in this r e p o r t .
S P R I N G 1969
On May 17,1969, Tongyai appeared at an S D S
festival being held at A u b u r n C o m m u n i t y College in
A u b u r n , New York. He showed a film p o r t r a y i n g a
theater skit a b o u t the war, Tongyai said t h a t he
was an SDS regional organizer from
Buffalo.
Tongyai is said to have been preaching t h e "revolut i o n " and his belief that drugs had no p a r t t o play in
it.
FALL 1969
Tongyai again appeared at A u b u r n C o m m u n i t y
College a n d approached a s t u d e n t . He flashed a card
in front of her, saying that he was from the F.B.I.
T h e n he said that he was only being funny a n d she
s h o u l d n ' t worry. Tongyai tried to talk tins s a m e girl
E V E N T S S U R R O U N D I N G R O T C SIT INS
T h o m a s Tongyai was present at various limes
t h r o u g h o u t the R O T C s i t - i n . S t u d e n t s believed him
to be an SDH regional organizer Trom Buffalo and
based on previous e n c o u n t e r s s t u d e n t s know of his
tendencies toward volence. S t u d e n t leader, Sean
Campbell, was asked by Causey and McKoan if there
were any outsiders or n o n - s t u d e n t s at the sit—in.
When Campbell assented, t h e Dean requested that
he ask t h e m t o leave.
On Hie night of April 2 1 . the Hobart S t u d e n t
Association passed u m o t i o n t o keep all outsiders.
KOSHER
FOR
$
PASSOVER FOOD
SIGN UP NOW THRU FRIDAY
IN THE LOBBY OF THE CAMPUS
with Tntiavn.'s
T o n g y a i ' s n a m e m e n t i o n e d specifically,
out of
«.itfe
snpmfiVnlhi ~..i
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the sit—in and o t h e r H o b a r t affairs. S t u d e n t Association President Paul Colarulli personally told
Tongyai t o get off c a m p u s . However, Tongyai,
intent on staying, a p p r o a c h e d Al Beretta, director
of s t u d e n t activities, in r e q u e s t of a press pass. He
told Tongyai t h a t Al L e a r n e d of t h e Colleges' News
Bureau was t h e o n l y p e r s o n w h o c o u l d issue such a
pass. A s t u d e n t a c c o m p a n i e d T o n g y a i when he went
to t h e News Bureau. L e a r n e d h a s r e p o r t e d having a
very strange c o n v e r s a t i o n with T o n g y a i . A conversation which was i m m e d i a t e d l y r e p o r t e d to the F.B.I.
and college officials. I n a n y case Tongyai was
refused the pass, b u t h e i n f o r m e d s t u d e n t s at the
sit—in t h a t Beretta h a d given h i m permission to stay
and t h a t he was a m e m b e r of t h e press.
by Neill Shanahan
Bismark Kuyon, a Peace Corps representitive from Liberia is on
Campus this week.
-de young
Peace Corps Worker Presents:
9
'Both Sides of Coin
On Wednesday, April 2 9 , T o n g y a i ' s group again
met. O n e of the freshmen, Neil Himelein, had
already disassociated himself from
the group.
Awerbuch and Dillon also d r o p p e d o u t . T h e two
remaining people d e c i d e d t o b o m b t h e offices on
Friday night. T o n g y a i told t h e m he was leaving for
the weekend t o go t o N e w Haven so would not be
around for the actual b o m b i n g . T h e b o m b i n g took
place Friday, May 1, at 4 : 0 0 a . m . T h r e e incendiary
bombs were t h r o w n t h r o u g h t h e w i n d o w ; only one
went off, causing little d a m a g e . S t u d e n t s awoke anil
refused to put out the blaze with extinguishers. Why
the fire alarms were o u t of o r d e r is still in question.
by Arnlynn A bare
In an effort t o present a truer
picture of c u r r e n t Peace Corps
activities,
representatives
from
host c o u n t r i e s have b e c o m e part
of recent r e c r u i t m e n t drives. O n e
such
representative,
Bismarck
Kuyon, from Liberia, is here this
week.
By talking t o host c o u n t r y representatives, K u y o n explains, students can see " b o t h sides of the
c o i n . " In his role, he feels he can
describe actual benefits of Peace
Corps services, as well as the
p r o b l e m s that exist and s o m e possible solutions t o these p r o b l e m s .
K u y o n , principal of a Liberian
school, began w o r k i n g with Peace
Corps " I n - C o u n t r y " training programs. These involved language
and cross-cultural training, plus
practice teaching within t h e country. Later, he assisted with Virgin
Island " I n - C o u n t r y " training and
has been in t h e U.S. for three
years.
Ml/sr l o v e . TD 10VEj« TTHAT CONSPIRATOR^
MUST SURVIVE. TO J ™ * 1
furate TCVRB')
At 7 : 0 0 a.m. F.B.I, a g e n t J e r r y O ' H a n l o n arrived
at the scene of t h e b o m b i n g . During a discussion
with a s t u d e n t , it was evident O ' H a n l o n had advance
information on t h e t w o s t u d e n t s (Bennett ami
S h e p p e r d ) , since arrested for t h e flrebombing. That
morning all five freshmen p r e s e n t in t h e Tongyai
meetings were called in for q u e s t i o n i n g along with
some o t h e r s t u d e n t s , including Rafael Martinez. Hall
Awerbuch stated that in t h e process of his questioning, t h e officer told him they e x p e c t e d t h e bombing
to take place a d a y later- than it o c c u r r e d . Martinez
saw Tongyai outside of t h e police station thai
morning, although T o n g y a i was s u p p o s e d l y in New
Haven at the time.
One primary p r o b l e m , according
to K u y o n , is t h e length of a Peace
Corps w o r k e r ' s stay in a c o u n t r y .
" I t takes (i year and a half for the
worker and t h e p e o p l e t o get t o
k n o w o n e a n o t h e r . This leaves
only six m o n t h s for t h e m to
accomplish a n y t h i n g e l s e . " K u y o n
advocates a three t o four year
stint instead. In this same vein, he
feels that volunteers should be
given more m o t i v a t i o n , such as
job assurance u p o n return t o the
U.S.
Tongyai was seen on c a m p u s only o n c e between
April 29 and J u n e 5. Since t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n had
made it clear that if T o n g y a i were seen on campus
again they were t o be notified, on May (i, Rafael
Martinez informed Assistant Dean J o h n Thrismcyer
that Tongyai was o u t s i d e . T h e i s m c y c i went mil
doors and witnessed T o n g y a i a n d M a r l i n e / exennge
heated words. Also present was a n o t h e r sluilenl.
Sally Gilmour. Tongyai then t h r e a t e n e d i " kill
Martinez and struck h i m . T h e i s m e y c r iniervnicd
and again ordered T o n g y a i off c a m p u s .
AI present, only o n e Liberian
holds a decision-ma king position
with the Peace Corps in that
c o u n t r y . Kuyon sees a definite
need for more host c o u n t r y personnel to judge t h e success or
failure of Peace Corps efforts and,
in general, to make Peace Corps
efforts more " r e l e v a n t " to the
specific needs of the c o u n t r y .
While traveling t h r o u g h o u t t h e
n o r t h e a s t e r n U.S., K u y o n has encountered
criticism
of United
States "political i n v o l v e m e n t " in
o t h e r c o u n t r i e s t h r o u g h t h e Peace
Corps. " S t u d e n t s have told m e
Laler that a f t e r n o o n Marline/, and Theismcyci
went t o the police s t a t i o n a n d swore mil a J o h n DIM'
warrant for T o n g y a i ' s arrest, since M a r l i n e / knew
him only as T o m m y t h e Traveler. However, I Inwarrant was n o t acted u p o n until the night ul'.hiin
S, oven after Martinez r e p o r t e d t o the police ihal !»•
had seen Tongyai lurking o u t s i d e his a p a r l m e n l and
had provided t h e m with T o n g y a i ' s license plali'
number.
Don't forget your
SCHEDULED REHEARSALS
Thun. Fri., Sat. F * 18, 19,20 in the Botox*,
P H O T O G R A P H E R S WILL BE T H E R E !
t h a t t h e Peace Corps is an ' E s t a b l i s h m e n t ' e l e m e n t of ' A m e r i c a n
i n t e r v e n t i o n , ' a n d t h a t t h e r e are
Secret Service agents in h o s t count r i e s , " he e x p l a i n e d , " b u t I c a n n o t
say o n e way or t h e o t h e r . " " I
only k n o w t h a t the o v e r w h e l m i n g
majority of p e o p l e in m y c o u n t r y
feel that the v o l u n t e e r s d o help on
an individual and positive basis, he
c o n t i n u e d , " a n d that 1 a m not
familiar enough with t h e political
e l e m e n t s involved t o decide on
that."
K u y o n will remain on c a m p u s
until t o m o r r o w at 5 p . m . Interviews, which he describes as " r a p
sessions, not j o b i n t e r v i e w s " will
run from 11-5 both t o d a y and
tomorrow
in t h e
Placement
Office.
Lost I.D. Fee
Lowered to $3
by Linda Ulsh
T h e five dollar r e p l a c e m e n t fee
for a new ID had b e e n called,
"Way over costs for r e p l a c e m e n t "
by Donald Bunis of t h e R e g i s t r a r ' s
office. T h e fee, t h e r e f o r e , h a s
been lowered to three dollars for a
new ID d u e t o a s t u d e n t e r r o r or
loss. If t h e card is defective
t h r o u g h n o fault of t h e s t u d e n t or
if t h e s t u d e n t ' s n a m e c h a n g e s t h e
University or the c o m p a n y will Irresponsible for replacing it. With
the new policy c o m i n g i n t o effect,
s t u d e n t s , faculty and staff will all
be treated equally w h e n replacem e n t is being c o n s i d e r e d . Bunis
wishes to remind e v e r y o n e t h a t
the card is necessary t o register
and it is issued free u p o n e n t e r i n g
the University.
LONDON
A t a t i m e w h e n t h e F o o d a n d Drug A d m i n i s t r a t i o n is 1 proposing great increases in t h e
a m o u n t of iron in bread, an Albany general p r a c t i t i o n e r a n d t w o leading B o s t o n d o c t o r s
claim t h a t "excessive iron is d e s t r u c t i v e " a n d m a y lead t o cancer.
Dr. Margaret A n n K r i k k e r , w h o formerly w o r k e d for t h e A l b a n y S t a t e University
I n f i r m a r y , Dr. William H. Crosby, a n d Dr.
F r e d e r i c k S t o h l m a n , h e a d s of B o s t o n
hospitals, have g o n e so far as t o urge t h a t iron a n d its salts be r e m o v e d from t h e " G R A S
l i s t " - t h e listing of foods a n d minerals g u a r a n t e e d as safe by t h e F D A .
I r o n a n d its salts " c a n n o t be judged safe u n d e r t h e present u s e p a t t e r n s . . . a n d t h e safe
u p p e r limits of iron s u p p l e m e n t a t i o n t o t h e diet in t h e m a l e ( a n d p o s t m e n o p a u s a l
female) are a m a t t e r of c o n c e r n , " Dr. Krikker w r o t e in a letter p r o t e s t i n g t h e F D A p l a n
t o m o r e t h a n triple t h e legal a m o u n t of iron allowed in bread a n d flour p r o d u c t s .
N e w s of t h e t h r e e d o c t o r s ' o p p o s i t i o n was released in t h e F o o d Chemical N e w s , a
weekly bulletin t o a b o u t 4 0 0 food p r o d u c e r s a n d executives. T h e b a k e r s a n d millers
industries s u p p o r t t h e F D A p r o p o s a l .
Dr. Krikker, w h o resigned from t h e university infirmary in 1 9 6 8 , a n d w h o c o n t i n u e s
t o m a i n t a i n an Albany residence was o u t of t o w n a n d unavailable for c o m m e n t .
T h e F D A h a s p r o p o s e d an increase in t h e a m o u n t of iron in bread a n d flour from 1 5
milligrams p e r p o u n d t o b e t w e e n 50 a n d 6 0 milligrams, T h e r e c o m m e n d e d m i n i m u m
daily r e q u i r e m e n t for m e n is b e t w e e n 5 t o 10 mgs p e r d a y a n d for m e n s t r u a t i n g w o m e n
b e t w e e n 7 t o 2 0 mgs.
In a 1 9 6 5 survey, t h e U.S. D e p a r t m e n t of Agriculture found t h a t 2 5 p e r c e n t of b o y s
12 t o 14, a n d U8 per c e n t of w o m e n a n d girls 9 t o 54 received less t h a n r e c o m m e n d e d
allowances of iron. T h e survey s h o w e d shortages were m o r e severe a m o n g t h e p o o r .
Dr. Philip L. White, secretary of the American Medical Association's council o n food
a n d n u t r i t i o n , has called iron deficiency "anemia a n d t h e r e s u l t a n t fatigue a n d l o w
resistance t o disease " o n e of t h e major n u t r i t i o n a l p r o b l e m s of teenage girls, and indeed
a d u l t w o m e n as w e l l . "
Dr. White has a c k n o w l e d g e d in o t h e r writings t h a t not e n o u g h is k n o w n of h u m a n iron
a b s o r p t i o n , b u t told t h e F D A t h a t t h e council " i s of t h e o p i n i o n t h a t the p r o p o s e d
increases in t h e a m o u n t of iron in e n r i c h m e n t s h o u l d be p u t i n t o effect even while w o r k
is c o n t i n u i n g o n t h e best forms of iron t o be u s e d , " adding t h a t " y e a r s of work m a y be
required before sufficient is k n o w n t o a d e q u a t e l y classify iron c o m p o u n d s by their
availability for a b s o r p t i o n . "
T h e o p p o n e n t s t o t h e F D A proposal, however claim t h a t t h e 1 9 6 5 survey w a s t o o
limited a n d did n o t take into a c c o u n t t h e Tact t h a t different p e o p l e a b s o r b iron in
differing a m o u n t s . T h e y claim t o o t h a t w h a t m a y often be identified as iron deficiency
is in fact deficiency of s o m e o t h e r vitamin such as B2.
In M a y , 1 9 7 0 , when t h e F D A proposal w a s m a d e , t h e Associated Press q u o t e d Dr.
C r o s b y , chief of blood studies at New England Medical Center, as claiming " e v e n 3 0
milligrams of iron per d a y m a y be a s o u r c e of danger t o t h e average m a l e . "
Dr. Krikker n o t e d t h a t a d d i t i o n of iron t o flour has been b a n n e d in F r a n c e , West
G e r m a n y , t h e N e t h e r l a n d s and L u x e m b o u r g , and t h a t G r e a t Britain presently p e r m i t s
only half t h e level allowed in the United States.
Dr. Krikker claimed t h a t prolonged, excessive iron a b s o r p t i o n results in an iron-excess
disease, h e m a c h r o m a t o s i s . In a m o r e recent p r o t e s t , says t h e F o o d Chemical News, t h e
A l b a n y p r a c t i t i o n e r asserted there is a " d i r e c t r e l a t i o n s h i p b e t w e e n excessive iron
d e p o s i t i o n in h e m a c h r o m a t o s i s and primary liver c a r c i n o m a s ( h u p a t o m a s ) . "
" A s t h e incidence of liver cancer in h a p a t o m a s in t h e general p o p u l a t i o n is relatively
rare a n d t h e incidence of liver cancer in h e m a c h r o m a t o s i s is very high, t h e c o n c l u s i o n is
inescapable t h a t liver cancer is induced by excessive iron a b s o r p t i o n . " Dr. Krikker said.
Dr. Krikker suggested t h a t t h e F D A ' s t r e a t m e n t of iron as "generally recognized as
safe ( G R A S ) " has enabled food m a n u f a c t u r e r s t o a d d iron in u n l i m i t e d a m o u n t s t o
n o n s t a n d a r d i z e d foods, w h e t h e r or n o t it is needed by, or safe t o , t h e c o n s u m e r . S h e
said it is also c o n s u m e d in huge q u a n t i t i e s in vitamin-mineral non-prescribed
supplements.
*
" I t is m o r e t h a n likely t h a t t h e h e a l t h y male a n d p o s t - m e n o p a u s a l w o m a n , as well as
t h o s e a n e m i c p a t i e n t s , possibly u n d i a g n o s e d , previously s h o w n t o have e n h a n c e d iron
a b s o r p t i o n , will be ingesting and absorbing very large a m o u n t s of u n n e e d e d i r o n , " Dr.
Krikker w r o t e , adding, " T h e iron in t h e u n d i a g n o s e d anemics will be absorbed b u t will
go n o t t o t h e h e m o g l o b i n b u t t o the tissues t o a c c u m u l a t e . "
T h u s , Dr. Krikker suggests t h a t t h e widespread iron deficiency found in t h e 1 9 6 5
A g r i c u l t u r e s t u d y will n o t be c o r r e c t e d by p e r m i t t i n g t h e flour a n d baking industry t o
triple t h e a m o u n t of iron in their bread a n d cereal p r o d u c t s .
T h e increase, if n o t t h e presently p e r m i t t e d a m o u n t , say t h e o p p o n e n t s , will pose a
serious t h r e a t t o t h e genera! p o p u l a t i o n of iron-excess disease and possibly cancer.
Dr. C r o s b y said d o c t o r s agree t h a t t h e b o d y d o e s a p o o r j o b of working off excess
iron. T h e mineral c o n c e n t r a t e s in t h e liver a n d o t h e r glands, m a y possibly lead t o
glandular failure, he said.
" N o o n e is in a position t o assure us t h a t a large segment of the p o p u l a t i o n w o u l d n o t
be placed at increased risk from a b s o r p t i o n and storage of u n n e e d e d i r o n , " said C r o s b y .
T h e N e w England d o c t o r cited heavy iron c o n s u m p t i o n by S o u t h African B a n t u s ,
whose m e t h o d s of c o o k i n g and brewing increase daily iron intake t o 50 o r 1 0 0
milligrams per day per person.
" A b o u t half the p o p u l a t i o n is found, at d e a t h , t o have serious a c c u m u l a t i o n s of iron
in liver, p a n c r e a s , heart a n d o t h e r susceptible organs and often these organs are severely
i n j u r e d , " said Crosby.
sMIMIfelllNHIBlCLIP THIS LQUPONlllMIMIiaillMIs
The Textbook Area
w i l l b o c l o s e d a s of M a r c h 4 t h .
All
S p r i n g t e x t s w i l l b o rot 11 m o d
Come Together
to t h e p u b l i s h o r at t h a t t i m e .
In
17 1 .//:/'
$99
IRELAND
Slightly llighci Dunne. Suimiiei
Pick Your Own Ouparluiu Dates
(student
1 wiinty Other Dastinatiuns
CENTER
FOR INFORMATION CALL SAM BOGEN 457-4996
May Lead to Cancer
During the sit—in T o n g y a i found five Hobart
freshmen w h o were n o t satisfied with merely
demonstrating. T o n g y a i m e t with t h e s e five people
on S u n d a y , April 26 t o discuss w a y s of harassing
ROTc. They discussed c o n t i n u o u s l y calling the
R O T C offices t o tie u p t h e lines and hinder work.
Breaking in a n d d e s t r o y i n g files was also considered,
but soon t h e c o n v e r s a t i o n t u r n e d t o fiiebombing.
Tongyai w o n d e r e d if t h e y w a n t e d t o use black
powder or incendiary b o m b s . T h e s t u d e n t s , realizing
the p o t e n c y of black p o w d e r , were concerned for
the lives of t h e s t u d e n t s living in t h e dormitory
housing the R O T C offices, s o i n c e n d i a r y devices
were agreed u p o n . T o n g y a i suggested t h a t he and
Gary Bennett s h o u l d lest b o m b s of both lypes the
next d a y . They did so in a field 10 miles outside of
Penn Yan, N.Y.
Attention all Telethon
Performers
PAGE 3
IALBANY STUDENT PRESS
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
riy
Available
S t a l e Quad Box K"
Sain llogen
4 5 7 4'>'H>
Drop c a r d s will be h o n o r e d
P A N AM
call S u e
at
i
flight)
I'IOHHC p u r c h a s e a l l b o o k s s o o n .
through March 4th.
7-7821
Buy 2-Get 1 Free!
with this coupon
I
either
MIKES
NEBA
Giant
Roast Beef
SUBMARINE
SANDWICH
offer expires l-eb. 28, 1971
GOOD AT ALL LOCATIONS
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
(CLIP THIS COUPON1EIIIMIIIIMI
II
yam
"...try using something else other than your ill-informed mind."
Dear Mr. White Side and those deprived ones of his "cliche' 1 :
While reading your opinionated
article of a situation of which you
know little about, my first reaction upon concluding was to
laugh. I really think you have a
great sense of poor humor. Then I
realized that you really believe
what you have so earnestly written down in your article and as a
result I have decided that you are
one of "those" that needs some
help. I am writing this reply to
your article so that you can take
in consideration the other side's
story, for you may decide to write
about this subject once again.
I
i i
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, io 71
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS*
PAGE 4
First of all I would like to say
that I must agree with your statement concerning "cliches." I
think that most of the white
people that I have spoken with on
occasion do think in "cliches",
with no individualism at all. Although I cannot judge on how
qualified you are to make statements about whites. I can only
guess that being 'white you have
had enough experience with them
to know. However, I would recommend that you confine your
statements to dealing with whites,
for your statement concerning the
characteristic of being black is
being "snotty" is a racist statement, for there are more snotty
whites present on this snotty campus anyway.
also. He comes out with both of
his hands extended reaching into
the pockets of those swindled
women for the TV or bed money,
that he sold them and they have
been paying for it for the last
When the check comes! It's real- twenty years. They have been
ly funny how you have stated that paying so long because his prices
when the checks come E.O.P. just happened to be a little higher
students run off and buy stereos. than usual in their part of town. I
This statement I thought was es- wonder what he buys with the
pecially funny coming from a money "when the check comes".
white person, because it brings to
mind a reality about certain poor
In conclusion I say: before you
blacks living in the Ghetto and a
day called "Check Day". This is write another article talking about
the day when those recipients on Blacks try using something else
Welfare get their periodical rations other than your ill-informed
of money, to keep them just mind.
The Yam
barely alive. This also is the day
when "your father" comes out
come across. I cannot explain for
your choice of sloppy attire subordinate to that of Blacks, but I
can say maybe you should try
harder.
"Racism"
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
(Editor's note: the articles on these two pages were
received as replies to Michael Lippman's "Where is
Racism QoingT which appeared in last Friday's
ASP. We print them not because we are ashamed of
the Lippman article (if it has done nothing else, it
has started communication), but becasue the ASP
feels that all sides have a right to be heard. There are
two replies which are not included here because
they were not signed. As always, the ASP will
withhold names, but we must, by law, have a
signature to all articles submitted. The authors of
the two articles are requested to identify themselves
to the ASP, after which their letters will be
considered for publication, with or without names.
In accordance with our editorial policy, Michael
Lippman will be allowed a reply to these articles,
which will appear in Friday's ASP.)
by Al Thompson
ASP Features Staff
albany student press ?
The Albany SIUCIHIII Press is published t i n t * ! times per wt;i;k cfurinu the
academic year (except dunnc) recesses) try the Student Association o l the
Slate University n l New York .it A l b a n y . The Student Association is located
in Campus Center 3 1 6 at 1400 Washington Avenue. A l b a n y . New Y o r k .
12203. Subscription price is $9 tier year or $b per semester Second class
rnailinij permit pendini), Ballston Spa, N e w Y o r k .
editor-in-chief
(nomas g. clingan
chuck ribak
technical editors
sue st'ligson
dan willianu
associate technical editors
torn rhodes
warren wishart
circulation manager
sue faulkner
graffiti/classified
dorothy phillip
graphics
jon gullman
photography editor
jay rusenberg
carol hughes
news editor
vicki zeldiii
associate news editors
roy lewis
maida oringiicr
terry wolf
features editor
John o'grady
assistant features editor
debbie nutansohn
arts editor
. . .
linda waters
associate arts editor
michele palella
sports editor
bob zuremba
columns editor
ctty editor
toiry ainideirsMi
•you're only fooling yourself."
executive editor
aralynn aha re
advertising manager
jeffrodgcrs
assistant advertising manager
. . . . Barbara coopermun
business manager
Though it is only February, SDS feels confident in awarding the
ASP our "Liberal Racist of the Year" commendation for its fine
analysis presented From the White Side. This article belongs with
such great works as Prof. Jensen"proof" that black people are
genetically inferior (so for the good of mankind must be kept
from breeding their defects any further) and History 131 B,
taught here at SUNYA, which uses the works of the great and
all-knowing Voltaire, whose wisdom teaches that Blacks are a
subhuman species, obviously inferior to white men.
It is easy to see why Governor Rockefeller believes in spending
so much money for higher education. After all, any system which
teaches the ideology to which he owes his personal fortune
(racism, sexism, anti-working class ideology and most important
that ALL-AMERICAN liberalism which grants a person the 'right'
to he racist) surely is worth spreading at any cost.
The article's arguments bear striking resemblance to those used
to attack welfare: People (Blacks) on welfare are dumb baby
machines, people (Puerto Ricans, Orientals)
on welfare take
advantage of hard working tax payers (Whites), welfare is
Un-American. The ending follows with the rest of the article and
can be paraphrased "America, we've done it now, we gave the
Blacks a few crumbs (more than we fed the pigeons, right Henry?)
and look what has happened, they threw it back in our faces.
Such ingratitude."
FIGHT RACIST UNEMPLOYMENT
SDS
"...people generally on this campus are snotty.
Dealing with the Black and
E.O.P. Blacks who are on E.O.P.
do not have the tendency to dress
much better than the average
white student (including you)
mainly because they are on
E.O.P., but rather because Blacks
have a standard value concerning
dressing well and staying clean
unlike "some whites" that I have
managing editor
"ASP...our 'Liberal Racist of the Year1...11
si [email protected]§@ifii
article:
r.j. warner
. .mike ellis
Lucky youl The Albany Student Press hai been found. It was in room
326 of the Campus Center of the State University of New York at Albany all
the timel If you still can't find us try and cell; our phones are 457-2190 and
2194. There's one more, but that's for us. We were founded by the class of
1916, one of their bigger mistakes. The ASP is kept alive and running due to
generous contributions and mandatory student tax.
Communications are limited to 300 words and are edited by whomever
happens to be around et the time. Right now its our Illustrious editor-inchief, peace.
The article "Where Is Racism Going?" in the
ASP of Friday, February 12, 1971, certainly
deserves comment from "the other side." I
shall begin by saying that it was poorly written
in that the ideas showed no continuity and led
to no purposeful point other than to incite a
racial incident on campus.
The beliefs in the article are typical of
crettnistic thinking which is fortified by "hearsay" and not fact.
The ideas suggesting that black students
"have more money than you d o " is nonreulistic. If you are referring to the stipends
($20 every 2 weeks—usually on Monday), they
are not delegated to all EOP students und all
Ntudents who receive them are not black, The
students who receive these stipends do not
have sufficient family income to provide for
personal needs.
The reason we dress better than you do is
because we have better taste than you do.
It was also stated that "and when the check
comes, they run off to buy a stereo." I believe
"the chock" referred to is tho one where the
funds allotted the student exceed the bill and
so he receives the balance.
This is a rare case and to see whether I lies*
students "run off and buy stereos" why don't
those of you who believe this take a survey ol
nil local stereo dealers the day "the check"
comes in.
The issue of the students at New Tall/ not
wanting to carry their trays because they've
been slaves too long is probably an isol, I
incident blown out of proportion.
It was also said that blacks are "snotty." A
more correct word would have been "imlig
nant." For centuries, the black man has been
kicked around, pushed around and told to stay
>" his place. In spite of all this he persists anil
endures and makes his way to the top. This is
Hie kind of strength it takes to be called ti
m
"n. To those who think like Michael l.ipp
"Un, and believe they are of the "superior
rUC
"'" y°u're ""ly fooling yourself The black
man t« truly a man, as a black woman is iruly a
~
, end by „ „ y i n u ,
,1fynul
,
A Very Iwligniuit
Terry Anderson
PAGE 5
ALB.ANY STUDENT PRESS
Let's face it, Albany State is just
messed up, racially, socially, and
politically. The campus scene is
off campus. Even if there weren't
any Blacks on campus, Albany
Slate would be clickish, dull and
with less color to say the least.
It is openly admitted that institutionalized racism exists here but
nothing is being done to correct
the situation. No, wearing buttons
like "Love is the only way" is just
too superficial. Almost as bad as
wearing one saying "Kill the
Pigs." I agree there isn't any mass
type of White and Black relations,
these have to be made individually, but there isn't any type of
White to While relationship either,
when it comes to social and political action. This I personally witnessed at an anti-Laos rally.
In reference to the article
printed Friday, "Where is Racism
Going," a common attitude was
revealed: "I'm not anti-Black, but
I don't like .snotty people, and a
lot of Blacks are snotty." Wow,
haven't people gotten hip to the
fact, that people generally on this
campus are snotty, and tight?
The second most common attitude expressed in the article, held
greatly by white students is about
the EOP program. "The EOP Program is great intellectually. When
it gets down to an emotional level
it hurts. They have more money
to spend than I do. They even
dress better than I do. And when
the Check comes they run off to
buy a stereo." --Great generalizations, but a lot of Blacks do tend
to be better dressers than whites
simply because of the cultural
"clean look" thai they project.The
stereo bit, I'm still wondering
about, 1 haven't gotlen mine yet.
Most of the noise I hear at four
o'clock in the morning comes
from my white counterparts' $150
and up stereo with four big speakers.
Being as objective as I can,
suppose 1 mention the fact that
I'm not anti-Greek, "some of my
best friends are:" nor anli Semitic,
"1 love Kosher food " b u t Albany
State has too much of a Long
Island and Greek atmosphere.
"The same people, the same
crowd, that act, talk, und dress
alike."
Imagine those white students
here whose old man owns slum
tenements in the ghettos and
charges the occupants above normal rent for living in a condemned
building with no real services,
except roaches and rats. Imagine
those white students here whose
old man exploits Blacks and other
lower-class people daily in their
businesses to send little Johnny
and Sue to Albany State. The half
hasn't been told, these are only
samples of how little Johnny and
Sue get to college on the exploited toil of others. Maybe it is
only due to Blacks and other
oppressed people the
privilege
of enjoying the fruits of the
majority's labor for once.
No, I'm not justifying or moralizing, if Blacks had the financial
backing and educational opportunities as most of their white
counterparts have had, there
wouldn't be any need of the EOP
Program. What society has sown
in the past it is reaping now.
True, it has been a superficial
Utopia on campus this fall and
winter with no great upheaval,
but we are reminded by this Biblical quote which I took out of
context: "they should say peace,
then c o m e t h
utter chaos."
When?
"Whitey can't stand to be ignored.'
I am a racist! Does this worry
you? If it does, you have the
wrong concept of what a racist is.
An astrologist studies the stars; a
geologist studies the earth, and a
racist studies his race of people. I
am a Black racist and I don't have
the time to worry about BlackWhite relationships on this campus.
Many whites suffer from a superiority complex. When Blacks
do not cringe; when whites are
present, the whites can not handle
it. This is quite evident in an
article I read by Micheal Lippman
(Feb. 12 ASP). He states "The
EOP program is great—intellectually. When it gets loan emotional
level, it hurts. They have more
money to spend than I do. They
even dress better than I do. And
when the check comes they runn
off to buy a stereo."
in the world where a person can
*buy a $20 stereo!
Many whites try to justify their
actions. They base their actions
on the actions of the Blacks.
Michael Lippman states, "I'm not
anti-Black, but I don't like snotty
people, and a lot of Blacks are
snotty." Here, instead of saying,
"I don't like Blacks," he takes the
coward's way out. Only an inferior person can be a coward, and
Blacks are not cowards!
Whites naturally think that
Blacks are belligerent. The truth
is: Blacks only respond when
something is said or done that
they feel is derogatory. You can
abuse people for so long and
eventually they will turn on you.
Blacks have turned away from the
whites. Whitey can't stand to be
ignored. They want attention no
matter what the cost. The cost is
I feel that I must clear these great!
statements up. EOP spelled backThere are many Blacks who feel
wards is POE. Due to the fact that the only way they can relieve
the students don't have a great t h e m s e l v e s from
oppression
deal of money, they tend to spend whould be to "kill all the Whitit on necessities. They don't buy a eys." [ feel this is not necessary.
pair of $15 jeans to tear and then, The white man is slowly killing
put patches or pour Clorox on himself. Every time he opens his
them.
As far as clothes are mouth, he has to swallow the
concerned Black people have al- poison of his words. Maybe he
ways dressed!! There is no place wilt shut up only to survive!
Madelyn Boyd
m
PAGE6
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
WEDNESDAY, FEJARY 17,1971
I ALBANY STUDENT FRBSS
PAGE 7
^li
«sWr'*"* *•»
S00
•is
Albany has many very nice sections of private one-family homes. Low taxes and
generally high employment are drawing factors to the city. The population lias been
stable for about SO years but may grow soon if the Pine Bush area (by Washington Ave.
Extension) is developed.
i
Dan O'Connell, the Albany County Democratic Chairman, was a minor World War I
hero who, along with his brothers, took control of Albany during the 1920's. It is a
common assumption that he calls all the shots in the city, which usually votes over 2-1
democrat for all levels of government. This is his winter home on Whitehall Road.
!
I
CITY OF ALBANY
words by mike ellis
photos by jay rosenbery
The city has two main public housing projects.
They are the Morton Ave. project near Lincoln Park
and the Thatcher project closer to the river.
Residents experience the problems common to
many housing projects: crime and inefficient service. A third project planned for below the Mall was
cancelled due to costs.
fa i<* V•m
WA. '"• •
i
I
|
;;^y<,'-,-•-'-
In I96S plans were first made for a new Albany High to be completed by 1969. Today
the pilings are in the ground and the last scheduled date of completion given was
September, 1973. Because of the extraordinarily high projected costs (which arc not
feasible due to the limits of the city's borrowing power) the entire project is under
study. There is some doubt as to how large a school is needed. This results from the
precariousfinancialposition of the city Catholic's high schools.
'•—^J>
>
The slate office campus was built to house the state offices in the
early 1960's. It has turned out to be only Phase I of Rockefellers
local building program, shadowed by the upcoming Mall. The stale
government is the largest area employer, providing a solid, ever
expanding base to the job situation.
Washington Park was once the tranquil heart of the upper city of
Albany. There were outdoor concerts in the summer, Sunday strolls
and fishing and boating in the hike.
Today the park is used by older people in the vicinity, the large
group of college .students living nearby, and some school children. But
family use is very small, as most young families who can afford lo,
leuve Albany.
The South Mall is the largest construction project in the world (and
the most expensive!) Governor Rockefeller arrived at the idea while
entertaining a foreign dignitary in Albany when the comments were
made on the dilapidated condition of much of the city. When
completed in 1975 (eight years late), it will doubtlessly be among the
more impressive sights in the country.
SI
The Capitol a.,d Education Building. New .pace to, expansion of both facilities arc In the Mall Both
buildings were air-clcuned during the 60's which greatly spruced up Ihe area.
''
Many people have moved back to il"-' »re" Wtween Ihe Capitol and Washington Park. A neighborhood
association has been formed l» keep up llu' "*" m private homes rather than apartments. Many of Ihe
buildings are over a century old.
State Street Is the heart of the city. It Is now mostly devoted to banking, Insurance,
law and business offices. The adjacent shopping district is holding on In hopes of
prosperity when the thousands of Stute Mall workers come.
,1
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 9
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
PAGE 8
•WTU. SUT YOU TWO CHAM TOOITHBt-YOU MUST HAVE A LOT TO TALK AIOUTI'
IHAV1ANA»MIMWI\--!'
New Rightist
Bombing...
Liberty
An ASP Column.
by Mitchell Frost
•
An ASP Humor
Virginia
Column
by Gene Da m m
Stan Lehr and Louia R o u e t t o Jr. have written a fascinating article
in the N e w York Times magazine section o f January 1 0 entitled, "The
N e w Right C r e d o - Libertarianism." Since I consider myself a
libertarian o f sorts, I read t h e article with great interest, b u t I am
sorry to say that I was disappointed.
T h e authors quite correctly assess much o f t o d a y ' s political
ideology as tiresome and hypocritical. Many conservatives, while
proclaiming law and order,"could scarcely contain their g l e e " w h e n
they saw construction workers pummel anti-war protesters and long
haired innocent bystanders. " S o m e were t h e self-appointed purifiers
of s o c i e t y - those w h o w a n t e d t o 'clean u p ' p o r n o g r a p h y , d r u g u s e ,
long hair, and other v i c e s . " Yet, conservatives have long claimed t o b e
the true champions of personal freedom.
Liberals feel that "the state should have virtually unlimited power t o
redistribute material wealth, plan and regulate e c o n o m i c activity and
balance t h e desires o f each interest group against those o f every
other." When their social solutions fail t o have positive results, rather
than trying n e w solutions t h e y c o m p o u n d t h e problem b y proposing
the same solutions In a higher dosage. For e x a m p l e , since rent control
has resulted in a virtual halt in the construction of low-cost h o u s i n g ,
liberals have advocated more rent control. Every time the minimum
wage is increased, thousands o f workers (the unskilled, t h e y o u n g , t h e
black) are thrown o u t o f work and added t o the u n e m p l o y m e n t rolls.
Of course, say the liberal, the solution is a higher minimum wage.
The radicals, lamenting about t h e "fascist s y s t e m " oppressing
t h e m , h a v e set up their o w n brand o f fascism in colleges u n d e r their
d e facto c o n t r o l threatening s t u d e n t s w h o o p p o s e t h e m . " T h e N e w
Left reached the height of its appeal by misrepresenting its goals as
libertarian, and it began t o decline as s o o n as its totalitarian n a t u r e
became evident."
Where t h e a u t h o r s a n d t h e article break with reality is in t h e true
m e a n i n g o f freedom. A s t h e a u t h o r s a c k n o w l e d g e , freedom includes
the right of a people t o organise a m o n g themselves t o form a
c o m m u n i t y o r g o v e r n m e n t . For a system t o b e politically free it m u s t
also b e e c o n o m i c a l l y free (with s o m e r e s t r i c t i o n s t o check t h e abuses
of m o n o p o l i e s - b o t h industrial a n d u n i o n ) . T h u s t h e libertarians
rightly call for laissez-faire. Laws are freely a n d d e m o c r a t i c a l l y
established t o p r o t e c t freedom, n o t t o restrict it.
T h e a u t h o r s find it difficult t o u n d e r s t a n d t h e need t o p r o t e c t a
free society. T o m a k e their p o i n t t h e y q u o t e Karl Hessi " L i b e r t a r ianism is t h e view...that all m a n ' s social a c t i o n s s h o u l d b e v o l u n t a r y . "
T h e y c o m p l e t e l y disregard t h e responsibility t h a t m u s t c o m e with
freedom.
My o t h e r p o i n t of dispute with Messrs. Lehr a n d R o s s e t t o is in
regard t o national defense. F o r i n s t a n c e : "...while traditionalists
a u t o m a t i c a l l y s u p p o r t e d a n y step t h e G o v e r n m e n t c h o s e t o take
Man U Sue, Defense Minister E x t r a o r d i n a i r e a n d P R m a n for
the N o r t h Vietnamese Air F o r c e p r o m p t l y s e n t a c u r t l y w o r d e d
sharply barbed incisive warning t o Washington t o d a y . T h e notice
follows heavy b o m b i n g ail week of t h e s t a t e s o f Pennsylvania,
Maryland, a n d Virginia in reprisal for thedowningby t h e A m e r i c a n s
of a N o r t h Viet reconnaissance plane in clear violation of Che
understanding. T h e u n d e r s t a n d i n g wasn't specified.
According t o Our American
Heritage Dictionary,
however,
" u n d e r s t a n d i n g " m e a n s " a solemn c o v e n a n t unilaterally arrived at
do, t o projection of wish fulfillment o n t h e part of t h e solemnizer
in a specified c o n t e x t , i.e. getting ones t r o o p s o u t of a c o m b a t
z o n e , and subject t o unilateral c o n d i t i o n s at t h e disposition of t h e
solemnizer given the contingencies of t h e s i t u a t i o n . "
Discounting e n e m y claims of an u n d e r s t a n d i n g with t h e
Pentagon whereby t h e N o r t h Vietnamese w o u l d o n l y b o m b n o r t h
of the Mason-Dixon line U Sue claimed that Western logic d i c t a t e d
that massive b o m b i n g raids were t h e p r o p e r response since t h e
recon plane violated their territorial integrity n o t o u r s , " and
stated if there were an u n d e r s t a n d i n g h e would b e t h e first t o
k n o w a b o u t it. Interjected U S u e : "War is h e l l , "
He w e n t o n t o explain that t h e raids should n o t b e interpreted
as an escalation of the war b u t as limited tempera-spatio
functional c o u n t e r d e t e r r e n t o p e r a t i o n s s y s t e m s response and
directed reporters to t h e N o r t h Viet Air F o r c e Manual N o .
.>l. r .678 for m o r e technical e x p l a n a t i o n . When q u e s t i o n e d about
civilian casualties U S u e m a d e s o m e flippant Oriental remark
about Americans r u n n i n g s h o r t of m a n h o l e covers. His conversation was interspersed with Chinese bullshit a b o u t t h e people and
his English weren't t o o good.
He declined to c o m m e n t o n r e p o r t e d raids in Iowa and
Florida.
IH19"
"...with society t o fulfill our responsibilities, t o exercise our rights,
T h e y ' r e t h e s a m e color a n d they c a n ' t get along.
and t o insure that society or government does n o t infringe u p o n or
suspend
those rights. Otherwise,
it is our right t o disband the
government by democratic m e a n s . "
against C o m m u n i s m , t h e libertarians were m o r e c o n c e r n e d a b o u t
w h e t h e r the G o v e r n m e n t had t h e right t o tax a n d c o n s c r i p t its citizens
to u n d e r t a k e so improbable an adventure. Libertarians believed t h a t is
the c o u n t r y were really in danger a free citizenry w o u l d b e m o r e t h a n
willing t o defend it v o l u n t a r y . " With this issue t h e a u t h o r s break w i t h
reality.
Firstly, t h e y fail t o realize t h a t freedom h a s its e n e m i e s , t h o s e
individuals a n d countries w h o wish t o direct a m o v e m e n t t o
o v e r t h r o w o u r government with t h e freedoms it provides. A t p r e s e n t ,
the Soviet Union a n d C o m m u n i s t China are t h e t w o greatest e x t e r n a l
t h r e a t s t o these freedoms; and the leaders of these t w o p o w e r s have a s
m u c h as said so.
Leonid Brezhnev, at t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l Meeting of C o m m u n i s t a n d
Workers' Parties in Moscow, J u n e 7, 1 9 6 9 : " C o m r a d s , all of us base
ourselves o n t h e fact t h a t t h e world socialist s y s t e m is t h e leading
revolutionary force a n d t h e mainstay of t h e anti-imperialist ( r e a d :
anti-American) m o v e m e n t . . . "
Lin Piao, Defense Minister of R e d China, a t t h e Ninth N a t i o n a l
Congress of t h e C o m m u n i s t Party of Peking, China, April 1, 1 9 6 9 :
" T h e c u r r e n t Great Proletarian Cultural R e v o l u t i o n is a b s o l u t e l y
necessary a n d m o s t timely for consolidating t h e d i c t a t o r s h i p of t h e
proletariat (meaning the mass m u r d e r s of those o p p o s i n g C o m m u n i s t
Party directives) preventing capitalist restoration a n d building socialism."
We c a n n o t ignore these s t a t e m e n t s a n y m o r e t h a n w e can ignore
the North Vietnamese aggression in S o u t h East Asia, Russian
aggression in t h e Middle East, o r t h e Russian build-up of offensive
nuclear w e a p o n s including the 25 m e g a t o n SS-9 missiles. U n f o r t u n a t e ly, Messrs. Lehr and R o s s e t t o c h o o s e to overlook these events.
Secondly, t h e a u t h o r s are naive if they believe t h a t o u r national
defense can be based o n a reliance o n t h e free c i t i z e n r y ' s willingness
to j u m p to its n a t i o n ' s defense in time of crisis. With a standing a r m y
a b a n d o n e d t o be replaced by... b y w h a t ? T h e y feel t h a t o u r security
could be defended by a band of citizens w h o , u p o n seeing their
nation's security threatened would volunteer their services t o its
defense, a sort of massive posse. T h e o n l y p r o b l e m is t h a t m o d e r n
security measures require s o m e t h i n g b e t t e r than an untrained g r o u p of
citizens masquerading as an army. We would be literally defenseless. A
m o r e reasonable solution t o t h e forced c o n s c r i p t i o n of t h e draft-lottery is an all-volunteer army gradually replacing o u r p r e s e n t s t a n d i n g
army and i m m e d i a t e l y replacing those unwilling c o n s c r i p t s w h o a r e
serving in V i e t n a m against their will. (Such a s o l u t i o n was advocated
by J i m Buckley during his senatorial campaign.)
A philosophy based o n individuality is, of c o u r s e , u p h i l o s o p h y
based on freedom and is superior t o any o t h e r b u t it m u s t b e
a d a p t a b l e t o m o d e r n d a y problems. A n y p h i l o s o p h y which is n o t
practical is useless. Liberty a n d freedom m u s t b e t h e major t h r u s t
behind any free society b u t the system m u s t be designed t o c o p e with
tile real world, or anarchism is sure to follow.
A fflmby Ernie Plntofl
WNWHE
CHICKEN
Reflections on Race
An ASP
Column
by J o h n O'Grady
I've studied t h e p r o b l e m , and I c a n ' t set* why t h e y ' r e different,
why I c a n ' t gfit along with t h e m . Arc they louder, or wittier, o r
happier? More r h y t h m i c , m o r e sexual, more alienated, better
organized?
Hell, I feel t h e same r h y t h m s , and want the same w o m e n , and
like the s a m e wit. I r a n dance and play basketball and I hale
bureaucracy and this paper-tilled stupid society.
T h e p r o b l e m is o r g a n i z a t i o n : We can't gel together because we
organize differently, o r rather, they organize and I d o n ' t . W h o
now hates tlu-m so m u c h thai they sing and march a n d write
a b o u t oppression'.'
I'd almost join I heir organization, but it's all split up a m was
Oppressed or n o t , they've got their middle class oppressed and
lower-class oppressed, and in working with all of them I'd b e
working with straights as well as radicals, and with scholars as well
as d r o p o u t s . T h e p h e n o m e n o n is too confusing to c o p e with.
Yet they seem t o stick together, as if problems different from
my o w n give t h e m c o h e r e n c e without me. S o m e h o w they've got
more m o n e y t o spend on cars a n d nice clothes and parties, a n d
they look like they share t h e same jokes. In fact, s o m e t i m e s I
catch myself thinking t h e y ' r e all suspicious-looking.
There a r e o p p o r t u n i t i e s for working relationships, though. On
the j o b , I can c o o p e r a t e with them easily enough, as long as we
avoid personal tensions. What the hell, we live differently, c o m e
from different b a c k g r o u n d s , twist o u r personalities in widely
disparate ways; it is e n o u g h , it is a start, that a similar j o b or ;i
single working objective can bring us together.
So there's h o p e . Christ, t h e y ' r e even t h e same volar as I a m ,
considering t h e freedom w e ' r e all working tor and everything else
we have in c o m m o n , t h e r e ' s n o reaso i 1 s h o u l d n ' t be able t o gel
m?
i JUST
expemMkNr
WITH
CHefllCAu-Vf^-
CI'S Graphic
along with white people s o m e d a y .
tht
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ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 10
Newly-elected officers of the
S U N Y A D E C A Club are President,
Jim Whitehurst; Vice-President, Bill
McNIff; Secretary, Bill
Lelcht;
Treasurer, Diane Schoalsky. A n y
Interested Distributive Education
majors who are not on the mailing
list, please call Bill Leicht at
4 6 2 - 4 1 8 6 after 5 p.m.
Want to engage In great discussions on Judaism and Chiistianity?
Then come to our informal class
Wednesday at 8 : 3 0 p.m. in Hu 113.
D o you give a damn? Needed: 1
student preferably a sophomore or
junior who lives in the trl-cittes area
to serve on the Board of Directors
of the Council on Community Services In the Albany area. This group
meets once a month plus committee meetings & coordinates
many volunteer services (social,
welfare, etc.) in the tri-citles area.
Application forms may be picked
up by Feb. 26th in the Student
Association Office, CC 3 4 6 .
Kent Legal Defense Fund speaker Bobby Franklin and the provocative film "Confrontation
at Kent
State" will be in LC 7 on Wednesday, Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. There Is no
charge
but donations
wou Id be
greatly appreciated.
A
beer
party
and dance
featuring the "Madrigal" will be
held at Brubacher Dining Room
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. on Friday,
Feb. 19, 1 9 7 1 . The event is sponsored by BAGS- Brubacher Adult
Graduate Students and GSA. Tickets will be sold at the door at
$ 1 . 0 0 with Tax card or BAGS
membership or $2.50 without.
Interested in joining a women's
liberation consciousness raising collective? Downtown people call
Marianne at 482-6460; Uptown call
Laura or Carol at 457-3007.
rttf
Peace Corps Will he m i i . i m
Din Fub, t!> 17 Imorv.riws w i l l b. ;
tn-Ui in Hie P W c m m i t OHuw
Lecture Center 25 will be open
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
AiiMiiniMM'inii HI* 1*1
to the University Community Maud
,KI
Wed. at 7 and Fridays at 8 to view
Lubbv
inlonimlu.n
t;ibli!
in 'Ho
TIK'HJ will hi;
,n t l m CC
International Student Association
will sponsor a Panel Discussion on
the idea of Integration in Europe,
Tuesday, February 2 3 at 7 : 0 0 p.m.
in CC 3 7 5 .
by Jeff Burger
There are a few things that I want to say about this concert and they are
as follows, neatly grouped and categorized for filing or whatever:
Israeli dancing will be held in the
State Quad Flagroom Thursday
night at 7:30 Everyone is welcome
to attend.
Ethnic Greeks (and PhilhellenesH
Learn your jnguage—Enjoy your
culture. Join the Modern Greek
Studies Asso* lation. Contact: John
Nicolopoulos, Social Scier.ce 3 7 6 ,
457-8648 or 472-6724.
jfctl
John Cupak, Chairman of the
Albany Chapter of the Hudson
River Sloop Restoration group will
give a talk and slide presentation of
the Hudson River's ecological problems in Bleeckor Hall, Dutch Quad
on Feb. 16, 1971 at 8:00 p.m.
Want l o spend a year in Israel?
A
program
has been s<st u p foi
S U N Y A students t o spend .i t e r m
on a k i b b u t z and a term at Hebrew
University
information
Kosher Food for Passover-Make
arrangements in tho Lobby of the
in Jerusalem, For more
call
Davis
Peck
PetHf Pan w i l l be (lying soon at a
theatre neat y o u , March 3 7. 1 \ckeis o n sjle now .it the Performing
A n s Cent'M Box o f f i c e , open 11
a.m. u n t i l 4 p.m. weekdays. Hurry 1
tu
457-3U2& ur Dr. B.K. J n h n p n l l ,n
1 7 2 3290.
Campus Center during the week of
Feb.
15, 1 9 7 1 . For more informa-
tion call Sam Bogen, 457-4996.
S k i C l u b meeting Thursday, February Iti at 7.30 p.m. in LC 5. Sign
u p for trrp t o Bromley o r S t r a t t o n .
STATE
M y guys. in A L C are the greatest
bowlers in the world!!!
Love,
LS? S.
CLASSIFIED ADS
PRODUCE RESULTS
Every Friday your ad will be circulated to over 10,000
people. Classified forms are available at the Campus
Center Information Desk, or by writing: Classified
Department; Campus Center 334; 1400 Washington
Avenue; Albany, N.Y. 12203.
BOOKSTORE
ANNOUNCES
Clasi 1^niiiig
:
Order your class ring now for delivery before Graduation Day
GradlMcmfti®ffii [email protected]][email protected]@iBiit§
Orders for graduation announcements and personal name cards will be taken
between FEBRUARY 2 2 & MARCH 15, ONLY (LATE ORDERS WILL NOT
ACCEPTED).
BE
Your ORDER FORM and the COMPLETE PAYMENT must be brought
or mailed to the STATE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE, 1400 Washington Avenue,
Albany, N.Y. 12203.
Graduation
announcements and personal name cards may be PICKED UP at
the Bookstore on or about May 10, 1971.
Samples of the announcements and cards are on display at the Bookstore.
Seniors ordering announcements who do not graduate will be given full credit
for this merchandise.
PRICE SCHEDULE
GRADUATION
ANNOUNCEMENTS
$.25 cad
( P l e a - * o r d e r in m u l t i p l e s o f 5: i e . I S
20
The Staple Singers (Roebuck "Pop" Staples and his daughters
Mavis, Cleo, and Yvonne), appeared at the Palace with the Bee Gees.
If you have something lo show, tell, or sell • advertise it
in the Classified Section of the Albany Student Press.
UNIVERSITY
EAR TO THE THUNDER
by Arlene Scheurer
Want to hear an oft ill used
word? New. But that's what describes Tony Williams Lifetime's
new album Turn it Over (Polydor
24-4021). The power is beyond
imagination, the combination of
the beauties of rock and jazz
complete, the talent supreme.
Tony Williams has long established his greatness with the Miles
Davis quintet. Being a member of
one of the most important of jazz
groups at the age of 19 is nothing
to scoff at. His incredible technique, his soulful, pouring, driving
force, his flashy, striking, energetic colors are all well focused on
here.
Jack Bruce's reputation with
Cream won't be lost here. He
creates a nice foundation. John
McLaughlin introduces new ideas
on guitar. He will be a new force
on his instrument. Khalid Yasin
(Larry Young) on organ, has some
nice solo moments, but his accompaniment (if such a tame phrase is
appropriate) is beautiful.
The only reservation I have
concerns the vocals that are similar to Schoenberg's speech-singing
technique. It becomes boring after
the initial affect wears off.
There is a lot of electronic
affects, but they are well used;
they shock, move and create all
kinds of moods. Check out "Once
I Loved" and "Night." "To Whom
It May Concern" is superb in
terms of pure excitement. The
arrangements are excellent using
many of the various sounds such a
group can produce, constantly
changing tempos, always fresh,
and, yes, new. So if you like rock
or jazz get this album. It is fantastic.
U has always been my opinion
that music is made to be listened
to. So when an allium is produced
so as not to offend anyone, I am
offended. I am talking, of course,
about what is commonly called
"background music." In utt artistic approach to music the judg-
KNOXSTKEET
WATERBEDS
138 K n o x S t .
Off
25 etc.)
Madison-I
Fineline Cards
100
$3.00
200
$5.00
ment that a record is nice to have
playing in a supermarket, or during a light conversation with a
friend cannot be used. It is this
type of music that is anti-art. 11
cannot surprise, or excite or exhilarate or stimulate. Here are two
albums that are that kind of product.
All the requirements for easily
ignored music are in these albums.
Early in the Morning (Polydor
24-4506), and James Last's Soft
Hock (Polydor 24-4507) - the
popular songs with all the emotions drained out, an unimaginative drummer who reads cliches
from his chart, syrupy strings,
and, in Early in the Morning, a
choral group that sings in tired,
drap harmonies.
There is little use in describing
each song as they have been formulated to the point of losing alt
individuality. Hunter Kallman's
girls on Early occassionally use a
German accent which lends an
unintentional air of humor, but
his arranging is absurdly uninspired.
Inspiration is perhaps what
makes Last's album the better. He
seems to really believe what he's
doing. "Yesterday" actually conveys a mood-super sentimentalitywith the weeping violin. "Lay
Lady Lay" is a better song than
anything Kallman has to offer.
Although Last's treatment of it
would be likely to bring up Dylan's latest dinner If he heard it,
the song's heart still pulsates,
albeit faintly.
The
doctors and restaurants
m a y f i n d t h e s e a l b u m s satisfact o r y t o p l a y f o r t h e i r p a t i e n t s and
c u s t o m e r s , b u t (hose w h o a c t u a l l y
w a n t t o listen to m u s i c had b e t t e r
pass t h i s
—
1. Crowds, lines, vibes, moods,
names, etc. Dept.
(Pe te Jackobs and Charles
Kriete, if by chance or cosmic
accident you're still reading my
reviews, you might want to skip
this section.) Anyway, it should
be said that the concert began
late, and in conjunction with this
minor bringdown there was a fairly major bringdown at the door in
the form of mass pushing and
shoving to get in; I saw a few
people get almost crushed and
that sort of thing. Later, these
same people who were in possession of such together manners at
the door, kept it up inside. They
yelled and shouted requests all
through the Bee Gees set: they
were very noticeable during the
ballads (unfortunately). On the
other hand, they were enthusiastic
(there were at least three standing
ovations) and excitement is what
a rock concert is all about, but
then excitement has nothing to do
with being rude. It should be
noted that I'm not talking about
the whole audience; also that the
reason for the late start was not
the fault of the promoter, the
groups just weren't ready in time.
2. Supershow
A preview of t h e film
Supershow was given. (The film
will be shown in full on Friday,
Saturday and Sunday and a complete review will appear after*
black
To Jeff Burger:
is clever, but misses the real point.
As insulting to you as Jacob's Someone who disagrees with your
tetter was, there was an awful lot opinion on one album will not
of hard truth contained within, necessarily disagree on another.
while your reply was both super- What is important is your underlying values that lead you to your
ficial and innaccurate.
Reviews are opinions, as you conclusions themselves. For exsay, but they should be substan- ample, if you like Chiago because
tiated opinions, giving insight- it has jazz elements well intebey ond the mere surface—about grated into a rock context and
the object being reviewed. As an your reader likes to hear music of
English major you are surely that type, then he will find your
aware of Eliot's criticism of column worth while.
As far as your writing about
Hamlet.
He didn't merely say it
failed, but carefully explained crowds, police, etc. being relevant
why it failed, thus, agree with him because rock is a "sociological and
or not, you became conscious of cultural phenomenon"...well so is
new elements in the play. Any all art music. So any music will
decent music journal, whether it be tell you more that the temporary
Down Heal or Rolling Stone does environment of the concert. And
its own variation on the same if you do find it necessary to
write about these surroundings
idea.
then you have the responsibility
Your enjoyment of music, subof explaining why the information
jective as it is, still depends on is relevant.
rather stable values. If you exSo if you can't write anything
plore your own tastes before you
write you would understand this. more than this is good and that is
Otherwise anyone who would be fair then why not leave it at that
energetic enough to say 1 like this rather than throwing all that extra
album would be qualified as a reading material just to fill up
space.
critic.
Bob Uosenblum
Your consumer guide argument
The Deadline for
Applications for Waivers of
The Student Activity Assessment
South
of
STUDENT SPECIAL
WatorhutfWaitress' I'wm . . . 1.4',,
Malliuss U n c i I'ad
. P a a . i q e $ViA
one knows why. Fifteen is all
there were, that's all. No matter.
The Bee Gees were really beautiful to pay an orchestra, they
won't perform unless they can do
it right. The three brothers who
3. Staple Singers
Good ol* Pop Roebuck Staples dominate the proceedings were all
and his three daughters. Pop must in fine form..
The concert was conceptually
be well into his forties—at least—
similar to the Moody Blues conand there he was plugged into an
cert
at State last spring. They
electric guitar and telling us to get
stayed* away from improvisation
it on. And he didn't look ridiculous as you might expect (instead, or extended numbers. They stuck
to familiar material, seeking to
some of us looked ridiculous, bereproduce the sound they obtain
cause he was able to "get it o n "
better than alot of us. ) He was on albums, only live. And, like the
Moodies, they succeeded well; the
really young and alive. The daughsound was staggering. To take a
ter who sang lead had a deep and
song like "Lonely Day, Lonely
flexible voice which covered a lot
Nights", their new single and reof range and carried well; the
harmonies delivered by her two produce the polished record version on stage complete with orsisters were smooth and pleasant.
chestration— well, it's n o small
Early in their set, I was
achievement. Yet without the studisappointed in the group's backdio
benefits of echo chambers,
up, a three man group which
overdubbing, retakes, etc., they
seemed rather lifeless and added
still succeeded completely. Their
nothing to the presentation. Howvoices were as full and as beautiever, I had to change my mind
ful as on record: you^re left thinklater on when they warmed up
ing, my God, they really can sing
and showed what they could do.
like that, that really is the way
Among the group's numbers were
they sound!
"For What It's Worth","Give A
For
some
reason,
the
Damn", and " The Weight", all
Bee Gees were not satisfied with
well presented in forceful gospel1
the sound and they left after a set
blues.
that was somewhere around an
4. Bee Gees
hour in length (a bit less or more;
First of all, it turned out to be a
I didn't time it and don't want to
fifteen piece orchestra instead of a quote a number...in any case, It
thirty piece as advertised and no was too short, at least for anyone
sitting in a $5.50 seat.) Though
the last few songs all got standing
ovations, the group was gone in a
flick of the eye and heading down
the thru way to New York.
wards. For now, just a mention
that it looks fantastic. Good color, excellent photography, good
sound (loud), good music.
Arts Communications
KJ4-()508
New Scotland Ai'f.
PERSONAL NAME CARDS
PAGE 11
Bee Gees' At The Palace:'
Quality, Not Quantity
M INTIMATE HOMETOWH FRIEND OF YOUR
ROOMM/ITF'S DROPPING- INr-AND NONE" OF
YOUR DOflMMATfS- HAVING HITCHEO OUT
-FOR THE WEEKEND.
Drug Abuse. W M H T , Channel 17
ing the rest of March and April.
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
MISERY IS:
the "Turned on Crisis" programs on
will broadcast these programs dur
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
Is Wednesday, Feb., 24, 1971.
Applications are available
5. Hype & Editorial Dept.
The Bee Gees are a top act. One
of the reasons that they left early
was the small audience. The theatre was less than half full. There
are something like 80 times more
people in New York than there
are in Albany; maybe we just
don't have the numbers to support a weekly concert setup. On
the other hand, maybe we do. All
the other Bee Gees concerts on
their tour are sell-outs. This one
should have been: it was the first
concert of their first American
tour in years.
If you do like to go to concerts,
and you're lucky enough to have
some money, the Palace is planning Byrds, Elton John, Hot
Tuna, etc. If nobody goes, that'll
be it. If the place stays 50% full,
and the promoter keeps losing
money, it will close. Period. (Moral: If you want to go, go. If you
don't, don't.)
6. Co-conspirators Dept.
Jeri, Rich & Patty, John &
Susan.
Textbook area
open for browsing
Wed.. Feb. 17th thru Feb. 26th
9-4:30
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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,1971
PAGE 12
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
'FIRST I'D LIKE TO THANH ALL YOUCONCEKNEI>
STUDENTS WHO CAME TO THIS SESSION OF
JUDICIAL WORKSHOP, ANP HOW:
HERE
COME
PETUDGE!
WORKSHOP
FIVE CENTS off campus
Albany Student Press
Wednesday, February 17, 1971
Vol. LVII No.10
State Uniuersitu of Nets York at Albany
by John Fairhall
Hacking your way through a jungle may not sound like fun;
but that is exactly what the Judicial Workshop did this past
weekend.
Participating Faculty, students, and administrators struggled
to define the "jungle" of relationships that constitute our
University community. Their goal was to provide a basis for
an effective judicial system at Albany State.
The compelling need for something better than our present
system is evidenced by the rapid increase of crime on campus.
The system as it stands does not clearly state several
guidelines, including:
1) who may report a crime;
2) to whom a crime should be reported (i.e., a particular
judicial body or person):
Workshop
The Same Faces
An ASP Column
by John Fairhall
Ken Kurzweil rightfully called
the Judicial Workshop a success.
Much was discussed and prospects for an effective judicial
system appear good.
But let's highlight, for a moment, those who made the
Workshop a success. It was motivated by students, people such
as Ken Kurzweil, Ken Blaisdell,
Alan Ceppos, Barry Kirschner,
Michele Mazepa, Mario Arthur
and Sharon Stiller (with apologies to any unmentioned). Many
of those cited are members of
campus judicial bodies and it
was they who knew first-hand
the defects in our current judicial setup. Let's extend to them
our congratulations, then.
But please, please, do not call
the Workshop a student success.
For as so often seems the case
at Albany State, student action
is not collective but the result
of a few. The Workshop was
publicized and quite open, but
as usual, no one came but the
regulars. For those ignorant,
"the regulars" refers to that
tiny group that is already involved in student government.
The regulars had more than
themselves to talk to, though, as
the Workshop was attended by
a veritable Who's Who of the
Administration. Chesin, Connally, Brown, Williams, Thorne,
and even John Henighan participated. President Benezet himself addressed one meeting. So
at least "Thej " came.
Judging from the culiher of
the people involved, then, I do
not feel that the Workshop's
representation—or its mandate
to act for all of us— can be
questioned. This problem was
raised during the weekend, however, d u e to the underrepresentation of "rank-andfile" students and, most important, of minority group students.
Why they weren't there is a
moot question, but I do know
that the judicial system that
develops will affect them.
I won't indulge in any diatribe
on student apathy. But I do
believe that, when future "student" actions develop und are
discussed, the names of those
students really involved should
be made clear. This should not,
j n fortunately, involve more
than a few extra lines.
PROFESSIONAL TVPINQ SERVICE
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Oiy or EvtnlnJ
The Campus Cop
by Dick Blystone
Associated Press Writer
On some police forces, 64 year-oid Jim Eisenberg would be
called an anachronism. He doesn't like wearing a gun and would
rather walk than ride a patrol car.
On some police forces, 25-year-old Jim Davis would be called a
radical. He enjoys talking with young rebels on his beat, and he
keeps saying policemen should explain to people why they do
what they do.
In fact, both Sgt. James P. Eisenberg and Officer James W. Davis
combined something of the anachronistic and something of the
radical. They are campus cops — Eisenberg a 35-year veteran at
Cornell and Davis a two-year man at Berkeley. They have learned
to wear their ambiguities as easily as their uniforms.
Like their colleagues at colleges and universities across the
country, Davis and Eisenberg are both campus guides and
professional crime fighters, both friends to the students and
symbols of authority where authority is often heated.
It was not always so.
"It was like heaven to start out with," says Eisenberg, recalling
when as Cornell's only campus cop he patrolled on foot or
horseback.
"They were just a good bunch of mischievous kids, but they
were never trouble. It was fun.
"Oh, you might meet a guy peeking in a window, or some of
them would throw toilet paper out of the dorm windows...a little
bit of thievery and some noise calls. Sometimes one of thorn
would have one too many and I'd take him home or call some of
his fraternity brothers.
"I was issued a weapon, but I never carried it. 1 still won't unless
it's absolutely necessary."
In the old days when things got out of hand, Eisenberg drew on
his experience as a civilian Conservation Corps boxing coach.
When the dust had settled, "the next minute you were back
huddies again and having a few beers together."
Davis never knew such days. He carries a pistol and a can of
chemical Mace on his daytime patrol of Berkeley's Sproul Plaza,
which has witnessed its share of tear gas and flying rocks.
The weapons come up often in the conversations with young
people that are a major part of Davis' job. Where Eisenberg once
could employ a brotherly right hook, Davis has to exercise
diplomacy.
"They've got to understand that why I'm there is not to harass
them but to do a job," Davis explains.
The Berkeley campus recorded one rape, ) 2 robberies, 1 12
burglaries and 1,-!24 thefts in 1970 - despite ;i 10 per cent drop
in crimes. Its H7 sworn officers are about double the force
of
three years ago.
3) where, once reported, a case should be heard; and
-1) upon conviction, what punishment should follow, with
what particular avenues of appeal.
Several members of the workshop felt thai victims of crimes
are often intimidated into silence, and attributed this to a
lack of faith in the system. The frequent lack of prompt
action in handling crimes was also cited as encouraging
students to remain silent or bypass the campus system in
favor of the civil courts.
Workshop members reached general agreement as to the
jurisdiction of a campus system. It was felt that our
community has a right lo set standards for and judge the
behavior of its members. Concensus was not reached as to
what people and what geographic area make up our community, but it was agreed that a judicial system should deal with
all areas that are of "community interest." Jurisdiction
should extend to problems that occur between members of
different campus groups: students, faculty, administrators
and staff.
Other areas of agreement were:
—the need to use civil courts as little as possible
—the need for a community code of conduct
—the need to avoid duplication of the civil court system on
campus
—the right of the campus judicial system to hold hearings on
student cases already pending in civil court
The important work of the Workshop was its full exploration of the judicial problem on campus. Lively dialogue
produced as many innovative suggestions as there were points
of view. Certain ideas seemed to constantly crop up, though:
that a campus grand jury be instituted, that a full-time legal
advisor be hired, and that Security deal mainly with crimes
involving victims, not property-damage crimes.
All seemed to agree that the role of the campus "peace
officer" needs a new definition. However, there was considerable debate as to the type of investigative service required.
Debate also centered on the power that campus judicial
bodies should have, with many feeling that the- should be
empowered to summon any person necessarj In hear a
particular case.
Student-conduct records were discussed, one suggestion
being that they not be used in judging guilt but rather in
determining the sentences of convicted offenders.
Much remains to be decided upon, and this will be the
work of the Steering Committee. Workshop Chairman Ken
Kurzweil called the discussions a success, and they were, but
this does not belittle the responsibility that the Steering
Committee must exercise in upcoming weeks.
The committee numbers about thirteen persons, including
students, faculty, and administrators. Kurzweil hopes to see a
program developed and, in some degree, implemented, before
he graduades in June.
The committee has a great deal to work with because of this
last weekend, but seeks additional comment from all corners
of the campus. Any information and opinion can be
submitted lo the committee through Kurzweil.
Bringing Yon ilic liesi
CONTEMPORARY
MUSIC!...hiilerKiiiimcnl!... DANCING!
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Housing Picture
Improves
Senate Awaits
Budget Decision
by Peter J. Coughlin
by Joan L. Zuckerman
President Benezet reported to
the University Senate on Monday
that he is still "sweating it out" as
he waits to hear of the legislature's decision on the budget.
Rodney Hart. Director of Admissions, delivered a report on the
undergraduate admission situation
in which he pointed to an increase
in freshman applications for 1970.
He said that only a small number
of acceptance and rejection
notices have been sent out, and
that the rest will be sent after
they receive the complete results
of the Regents Scholarship Exam,
For the first time at Albany
State, the number of students in
the freshman class will not have to
be limited because of a lack of
housing space. According to a
letter from the Housing Office
that is being sent to the incoming
class of '75, "we are expecting to
open a new residence quadrangle
on our uptown campus and with
other vacancies, should not experience difficulty in accomodating
any undergraduate student desiring to live on campus."
As of January 29, the Processing
Center had received 11,631 applications for admission in September 1971. According to Rodney
Hart, the new Director of Admissions, 2400 new students are expected to be admitted. 1200 will
be freshman, 300 will be EOP
students, and 900 will be transfers. Since freshmen are no longer
required to live in University housing, not all of these students are
expected to apply for dormitory
rooms. With the 1100 new beds
that will be available with the
completion of Indian Quad, space
can be provided for 1600 new
on-campus students.
Twenty-four hundred new students will bring the Albany student body to 13,000. The campus
was originally designed to accommodate 10,000 students, and the
question is not whether there will
be enough living space, but how
much farther the faculty and academic facilities can be stretched.
Reporting on the SUNY Senate
m e e t i n g in Buffalo, Joseph
Norton told of ;i proposal for
"roving students." Under this
program students would take
courses throughout the SUNY
•ystem. Also discussed there was a
proposal concerning state wide
governance by students, faculty,
and administration.
An issue that provoked controversy centered around the rejection of transfer credit for ROTC
courses. Senator Kendall, ex
pressing particular concern, tried
to bring to the fore more complete details and finally seconded
a motion to hold discussion on
the issue at the next Senate meeting.
The Graduate Academic Council
reported that the recommended
Ph.D. programs in Library Science
and Anthropology have been
approved^-effeclive June 15,
1971. It was also noted that prelaw advisement is given on campus
by Robert Gibson, despite an
earlier statement that there was
no such service available.
Registration
Apathy?
BUFFALO AP
Erie County
election officials said Tuesday
they're disappointed thai so few
18 to 20-year-olds have registered
to vote.
They said that of the 150,000 in
that age bracket in the county,
only 3,000 have registered so far.
Election Commissioners James
R. Lawley and Edward J. Mahoney said in a statement:
"Quite frankly, we in the Board
of Elections have been disappointed at the lack of interest
on the part of 1H, 19 and
20-year-olds" lo register.
"Many reasons have been suggested lor this apathy," they said,
"but we feel that for the most
part the young people are disenchanted because of the fact that
the U.S. Supreme Court's decision
does not allow them to vote until
1972, which will be the first
federal election."
The Supreme Court approved
the lower voting age for federal
elections, but left it to each state
to fix the minimum age limit for
state and local elections.
In New York, voters will be
asked this fall whether they want
to approve a constitutional
amendment granting 18-year-olds
the right to vote in state und local
elections.
Discussion was varied concerning a proposed "Outstanding
Teocher's Award." The proposal
provided for a stipend of $2,000
each for the selected teachers. The
award was labeled as a necessary
incentive by one Senator, white
others questioned its claimed
effectiveness. Certain specific objections were raised including:
selection of committee members
who were nominated would be
entitled to choose their own successor; the awurd could be given
to the same individual for two
consecutive years; and no specific
qualifications for nominees were
listed. The bill was sent back to
the committee to be rewritten.
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The meeting ended with an
expression of sympathy concerning the death of Robert
Fairbanks, a late member of the
Graduate School of Public Affairs
at SUNYA.
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