SWEET DREAMS

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'SffmlilS.
TUESDAY, FEBRURAY 10,1970
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 12
'
mm i
7/1
NDC maps plans
for new semester
by Bob Warner
The New Democratic Coalition,
NDC, a liberal reform group,
which seeks to make America a
more democraticjust, and economically equitable nation met
Wednesday evening for the first
time this semester.
Pete Stockweather, a visiting
college student who is a member
of the state NDC, spoke to the
campus NCD group on whether or
not NDC students should have "a
youth caucus around the state, or
have youth represented on each
(state NCD0 committee." In effect, he was asking whether college students should integrate
themselves into the core of the
— anonymout
SWEET DREAMS
(CPS)--Almoat clandestinely,
secrets of spices herbs and culinary artistry have too long been
kept from dedicated connoisseurs.
For this reason, and also due to
tremendous reader request, we (in
our never-ending search for truth,
light, and the American way) present our first cooking page.
In order that this service should
achieve some degree of genius the
. magical, mystical kitchen has
sought out recipes par excellence
and: has revised and improved
them into masterpieces of Incredible proportion. All recipes have
beon kitchen-tested by scrutinizing gourmets.
Unfortunately, Madison Avenue
has not yet realized pot's full
potential in the kitchen and has
neglected to cleverly package and
market the stuff, in favor of such
substances as nicotine and alcohol.
When selecting your marijuana,
choose a relatively good cooking
grade grass-domestic is fine. Save
the imported dope for before and
after dinner joints.
The grass you use will not elicit
an exceptionally strong flavor to
the dish, but will make every
thing seem fantastic by the end of
the meal.
(One relatively unimportant
point-the quantities of weed called for In the recipes are fairly
arbitrary. Add more to suit taste.
The chef was, oddly enough,
smoking while cooking and not
paying exact attention to the
amounts used.)
This Thursday night at 7:00, in
room 325, Central Council will be
meeting specifically on revising
the Student Association Constitution. The new proposed Constitution calls for changes in the
areas of direct, popular, election
of
the
President
and
Vice-President of Central Council,
Student and Commission Representation, Student Courts, Imp e a c h m e n t and Recall, and
Amending Procedure. All interested students are urged by Ken
Stokem, chairman of the Constitutional Revisions Committee
to get off their "apathetic asses"
and make themselves heard at this
meeting.
With Regards to Alice B. Toklas
Brownies
1 cup shortening
4 I-ounce squares un-sweetened
chocolate
,
1 1 / 2 cup flour
1 Up. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
4 eggs
2 cups sugar
2 tsp. vanilla extract
2 cups coarsely cut walnuts
3/4 cup marijuana
Melt shortening and chocolate
together over hot water. Coal. Sift
flour with baking powder and salt.
Beat eggs until light; add sugar;
and blend; Add flour, vanilla and
nuts. Mix well. Pour batter into
waxed-paper-lincd 13x9 oblong
pan. Bak >in moderate oven (350
degrees) 30 to 35 minutes. Cool
and cut into squares.
Two tablespoons of grass mixed
well with any chocolate frosting
makes a topping that is nothing
short of phenomenal. Serve with
marijuana tea and burn incense.
Dig it.
Enjoy it.
Oh, and one word of caution.
Even though your kitchen win
dow faces east and lets in all the
glorius sunlight, it might be wisest
to draw the curtain. Some people
don't appreciate the finer things
of life.
The ASP will print additional
recipes as space allows and interest demands.
NOTICE
Chinese New Yeur Dance February 13, 1970. For the first time in
the history of this University, we are going to have a Chinese New
Year Dinner Dance at Brubacher Kail. Chinese cuisine will be served in
authentic Oriental setting. We promise you a delightful evening of
entertainment. Tickets will be sold in the Campus Center, starting
Feb. 11, 1970.
Reservations can also be made with James Wong I31-3H08, or
Marshall Toplansky 457-7935, Tickets are $2.1)0 per person witli lax
$2.50 without.
c°
On March 11, 1970, Forum of
Politics will present Mr. Art Buchwald speaking on: "The Establishment is Alive and Well in Washington."
We're the different
Abu Tabul (drummer)
Oil. (he dingy routine of burgers,
shakes,
and
ordinary
foods! Listen lo something different: Kul'ta, Beet Kebab, l'ilaf. Chicken Gtiffa, and Persian
Snow. Real foods from the Middle East. A touch of Baghdad.
Prepared by Farid, one of the
most famous names in Baghdad
culinary magic. Now he's just a
Walt's
SUBMARINES
short camel's drive from
the
campus on Central Avenue-just
past Route 155. Look for the
Call IV 9 - 2 * 2 7
or IV 2-022S
J
big
Kebob
sign
that
says
"Salim's". Indeed, we are the
FREE
DELIVERY
different Abu Tabul. Come and
enjoy our difference.
Salmi
(Throe Subs Minimum!
Mon-Sat.
8 pm 1 am
Sun & Other Special
Days 4 pm- 1 am
A Little
Farid's
Bit
our
bab's our
of
chef
Baghdadand
Music:
SINGERS WANTED!
for
Choral
Ke-
W
*tc
works,
Broadway
Rehearsals:
show
tunes,
folk
Sunday afternoons, 3:00-5:00
to 405 Washington Avenue, Albany
TORCH '70
SUGAR
Vol
IVII no.
hU JV
" • • IVII
State Unioenity of New York at Albany
songs
Take SUNY bus
from Draper Hall)
I n f o r m a t i o n : Call Mr. C a r r u t h e r s GR4-5917 8:30-5:00 wookdayH
463-1563
Friday,
Evenings
:
W
-*»
FebhmffSTWiO
SA to subsidize
« Draft Counseling
by Dave Peck
Students at Albany State will soon be able to avail themselves of draft
counseling on campus. Central Council passed a bill on January 8,
which provides $30 to be used to set up a draft counseling library in the
Student Association office, Within a few weeks there will also be a
counselor available at all times.
The bill was introduced by Dave Neufeld, head of the Political and
Social Positions Committee. A bookshelf with limited materials has
already been set up in the Student Association office and more books
are expected shortly. Some of the booklets are for free and some for a
slight charge. Neufeld emphasizes that if a student can't afford the
material he can have it for what ever he can afford, or for free.
VICTOR K. LOOPER, VICE-PRESIDENT of Student Aaocbtion, bean down on some organizations while
lavishing others with honey in his "Budget Philosophy for 1970-71," recently introduced in Central
Council.
-polskowski
The Albany Peace Center, along with PSP, plans to train the draft
counselors. Anyone who would like to become a counselor should
come to CC 346 at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, February 17 for a short meeting
explaining the type of training one has to go through to become a draft
counselor. Those who can't attend should call 7-8756.
Crime on campus up 100%;
Security force still only 31 men
Draft counseling is not draft evasion or resistance. A Counselor will
tell a student his options and his alternatives. He willnot tell a student
what to do and will not make any decisions for the student. Neufeld
feels that it is important not to
by
Senia
bv Al
AfSenia
J
**
Incidents of crime on campus
have .skyrocketed more than one
hundred percent In the past year,
according to James Connally,
chief of the SUNYA security
force. And the critical situation is
not apt lo improve as them »re no
plans to hire additional men.
This gloomy picture is the end
result of a variety of causes. Although the amount of persons and
property protected by security
has increased over the past year,
the number of patrolmen has
stayed the same- thirty one
(grouped into three shifts).
Unbelievably, there is but one
investigator. He is responsible for
the follow-up work on EVERY
CASE. Since most arrests are the
result of lengthy investigation,
there is an obvious problem.
All requests for increases have
been systematically turned down.
Furthermore, priority is placed
on keeping police at "fixed
posts," which they cannot leave.
Thus the responsibility for virtually all police patrolling falls on
the two patrol units. And a great
deal of THEIR time is occupied
by tasks such as transporting ill
*"
students to the infirmary or hospital. Last year, 730 such calls
were made. Each response ties up
one of the cars (half of the patrolling force) for at least thirty minutes. Attempts to £et a third
marked patrolling car or hire a
Connally also cited a dire need
for supervisors in each platoon to
assure cooperation and coordinate efforts.
These requests, like the others,
are annually turned down by the
Bureau of the Budget.
And how does this bureaucratic
red tape effect the student? In
January of 1969, there were 21
thefts. Last January, there were
41. Criminal mischief cases increased 60%. And burgularies
doubled. Yet, in typical AliceIn-Wonderland fashion, during
peak crime hours only seven to
eight officers are on duty. One
policeman each is stationed in the
lecture complex (usually a private
Burns guard), at the desk in security, at the library, fine arts center, as a watchman, and in the two
cars. To put it simply, I here are
scarcely enough bodies to fill the
posts.
What can he clone to reverse the
situation? As a start, the funds
used to hire private guards should
be diverted to the campus security
force. SUNYA police are generally
younger «ud are better acquainted
with campus problems.
Secondly, mobility should be
emphasized; patrolmen at "fixed
posts" should be allowed to patrol
even though certain people who
demand extra protection may become upset.
But the real solution lies with
the student himself. As a start,
Chief Connally would like
SUNYA students to realize the
police are present to "perform a
service instead of being viewed as
unnecessary interference with students." Ultimately, that IS the
answer, for we must realize it is in
our interest to demand a stop to
the sacrificing of security needs.
The situation is reaching crisis
p r o p o r t i o n s . Past experience
shows that a concerned student
body is the way to cut through
administrative indifference.
State moves
on Blaine
Amendment
wait until the last moment for
draft counseling but to get it before you register. It ia also important that RA's sould have some
knowledge about draft counseling.
In the past SUNYA stunVnts
who wanted advice on the draft
by Barry Kirschner
could go to the Albany Peace CenMovement has been taken in the
State
ter or speak to a faculty member
Legislature to repeal the
•
, Pi
,
'Blaine Amendment." which bans
who was a draft counselor. „
" \7. ' , e
, ,
Lhe use of public funds for schools
SUNYA as an institution doesn't w i t h r e | j g i o u s affiliations, in one
have any draft counseling for its of the first significant votes of this
students. However, the college session. The Senate voted 41-15
does have a very large Placement (14 of 16 dissenting votes coming
nrp:„„
*u ..„u which
u- u >II ,try ,to from
with
Office
. . . . Senators
, ^., constituencies
.. .
x,
v
find youthough,
a job and evenwill
a place in
within New York City) in favor of
the armed forces, when you grad- repeal.
uate. The Library only has four
In order to do away with the
books on the draft. The Book- Blaine provision, an amendment
to
the New York State Constitustore has a few books on the draft
but at a higher price than the Stu- tion is needed. Amending the constitution is needed. Amending the
dent Association. There is litera- constitution necessitates legislature available in CC 346. Those
who want counseling should call
-i
.i •
.
n .),.,,,
7-3430 and leave their name and
nunlber
-
specialty.
New Inter-College Mixed Chorus
Please Keep Your
1st Semester
Tax Card For
I llMIUNIVMIltrWNIWrOMATAlUNY
Buchwald
to appear
Also, students should contact
their Central Council Representatives from their living areas and
commission or the following
members of Constitutional Revisions Committee: Terry Wilbert,
Corky Thompson, Dick Wesley,
Bob Iseman, Bob Sichel, Cherie
Pach, Bev Cooper, Norm Rich,
Dave Neufeld, Carol Tibbets, Sue
Levey, Mike Avon, Doug Goldschmidt, or Ken Stokem.
haruey toallbangcr
.*
&
NOTICE
of Albany County NDC, considei
us a substantial part of the membership. As of last year, we were
one-third of the membership."
The remainder of the meeting
was taken up with announcements
and assignments for various projects. On Feb. 19, Eugene Nickerson, Nassau County Executive,
will speak on campus.
Four assemblymen will hold an
open hearing on the legalization
of marijuana, abortion reform,
and the education budget. On
Feb. 24, Steve Villano stressed
that everyone is encouraged to
attend these two meetings regardless of his political persuation.
Feb. 10 through 17 is Welfare
Rights Week. On the 17th, a
demonstration will be held in
front of the State Capitol
Proposed Constitution
eliminates Greek vote
by Kathy Huseman
Reform of the present Student
voting members on Council. The
Association Constitution was the revised Constitution calls for two
subject of discussion at last night's n o n - v o t ing Panhellenic repreCentral Council meeting.
sentatives.
The new constitution will be
Only one of the many Council
present to the student body in a members who are Greeks voted
referendum to be held March 23, for the continuation of the pre24, and 25.
sent policy.
One of the largest issues proIt was generally felt that
vided for in the new proposal is changes were being attempted to
for the elimination of com* make Council more democratic.
mission-appointed members on The retention of special seats for
Council. By this mrasure, all stu- interest groups was thought to be
dents on Central Council would in violation of this aim.
be elected by the membership of
The second installment of the
Student Association.
Constitutional Revision meeting!
Two Council members would of Central Council will take place
also be appointed to each Com- next week. And the continuing
mission.
saifa of long-winded trivia arguUnder the present Constitu- ments will reoccur when Council JOHN REILLY OF THE ENGLISH department mikes a point i t tart
tion, Panhellenic Council has two reconvenes.
Tuesday's Senute meeting. See editorial comment.
—poUkowski
tion passed by two separately
elected bodies plus approval of
statewide referendum.
Should the repeal be effected, it
. . .
.. r . . .,
. .
would give the state the go-ahead
to subsidize parochial schools.
State appropriations to religiously
affiliated schools can also be seen
at a subsidy for parents seeking to
avoid sending their children to an
Integrated school system.
The state's decision-makers will
be facing significant problems in
the upcoming weeks(before legislators vacate Albany to reacquaint
themselves with their constituencies.) Legislation concerning education, drugs, and abortion reform
are among the most imporlent to
be debated in the Capital.
Being an election year, New
York State politics will feature an
exceptional amount of mud
slinging. Governor Rockefeller
who made his economy pitch last
year (5% across the board cuts),
may be seriously hurting in November, especially with commuters on the subways and Long
Island Rail Road.
Although educators, welfare recipients, commuters, and the
cities have been crying out for
more state aid, the governor and
Republican legislative leaders have
promised no new taxes for this
year. Democratic leaders have deContiiiued on page 3
v o t e r s in a
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1970
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PACE'
Judaic Studies
program offered
Howard Picker will continue his
weekly sessions of "A Modern Inquiry into Bible" every Wednesday in HU 115 at H:;iOp.m.
" N e w Trends om Kewosj
Thought" will be discussed every
Thursday night from 7:30-8:30 in
HU 115. Mr. Leonard Rosenthal,
educator and lawyer, will lead an
exploration of modern Jewish
theology and philosophy; the difference between the Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox branches
of Judaism: the relationship between the Jew and Israel; Recon-
A general meeting will be held
on Sunday Feb. 15, at 5 p.m. in
the Patroon Lounge (1st floor) for
all interested people to meet with
the professors of the program,
who will further discuss their
courses and the programs itself.
For further information contact
Amy Kaplan 457-8817 or Hilary
Warner.
DIALOGUE, a series of informal coffee hours for faculty and
students, will be held on Tuesdays
from 9:00 a.m. -10:30 a.m. in the
Campus Center Patroon Lounge.
The first DIALOGUE will be held
on February 10, 1970. Alt stu
udents and faculty are encouraged
to attend an participate in these
informal sessions.
The New Democratic Coalition
will meet on Monday Feb. 16 at
8:00 p.m. in CC 316. Endorsement of candidates will be discussed.
There will be an informational
meeting on Wed. Feb. 18 at 7:30
in the Assembly Hall for all those
interested in spending a summer
abroad, living with a family
through the Experiment in International Living-not a study program.
Those who are interested in becoming draft counselors should attend a short meeting Tuesday
February 17 in CC 346 at 3 p.m.
Those who are interested but can
not attend should call Dave Neufeld at 7-8756.
Eugene Nickerson will appear
on campus Thursday February 19.
Following a brief speech will be a
question-answer session. 8:00
p.m. CC Ballroom.
The Church of the University
Community holds worship services each Sunday at 7:00 p.m.
in the Campus Center.
Ex-Peace Corps Volunteer
Wanted for Part-time Recruiting
Work at SUNYA.
Please contact: International
Student Office, Campus Center
332; phone 457-8383.
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 1965 SAAI1 2 dr.
Sedan Radio and Heater, 2
mounted snows and reg. tires—
31.(WOmites Excellent condition
starts easily at all times Call
457:I9DB.
For sale: Hacon Banjo, Used,
Good condition $H5. Call Gait
7-'l72li
Portable typewriter. Smith Corona. Old. lilllc used. $'j:i-catl llel
•27,76 after Ip.m.
ForSale Sil Hoots Size 7 $15,111)
Call Jackie 457-7X92
4 monkeys for rent, all kinds of
tricks. ,182-1111
PERSONALS
Nice is nice. Miss you all. WRITE
SOON. Love, Judy
LOST * FOUND
Lost: Man's Brown Corduroy
llushcoat- Inlerscssion Dippikitl.
Call Barbara 7-17(1(1.
Left gold locket in girl's gym
locker
several weeks ago-lf
found,
please call Michele
•157-1759.
EMPLOYMENT
Drummer and Lead Guitarist
looking for other rock musicians
and lead singer to form group for
immediate and summer work.
Call 457-49H:l. Ask for Richard
or Brian.
F«CUS
ON THE
Justice
Gerry
For
Wagnci
STUDENTS!! Part-time work
15-20 hrs. $3.15 per hr. Car
Needed. Call 869-6437 4-6 for
interview appointment. Scholarsh ip aid available. Call Weekdays.
Group for hire. Available for
mixers, beer parties, etc. Call
John at 465-1203.
CO GO GIRLS needed by
Agency to dance on weekends in
area nite-chtbs (week-nites too, if
you're available) Experience is
NOT required, dependability is.
You make top money but never
pay us a fee! For a chance to
crack Show Bus. phone TEMPCO 8H9-7777
MARTHA'S VINEYARD summer 1970 Student EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES. Hundreds of jobs! Detailed descriptions including restaurants,
hotels, shops. SEND $2.0(1. APPLIED
RESEARCH
ASSOCIATES, Depl. 25, PO BOX
3903, New Haven, Conn. 06525.
GOT A DATE FOR DINNER ?
THIS
SUMMER
Take her to the Patroon Room
in the Campus Center
Theatre, tennis and riding facilities are on
campus as well as modern residence
halls for men and women.
special this week— lamb chops $ 3.50
including soup, salad, rolls & beverage
UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Pre Professional,
Pre Engineering. Business and Education.
steak for two $8.00
GRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS in the School of
Education, Arts and Sciences, Palmer Graduate Library
School, Arthur T. Roth School of Business Administration.
-And m a n y o t h e r w o n d e r f u l
at d a t e p r i c e s
entrees
Dinner served 5:30 to 8:00 P.M.
For reservations call 457 4833
Art and Theatre Workshops
Apply now for TWO 5-WEIK SUMMER SESC INS
ATTENTION CLASS OF
JUNE 22 JULY 24 and JUIY 27 AUGUST 28—Day and Evening
Visiting students from accredited colleges welcome.
C.W. POST CENTER
LONG ISLAND UNIVERSITY
For additional information, summer bulletin and application
Phone 1516) 299-2431 or mail coupon
Summer Session OHico, C. W. Post Center
P.O. Greenvale, L.I., N.V. 1151a
Pleaca tend mi: Summer Sessions information bulletin.
[ ] Undergraduate I ] Graduate U Day I ] Evening
Address
Clly
Slate
If visiting student, from which college?
Zip
70, 71, 72, 73
DEADLINE for
applications for
c p
Name
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
Interact breaks down barriers
between faculty and students
graffiti
The Judaic Studies program, ini- structionism; and the modern
tiated in the fall of 1969 will con- thinkers, Buber and Kaplan.
tinue during the spring semester,
A special once a month lecture
with the addition of three difon the "Roots of the Middle Eastferent course offerings.
The four courses now offered ern Conflict" will be given by Mr.
are given on an informal, non- Zvi Abbo, in HU 137. Mr. Abbo is
accredited basis, and are designed an Israeli lawyer and educator,
to promote greater knowledge, Who is presently an instructor of
discussion, and understanding of the Hebrew language at SUNY.
Jewish history, culture, and philo- The lectures will be given on the
last Monday evening of every
sophy.
month at 8:00 starting Feb. 23.
The courses will begin the week
of Feb. 16, and are open to all
interested students and faculty.
On alternating Tuesdays, in HU
115, at 8:00 (beginning Feb. 17)
Prof. Bernard Johnpoll, SUNY
professor of Political Science, will
conduct an exploration of the
role of Jews in revolutionary
thought and action. The course
Jews and Revolution" will encompass a discussion of such men
as Marx, Garrison, Trotsky and
Stalin, their effect upon the Jews,
and their relation to Jewish
thought.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13.1970
class officers
Alumni Board
MYSKANIA
TODAY
A VAILABLE
at 5 pm
AT CC INFO DESK
TURN IN AT CC 346 SA OFFICE
The following positions are currently open for student representations on University Senate
Councils and Committees:
-Educational Policies Council (3
vacancies)
'
-Research Council (1)
•Library Council (1)
-Academic Standing Committee
(1)
-University Governance
There are also positions
available for students on two administrative committees:
-Equal Employment Committee^)
-Space Management Committee^)
Within Student Association,
there are vacant positions for one
sophomore and two juniors on the
Athletic Advisory Board.
For further information on any
of these committees, please contact Terry Mathias in Campus
Center 346, 457-3430.
A p p l i c a t i o n s available for
Myskania, Alumni board, and
Class Officers at CC Information
Desk, are due in CC 346 (Student
Association Office) by 5 p.m.
Friday, February 13.
Qualifications:Myskania- Junior
Status, 2.0 cumulative average;
Alumni Board, Class Officers-2.0
cumulative average, class dues
paid.
All students interested in the
free University of Judaic Studies
are invited to attend an informal
meeting on Sunday, Feb. 15, at
5:00 in the CC Patroon Lounge,
to meet with the professors and to
become acquainted with the program. Refreshments will be
served.
Relevancy, if that's what you
want, we've got it!
The STUDENTS FOR COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Is
looking for volunteers to work in
the capacity of recreation leaders,
skill-instructors or tutors, drivers,
clerical workers, etc. in such
places as Albany Boys Club, St.
Peter's Hospital, American Cancer
Society and more.
No experience necessary.
Contact Mark -157-79-10 for
more information.
TYPISTS NEEDED
Wanted: 2 excellent typists to
type for various Student Associa
tion Publications. Salary $2/hour.
Pick up further information and
applications in CC 346.
WOULD YOU
LIKE TO START
YOUR OWN
CHURCH?
We will furnish yon with a
Church Charter ami ) m can
start your own church. I leadquarters ol' UNIVERSAL 1.111CHURCH will keep recoids ol
your church and file with the
federal government and furnish
you with a tax-exempt status
all you have In do is report your
activities lo headquarters four
limes a year. Enclose u liee will
offering.
Universal
Life Church
BOX 6575
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA
33021
by Sharon Philipson
Chancellor UOUM names Minor U M | ooMecnnum at a tmamm w
the State University Committee to research the goals and future of the
State University system.
... hochberg
You say you're unhappy. Why?
Why are you here? Why are you
playing a role which you do not
like? You're lost in a world of
concrete and glass. What can you
do about it? Interact!
Loneliness is sad. Life is uncertain. People are apathetic.
Faces. Strange faces. We sec them
every day. Would you really be
happier any place else ? Smile! Be
happy! It'll make you feel a lot
better.
So you've just failed three exams. So you don't get along with
your roommate. Go out! Explore!
Communicate! Don't be afraid!
Love, you may ask yourself, will
I ever find it? Will I ever know the
companionship, the affection of
someone who accepts me for what
I am and who enjoys being with
me? Friend, go out and find it.
What's holding you bach?
Albany student to study future
of State University system
by Vicki Zelden
Doug Goldschmidt, an undergraduate at the University and a
member of the University Senate,
has been namtd by Chancellor
Samuel B. Gould to a panel to
research the goals and future of
the entire State University system.
Chancellor Gould announced
the establishment of the "Panel
on University Purposes" to look
into the University's aims and objectives and discuss specific topics
affecting its future, such as the
much debated open admissions
proposal.
Goldschmidt, a senior political
science major from Elmont, L.I.,
is a member of the national debate club honorary TKADSR, and
has been actively involved in the
student-faculty committee planning a new General College.
The Chancellor's panel consists
of some 50 members, including
community leaders, legislators,
educators and six students, each
from different state university
campuses. Goldschmidt, a temporary member of the panel itself,
is a member of the committee
doing research on universities'
trends and changes in all areas.
The information gathered by this
group is then submitted to the
panel for discussion and and
analysis.
The task of the panel has been
divided into six general areas.
"The Changing Educational Mandate" Is one. Its goal is to realize
and project what high school level
achievement students entering the
University will have. And, with
this projection, be able to forsee
what courses will be needed at the
college level in the future.
"The Students and the University" is an area that will consider
the University's responsibilities to
the student as well as to his parents. This division will also attempt to define student responsibilities and rights.
" T h e University's Role in
Society" is a topic dealing with
the questions of what responsibilities does the University have to
the society, and how much of a
role should the society play in
shaping the University.
There then is the topic entitled
"The Advancement of Knowledge" which just might be daring
enough to analyze teaching techniques. This topic also includes
questions on research and its ultimate effects on the University and
society.
The major goal of the Chan
cellor's "Panel on University Purpose" seems to be that of pro
jection. Projection so that the
University can be and will be in
the years to come "all that it
should be." It is an attempt at
anticipation rather than waiting
for that which could be anticipated to come unexpectedly.
Blaine
Amendment
Continued from page I
monstrated a willingness to increase spending but being out of
power, this is pure rhetoric.
Should the Republicans wish to
maintain their dominance in each
house of the legislature as well as
the governor's office, it would be
to their advantage to change a
status quo many are disgusted
with.
"The Prospects of Support" is
an area concerned with finding
out where and how aid will come
in the future. It is also involved in
discovering how University actions may or may not affect the
supply of aid.
guys 75<t
9 pm • dawn
girls 25$
wear a toga and get in free
.
Forget the Pot,Baby;
We've Got the Kufta
And we've got the Pilaf, and
Beef Kebob. And Persian Snow.
The real thing. Our cook was
the shiek of chefs when he was
sowing his wild Kibbee back in
Baghdad. Now he's only a short
SALE
camel's drive from the campus
Save 20% to 50% on
•
•
•
o
•
A table will be set up in the
lobby of the Campus Center with
petitions urging University reversal of the decision denying
Wagner term renewal. Individuals
soliciting signatures will also be
expected to "tell people what is
happening," and to further gain
support for student action.
MID-WINTER CLEARANCE
Dress Bells
• Sweaters
Vinyl and Corduroy Jackets
Finest in Fake Furs for Him and Her
Bush Jackets
• Midi Coats
Suede Vests
o Etc., Etc., Etc.
on Central Avenue-- just past
Route 155. Look for the big
Kebob sign that says "Salim's".
We're a different
(drummer).
Abu Tabul
Real
different.
Come and help fill a needy
face--yours. You'll love it.
YOU'LL LIKE WHAT YOU SEE
DAILY
Feb. 14th
A significant debate developed
over whether students should act
for Wagner as an individual case,
or as part of a larger issue. Concern was voiced that the situation
reflected a dangerous pattern of
disregarding student opinion making University decisions.
Unisex Clothes
Dutch Quad Flagroom
Sat.
by Carol Hughes
Information was deemed the
"Save Gerry Wagner" the signs most pressing problem. "Rumors
read, and on Tuesday afternoon, spread faster than real problems,"
some 50 'friends of Gerry' met for one student complained.
that purpose. Wagner's personal
position was explained, and sevAn open meeting will be held
eral suggestions for student action
initiated at the session. Wagner Thursday evening in the Lecture
has not been given term renewal, Center for further planning and to
and expects to take legal action to hopefully broaden student support. Advertising in the ASP and
have this decision reversed.
on WSUA will be utilized to
"spread the word."
(Shajitrr VII
BIOLOGY CLUB PROGRAMS
ROMAN WINE & CHEESE ORGY
The writing on the wall
'Save Gerry Wagner'
Similiarities between Wagner's
denial of term renewal, the situation of Waterman and Rhodes
last year, and the present difficulty faced by Tucker in the History Department also were discussed.
The last topic of study, entitled
"Structure and Governance" is involved in discovering what the
best form of University administration is. It is an attempt
Lo discover what roles in policy
formulation should be assigned to
students, faculty, administrators,
and community groups.
February 1 9 - D R . A R T H U R O. L O N G : Aspects of General A i r
Pollution: Slides
February 2G D A N I E L M C K I N L E Y : Thq History of Nature Hating
March 5 JOE O ' C O N N O R : The B i o l o g y of Thermal Loading in Aquatic Syslems (Thermal Pollution)
March 1 2 - D A R Y L W I N T E R : D D T
March 19- DR. D O N A L D M C N A U G H T : Studios at Cranberry Lake
Biology Field Station
A p r i l 16 DR. M I C H A E L R O S E N S W E I G : What Happens When Populations Gel T o o Dense?
A p r i l 2 J DR. M I C H A E L R O S E N S W E I G : Controlling Population Size
A p r i l 30 M O V I E : Assault on L i f e , aspects concerning advances In
science
Others to bo announced
T i m e : 8:30 p.m.
P L A C E : Biology 218
Are you content to go from one to him, ask him questions, What
class to another, to study, to eat makes you happy, sad? What are
and to steep? There is so much you afraid of? What do you want
more to life than this. Get out and most out of life?
The next step was for each pair
discover the vast world which
exists beyond the limits of this to find another pair. Each memuniversity. Interact! It's a pleasant ber of the quartet then talked
about what he was most ashamed
experience.
Lie down, close your eyes, of and most proud of. Then two
relax. Now stand up and with quartets got together. In this
your eyes still closed, feel your group of eight came the ultimate
way around the room. Look for a interaction. What all the varied
partner. Communicate. These in- discussion boiled down to was the
structions were given to all those conclusion that there was a need
who attended the Interact- a time for increased communication and
when, with trained group leaders, interaction.
The event concluded with a few
people in the University can interact with one another in a positive exercises which tested one's trust
manner. Why Interact? "Because of the friends one had made.
everyone in the University Com- Finally everyone was given the opmunity has asked- demanded that portunity to say or do anything
people listened, talk, interact in he felt like saying or doing.
This innovative, novel approach
order that learning be vital, viable,
and relevant." This was the pur- is a means by which one can break
pose as stated by the formulating down the barriers between faculty
and faculty, student and student,
committee of Interact.
Those students faculty, and ad- and student and faculty. It was
ministrators that attended Inter- developed in a world where closer
act were subject to an almost communication between people is
mystical process of mingling. The needed. There is something about
idea was to interact, first with the Interacts which might bring about
group as a whole. Then each per- a better University, perhaps even a
son was to find a partner and talk better world.
10:00-6:00
Thurs.-Fri. 'til 9:00
Scdm'i
Chapter 7
Chapter 7 ^ _ ^ _
Chapter 7 """
Plaia Saven
Shopping Cantar
Naxt to Jamaica Inn
Schanactady Road
Latham, Naw York 12110
A
Little
Farid's
Bit
our
bob 's our
of
chef
Baghdadand
specialty.
Ke-
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1970
ALF ANY STUDENT PRESS
PACE 4
Ala-ed-din Auditions
Orestes' Unveiled
Steve Sullivan, and Rae Ann Cranrjr.ll.
Acceptance at the March 20-22
Yale Drama Festival is a welldeserved accolade for Experimental Theatre, which has, under
the direction of James M.
Leonard, of the Theatre faculty,
offered State University a full and
diversified program of theatre this
year through the Friday Night
Series in the Arena Theatre of the
PAC, and through its General
Theatre Workshop under James
Leonard and its Acting Workshop
under Joseph Balifior.
Experimental Theatre's Friday
Night Series began this semester
with an original play by Ste\e Sullivan last week, THE LAST BUFFALO, and continues next week,
February 20, with REX, a musical
ORESTES, State University
parody of the Oedipus legend
Theatre's third major production,
from Jo'in Barth's GILES GOAT
is entering the final stages of reBOY.
hearsal for its Wednesday evening
Directed by William Doscher,
through Sunday afternoon, February 25-March 1, presentation in REX will be produced with
original music composed by Hon
Blues singer JOHNNY WINTER will appear here in concert on Friday, Feb. 2 1 . Tickets go on sale in the the Main Theatre of the PAC
A symposium on the place of Abel.
Campus Center on Feb. 16.
classical Greek tragedy in the
"Now Generation" is being sponsored jointly by the Departments
or Theatre and Classics for February 26 and 27, in conjunction
by Linda Waters
with the production of ORES"Whatever
happened to the old
TES. Renowned New York the"
Coffee House Circuit in the CamBlues singer Johnny Winter will
Since then he has given SRO a group called Robbie and The tre artists as well as ir -•appear in concert at the Univer- concerts at the Fillmore East, the Troubadors. And Mike Bloom- nationally famous classics scho- pus Center?" No doubt a number
sity gymnasium on Friday, Feb- Fillmore West, the Scene and the field. Mike had a club called the lars will participate in the sym- of people have been wondering
ruary 21. Doors open at H:00 p.m. Boston Music Hall; been hailed by Fickle Pickle on State Street. He posium, c o n t r i b u t i n g their about its sudden disappearance.
Seven years ago, Johnny Winter the New York Times as "a charis- booked in people that nobody theories and opintions on modern Let me alleviate all worry. The
came to Chicago from Beaumont, matic performer" and "a fountain else would touch. As a result he productions of classical tragedy. Coffee House Circuit we all know
Texas, and Lamar Technical Col- of vintage blues;" and been ac- wasn't making any money.
The symposium has attracted is dead- but it will soon be replaced by what promises to be an
lege, where he had spent part of claimed by Si one whose first arI walked up and started blowing nationwide interest, and will be
one semester majoring in business ticle brought him to national at- my harp (harmonica.) I didn't attended by theatre and classics even better system.
The original Circuit was actually
and the rest driving or hitching' t e n t i o n , a s ' ' a h u n- know anybody to talk to, so I scholars from all state. The State
fifty miles to Louisiana, where he dred-and-thirty-pound cross-eyed figured if I started playing, some- University Theatre production of a national organization, with the
performed in small clubs on week- albino with long fleecy hair play- body would come up and talk to Euripides' ORESTES, directed by main office located in New York
ends.
Dr. Albert Weiner, will serve as City. The Campus Center Governing some of the gutsiest fluid me."
ing Board paid dues and was in
blues guitar you have ever heard."
For six years, between playing the focal point of the symposium.
Tickets for ORESTES went on turn given membership, which
Winter has been into music as the Fickle Pickle in Chicago and
provided for one new show per
long as he can remember. "Soon the Fillmore in New York, Winter sale this week, and are now availweek. T h e performers were
as I could walk and talk, I was traveled throughout the South able in the PAC box office.
housed on the campus and gave
singing and playing, My dad al- with a large entertaining group. Tickets may be reserved by calling
two shows per night for the week
ways encouraged my kid brother "We traveled with kids, wives, 457-8606, or in person. Box office hours are 10 a.m. to -1 p.m. they were here. This worked for
baby
cribs,
everything.
It
was
like
Edgar
and
me.
When
I
was
eight,
Call IV 9 - 2 * 2 7
the first few months since it was
Dad taught me the ukelele. I n gypsy caravan, and it was getting and admission is $2.00, or free
inexpensive and relatively simple.
learned the guitar when my hands to be too much blues. Whatever with student tax.
• r l V 2-0228
However, the nature of the
was happening musically at the
got bigger."
organization soon changed so that
# *** *
Soon after his arrival in Chicago, time, we played it. Soul, whatever
The Experimental Theatre of the costs went up and the comWinter recalls, "I didn't know it at the drunks wanted to hear. Anyplexity increased. Unfortunately,
the time, but I played with Barry thing but the blues. I'd sneak one State University has been invited
to produce a play for the Yale the quality and temperament of
Goldberg. He was an organist with in every so often."
the performers did not improve
Winter says that he's "really Drama Festival this year. Douglas
(Three Subs Minimum)
accordingly. Therefore, we withgassed to find people digging Wager, a theatre major from Coxdrew from the circuit.
Mon-Sat.
blues" today. For those who in- sackie, will be directing PARAHouse of Wong
deed "dig" Winter's sounu, tickets NOIA BLUES, a series of enactA new and better circuit is now
Dsc-Americdn Restau
8 pm 1 am
orders to take out
will go on sale Monday, February ments of the cartoons of Jules being formed. Beginning in March,
Feiffer.
The
cast
includes
Jay
223 Central Ave.
Sun & Other Special
16 in the Campus Center. The
student and area talent will be or462-2236
price is $2.50 with student tax Kuperman, Marilyn Liberati, Bar- ganized into a series which will be
Days.4 pm- 1 am
bara
Richards,
William
Doscher,
and $4.00 without.
held on Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday nights in the Campus
"nr/J* A H , A7J.AW S T A T I "
T.IWG 1 1 7 0 PWlfiEAM SCHEDULE
EVERY NIGHT DEGINNINfi AT
Center Cafeteria. This will not
PPOUTS BROADCAST LIVE
rtPM, CAMl'KS AND WORLD .MEWS
only cut expenses, but, as many
OK YOim CAHi'l-S R / I D I C
ON THE 1101'R, COMPLETE WFHJA
students agree, also provide a
ST ATT 01:
wider range of talent, of a better
SPORTS ON THE HALF-HOUR
quality than was given towards
the end of the first Circuit.
TUESDAY
WIDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
TIf'F.
MONDAY
SATURDAY"
SUNDAY
Auditions for State University
Theatre's fourth major production
of the season, ALA-ED-DIN will
be held in the Laboratory Theatre
of the Performing Arts Center,
this coming Sunday through Tuesday evenings February 15-17, at 8
p.m.
ALA-ED-DIN is an original
children's play by Patricia B.
Snyder, ALA-ED-DIN is based on
the popular Mid-East legend of Alladin and his adventures with the
Caliph and the evil magician.
ALA-ED-DIN features a large cast
of characters including dancers,
and is scheduled for production in
the Laboratory Theatre April
15-19.
Contemporary Music Schedules
Johnny Winter Concert Feb. 21
Coffee House
To Perk Soon
Waif's
SUBMARINES
FREE
DELIVERY
QUSOl^
6:00an
7: CO
8:C0
9:C0
10:00
11:00
12:C0n
l:C0pm
2:00
3;00
4:C0
5: CO
6:C0
7:C0
B:C0
9:C0
10:00
11)00
12:00m
l:C0am
2:00
. AT,
; ALl'ERN
JASON
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I
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MIICT?
SAKELLARIHES
MARC
ROSENBERG
"Sakellarides
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BENNETT
DIANE
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PAGES
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1970
'Topaz* Shows Hitch's Hand;
'Counles' Doesn't Make It
shot as most directors would, or spend its remaining years a*
second feature late show. The film
by Michael Nolan and Diana Dalley even in two as some of the more
imaginative ones would, but cuts is really quite laughable mostly
TOPAZ, based on Leon Una'
due to inept acting and terribly
novel of the same name, is Alfred four times ending with an abtrite dialog. The plot Is, of course,
Hitchcock's first film in some solutely superb overhead shot of
about wife swapping and contains
time. The critical acclaim the film her dead body. This is almost as if
such gems as , "On the other side
achieved must have been doubly he were subliminally flashing a
of town there is a group that realsatisfying to the aging master title which reads "don't bury me
ly swings... S. M. and everything."
iince many critics were consider- yet."
".'Oh really, sado-maBochism."
ing him too old, a has-been.
D e s p i t e all its weaknesses
The film opens in 1962 in Co- ALL THE LOVING COUPLES
COUPLES actually has some good
penhagen where a top Russian in- has been advertized as a spin off
moments. Some of the commertelligence agent is trying to defect of BOB & CAROL & TED &
cials are mildly amusing, especialby seeking refuge in the American ALICE. The intermittent comly one about a greasy hair tonic
embassy there. Once back in mericals throughout the film have
which can be used for other things
Washington he tells American a tendency to remind one of PUTtoo. Also Richard Brook's photoagents that the Russians have been NEY SLOPE also. However, it is
graphy is rather interesting, essending imissies, and technicians not nearly as good or as funny as
pecially when the film tries to exinto Cuba. The Americans need BCTA or as tasteless and displain each character's ego by
further verification of this. How- gusting as SLOPE. Actually
means of fantasy. Yet despite
ever, since the Bay of Pigs in- COUPLES is an unpretentious litthese good points, ALL THE
vasion, America has not had any tle film watch will have moderate
LOVING COUPLES doesn't quite
diplomatic relations with Cubs; success at the box office and then
make it; in fact it doesn't even
thus an outside agent must be be sold to television where it will
come close.
used
The head American agent (John
Forsythe) has a friend in the
French diplomatic corps who
agrees to gather the necessary in*
formation. The Frenchman doe*
his job well; indeed a number oil
STEAM will be appearing tonight at the Palace Theatre at 7 and 10 exciting episodes ensue, however
not without reprisal to him. His
p.m. For complete ticket information call 462-4462.
superiors think his friendship and
service to theAmericans totally
unnecessary, esp eciall y si nee
France is trying to stay neutral in
the Cold War.
In short, he is called back to
State Quad's Tower East Cine- A MAN AND A WOMAN; 20, France for a full investigation of
ma, which recently moved to THE FEARLESS VAMPIRE KIL- his activities. His future in the dipLecture Center Seven, has an- LERS; 21, EXODUS (7:30 only); lomatic service looks bleak, until
the former Russianspy tells him of
nounced the following spring 27 and 28, PINK PANTHER and
a group of high French official*
movie schedule. All films, unless A SHOT IN THE DARK (7:30
who
are passing classified inform**
otherwise noted, will be shown only).
tion along to the Russians under
March 6 and 7, THE SAND
Friday and Saturday at 7:30 and
PEBBLES (7:30 only); 13 and 14, the code name Topaz. If only h t
10:00.
A scene from GOODBYE MR CHIPS currently playing ht the HellTHE HEART IS A LONELY could expose this ring of conPhil Garvey, chairman of State HUNTER; 20 and 21, THE spirators he could then justify his man Theatre. For a complete listing of Albany movies see below.
Quad Board, expressed the hope CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRI- closeness with the Americans.
that Lecture Center Seven would GADE (Sunday at 7:30 only).
Technically the film is quite a
be more convenient for students.
April 10 and 11, PLANET O F departure from what Hitchcock
The new facility houses 500; THE APES; 17 and 18, THE has done in the past. Since his last
whereas, State Quad Flag Room FOX; 24 and 25, IN THE HEAT
film cinematic style has changed a
held a maximum of 200 people, OF THE NIGHT; 26, (Sunday
great deal hut Mr. Hitchcock
For the first show in the lecture at 7:30 only); 30, WAIT UNTIL shows that he has not been passed
Sat., Feb. 14 at 8:30 PM. Tickets
center, on the weekend of Feb- DARK (Thurs. at 7:30 only).
by. TOPAZ abounds in jump cuts Films:
will be $3.50 and are available at
ruary 6 and 7, no tickets were
GOODBYE,
MR.
CHIPS
•
Hellman
May 1, A FUNNY THING and other cinema verite methods,
the door or in advance at the
sold, and 250 people entered in
HAMLET - Cinema Delaware
HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO Indeed there is one sequence in
Union College Student Activities
15 minutes. Garvey intends to
HELLO, DOLLY - Center Theatre
which
a
women
member
of
the
THE FORUM; 2, TAMING OF
Office.
open the doors a half hour before
PAINT YOUR WAGON - Fox
Cuban
underground
is
exposed
THE SHREW; 3,BLOW-UP (Sun.)
show time, rather than an hour,
TOPAZ - Madison Theatre
8 and 9, THE TWO OF US; 15 and Sfloj |}y | i e r lover to keep her
Coffee Houses:
since seating should no longer be a
and 16, RACHEL, RACHEL; 22 from being tortured. Mr. Hitch- Concerts:
problem.
cock does not handle this in one
and 23, ROSEMARY'S BABY.
STEAM - Palace Theatre on Fri., CAFE LENA - Saratoga. Open
February 13, INTERLUDE; 14,
Feb. 13. There will be two per- Friday, Saturday and Sunday at
formances, one at 7 PM, the other 8:30 PM.
at 10 PM. Ticket information at
THE FRAME - Ft. Edward Art
462-4462.
Center, 85 Broadway, Ft. Edward.
B.B. KING - Memorial Chapel on Sat eves.
State Quad Announces
Spring Film Schedule
Weekend Arts Events
Provide Varied Fare
:Y
DRY CLEANERS
jSluyDfionl ?\aia
Albany. N
Wan'na
Be A
Minister?
and
SHIRT LAUNDRY
Dutch Colonial State
(Before you
"Stonewall"]
SCOTT IS COMING
Located in Quad Lower Lounges
Feeling down? Or just interested in a new thing? Scolt Ross, a
former New York City DJ will talk about a new kind of life that
he's found, an exciting experience without drugs. If guitar is your
thing come and hear Danny Taylor sing and play his original
creations. All will lake place this Saturday, Feburary 14th in the
Art Gallery at 8:00 p.m.
Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-7 pm Sat. II am-2 pm
send your $10—
see
-4-
Planning to spand the summer in
Europe? The total cost for the use of
this car in Europe is much less than
trains, buses, or taxis. Travel at your
leisure and save yourself luggage
problems, aggravation, and money.
Europe By Car, Inc.
Contact: Greear Wasson
Waterbury Hall rm. 155
472-7762
FUN WORKING IN EUROPE
JUNIORS
LIFE magazine
photos for TORCH '71
11/14/69
Sign up in Campus Center
^Compliments
Episcopal
[Diocese of Albany
Summer and Year Round JOBS ABROAD: Get paid, meet people, learn a language, travel, enjoy! Nine job categories in more
than fifteen countries. Foreign language not essential. Send $1.00
for membership and 34-page illustrated JOBS ABROAD magazine, complete with details and applications to International
Society for Training and Culture, 886 United Nations Plaza, New
York, N. Y., a non-profit student membership organization.
opp. Info Desn Starts March 2nd
$2 Sitting fee
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1970
PAGE 6
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
University Shatterbox
Communications
•
LAAC bill
To the Editor:
Living Affairs Commission brought up a bill which
would grant commuter students preferred parking
over resident students. A check with security revealed that there are approximately three times as
many commuter vehicles registered on campus as
resident vehicles.
IRRESPONSIBLE
The problem that arises becomes most severe
during the winter months. Resident students tend to
leave their cars parked in the first few rows of the
Student's lot. This forces commuters to part further
away from campus. These commuters are required
to use their car each day, in order to attend classes.
While they walk through the winter weather, resident's cars are left in the closest parking spots.
J UNEMPLOYED
"^PBRASITICAL
EASILY DUPED
PRACTICAL!
PRODUCTIVE L .
INDEPENDANTp
DISCIPLINED
©l9TOSAWVrBH}E5S fllUMiiHtEPfStmD
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1970
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
C.II'M H r . l l
R£EBB
S*r,
Editorial
The Senate
After two months of debate the University Senate
finally voted on and approved a resolution condemning "the intervention of the Unilcd Slates in
the affairs of the nation of Vietnam." The general
disorder of previous meeting ("These meetings are
'bullshit' " one distraught faculty member streamed
at a December 1969 meeting) was replaced Kebruary 10 by a productive and responsive atmosphere.
This was bound lo happen. One point many critics
don't seem to understand il Ihal participatory democracy requires periods of flux and self-appraisal. Or
to put it another way, everyone has to have their
say. During the lasl two months most factions in the
Senate had their say, and this proved valuable:. The
vacuous arguments (The who-nccds-a-Senale- anyway contention for example) and the meaningless
rhetoric dissolved under the force of expediency:
time was short and issues were pressing.
The meeting was a breath of fresh air in the
interest deportment also. The blandness of "decorum" was replaced by the old English system of
speaking your mind. For example when John Rcilly
of the English Department stood up lo deride tlie
It is for these reasons that I proposed the bill to
LAAC. Although we realized the possibility that
some resident students use their cars for work or
student teaching, we believe this number to be relatively small and feel that this new rule will benefit
those students who are totally dependent upon their
cars for school.
Sincerely,
Richard Gurian
LACC
Comment
Senate for its "indirect morality," people clapped
and people booed. The same thing happened when
Douglas (ioldschmidl, a student, voiced opposition
to making the University responsible for individual
morality. Whoever the speaker and whatever his position, each senator who spoke experienced the kind
of personal confronlaion needed in decision making.
Alas Tuesday's meeting was a good catharsis for
all. Decisions were made, people spoke up, and a lol
of uplighlness disappeared.
The City
The ASP will soon start covering Albany City
news. The City Editor's first feature is an interview
wilh Mayor Erastus Corning.
We initialed this coverage for two reasons. Eirst,
there was a lack of city news coverage in the past.
Second, many students living on campus have developed an Ivory Tower complex. These people
seem lo think all their physical, social, and intellectual needs are taken care of within the borders
of Perimeter Road. They see Mule need for exploration.
The War
To the Editor:
It seems to me that we veLerans
who know mud, bombs and death
do not write many letters to the
newspapers.
Do you recall Mauldin's Joe and
Willy cartoons? Those grimy,
cynical combat men portrayed a
theme that a lot of the homeguard
missed. "We're doing the job. But
don't believe what you hear, and
only half of what you see."
You won't find Joe and Willy
condemning the youngsters who
protest war. Turn the clock back
and Joe and Willy would be with
them.
The fire-eaters and go-get-'em
patriots are emotional, but not
convinced enough to throng the
recruiting offices. Not counting
aged cong ressmen, frustrated
-•
h o u s e w i v e s , munitions beneficiaries, and brass who were
pruned of all imagination in their
plebe year, there still should be
enough bloodthirsty, gullible volunteers to fill out the platoons.
You too can be a hero. The recruiting offices are plentiful and
over-staffed. No waiting.
The pay is good. The military
gets 85 billion for war this year,
while 19 billion for domestic services combined is vetoed.
You won't meet Joe or Willy or
me at the training camp. We've
been there. And we've learned to
count.
We know that counting all
losses North Vietnam has had
1,600,000 casualties since 1961.
In proportion, the U.S.A. would
have to lose 15 million to match
it. These N.V.losses are the greatest in the history of warfare.
Fighting men often learn to respect their enemy more than they
do their own leaders and poli
ticians. If Roger's Rangers and the
Green Mountain Boys and Washington's Continental Line were to
meet N.L.F. veterans they would
have much in common. They
would not have differences worth
fighting over.
This is what spurs the endless
flow of crude propaganda which
smothers American thought and
morality. Joe and Willy and I
don't believe it -- and a lot of
Americans are ceasing to believe
it.
We citizen soldiers can win any
war that's forced on us, but we
know a dishonorable overseas adventure when we see
one.
Would George Washington and his
staff have called this murder?
We've dropped bombs by the ton
for 5 years. The civilian casualties
and murders are well- documented.
Combat veterans rarely write to
newspapers. We do not sit in cabinet meetings or at peace talks,
Would events go differently if we
did?
Sincerely,
M. Daniels
W.2 To discharge these responsibilities the Faculty shall create a
Senate and shall delegate its
power to the Senate... ."
At no place in the by-laws is
there provision for the Faculty
Senate to present policy positions
on issues not concerning the
above responsibilities. Yet the
Senate has done just that. What
then is the nature of such an action?
Every individual has the responsibility of evaluating events
around him and acting on his
value choices. Too often today,
the individual allows the group to
speak for him, or allows his representative to act outside his authority.
There is only one type of person
who will accept such an offering:
the person who wants power over
others.
In this root is the true nature of
apathy and dictatorship. The person who does not care to control
those who act for him, who abdicates his responsibility to someone else is the WORST of the
apathetic and u threat, because of
his apathy, to representative
government. The person who
readily accepts a blank check to
extend his authority to act for his
constituent is the "father" of the
dictator.
NATIONAL
IMPORT
She has inspired students to learn
and continue in their study of history."
Dr. Tucker has a high regard for
teaching and the responsibilities
of the teacher to her students.
However, she argues, quite surprisingly, that students' interest
might be overlooked in favor of
higher criteria.
"Students are concerned with
problems now. The administration
is committed to the future. It is
difficult to reconcile the two."
STUDENT ACTION
Dr. Tucker's acquiescent attitude prompted a request for her
opinion of the student action in
her behalf, since she had state that
she would comply to the University's decision without attempts
toward legal action. Although she
personally appreciated the students' efforts for her benefit she
personally has chosen to remain
uninvolved in their activities.
Nevertheless, Dr. Tucker views
the student action as positive.
Through her personal service on
the Student Affairs Council, she
appreciates the need for students
Dr. Tucker also introduced an
interesting aspect of the student
movement in her case. She questioned student understanding of
what criteria were used in recommending a particular faculty member for tenure.
TENURE QUESTION
The University is changing in its
development into a large institution. Along with this is a "move
towards generally accepted standards," especially in the context of
granting tenure.
Most tenure recommendations
are made in accordance with the
criteria established by the American Association of University Professors, with which most college
instructors are familiar. The University's new guidelines, soon to
be studied by the University Senate, follow those ideas quite closeiy.
Furthermore, it is doubtful
where Dr. Tucker's case may be
thought of as a blow to student
need. Besides the evaluation of
present achievements, the department is compelled to consider the
future.
"Just because a person is hired
for a term does not mean that he
will be given a job until he retires," Dr. Tucker reiterated.
If, as a result of student efforts and departmental attempts
to have the Tucker case reviewed,
the University reverses its decision
and grants her tenure, what would
be her feelings about staying on at
this institution?
"If I didn't feel that I could
respect the department, students
and faculty, I wouln't stay. I
would look for another job...."
WILL COMPLY
All in all, Dr. Tucker feels that
she has been treated fairly by her
department. Although she hopes
for a favorable response, she plans
to accept whatever decision the
University committee renders.
Petitions have oeen circuiaieu,
meetings have been held. Concerned students have spread their
views to all of the University community. Dr. Tucker's excellence as
a teacher has been lauded. (As one
of her
former students
put it: "She's excellent, and
coming from one of the two students who tailed her course, that's
quite a testimonial.") The Department of History has sent its recommendation. Hopefully the University will wisely consider these
aspects of the question in making
its final decision.
Some office jobs
are more interesting
than others.
Subscriptions
In Ihe old days il a man wanted to be an executive
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clipper ship.
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That's maybe a million bucks
worth of plane And when
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ity's all yours.
or roll at 1,400 I- m p h . try for Officer Training
School after you graduate from college. Also, remember Ihe nice idea of yourself, an Air Force pilot,
captain of all you command, getting to visit foreign
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An Air Force of beer's life is a great life!
Why jusl be skipper of a desk?
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<tf
W
f (1)1 US IAN I) 1HI Ht IS NO OUIIGAriON
.W?o>i,
by Joe Stringer
I represent no one but myself. I
do not purport to speak for conservatives, reactionaries, students,
or any other group. I speak only
for myself.
Likewise, when I vote for a person to represent me, I expect him
to perform certain specific actions
for me. I do not expect him to
speak for me unless I direct him
to. I never expect him to think or
value for me.
This brings me to the Faculty
Senate resolution condemning the
Vietnam War, passed in a special
meeting Monday.
The purpose of the Faculty Senate was outline in the by-laws appearing in the 1969-70 Faculty
Handbook.
"Section 3: Responsibilities of
the Faculty:
3.1. The Faculty shall be responsible for the development of
the educational program of the
University and for the conduct of
the University's instruction, research and Bervice programs, subject to the provisions of the New
York State Education Law and
the policies of the Board of Trustees.
OP
C A M P U S I N T E R E S T OR
The growth of oar university and the development of its character
depend to a large vxtent upon the administrative system of Continuing Appointment. Tenure is granted to those faculty members
who have proven themselves to be of the valuable material that builds
the character of a university. A position on the permanent faculty
ensures the continuity of the institution's reputation. Decisions that
form the permanent faculty are made on the departmental level and
are reviewed through the ad"PUBLISH OR PERISH"
ministrative ladder.
How much of the student voice
Publicity by the History
Stumust be heard for the wisest condents Association attempted to
sideration of each case? When and
stereotype the issue as a matter of
where are these voices transmitted
"Publish or perish," a label which
and received? Why is there so
Dr. Tucker strongly disputed. She
often a heated discussion on new
termed it "a crude way to put it
departmental decisions?
and not a very accurate one."
The following article observes
"The issue is perhaps put better
one case in the question of tenure.
in terms of a question. The deIn the future, the ASP will publish
partment is going to grow, dearticles dealing w ith the develop, and increase in excellence.
veloping elaboration of adminisIn considering retaining faculty
tration
policy and the demembers, the department should
velopments among current issues.
ask the question: 'How well suited will this person be to serve the
department in the future?'"
By Carol Hughes
According to the History Students Association, a group that
spearheaded the move to save Dr.
"We have to be indulgent. The
Tucker, Tucker's excellence as a
University is doing its best to keep
teacher was overlooked in conpace and to see that things are
siderations of her lack of publicadone properly." With this comtion. Dr. Tucker is now unpubment Dr. Clara Tucker of the Hislished, although she stated that
tory Department succinctly and
she is presently at work towards
uniquely defined her attitude
some future publication. Her contoward the issue of her being deception of the role of the teacher
nied tenure.
is significant, for the student
Finding herself at the center of
group contends (as published in
a large student movement to have the December 16, 1969 issue of
the University's denial of tenure
the Albany Student Press):
reversed, Dr. Tucker has become a
"Dr. Clara Tucker is one of the
rallying point for some advocates
few outstanding undergraduate
of greater student power in University decisions. Like Gerry Wag- teachers.... Her classes are always
filled to capacity: a result not
ner, and the Waterman and
only of her popularity, but a tesRhodes case of last year, Dr.
tament to her ability as a teacher.
Tucker's case reflects a negation
of student wants and needs.
Dr. Tucker personally intends to
accept whatever decision the University delivers. Her case is preThe
sently being reviewed by the UniAlbany Student Press
versity Committee on Continuing
Appointments.
now offers subscriptions al a
In response to student protest,
rale of S3.00 per semester. Inas manifested in the action of the
terested? Drop a line (and $3)
History Students Association, the
loThc ASP, CC 334,1223 WestHistory Department reviewed Dr.
ern Avenue. Albany, New York
Tucker's case and recommended
12203.
her for tenure. No final decision
has yet been reached.
Coming Tuesday: Interview
Through city coverage we hope lo do some tuning
on these students' antennae.
Visitations: Counter-balance
ARTICLES
PAGE 7
to express their opinions.
However, she stated that the
many avenues of e: presaion now
being open to students should be
the means of making their views
known.
accaa
ASP STAFF
The Faculty Senate has gone far
The Albany Student Press is published two Lime. a week by the
beyond its authority. It has spo- Student Association of the State University of New York at Albany.
ken out for the beliefs and morals THE ASP editorial off ce is located in Room 334 of the Campus
of the university as a whole. It Center. This newspaper i ' funded by S.A. tax. Th i ASP was founded by
seems that I must remind the Sen- the class of 1918. The ASP phones are 157-2190, 457-2194. If no
ate that the University is not an answer, 457-3430
entity in itself, but a collection of
Edi'.or-in-Chief
individuals, many of whom do not
Wiiltam Rohde
support their action or their
Managing Editor
Pat O'Hern
stand. As long as one individual
Anita Thayer
disagrees with the stand of the News Editor
Nancy Durish
Senate, the Senate can not pos- Associate News Edit on
Carol Hughes
sibly represent him. This action,
Arts
Editor
Gary Gelt
then, is an outright usurpation of
Robert Famiiant
the right of the individual to his Sports Editors
Dave
Fink
own beliefs and the expression of
Technical Editors
Tom Clingan
those beliefs for himself.
Linda Staszak
Features Editor
Lucius Havre
If members of the Faculty Sen- City Editor
Harry Kirschncr
ate wish to take a stand on any Business Manager
Clutch HibaU
issue, they may circulate a peti- Advertising Manager
Jeff Rodgers
tion for support. But to assume Photography Editor
Andy Hochberg
the right to speak for any person
All communications must be ailclrossud to the editor and must be siunod.
without his express consent is to
deny his right to speak for him- Communications should bo limited to 300 words ant are
self.
Editorial policy of the Albany Student Press is dutormlned by the Ectoor-in-Chiof
l&i&uc
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ClO^E COVId HtfUKt SIHIMNG
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1970
ALBANY STUDENT PRESS
PAGE 8
THE ASP SPORTS
Siena Saturday
ALBANY STUDENT
PRESS
8:30
Danes are Victorious :
Crush New Paltz 71-55; Reid Excels
by Jay Marshall
Tuesday night the Albany STate
basketball team broke a two game
losing streak by defeating New
Paltz 71-55. The team was coming
off a tough loss to Cortland last
Saturday which as Coach Sauers
admitted, took a lot out of the
team. The team did not shoot
very well, but was offset by the
usual tight defense and good rebounding.
New Paltz had a decided height
advantage throughout the game.
Albany attempted to counteract
this height problem by playing a
running, pressing game. The press
was effective, however State failed
to convert on many fast-freak
situations. Coach Sauers readily
admits that the Danes are not a
running team, but such a situation
calls for the smaller team to play a
running game. Jack Jordan scored
nine of his thirteen points in the
first half as Albany jumped out to
a 33-21 advantage at intermission.
After half-time Jack Adams hit
eight quick points preventing New
Paltz from closing the lead.
Adams and Al Reid, who paced all
scorers with nineteen points, led
the attack in the second half as
Albany pulled away.
The important play of the reserves was a key in Albany's success. Ed Arscnau, displaying more
confidence than in the beginning
of the season and Mike Hill both
came off the bench and contributed in the victory. Hill showed
a willingness to battle under the
boards and, along with Jordan,
Steve Sheehan, and Reid, helped
Albany outrebound New Paltz.
After the game, Sauers commended the play of the subs and added
that forward Jim Sandy has been
the most valuable replacement,
but wasn't used much against New
Paltz because none of the forwards were in foul trouble.
Those who arrived al the start
of the varsity game missed half
the show. The freshmen team,
now 10-.1, ran over the New Paltz
Frosh 92-55. The Freshmen fea-
tured a balanced attack with the
starters averaging around ten
points each per game. The team
also has excellent depth and
Coach Lewis substitutes freely,
Coach Sauers believes at least five
players will move up to the varsity
next year. They will face a tough
opponent Saturday night in the
Siena Frosh. At the end of the
Frosh game, the Albany varsity
came onto the floor and warmed
up to the beat of Sly and the
Family Stone and other records.
The team held a meeting Monday
and decided to add some music to
the warm-ups. Sauers did not
object st), courtesy of Hill, music
was supplied.
The two clubs split last year,
Albany winning, 59-58 in the
championship game of the Capital
City Tournament and Siena stopping an 11-game Dane victory
slum later in the year, 73-«4. at
Troy High. That triumph also
halted Albany's longest series winning streak at four games. This
year, for the first time since 1964,
the rivals will meet only once.
Saturday night, Albany meets
its traditional rival, Siena. The Indians are led by 6-7 center Bob
Hermann who poses a large problem for the Albany defense. According to Sauers, Albany was
"flat" against New Paltz and must
play better to win Saturday night.
Come early and enjoy the show.
Grapplers edged by Post 22-18
The Albany State wrestling
team dropped a close 22-1H decision to the Pioneers from C.W.
Post on Wednesday. The loss left
the matmen with an overall 1-6
record.
The Danes registered three pins
and one decision in totaling up
their 18 points. Pinning their opponents were sophomore Jim
Nightingale, 158 lbs.; sophomore
Mike Mueller, 190 lbs and freshman heavyweight Herman Milliard. The other victory went to
freshman Phil Mims, 167 lbs., who
decisioned his man 12-5.
Just as Coach Garcia was mellowing in the good fortune of
having a 100% healthy team, a
major setback befell the grapplers
as Tim Coons injured his knee and
A
was unable to compete in the Post
contest. As the Coach sees it, the
absence of Tim could have been
the deciding factor in the outcome of Ihe match.
Despite the unimpressive record
amassed up to this point in the
season, several things should be
noted about this year's team. A
lack of depth and experience cannot be compensated in any way
and hits hardest in a sport like
wrestling. Not only does it
eliminate the much needed individual competition but has forced
the wrestlers in the lower weight
classes to compete one class above
their regular weight. Nevertheless
Coach Garcia is quite proud of the
job these boys are doing under
such conditions.
M I A
AMIA basketball continued this
week on its road to determining
the teams in each league that will
participate in the championship
playoff series.
In League I, EOP I continued to
set the pace with a 511-25 pasting
of STB. The winners were paced
by Carl Jones and Bobby Wright
who notched 14 and 12 points respectively. Jeff Soperstone led
STB with 8 markers. Potter Blub
continued to follow close behind
in second place winning from the
Underdogs by forfeit. This left
EOP with an unblem shed 9-0
slate, one game in front of Potter
which is 8-1.
In League I!A action, KB,
paced by Alan Zaremba and Kurt
Legler upended APA 55-M3. Doug
HUYCK FELT
COMPANY
Interview Ihe man from
lluyck on February 24. Ho just
may have your career in his
portfolio. Big enough for opportunity, small enough for
recognition.
HUYCK FELT COMPANY
The team is young, which lead*
the Coach to believe that the future of wrestling looks favorable.
The spirit and desire are there and
invaluable experience is being obtained every day.
As for the near future, the matmen face New Paltz, Harpur, and
Marist, three matches Coach Garcia looks to as excellent chances
'>f victory.
Sport
Squash - Indiivduals interested
in entering an AMIA Squash Singles or Doubles Tourney should report to room 1 211 of the Physical
Education Center at 3:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, Tebruary 17. You may
send a representative if you cannot make the meeting.
*** * *
Chesser tallied 14 points for the
losers. League IIB play saw the
Nads, bebing Rich Nussbaum's 20
points, whip crow I by a 56-39
count. Ron Brooks scored 15 for
the losers.
Handball • All individuals now
participating in the AMIA Handball Round-Robin M06T attend a
meeting in room 123 of the Physical Education Center at 4 ;30
p.m. on Tuesday, February 17.
Applications are available
for at-large positions for
Communications
Commission
PICK ONE UP AT THE CC, INFORMATION
BEFORE FEBRUARY 20
DESK
DEADLINE TODAY
for applications for
MYSKAMA
class offices
Alumni Board
APPLICATIONS
A VAILAHLE AT CC INFO DESK
TURN IN AT CC34B S.A. OFFICE
Al Reid grabs rebound in route to victory over New rttte State.
• harris
Vie SUMI Hat
Shorts
FROM LONG ISLAND?
Swimming - The AMIA swimming meet will be held on Saturday, February 21, at 10:00 a.m.
Individuals and team entries must
be in the AMIA Office by Tuesday, February 17. Entry forms are
available in the AMIA Office (PE
134).
We need a contact for
Albany Mug Nite
over Easter — Benefits
Write Straw Hat
100 K.Jericho Tpke.
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JAN
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BE
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5 6 7 8 5 6 7 8
A
WINNER.'!
NO MATTER WHAT DAY YOU WERE BORN
JOIN AFR0TC AT SUNYA
If you have 2 years of College left
(grad or undergrad), AFROTC has a
2-yr Commissioning program that will
pay you while you're still in school
and even offers Free Flying Lessons
(if you qualify).
UNION COLLEGE AFROTC will again visit
SUNYA on 18 & 20 Feb. Come visit with
us in Room 214 B.A. Building.
1:30 - 4:00 P.M.
OR
Call 374-6523
for
more information
DON'T TAKE A CHANCE ON A LOTTERY
THE AFROTC WAY
The StgU Unioeriltu of Hew Yorfc at Albany
Tuesday Feb. 17, 1970
New consultation
policy approved
Copies of the University Senate's resolution condemning the war in
Vietnam will be circulated to various elected representatives and
selected national media in compliance with a request made by the
Senate at their meeting yesterday afternoon.
Also at the Senate meeting the Executive Committee reported
on ils activities since January 19 when it was authorized to act for the
Senate on pending matters. Towards the end of the Senate meeting a
number of now resolutions were presented by various student senators
which wilt be discussed at the next regular Senate meeting.
The Guidelines for faculty-student consultation prepared to
implement last spring's Senate policy statement on student
participation have now been officially adopted. These guidelines slate
that the primary responsibility for drawing up student consultation
procedures lies at the departmental level. The guidelines acknowledge
that the mechanism of implementation are varied. However, it is
necessary for each department or unit to formulate a statement of
procedure, which is to be filed with the Vice-Chairman of the Senate.
These statements should "make explicit the circumstances and
manner in which student opinion will be obtained, the subject matters
scheduled for discussion, the machinery to be employed for selection
of sLuclent representatives, the grievance procedure and such other
provisions as may appropriately be made a matter of record as having
been decided or agreed to."
The recommendations on tenure and continuing appointments as
approved by the Council on Promotions and Continuing Appointments and the Executive Committee were discussed. It was the sense
of some Senators that the report was vaguely worded in places and it
was decided to return the report to the Council on Promotions and
Continuing Appointments to be reconsidered. Generally the report as
presented to Senate seems to ignore a substantial number of
suggestions made by the faculty-student committee on l'.iure which
would have guaranteed the role of the student.
Five new resolutions were introduced by various student senators
and were referred to the appropriate Senate Councils. They will be
discussed at the next regular Senate meeting.
These resolutions include the establishment of a review committee
in the RPA department, <i parking policy which will not. discriminate
Continued on page 2
Students are now circulating petitions in support of Gerry Wagner, an instructor in the RPA department
who was denied term renewal.
. .
__ _
-benjamin
New State policy on religion,
Services allowed on campus
by Aralynn Abare
"Worship should take place
where people live," says Reverend
Paul Smith, and that is exactly
what is beginning to happen at
SUNY Albany.
Until
recently,
University
policy had been based on the
Crary decision (196H) stating that
"making office facilities available
for religious counsellors" on
Welfare rally today at noon;
spokesmen speak to NDC
by Dave Peck
P U N YOUR FUTURE - YOURSELF
must be in by 5pm
Vol. LVH No. 3
Five thousand people are expected to converge on Albany
today to demand increased welfare benefits. They are asking for
$f),r>00 a year for a family of four,
without increasing taxes on the
middle and working classes. They
proposed that industry which has
not bad its taxes raised for ten
years, and the rich should be
taxed to a greater extent. Andrea
Kidd and Marilyn Berger of the
welfare rights organizion spoke
before a meeting of the New
Democratic Coalition last night.
They asked for students to help at
today's march as marshals and
baby sitters.
Kidd asked for the restoration
of Medicaid acts, an end to
discrimination against welfare recipients in housing, hot breakfast!
for children, and special grants for
meeting the emerging needs of the
poor.
NDC also discussed the matter
of their endorsement of candidates for Governor, Senator, and
Attorney General. They decided
that there were too few people at
this meeting to take any action
but will endorse candidates at the
next meeting on Monday, February 23. The state NDC will
endorse candidates on February
28.
Steve Villano, president of
NDC, disclosed the results of a
poll that was taken last week.
Everyone was allowed to vote in it
so the results do not have very
much validity.
For Senator, Paul O'Dwyer
received 90 first place votes and
Continued on page 2
Pollution of campus
environment discussed
by Liz Llsesser
Chicago 7
rally Wed.
There will he a rally Wednesday noon in trout of Ihe
Campus Center in support of
the Chicago K, formerly the
Chicago 7. Dr. Loren Baritz, Dr.
Michael Chcniinvsky, and'Shiart
Kwen, all of Ihe history department will speak,
campus would be a violation of to practice their religions."
the NYS Constitution.
On-campus religious services
This
position
was
first
began here •
January when
challenged
by
Farmingdale Roman Catholic students, unable
students who, when refused use of to reach Parkwood East (their
school facilities, held services in regular meeting place) because of
the parking lot. The group was snow, held a mass in Stuyvesant
granted use of an on-campus Tower (Dutch Quad).
meeting place and, since October
No interpretation, i.e. guide196K, masses have been held at lines of the Lefkowitz opinion
Fanningdale.
had been received at the time of
At the request of SUNY Legal this mass, so
Vice-President
Counsel John Crary, in October Thome, Mr. Neil Brown, director
1969 Attorney General Louis of Campus Center, and Mike
Lefkowitz released a statement
Lamport, Vice-Chairman of Relithat, in his opinion, "in those gious Affairs Commission, met to,
situations in which students re- as Mr. Brown put it, "get the
quest permission to use University problem solved."
facilities for the purpose of
They decided that, until further
holding
religious
s e r- clarification of the Lefkowitz
vices,...permission may be granted statement becomes available, stuprovided that the provision of dents requesting CC rooms, chairs,
such facilities will not otherwise etc. for religious services be given
interfere with campus administra- the same consideration as those
tion."
wanting use of the Center and its
Lefkowitz'a
reasoning
was equipment for any other purpose.
based on the view that students,
"I will recommend to the
like "prison inmates, Slate hos- University Council," state Thome,
pital patients and maritime cadets, "that we make facilities available
were confined to the particular for corporate religious services in
State property involved and, with- the Campus Center, but not for
out the pr< ivision of religious funerals and weddings for which
facilities to hem at that place, we are not equipped."
would be deprWod of Lheir right
Continued on page 3
Eugene Nickerson~offlclally declnred his candidacy for the New
York State governorship today. He will speak here Thursday evening
at 8:00 p.m. in Ihe Campus Center Ballroom.
Environmental problems again
dominated the weekly presidential
press
conference.
Yesterday's
meeting was presided over by Dr.
Clifton Thome, because of Dr.
Kuusisto's illness
A student from the Environmental Forum class offered a
statement which stated that "Man
is becoming increasingly aware of
Ins environment," The statement
proceeded to describe the destruction of the natural setting
and what could he done about it.
In conclution all PYE members,
the environmental forum, biology
club members and any other
interested parties were encouraged
to attend hearings where any
alteration of the university's sur-
roundings would be discussed.
Dr. Thome replied that "he
sympathizes and agrees, but not
much can be done with University
property because State University
construction fund is more or less
autonomous.
The fact that the State University was once a golf course and
country club was also brought up.
However, today wo have trees
planted in pots, in straight rows.
The administrators claim that
no one is aware of the recent muss
cutting down of trees in the lake
area, to which an angry student
remarked "Somuono in the President's office should be aware of
what goes on in their own
backyard."
Continued on page 2
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