'The Stronger' Highlights Four Generally Good AD Presentations

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PAGE 10
STATE U N I V E R S I T Y N E W S , FRIDAY,
N O V E M B E R 15. 1963
State Drama Students
Take Top Honors
At RPI Arts Festival
Play Review
'The Stronger' Highlights Four
Generally Good AD Presentations
by Skip Schrelber
A o n e - a c t play often tends to
an e x t r e m e : e i t h e r it h a s little
plot and c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n and d r a g s
o n , o r it suddenly stops just when
it s t a r t s to get going.
" T h e Tiny C l o s e t , " by William
Inge, l i e s at the first e x t r e m e .
C o n c e r n e d with the i n t e r a c t i o n s of
a landlady and her r a t h e r sensitive
b o a r d e r who m a k e s hats in his s p a r e
t i m e and locks them in his closet,
the play never goes anywhere and
a t t e m p t s to hold the audience with
s o m e t r i t e humor and an overworked
" s u r p r i s e mystery ending."
" T h e Golden A x e "
" T h e G o l d e n A x e , " by Ralph
Scholl, is a clever t r e a t m e n t of
an Ozark Mountaineer who chops
down a billboard because it d e s t r o y s
the view, and of his subsequent
involvement with the Widow E v a n s .
All t h r e e c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n s were
excellent, except for the occasional
shifts in dialect.
Eve C h a m b e r s did a magnificent
job, and T e r r y F i t z g e r a l d and Robert
Dietz ran an e x t r e m e l y close second
with their s e n s e of timingand ridiculous m o v e m e n t s . Nancy Delain's
direction made this play very enjoyable.
Pauline Arasim and Jon Barden, winners of the first prize at
the Religious Arts Festival at R . P . I .
Eternal T r i a n g l e
F i n e Characterization
The play would have been a c o m plete l o s s without Alice Katz who
did a fine c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n of M r s .
C r o s b y , a role occasionally s m a c k ing of Imogene Coca.
Lois Rathbone as M r s . H e r g e s h e i m e r was fairly good, but only
b e c a u s e she was not in the s c e n e
very much. Richard Hoeth was stiff
and often r e g r e s s e d to a " b r o w c l u t c h i n g " style of method acting
gone s t a l e . Sliari Townseiid did a
commendable jofc of making the
play somewhat palatable.
"Something Unspoken," by T e n n e s s e e Williams, is an unbelievably
bad play. The a u t h o r ' s attempt
( c h a r a c t e r i s t i c of much of his work)
to find a workable c h a r a c t e r in the
neurotic fringe of faded Southern
a r i s t o c r a t i c women fails m i s e r a b l y .
Gladys Winkworth was very good
a s Cornelia Scott — a woman unable
to v e r b a l i z e the feelings walled up
within h e r .
C a t h e r i n e B a r k e r was just not
convincing as the middle-age s e c r e t a r y , and her supposed feelings of
i n e x p r e s s i b l e anxiety and hate came
out m o r e like an adolescent whine
and t e m p e r tantrum. Sharon House
directed well a play which is a
deadly b o r e .
In " T h e S t r o n g e r , " Strindberg
gives an interesting t r e a t m e n t to
feminism and the e t e r n a l t r i a n g l e .
In a scathing indictment of the
t r e a c h e r y of egocentricity in women,
he p r e s e n t s the t h e s i s that the
m a r r i e d a c t r e s s , knowing of her
husband's affair with the u n m a r r i e d
a c t r e s s , is nonetheless s t r o n g e r
because she can still love her h u s band.
Mary Temple as M r s . X was
magnificent and s u p e r b in a r o l e
which r e q u i r e d constantly changing
moods and an emotional autobiography of a distraught and frantic
woman. Brenda Smith a s the unm a r r i e d and silent a c t r e s s was
excellent in a r a t h e r difficult r o l e .
Roz F e r r a r a ' s direction was e x ceptional and never let the play
slip into drippy sentiment or d i d a c tic m o r a l i z i n g .
K e y n o t e Simpl i c i t y
Simplicity was the keynote of
the four productions. Most notably
poor was the lighting.
Only " T h e S t r o n g e r " had any
noticeable special effects, and these
for too short a t i m e . It s e e m s as
if the s p a r s e n e s s of the settings
c a r r i e d over into the lighting, with
the result that the a c t o r s were in
an unfortunate position of having
to solely c r e a t e and sustain the
moods for each plav.
Movie
Review
Disney Picture, 'Fantasia'
Still Great bilm Treat
by P a u l Jensen
Originally released in 1940, Walt
Disney's F a n t a s i a was very much
an innovation in its attempt at visual
i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s of music. Such things
have been done since, by Norman
McLaren for t h e National Film
Board of Canada, but these have
all been much s h o r t e r than this
e a r l i e r feature film.
Fantasia, now r e leased by D i s n e y ,
lias held up very well
over the y e a r s . It i s ,
in fact, still original
in conception.
Deems T a y l o r ,
announcing each of
the w o r k s, first int r o d u c e s Leooold Stowkowski, who
conducted the Philadelphia O r c h e s t r a . The first selection is a Bach
toccata, a work which m a k e s no
attempt at telling a " s t o r y . 1 ' The
visual i m a g e s , therefore, are almost
completely a b s t r a c t .
A r r i v a l of Winter
The Nutcracker Suite, which follows, depicts elements of the a r r i v a l
of winter; in The Sorcerer's Apprentice Mickey Mouse attempts to use
his m a s t e r ' s p o w e r s , but loses control and is nearly destroyed; S t r a v i n s k y ' s Rite of Spring follows the
evolution of life on Earth through
the d e m i s e oi the d i n o s a u r s .
Beethoven's Sixth Symphony is
given a p a s t o r a l , mythological t r e a t ment, featuring c o n t a i n s , unicorns,
and various and sundry gods and godd e s s e s . The Dance of the Hours is
p r e s e n t e d humorously, with o s t r i c h e s , hippopotami, elephants and
alligators attempting a ballet.
The concluding, and still must
effective, s e q u e n c e combines A
Night on Bald Mountain
Willi Schub e r t ' s Ave Maria. The conflict between the profane and the s a c r e d ,
and the l a l t e r ' s victory over (lemons,
is visualized inosi imaginatively.
A b s t r a c t Genus
mr
Disney is most effective when
least explicit. The abstract foi ins
and colors ul the bach piece please
the i",(i, while the n a r r a t i v e - l e s s
Rite
*5mtm
Gladys Winkworth and Catherine Barker in a scene from " Something U n s p o k e n , " one of the series of the one-act plays presented by the A. D. Council last week.
Walt's Subs
Around the Corner
from the Dorms
Open Daily
Mon-Jhurs.
Ila.in.ll30p.fn.
Fri. iSat. Ita.m.—ltiOam.
Sun. 4.00p.m.-Hpm.
271 Ontario Street
r
t
of
Spring
and
Bald
Mountain
a r e still exciting.
Perhaps the sole
exception
Dance
hi
of
the
Hours,
this,
is
the
iin ongruous and u n ga l u I y ballet
develops a substantial aiuoiinl ul
farcical humoi .
Recorded in slui euphonic sound,
ihe music is most i m p r e s s i v e . Although made in the years B.C.
(Before CinemaScope), some s c e n e s
a r e projected through a C i n e m a Scope l e n s . This is fine, since the
wide s c r e e n even m o r e completely
fills the eye with color and pattern.
But in the n o n - a b s t r a c t s c e n e s
the d i n o s a u r s , lor i n s t a n c e , a r e
often horizontally elongated into a b surdity.
Despite such occasional e x c e s s e s
of plot, " c u t e n e s s " and wide s c r e e n ,
e v e r y segment contains at least
s o m e e l e m e n t s of beauty. The film
as a whole is successful and e n t e r taining, and the lime may now be
right for Mr. Disney to attempt a
s e q u e l , using m o d e r n techniques
and p r o c e s s e s .
The
Two speech and d r a m a s t u d e n t s ,
Jon Barden 'G5 and Pauline A r a s i m
'64, recently won first p r i z e for
t h e i r p e r f o r m a n c e s in J a m e s
Broughton's " T h e Last W o r k . " The
twosome appeared in the one-act
play at the Religious A r t s F e s t i v a l
at R.P.I. Saturday, November 8.
The p l a y concerned a couple
awaiting a nuclear blast which would
d e s t r o y the world.
The two a c t o r s were coached by
Mr. J a m e s Leonard, A s s o c i a t e P r o f e s s o r of Speech and D r a m a t i c s
and i n s t r u c t o r of tire c o u r s e in
acting, Speech 113.
Following the play,, a panel d i s cussed the religious significance
of the ideas presented in the p r o duction.
Both Barden and Miss A r a s i m
a r e active in d r a m a t i c s . Jon is
stage m a n a g e r of Stale University
T h e a t r e and Pauline is box office
manager of the s a m e organization.
Both students s e r v e on the D r a m a t i c s and A r t s Counc il.
Barden has appeared in virtually
e v e r y major production at State
in the past year.
Ambassador (More)
The founding of The E x p e r i m e n t
was a result of " t h e conviction
that people the world over a r e
m o r e alike than they a r e different,
and that they can learn to u n d e r stand and respect one a n o t h e r . "
Each s u m m e r the State U n i v e r sity of New York at Albany spons o r s a Student Ambassador under
the Experiment p r o g r a m . Our Amb a s s a d o r l e a r n s about a foreign
c u l t u r e by living in the foreign
country of his choice lor two months.
C I R T N E COGE
by Libby Stroud
It's a shame how often truth and drinking go hand
in hand; it's even sadder how often drinking is used
as an escape Have you ever examined the reasons
for drinking - not just the "one b e e r ' with the gang,
but to e x c e s s ?
What is it that a t t r a c t s so many who never drank
in high school? Are p r e s s u r e s — both social and
scholastic — so unbearable that people are literally
forced to drink? It's such a complex problem that
no one answer is possible, but evidence of its existence
can lie found any Friday o r Saturday night.
Just walk into any bar — il you can hnd room,
and listen. Laughter is loud — too loud; conversation
flows freely — too freely, in many c a s e s , for the;
more sober moments later on. Students go through
an alcoholic metamorphosis, mil all that's been bottled
up spews forth "like a bottle of warm b e e r . "
What kind of an existence is it that considers
drunkenness a necessity, many times, or an excuse
for speaking one's mind? Can't meaningful things
be expressed in any atmosphere; tire innermost thoughts
forced into secrecy by sobriety?
I sincerely hope that this isn't generally the c a s e .
I hope that people — students — can ace responsibility, p r e s s u r e , can live through the school week
without finding it necessary to consistently T. (J.I.F.
and T.(i I.S. before lacing another week.
I hont that students can talk: and s h a r e , can be more
than superficial without withdi iwing to theii shells
come Monday, with a rationalizing (Jood-bye, moment
of truth, the glass is e m p t y . "
hope; I'm wrong in
assuming that heavy drinking is far too frequent on
our campus.
What oi i ear t h
d o you e x p e c t
to fand w i t h
a balanced
bodget?»
/
r?\
V ^ 11
IWTBl
Dippikill
Referendum
A L B A N Y 3, N E W YORK
VOL. X L I X , N O . 24
N O V E M B E R 2 2 , 1063
Finance Committee Expansion Forces Budget Increase Senate Authorizes Two Individuals,
Freezes Budgets
Services Group to Charter Buses
Of 5 Organizations
Two motions were made at Wednesday's Senate
Student Senate's Finance C o m m i t tee acted e a r l i e r this week by f r e e z ing the budgets ul P r e s s Bureau,
S m i l e s , the Peace Group, Forum
ol Politics, and Music Council.
I'ln.s action was taken as a result
ol Hie failure ol the groups to hand
in ihe required monthly financial
s t a t e m e n t s . These r e p o r t s were instituted this .(Mr by Senate in .in
attempt to control expenditures.
Evi'i . budget was acted upon s e p a r a b l y . Man. groups were given
extensions on their r e p o r t s when
the. submitted r e a s o n s lot encountering ditlieulties.
.Tr. I
tin iiith.
(ictiil'i'i \s 1 epol'l s were t h e r e l o r e
due mi November 15. All o r g a n i s a tions were given until Monda, d
this week, since Ihe p l o r e ' l u i " IS
a new .me.
As ul Monday . the budgets ol
S m i l e s , the Peace Gt imp, Forum id
P o l i t i c s , and Muse- Council were
tio/.eti by Finance Committee c h a i r man. Bai I a r a Townseiid 'G5. She
acted with t he consent "I the m e m b e r s ul hoi ci,111:11 n i c e .
The bud: el ol P r e s s Bur ;.ui was
li 1, ell .0 the regular 1- in.nice < 0111 m i n o r ineetiin on Tuesda
night
at 9:.'10 1:1 Id ubacliet . The report
loi 1 lie croup wa s gi . en an extension until Mi -li la . no. lit. When this
was not 1110' the ai ' n 111 was I aken.
D i v i s i o n of Duty
A u o ' i n he) ol I m a n e 1 o i n i i i n t e c
1 •. lii en,11 ,'e ol i'.i ii n ' a m / . I 1 1 it.
T h e Midget I e p o l 1 Is In he n . e n
li, t h i s p e l si in in •' t h e \ | c Pi e m dent ol Si ,1 d e m A s s . n i a t i o n , N a n c .
B . n u n , i n n '1',.",.
I'lie ' 1 illl III It lee I '. Ill 1 he |il o r e s ' - ,
• '1 po.st mi' ,1 Iisi ol 11 s iiieiul el '. and
1 h o s e . 1 ii| •'-. a s s u m e I '11 ' :,e Ihdl . i Mi.ils on r . e Seu.i e I 11! I n in B o a : d
in I ill s l e d .
In the 1". em 1h.1t a 1 ml. n is li ../ e 11 11 ,'. 111 iio' I e 11:. 11 ' e l , m a i l
,ji l e a s t 'lie lie •.' 1 e. 11..11 I M 1.eli d e d I' m a m <• 1 m u m tut-i m r r i 11,; .
I- i i i a n c e ( 1 n u n i"i'i
1 r n i s i " ! ii'
.0 1 on mil 1 e o n ig, 1 lie I ml. el ' -I
I-1 a 11111 1 'I I'olit K s ,11 11 s l a s t .ni'.'t
lll|'. b w a s slli : e a r I s u n r Ihe
I e p o l I l a d e d In llleei 1 l.e 1 rijill I e nieiil ', ' il S e l i a l r ih.11 II.'- 1 11 I el
I I '111 .1 I 11 II -.'ell lllit ll | ' i | ' Hi I lii' J.1 • .pel
I'.I
III
Forms New Group
\ new |'i oiip 1 s loi i n n , r I' a r I iip i n p o s e ' '1 dl s e u s s i m 1 id i g i o n s and
I h e o l o g n al i|U(" t l o i r ol 1 in| . a 1 am r
li' sliideiu s.
I lie |'l ullp '.'. ill IIIOi'l c . l i , I I I
m
11 1,111 1:2', io '.: I , | in 11. the
' • o l d I ai ul 1 . I ' m u . ; K i i o i i i , " w h o h
I s pisl "II the I ai 1. r a l e l e l la. Spolis, ,1 t-d I.. Hie t ' a 111 1 11 '• ( In 1st lan
( 1,11m 11 , Hie |'.l ullp v. Ill m e e t Willi
Ihe h e ' - . I' 1 auk Snow, l a i n p u s M l i n s l e i and 110 l i e d l a e u l i . .
T h e III si s e s s i o n Will be NoVeill|,t'i
_id. T h e t o p i c ul d i s c u s s i o n
Mill b e W i l l i a m G o l d i n g ' s Lord o(
the F l i e s .
A n y o n e Intel e s t e d in t h e gi oiip
.should c o n t a c t J i m I i l k i u s ' 0 7 01
Al Sin 1 Hi ' o h Io s l u d e n l m a i l , M r .
Snort al III'. 1.-9:17. ol c o l l i e to
I he m e e t Iiig.
Hines to Perform
In Page Dec. 6
mu
Procedure
The i oports c o \ e i .1 hill calendar inoirli's e x p e n d i t u r e s , what budget line the mono, is taken Iruin,
and how mu it is letl 111 the h i ' .
The 1 ']i Jits a r e due on or bet n e
the lifteenlli da', ol Ihe lollowmg
*KS**>$
The p a r t i a l l y completed Services B u i l d i n g on the new campus
is
indicative
of a r a p i d l y
expanding State U n i v e r s i t y that re-
quires a record budget next year.
The proposed 19C4-19G5 f i s c a l
. e a r operating budget lor the State
University ol New York totals $140
million. Tims is m o r e ihan $3'J m i l lion lughei than State a p p r o p r i a t i o n s
loi die clll 1 cut iiseal veal',
The budget will provide for the
operuiion ol vastly expanded c a m p u s e s and lor the accommodation
ol rapidly increasing e n r o l l m e n t s .
The I'mvei sit > 's lull-time e n r o l l uieiii , including community colleges,
is estimated in i n c r e a s e from over
78,1)00 this '.oat to almost 90.000
111 1904-1 '.)> a. The lust ruction ol
these additional students will use
about $12.A million ol the increased
costs.
The Slate I ' n r . e i s n , "I Nov, Vol k
ai Albati'. accounts tin appi o x i m a t e I. T'.inn ul me pieseiii Slate UuiI'tsn
eiuoll
in. It is expected
to al soi 1 an iddnional iiOO-aOU
udeiit
in I ' . m l - '
s
L a r g e C o n s t r u c t i o n Program
Alb.in,
S l a t e a l s o lij'iii e.s pi o
iiinieiiil', in t h e 1'im. ei sit . ' s c a p i t a l
n nisi i m i ii .a pi I,, i a m . T h e d m mi loi , and s e i . n e t u i l d i m m -v. lindei
i o u s t i m i n in and t h e a r a d e m n o 'in p i e x in be s t a i led t Ins .spring ai e
p a i i i •! •'." i till Mill's I c i n g ' n n si i a r i e d t i n . . i i >' in till the S l a t e I ' m •
. ei s o , i r i s
e
i a cost ol $(in
III ll I loll.
\ d d l i I'.iial i " l i s t i in (inn on the lie'.'.
a i n p u s in l.e 1 t.5 'nil be i n c l u d e d
li n , e S t a l e I'm ,el sll . ' s pi o p o s e d
oi, a i in lion ol l o i n , - o n e b u i l d i n g s
o.'.l iii. al i .in .>'.m mi II li 'li.
University Developing Rapidly
I h e i olist I l i d Ion ol an e n t i l e
i n .'. i ami m, ai Albany Is d e s i g n e d
io . i m m u n e '' la 1 e Ill,0110 st iideni s I .
I '.I ill,
I'iilS I . i •I L a p s a p i i in e
,. a m p l e ' I ' ne Si a t e I'M vol sllV ' s
e i n . i ' lii ai i o i n p l i s h
in a shin i
•,| .m ol
e a i s A mil ' iihel
slates
I,., . e m a n a g e d in a i mil in . .
I, l.av, i em e Mill l a
Seel e l a l ',
ai,, I a i l i n g i Mel adin n n si i at r> e ot
In el id ll
i,i.em,m,
observed
iluit t in- i a| id do • elopiiiimi is u o e e s s a l . i " l u c e ! I'M llli.lies ol Ihe n e e d
|i a i ippiu i unit l e s in put In iiigl.et
e d i i r a t ion in New Vol k Si a l e .
Ml . Mm i a a l s o s a i d that ll would
lie " i n n e a l l s t n '
to I . e l l i n e thai
ll.el e i mild be a n . sl,n l.ening in
ihe pai e ol :'.i o w l h ol Ihe Unl \ e l ' s i l V ' s
Midget s m t h e I l.-ii al •, e a i s llillllodlaiel . ahead
I he S l a t e U n i v e i slly i s p r e p a l lug
Io a m epl at l e a s t lnO.OOO l l l l l - l l i n e
.students including ' o u u u u i i m coll e g e e m o l l i u e i i t s , by 1970.
uihei
increases
meeting to give permission to two groups outside of
Senate to c h a r t e r buses for transportation during the
Thanksgiving vacation.
Senator Galu stated that in compliance with MYSKANIA's decision, Senate had the power to supervise
the chartering of buses.
Several senators asked
questions concerning the
quality of service being
Ai 8:30 p.m., December G, Music
provided by these groups
Council will present in Page Hall
and the amount of profit
t h e world-renowned Metropolitan
Opera b a s s o . J e r o m e Hines.
which would be received
Tickets will be exchanged for
by
individuals
taking
Student Tax this Monday , Tuesday,
charge
of
the
groups.
and Wednesday , November 25, 26,
m
the
budget
include pio\isioii loi ihe State Univeisily Schoiai ship fund and ex-
Mansions ol the National Defense
Student Loan p r o g r a m .
The State University Scholarship
Fund was established this year when
tuition was instituted at previously
tuition-free .sections ol the Slate
University. It provides aid to stud e m s in the lowei income b r a c k e t s ,
The funds lor these p r o g r a m s
will come from State a p p r o p r i a tains. To date there has been no
indication ol increasing tuition c o s t s
in die University.
Pre - Registration
To Begin Soon
and 21. al 9:00 a.m. No tickets
can be r e s e r v e d ; tax c a r d s must
be presented at the time ol exchange.
J e r o m e Bines made his debut
with the Metropolitan Opera in 1940
at the age ol 25. He has since
appeared ai the Met in more than
thirty leading r o l e s .
M u l t i l inguol
Nor is he limited to the opera
ol any one country.
He has established himself in
Ihe title Idle in Don Giovanni; as
King Mai ke in Tristan und Isolde
and Landgral H e r m a n n in Tannhauser; Arkel III P e l l e a s et Melisande; as Swallow in Bill leu's Peter
Grimes; and. in his most recent
triumph, the title role in M o u s s o r g s k \ ' S Boris Godounov.
All c u r i e n t B enrolled day session
students who plan (and a r e eligible)
to (out mile in the University , Spring
190-1, mil.sl s e c u r e adv i.seinelit and
Faculty
( c o n t i n u e d on p a g e 3)
19.
adinlssn
d i n e I mho e seem lug
a j i i i u ' i .1111 and si heihi!c.
I r e and t u n ion r o l l e r ! ion v. ill
he Meld I' ('In mil . 0 tin migh 1' e b l tun .
I I, Dm I (rt n n e x c e p t i o n s loi .'ll 'I
q u a i let si in It'ii I t e n I,el s and F i l m ing and Sal III la . Pi ugi a i m s . ) I he
p a . i u e i i i s c h e d u l e .v ll I I 'i' p u b l i s h e d
,,, J a n u . i l . .
I'lie si h e d l l l e loi ihe I s s u a n c e ol
a s s mil Is will be a s l o l l o w s :
nsli
'I'-/
Dm . ',
'.)- 12:0a
p-S
Bee. '
12:0a-4
Mm i
Dec. 0
11-12:0!")
H-I.
Dm . r,
12:1)5-4
|i-(.i
Dec 9
9-12:05
A-(
l<rr. 9
12:05 I
Soph
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Senioi
Gl a d s
Specials
ll-lt
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A-ii
Day S t u d e n t s
whouussed
Dec. 5-lH
12
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13
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9-4
Committees
Bean David Hartley , Dean of Stud e n t s , addressed Senate in an execuuye session ai the beginning oi the
meeting. The purpose ol the s e s s i o n
yvas to d i s c u s s the organization ol
a new Faculty Committee s y s t e m .
The Student Personnel Council
contains c o m m i t t e e s on Financial
a i d s . Housing. Student Government
c l a s s s c h e d u l i n g d m in;' die p e r i o d
Novoinbel
Hi to D e c e m b e i 20 a s
out l i n e d b e l o w .
T h i s p e l lod s h o u l d a l l o w n i n e loi
a s l u d e u i to t h o r o u g h ! ; d i s c u s s I n s
p r o g i a m vvnh h i s m a j o r a c a d e m i c
adv i s m . C l a s s s e c t i o n r a i d s will
I r i s s u e I l a t e r : I l e c e i u b e i r, tin ough
L'lidei : i adliale special si udeiit s
( c l a s s .cat '30) and Seuioi s gradualn,|; in Jaiinai y 1904 must In st obtain admi ssn in a' the appi opi lale
The quality was stated to be a s
good as that being provided by
Senate S e r v i c e s Committee. The
profit by one group of three individuals was $20.00. Senate lelt that
Ihe s e r v i c e provided was lair to the
student body and therefore passed
the motions.
Senator Miles 'G4 moved that
Senate authorize S e r v i c e s C o m m i t tee as an organ ol Senate to c h a r ter buses for the Thanksgiving Vacation, 19G3, and that any money
d e r i v e d in e x c e s s of expenses be
placed in Surplus Fund to be used
for the sole purpose of subsidizing
b u s e s during future vacations.
Senatoi Miles slated that this
s u r p l u s would provide money should
the amount of money taken m during
an\ vacation lail to coyer the exp e n s e s incurred. The motion yvas
carried.
Jerome Hines
I lines was the In st American
in .sing Hoi is at the Met. l.asi y eai ,
on tuiii in Russia with the native
opei a he '• In ought down ihe h o u s e "
at the Holslioi T h e a t r e whose audience included Pi einlei Krusohchev.
Russian acclaim was similar to
that am ol ded \ all l llblll h III 1958,
I he last si o n e ol ' ' l l o l I S . " w i n c h
Intel pi e l a t i o n H i n e s r a n c l a i m a s
I n s o w n . will he pi e s e n l e d with
i h e b a s s o 111 lull c o s l i i l u e . He will
a l s o pi e s e n l s c e n e s l i m n Don Giovunni in c o s t u m e .
No Pi IIIIU Donna
leioine limes does not present
I he usual llg.tn e ol an opei a slligel .
He was once asked to leave Ihe
I'l I,A glee club bei au.se he was
unable to eai t \ a tune.
He was a major in ( heinislrv
ami mathematics at Los Angeles
and eai nod his MA ill 1943. He
ihen continued Willi graduate studies
in phy sics.
Ills recent Victor and London
i m oi 11 i el e a s e s include both V e r d i ' s
Macbeth and "Gospel Hymns ol
Ihe Salvation A r m y . "
Traveling all over the world,
lie has pel lorined al La Srala in
Milan, in Muenos A i r e s , and at
the May i eiiih Music Festival-
Foster
Child
Contributions Still
Short oj Goal
The State University News has
received approximately eighty doll a r s toward the I'ostei P a r e n t s '
I- und. This one hundred d< d l a r s
slim t ul the amount needed to suppoi t an uiiloi I unale child lor one
y eai .
The S. U. News is grateful loi
the money already com n b u t e d . but
r e m i n d s students that it would like
ihe lotal amount in lime lor C h r i s t inas.
The child who r e c e i v e s .oin support will gel loud, clothing, medical
c a i e and olhel n e c e s s i t i e s lor one
yeai
lie will write a leltei each
mould telling about himself. The
S.U.News will print all information
and c o r r e s p o n d e n c e received from
the child.
Students may contribute to the
lund ihi ough any News Hoard uieinbei oi at the News Office, Koom 5
in lii uhachei . on Sunday through
Wednesday nights from 7 to 11 p.m.
Contributions may also be mailed
io the News Office, 750 S t a t e S t r e e t .
The S.U.Nows e m p h a s i z e s that the
size oi ihe contribution does not
m a t t e r , but hopes thai everyone
will help to meet the goal by C h r i s t mas.
PAGE 2
STATE UNIVERSITY N E W S , FRIDAY, N O V E M B E R 2 2 , 1 9 6 3 PAGE 3
STATE UNIVERSITY N E W S , FRIDAY, N O V E M B E R 22, 1963
One Special Day Believes in Budget
but the lack of planning by other groups
makes the planning of Stenard and Lewis
unique.
The other c o - c h a i r m e n of special days
were not only unable to live within their
incomes, but they were also unable to
realize that they were exceeding their
incomes until after the debts had been
created. "Good, old r e l i a b l e " Senate came
through and refilled the coffers of Mic
special day of the non-responsible groups.
Stenard and Lewis appear to be exceptional.
Now that all of the special days have
been completed, one noticeable financial
trend s e e m s to predominate. This trend
is that of violating the budget alloted
by Senate. There was only one complete
exception to this rule. This exception
is Homecoming.
Juniors Dick Stenard and Mary Lewis
were in charge of the weekend. They
seem to be the only students who were
able to do enough planning to remain
with their budget. Ordinarily this would
not be considered much of an achievement,
Dr. Knotfs Begins Evaluation Of Intellectual Atmosphere
E d i t o r ' s Note: T h e following article
b e g i n s an a t t e m p t by the S.U. N e w s
to e v a l u a t e the " i n t e l l e c t u a l a t m o s p h e r e " on t h i s c a m p u s .
A s e r i e s o f a r t i c l e s , w r i t t e n by
faculty m e m b e r s and s t u d e n t s , will
t a c k l e t h i s p r o b l e m in the S . U .
N e w s f r o m t i m e to t i m e .
By d o i n g t h i s , it i s hoped s o m e
s y n t h i s i s c a n be g l e a n e d out o f
the v a r i o u s a r t i c l e s , and a n under -
»-w*J"
Earlier Examination Scheduling
laid out his schedule, he would be res pi
sible to see that no conflicts o c c u r his examinations.
In c a s e s where conflicts were uniivu
able, a student could get p e r m i s Questioning students about their c o u r s e s from his advisor to schedule the com
This would prove beneficial for •
might have worked in the good old days.
T
e
a c h e r s would no longer have to :
When a University's student population
twenty
minutes out of their class.
pushes 4000, and when the number of
compile
exams, and students would
courses and majors offered i n c r e a s e s a s
ours have, then it is time to change our able to spread their e x a m s out i
better.
examination procedures.
We have finally gotten around to imp!
We think it would be wise to publish menting a new, intelligent regis) i •
examination schedules a l o n g with the plan in the University. L e t ' s conir
schedule of c l a s s e s . Then, a s a student the trend with the exam schedule.
We think i t ' s about time our big University went about scheduling final exams
in an intelligent manner. The ridiculous
method presently used is about a s out of
date as Minerva's spear.
Sure young fellow, that Camp Dippikill
is just up the road a
piece. But there isn't much there for folks like you.
Dippikill Referendum
The question has been raised in many minds, including o u r s , of whether the existence of our wilderness haven at Dippikill i s justified. We believe it
is not.
The camp i s located ninety miles to the north,
within easy reach of only the few students fortunate
enough to have c a r s . In spite of this, large amounts
of student money have already been spent on the
camp, and plans a r e being made for a $50,000 lodge
to be constructed.
We feel that the expenditure of such large amounts
of money should benefit more students, We also feel
that the entire student body should make the decision,
via a referendum, on whether to keep Dippikill o r
to sell it.
We call upon Senate to initiate such a referendum,
and to inform the student body of exactly how much
student tax money is devoted to Dippikill, and exactly
how much use is made of the camp. We leave the
rest to. the students.
College Calendar
F R I D A Y , N O V E M B E R 22
8:00 p.m.
Brubacher Informal Party
P o l i s h Community Center
8:30 p.m
Alden Informal Party
Knights of Columbus
7:00, 9:15 p.m. I F G " I t Happened to J a n e "
Draper 349
Saturday, November 23
9:00 Dorm Formals - A l d e n , Brubacher, P i e r c e , Sayles
Wednesday, November 27
12:00 - T h a n k s g i v i n g Recess
Wednesday, December 4
8:30 - B a s k e t b a l l - O n e o n t a
Washington Armory
Nomination Law Avoids Referendum
Senate s e e m s to think that the end ment to the SA constitution in tlv
justifies the means these days. The Sen- few months that will have the II
atorial Qualifications Law stands a s a meeting requirements in it.
case in point.
This amendment will be referivt
This law r e p r e s e n t s a rather deft piece a student referendum. Until then
of maneuvering by which Senate was Senatorial Qualifications Law is to
able to avoid having to go to the trouble a s a stop gap m e a s u r e for next sen
of holding a student referendum.
t e r ' s elections.
The Qualifications Law states " t h a t
This is all very well. It s a v e s i ' L
every person wishing to be elected to Commission the trouble of holclim
Senate be required to attend at least e x t r a referendum; it also s a v e s tlv•
three Senate meetings."
dent body the trouble of voting >
In the past (as with the enactment e x t r a amendment.
of the 2.0 requirements last year) any
Unfortunately, by saving everybody
new senatorial qualifications have been this time, Senate s e e m s to be igno
referred to student body approval.)
flue p r o c e s s in favor of cutting i
Senate smoothly got around this little admittedly time-consuming, c o r n e r s .
point by making the three meeting r e We a r e completely in favor o1
quirement a necessity for nomination, Senatorial Qualifications Law. Hm
not for election.
do object to the way it was munem
The reason given for this maneuvering past the student body.
is that the Government Re-Organization
This is a bad precedent; wo
Committee plans to submit an amend- not like to see it followed.
COMMUNICATIONS
State University
ESTABLISHED
Student Sees Senate
Overstepping limits
To the Editor:
I object to t h e recent Illicit',
taken by S e n a t e in c o n n e c t i o n with
c h a r t e r e d bu.se.s. When J g o v e r n m e n t ol an\ kind l a k e s upon i t s e l l
the l i b e l t v lu i n t e r l e i e with the
p r i v a t e p l a n s ol i t s s u b j e c t s , thai
g o v e i ninent i s g r a v e l , wi o n g .
I i e l e i liei e l o the audacity '.I
S e n a t e ' s a c t i o n last l i n l u , in l e inov ing cn.n KM eil bus s i g n s put up
b', individual s t u d e n t s who h a d t a k e n
i l i n e l o :',i. talk i o i nut iei i us a u t h o r i t i e s in m a k e ai i a n g e i n e n t s loi
c h a n e i bus s e t v i c e , and pul up Us
( S e n a t e ' s ) own c h a r t e i e d l u s s i g n s .
Who a s k e d S e n a t e lo do t h i s ? Old
S e n a t e e'.ei c o n s u l ! d i e siudent bod}
to s e e II n wanled S e n a t e l o do
m i s ? Was It n e c e s s a i . 7 I'm s u r e
.I.II will a g i e e .'.nil m e ihai the
a n s w e i in e i i h e i r a s e i s n e g a t i v e .
II S e n a t e i n t e n d e d to c h a r t e i b u s e s
to a l l p o i n t s o l New York S t a t e loi
i t s s i u d e n i bod;,, ihen ll s h o u l d have
a n n o u n c e d t h i s e a i l i e i in the vt.ui
and bi ought t h e i s s u e h e l o t e i h e
s t u d e n t l>ody. N o ' only that, but n
c h a i l e n n g b u s e s now S e n a t e c o u l d
h a v e c h a r t e i e d b u s e s to t h o s e ( d a c e s
thai c h a i l e i b u s s e i v j i e had uol
all eadv b e e n pi ov ided loi .
I p e r s o n a l i s had c h a r t e r e d a b u s
lo Newbiirgh at Ihe s a m e p r i c e that
S e n a t e i s a d v e r t i s i n g now. S e n a t e
w i t h o u t air, i n d i c a t i o n ol l i s a c t u m
snatched iu\ s i g n - u p sheet
from
the b u l l e t i n board o v e r n i g h t and
p o s t e d l i s own s i g n - u p s h e e t .
At no t i m e w a s I c o n s u l t e d o r e v e n
told ol S e n a t e ' s a c t i o n . F o r this
r e a s o n 1 leel that 1 w a s w r o n g e d ,
and lhal S e n a t e o w e s m e and Ihe
uiliei s t u d e n t s i n v o l v e d in t i n s a c t i o n
an apolog', .
I l o w e w i , s i n c e S e n a t e h a s iaken
Ihe III ei i\ io i elliov e in-, s i g n - u p
s n e e i I ' m sin e il will lollow ihi ough
I • going t o i ne 1 i .olv.'i.,', litis S t a t i o n
lo i am el Ihe bus ol hire Ihe c o n •>equeni e ol lailing to do s o . I wash
in . hands o | ihe whole at l a i r .
Cerlene Ross '65
Individual Remembered
in College Hustle
To the Editor:
Willi all Ihe h u s t l e and o u s t l e ol
c o l l e g e l i l e , i n d i v i d u a l s ai e olio.i
ill 'pped l), t h e w a v s i d e and o v e r looked,
b oi t u m i i e l ,
Mils w a s uol
l i n e in m e r a s e ol Kobei t b a i r b a n k s .
As m o s t ol ,oti know, ne had todl'up
out o l s c h o o l bet a i i s e ol a s e r i o u s
Illness.
I l l s l i i e n d s and l e l l o w s t u d e n t s
r a l l i e d lo do what they c o u l d . S i n c e
Bob n e e d e d l r a n s l u s i o n s ,
scores
weni to ihe Uendei Labs to donate
bli •oil; mam. old;, lo be lui nod away
lor v a r i o u s r e a s o n s .
Hub i s well on h i s way t o i e rir.ei . and e v e n llilnks h e ma •,
i etui ii I n the Spi nig S e m e s t e r , lie
would like io ihank .ill loi I h e n
i h o i l g l i i l u l i i e s s a n d g e n e t o s t l \.
Name Withheld
BY
Oic
Slate
every
The
also
University
' r i day
N i ^ i
throughout
Slolo
University
News
I I U0
pubhralion
office,
p.m. Sunday
through
may
1916
OF
excepting
Hall
489-6481.
', o l B r u b a c h e r
Hull
WILLIAM H. C Ot CAN
Edltor-tn-C hief
D A V I D W. JENKS
J O S I I ' l l * .'•
Managing
RONALD W. HAMIt TON
Sports
Frditor
B u s i n e s s Mu ' • .•
E D I T H S. HARDY
Associate
JACQUll.INI
Editor
Associate
JOANNI
Editor
P h i l o s o p h y Course
A new r o i n . s e , Philosophy 2UO,
w a s . m u l l e d h mi the Spring S c h e d ule ol ( l a s s e s .
I h e t u n r s e ' s o I 11 c i a I t i t l e
i s ' '<• o n i e in p o i , P h i l o s o p h i c a l
Thought; L x i s t e n i i u l i s u i . "
It will be latlghl In D r . Moi i i s
1. Hei gei
on M, T , and Til al
l:2!"j p . m .
technical
CARREN
Supervisor
E". Eugene
Paul
^ ,
Rosemary
Jensen, E l i i a b a t h
Mansour,
Hallock,
Gary
.
Bolty
I l '•
A IJR'.">
Tubey. C l a u d i a ' u l t i " ' '
S t r o u d , E a r l 0,
Wanor,
Helen
William
Smith,
Kurth, Ellen
Vl.rci'
J . Rage'
Penosack,
William
P.t.r
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O„9oi
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b i n f o r d C. W h i l o , R i c h o i d
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JUIINSUM
judv
D o u g l a , Upham, D e n , , , , Church, M i c h a e l
Nl.C.°mn;iri.C0"0nc,u,,hrld
> ••
Dig""
Gray,
/ u n g , Diane
T e c h n i c a l Supervisor
Photograph.,,
I I '
F r a n c o s B o n n e t t , H o r o l d 1 y n n e , Gui y Muiduck
Hirchborg,
T
A.iislont
',"» '
Circulotion-E xcliunyo
J o s o p h A . G o m o j , John M a r i o n , Gary L u c j u k ,
"°
i
Advertising
D«sk E d i t o r s . . .
Col umni sts
0 , i O
R A;'<<"
A s s o c i ale I '
SUSAN J. THOMSON
Dean's L i s t
T h e billowing n a m e s have hern
on D e a n ' s l i s t : Jiiliaune Molios 'tifi,
and Ian a l e e Shai i o \ 'Of,.
I ' '
JUDI f H D. Ml n A: '
K A R E N E. K E E F E R
NOTICES
... ,,,„•,
Wednesday.
E « o c u l i ve Editor
( E d i t o r ' s Note: Bob r e c e i v e d ten
pints
of blood from donors and
received a check for one hundred
d o l l a r s from the student body from
individual donations.)
' >
I uk«i
be , . , n . . .
° " U n t v . r . i . y N e w , a,.ume
c o
|
o m n
»ueh • « p , „ „ o n , do not n , c . „ a , y , . | | . c , t , , „ „ , ,
,
ol
c o n
„„un,ca..o„., a,
i t s l i k e t r a d i n g s t a m p s until t h e y
h a v e e n o u g h t o g e t that m a r k e t a b l e
thing — a d e g r e e . D i s c u s s i o n s about
c o u r s e w o r k and about b o o k s a r e , I
w o u l d g u e s s , s t r a t e g i c r a t h e r than
i n t e l l e c t u a l ; that i s , they a r e g e n e r a t e d by the d e s i r e t o d e t e r m i n e
what i s n e c e s s a r y for a good g r a d e
r a t h e r than by the a n t i c i p a t e d p l e a s u r e in s i m p l y e n t e r t a i n i n g an i d e a .
And what i s n e c e s s a r y f o r a good
g r a d e ? F o r m a n y s t u d e n t s an A ,
B , o r C would s e e m t o b e t h e
p r i z e f o r a s h r e w d g u e s s in a
p s y c h o l o g i c a l g a m e . Obviously the
l e c t u r e s of e v e r y i n s t r u c t o r m o v e
on s o m e p a t t e r n and for t h e s e s t u d e n t s the p a t t e r n I s to b e found
in t h e s o m e w h a t o b s c u r e i m p u l s e s
of the i n s t r u c t o r ' s p e r s o n a l i t y . D i s c u s s i o n s o f c o u r s e work b e c o m e ,
t h e n , a t t e m p t s to find out " w h a t
the i n s t r u c t o r w a n t s . "
But e v e n if t h e d i s c u s s i o n s s h o u l d
r e v o l v e around the d e m a n d s of the
Dr. Walter Knotts
( c o n t i n u e d on page 8)
wait
MORE KINDS OF CHEVROLETS THAN
Campus Chest Campaign Concludes
EVER BEFORE!
~
CHEVROLET
With Addition q{ Iwo New Activities
.'.'iVi'ii'.V-'iVu-'iJ W . - . V . V ,
The College Bowl on Sunday, November 17, marked
the end of this y e a r ' s Campus Chest Drive. The p u r pose of this drive was to raise money for World
University Service, the National Scholarship and Fund
for Negro Students, and the Albany Community Chest.
The co-chairmen of the
Senate [More]
Campus Chest Drive were
Janie Gusberti '65 and Doug
and Student O r g a n i z a t i o n s , Student
Lippert '65. The goal for
P u b l i c a t i o n s , and S p e a k e r s and P e r formers.
the drive was $2,000.
New Events
T h e new e v e n t s Included in t h i s
y e a r ' s c a m p a i g n included a hooteiiaiiny and a C o l l e g e Howl. T h e
C o l l e g e Bowl w a s o r g a n i z e d by I F C Course Guide
Q u e s t i o n n a i r e C o m m i t t e e report
I S C . T h e iwo t e a m s w e r e c o m p o s e d
i n c l u d e d s e v e r a l s t a t e m e n t s which
o f m e m b e r s from the s o r o r i t i e s
o u t l i n e d ihe future of t h e C o u r s e
and fraternities.
Guide. John M a r i o n 'Ob, s p o k e s m a n
Halpli G r i i n a l d i 'GG a c t e d a s m o d fur
Hie g r o u p w h i c h will p u b l i s h
erattn
ol the C o l l e g e Howl. T h e
t h i s g u i d e , p l a n s to p r e s e n t . i r o n f r a t e r n i t i e s won by u final s c o r e
s t i l u t i o i i for S e n a t e ' s a p p r o v a l b e - (if 3 5 0 - 1 4 5 .
f o r e ihe nexl m e e t i n g .
The b o o s t e r s Ibis year were sold
T h e group will not p u b l i s h a at p r i c e s ranging Iroin 2 5 ? to $1,00.
g u i d e this s e m e s l e r , but will s h i r t
Formerly
i h e \ w e r e sold al the
c o m p i l i n g data for ihe s e c o n d s e p r i c e ol $ 1 . 0 0 .
Illester.
S u c c e s s f u l Auction
F i n a n c e C o m m i t t e e s e t up a I i T h e C h i n e s e Auction w a s the m o s t
n a n c e policy t o b e l o l l o w e d r e g a r d i n g
s u c c e s s l u l " I all die e v e n t s . T h i s
i n o n t h h budgetary r e p o r t s from
e v e n t w a s u n d e r ihe d i r e c t i o n ol
budgetary o r g a n i z a t i o n s . A report
p a i l-'asano 'cf, ami Bill L a u n d r y
ol an o r g a n i z a t i o n ' s s p e n d i n g i s t o
<(,(,. T h e b i g g e s t money niakei w a s
b e g i v e n lo a s p e c i l n c u l i i i i i i l l o e
| | , , , 111111'.'.111{'. "I p i e s at J u n i o r s
member.
Aniline,
I >i l i o c c o , J o s e p h Gain,
Included
in i h e poln . w a s ' ' I f J o h n Si in i e \ ant, a n d L e o n a r d L a p i n IIn* i u l i ' s .II e noi c o m p l i e d with, s k i .
Ihe b u d g e t
in q u c s i i n i i will b e
A ihince held S a i u r d a v , N o v e m b e r
Ii c i z e n . "
lli alsi i c, ml ributed t o ihe hind.
JET-SM00TH LUXURY CHEVROLET
15 models. Four series. One
brand-new series—the Impala
Super Sports. More luxury,
too. Even the Biscaynes are
now fully carpeted. There's
seven different engines' worth
of power—140 hp to 425 hp
(optional at extra cost). It's
a matter of knowing if you'd
like your luxury on the gentle
side or on the other side.
Model
O t h e r m a j o r g r o u p s fell under
the t i t l e s of F a c u l t y C o u n c i l , G r a d u a t e A c a d e m i c C o u n c i l , a n d an
undergraduate Academic
Council.
MYSKANIA Answers Senator;
Senate Has Power to Cliarter Buses
newspapci
University
at IV 2 - 3 3 2 6 .
in R o o m
Mistaken Values
F r o m this fragmentary data, I
would s u p p o s e that t h e i n t e l l e c t u a l
c l i m a t e at S t a t e i s not v e r y s t i m u l a t i n g . Many s t u d e n t s , I ' m a f r a i d ,
s e e t h e i r four y e a r s h e r e s i m p l y
a s a p e r i o d in w h i c h they p a i n f u l l y
g o through c o u r s e s , a d d i n g u p c r e d -
.^MWiiB^mwmMW'mMtmnr.
lc sin ii c o i i i i n l i l e e s d e e m e d nei e s s a i \ . ' ' Sen,He h a s Ihe authi n i l .
in en.ici l e g i s l a t i o n c o n c e r n i n g u s
po'Aei i ,1 r b , n l e i b u s e s .
.'.
| i Senate h a s i b i s powei , h a s
ihe Si iiilcnl A S M icial Ion I'l e s i d e n l
In ,ici H I iluiu e v. lib At t o b' V , Nei •
I IK |JI wei ' i ' e n l o t i e t h i s l e g l s l a Hi,u I I I o l Ihe Sllldoiil A s s u r l . i t l o n
l n in'.'
t ouslilililoii
MYSKANIA i e i i ' l e i •
In ;n i i .1 d a m e v. iih Ai i n le 1\ ,
Hie l o l l o w i i i r inlet pi clui inns:
Seclitiii 11S-.I. H s h a l l be Ihe dill .
|
II.i', S e n u l e il
islillil liiii.d
ni i be Pi e s i d e n l " l o e -.ei ute al I
hiiwel lo ei.jt I leg islal lull in It' a i d
h't'i slai ii HI p a s s e d I y S e n a t e . "
o< Sen,iic ' ' a s s u m i n g i h e i i ' S p o i i s l I. I l a s Sen.lie
I . i be adopl ion
bllli . lui i I in i lei in. b u s e •. b ' l
nl litis l e g i s l a t i o n , d i e powul lo be
s c h e d u l e d . ac.ji i n n s ? ' '
11it< stile chai lei el ol b u s e s loi
I'he uinl inn a s s l u i e d in I he i e l e i
s t l i e IulI'-1 . ai ai n HIS .'
i al i s mi oi i e e l . I be . in i ci i innHun
L e g i s l a t i o n p a s s e d Mat 'i'i. l'JG-f
is " l h a l S e n a l e a s s u m e iht! i t : s p n n s i b . Stinleiit A s s o c i a t i o n S e n a t e d o e s
lillli , loi r h . n l e i ed b u s e s loi Hie
inn g i \ e Sen.tie the e x c l u s i v e powei
M m l e n l b o d i dm ing si h e d u l e i l u n , i i,ai iei b u s e s .
callous."
Saul law d o e s not pi ohibll a g i v e n
In ,e , ,,i iluiu e Willi Ai I n le \ 1,
sliidmii
I i II in chai lei lllg a b u s .
S e c t i o n i( ol i h e S t u i l e n t A s s o c i a t i o n
Sliouhl b u s e s be c h a r t e r e d by othei
( o n s l i i u l loll, iv b I c h i n a i l s , " l'he
. s t u d e n t s , Ihe law in q u e s t i o n d o e s
l u n i l l i i l i i'l the S e n a l e s h a l l be l o
g i v e Senale ihe responsibility t o
e x a m i n e all J I e a s o l stutienl i n t e r e s t
s u p e i v i s e die b u s e s s o chai lei e d .
and a c t i v i t i e s a s a m e a n s ol d e t e r MYSKANIA
m i n i n g and oi r e c o m m e n d i n g policy ,
F r e d e r i c k G. Smith
ami p r o v i d i n g loi Ihe m e a n s lo
i n i t i a t e s u c h policy uiio l e g i s l a t i o n
Chairman
To: Student A s s o c i a t i o n
From: M Y S K A N I A
Re: Questions Referred to MYSK A N I A by Senator James M i l e s
shown:
Impala
Sport
Coupe
TOTALLY NEW CHEVELLE! 11
models. Three series. An
entirely new line of cars sized
a foot shorter than the big
cars, so you get the handling
ease of smaller cars. But don't
sell it short! Chevelle gives
you generous passenger and
luggage room. Engine choice:
120 to extra-cost 220 hp.
Model
Cplliiii^^
-«
t
shown:
Malibu
Sport
Coupe
NEW CHEVY II Six models. Two
series—Nova and Chevy II
100. Both now offer an extracost 195-hp V8 or a 155-hp
six, to give you more Chevy
II power than ever before.
Match this added power with
Chevy II thrift, and you can
see why Chevy II will be
harder than ever to keep up
with this year.
Model
roguhir
by d i a l i n g
f r o m annex l o a n n e x . A l l I c a n
do i s g u e s s f r o m what I h e a r In
c l a s s r o o m o r in c o n v e r s a t i o n s with
students.
Pat Fasano takes a slightly sadistic pleasure in letting Bill
Laundry do his bit for Campus Chest last week.
l»|«
owno.J urn) o p e r a t e d
your,
be l o n c h a d
Brubacher
located
HAY
CLASS
is a s t u d e n t
the school
be r e a c h e d by d i a l i n g
Hi,,
THE
NEWS
—i"""
By i t s curriculum it can bear
w i t n e s s to the i m p o r t a n c e of t h o s e
i n t e l l e c t u a l a r t s w h i c h q u i c k e n the
s e n s e s , s t i r the i m a g i n a t i o n , and
m a k e t h e mind f l e x i b l e and d i s by Dr. Walter Knotts
criminating. By its appointments
The a i m of any u n i v e r s i t y i s to it can a t t e m p t to i n s u r e that t h i s
c u r r i c u l u m i s v i v i d l y r e a l i z e d in
foster die intellectual growth of
teaching which itself i s intellectually
i t s s t u d e n t s . But what a u n i v e r s i t y
distinguished.
a s in institution can do to a c h i e v e
this goal i s l i m i t e d .
Attitudes Most Influential
But the c o u r s e of study a student
f o l l o w s and ihe kind o f t e a c h e r s
he h a s a r e of l e s s i m p o r t a n c e in
f o s t e r i n g h i s i n t e l l e c t u a l g r o w t h than
the a t t i t u d e s w h i c h he m e e t s a m o n g s t
his fellow students.
T h e s e a t t i t u d e s play a r o u n d h i m
c o n t i n u o u s l y . T h e y d e t e r m i n e the
a t m o s p h e r e o r c l i m a t e in which he
m o v e s and lias h i s b e i n g .
It would b e p r e s u m p t u o u s for
me,
a t e a c h e r l o tell you what
t h i s a t m o s p h e r e i s l i k e . I don't
know what i s s a i d o v e r c o f f e e or
in the d o r m i t o r i e s o r on the t r e k s
s t a n d i n g of t h i s c a m p u s ' " i n t e l l e c t u a l a t m o s p h e r e " be m a d e p o s sible.
shown:
Novo
t-Door
Sedan
NEW C0RVAIR Seven models in
four series. Two Greenbriers.
A new standard 95-hp engine
(nearly 19' ,' livelier). An
extra-cost 110-hpengineonall
('orvairs and a 1 .r>0-hp Turbocharged engine in the Monza
Spyder. Styling? Never been
cleaner. Interior? Never been
brighter. Fun to drive? Never
been more so.
Model
shown:
Monza
Club
Coupe
NEW CORVETTE Two motlelsthe Sport Coupe with a new
one-piece rear window plus
improved interior ventilation,
and the dashing Sting Kay
Convertible. Both boast
smoother rides, improved
sound insulation. Both go
with four big VS's, including
;i new extra-cost 875-hp
engine with Fuel Injection.
Model
shown: Sporl
Ask about a SMILE-MILE Ride and the Chevrolet
Song Book at your Chevrolet dealer's
Coupe
STATE UNIVERSITY N E W S . FRIDAY, N O V E M B E R 22, 1963
PAGE 4
Current Comment
WSUA Schedule
MON-THURS:
5 p.m.:
' C a m p u s B e a t " ; Leon
G r o s s , Bob Clark, Ron C a m p l s i ,
Rick Genero.
6 p . m . : Popular Vocal & I n s t r u m e n t a l ; Jim Wilson, Bev L e e ,
Ron Walter.
7 p . m . : Show, Folk, & J a z z ; Dave
Hughes, Tom Vandermeulen, G e r r y
T e r d i m a n , Marty Schwartz.
8 - 1 0 p . m . : Mood i n s t r u m e n t a l ;
Bob F u l l e m , George Ashley, Carol
Hughes, Duane White, Linda P e r kins.
10 p . m . : C l a s s i c s ; Bill Moran,
Tom Alexander, Linda P e r k i n s , Art
Loder.
FRI: 5 p . m . : " C a m p u s B e a t " ; J i m
Wilson.
6-11 p . m . : Variety; Doug P e t e r son, Ron Campisi, Ron Walter.
SAT: 1 p . m . : "Golden O l d i e s " ; Bob
Lawson, Maureen Glasheen.
6-11 p . m . : Variety; Stan Katz,
Don King, Jay Rosovsky.
SUN.:
1 p . m . C l a s s i c s ; Nick A r g y r o s ,
Ian Leet.
'Perspective"; Doug
4 p.in
Peterson
Defeat of Bonds Assists
Jersey Democrat Decline
by Joseph W, Galu
The r e s u l t s of the off-year e l e c tions in New J e r s e y reveal a major
setback for the Democratic party.
It is my feeling that the setback
will be a t e m p o r a r y one.
The Governor of New J e r s e y ,
Richard Hughes, i s a D e m o c r a t .
The Assembly was under D e m o c r a t i c control. The Senate has a l ways been controlled by the R e publicans with the help of s e v e r a l
s m a l l r u r a l counties.
Hughes b a c k e d a p r o g r a m of
bonded indebtedness to pay for c a p i tal construction. The plan was d e feated by significant m a r g i n s in
the state-wide r e f e r e n d u m s . The
plan was proposed in two p a r t s ;
both were defeated.
Crazy Coalition of Opposition
The proposal was opposed by
many R e p u b l i c a n s , the Young
FROM CAMPUS TO CAMPUS...
FROM COAST TO COAST...
THEY ALL LOVE
A m e r i c a n s for F r e e d o m , the A m e r i cans for Democratic Action, and
the League of Women V o t e r s . This
last organization is most probably
the c a u s e for the defeat.
The official party views gave
the a p p e a r a n c e that the proposal
was b i - p a r t i s a n with support from
both D e m o c r a t s and Republicans.
The D e m o c r a t s were firmly c o m mitted to the p r o g r a m since Gove r n o r Hughes was its author.
T h e r e were many Republicans
in opposition to the p r o p o s a l s , a l though the Republican party did not
take a formal or an official position.
Weak Reasoning
The plan was for capital c o n s t r u c tion paid for by bonds. In and of
itself, it is questionable whether
tlie plan would have been defeated.
The m e a n s for paying off the bonds
precipitated most of the opposition.
The method lor r e t i r i n g the bonds
was to use income from the New
J e r s e y Turnpike. T h i s method was
and is a poor one. T h e r e a r e plans
for the F e d e r a l highway system to
include a highway running almost
p a r a l l e l to the J e r s e y Turnpike.
Either the Turnpike will be given
o v e r to the F e d e r a l system or the
income from the road will virtually
d i s a p p e a r . The reason for this is
that all F e d e r a l highways a r e toll
free.
T h e defeat uf ttie p r o p o s a l s can
l)e blamed, with a good deal of logic,
upon the Republicans. The League
of Women Voters provided the m a r gin of victory, but the Republicans
provided the vast majority of tiie
votes in opposition.
If you can take your nose out of that text book for j u s t a
moment, you'll notice that Yum-Yum has emerged as the most
stimulating campus sport in many a year. W h o needs p a n t y raids
when you can Yum-Yum under a large tree or in a little s p o r t s
c a r f Be advised, however, t h a t on rainy days the
hip
prefer
their
Yum-Yum
indoors.
(Research
rooms of libraries and e m p t y field houses are considered the choicest locations.)
As you've probably deduced by now, Y u m Yum is strictly for Him and H e r . A n d in Columbia's
riotous new comedy " U N D E R T H E
YUM-YUM
T R E E " , (Columbia Pictures, not Columbia University) Y u m - Y u m
is developed into a high a r t form by its greatest
Problem of Republicans
T h i s leaves the Republicans with
the problem of providing tlie tax
p r o g r a m to pay for the needed construction. New J e r s e y is now one
of but two s l a t e s with no state income
tax and no general s a l e s tax.
One of ttie two p r o g r a m s will
have to be imposed, if any semblance
of governmental function is to r e main. Neither p r o g r a m will win
any votes for the Republicans, e s pecially in 19G'I.
The D e m o c r a t s can now sit hack
enjoying their numerous legislative
defeats and watcli the Republicans
take all the blame lor whatever
p r o g r a m is instituted. Hughes will
learn his lesson il he lias any of
the political sense lie showed in
getting elected in 1901
practitioner,
"Hogan."
Hogan, hilariously portrayed by Jack Lemmon, is a lecherous
landlord who rents a p a r t m e n t s to attractive girls and goes from
door to door with a heart-shaped passkey. One of the tenants is
Carol Lynley, a curvy co-ed who is conducting a cozy experiment
in platonic, pre-marital co-habitation. ( I t ' s all in the interests
of science.) Dean Jones is her nervous wreck of a (lance and Edie
Adams is on the premises as the marriage-counseling teacher who
takes a tumble for Hogan.
Hogan's own a p a r t m e n t , happily referred to as "The Sin
Bin," is an electronic ambush-on-virtue' that could make etchings
obsolete. There's a violin section, for example, that emerges out
of nowhere and plays, without benefit of human hands, "Music To
Make Yum-Yum By." There's also a bar with
enough whiskey to refloat the T i t a n i c But don't
P a r t y Split
The second problem the Republicans have is that ol a liberal v e r s u s
conservative s p l i t . U.S. Senator
Clifford Case is a liberal; most New
J e r s e y l e g i s l a t o r s and C o n g r e s s m e n
are conservatives.
In 1964, the Democratic Senator,
Harrison A. (Pete) Williams will
lie up lor r e - e l e c t i o n . The Republicans have to find someone whose
views a r e both well known and
someone who will not antagonize
either faction ol llie p a r t i .
hour of the eight Republican Cong r e s s m e n from New J e r s e \ a r e
considering running against Will i a m s , None of them a r e known
throughout the State, although s e v e r a l have moderate r e c o r d s .
The Republicans have no candidate to oppose Williams, The) also
have the problem and the responsibility ol instituting a tax program
which cannot help but be unpopular.
get Ilogan wrong. J a c k Lemmon defines Hogan
as "a man who is outraged at humanity. There
fore, everything that seems outlandish and bizarre
to the rest of the world, seems perfectly normal to C
him. Hogan cannot understand why the world is so ungrateful to
him."
Walt's Subs
Around the Corner
from the Dorms
We guarantee it's marvelous mayhem and sure-fire material for a term paper on Laughter. It may not earn you an "A"
—but what an 'education' when you see Jack Lemmon in Columbia Picture's "UNDER THE YUM-YUM TREE," co starring:
Carol Lynley • Dean Jones • Edie Adams • Imogene Coca • Paul
Lynd • Robert Lansing and The Yum-Yum Girts.
Mon.-Thurs. Ila.m.1130p.m.
SEE IT AT A THEATRE IN YOUR CITY!
271 Ontario Street
Open Daily
Fri. £,Sat. Ha.m.-IJOa.m.
Sun. 4:00p.m.-lip.m.
STATE U N I V E R S I T Y N E W S , FRIDAY, N O V E M B E R 2 2 , 1963
Emerging Africa—
A View by an Exchange Student
Common-BtcUe/i
by Maurice Tsododo
T h e Second Scramble for A f r i c a
First Scramble
A scramble is a mad rush for something. The first
scramble for Africa was in the nineteenth century
when the European countries rushed to secure territories in Africa. To achieve their ends the colonialists incited tribe against tribe. They even fought among
themselves for the control of the territories.
Second Scramble
Today there is a second s c r a m b l e for Africa, but
this time the rush is not by individual count n but by two power blocks; the Socialist and Capitnlisi
blocks. The technique is simple. One power Find
labels an African move for unity"An Imperialist Plot,'
not because it is so but because the block docs :i,r
like it.
Another power block labels another move for in ,',,
"A Communist P l o t , " not because it is so but beta ; „
the power block does not like it. What annoys Hi,
African is not the use of these slogans, but it's Hi,
way they expect the Africans to be treated as a In,' I
of naive idiots.
The African is constantly told that unity is impo.ssii Ho
because of tribalism. If he t r i e s to take m e a s u r e
to deal with tribalism, he is accused of "dictators h i p . " While there a r e problems, the African believes
that many of them are emphasized for the purp- ,.<
of sabotaging any move to unite Africa. The C >;
is a specific example of this sabotage.
To quote Julius Nyerere, the P r e s i d e n t of Tanganvik.i:
" T h e r e is no need for fear. All we need to do i- in
use our intellect; to know what is good for us. We n - I
to listen to the outside world; to accept what we be lb ,,•
is in the best interest of Africa and African Pii''v,
and to reject (and reject in no uncertain terms) v-lni
we believe is not in the best i n t e r e s t of Al'rn-t.
The misleading slogans of ' d e m o c r a c y ' and 'socialism'
b e a r little relation to what Africa is doing, ami tk v
a r e generally used by those whose purpose is n>
divide Africa into opposing c a m p s . "
by E l i z a b e t h Stroud
" R e m e m b e r who you a r e , and what you represent
Okay, I'll play your silly games. Who am I? Whni
I r e p r e s e n t ? I'm fully aware that my birth err!
cate will tell me what my name is; my extra-cur-'
ular activities could be said to define "what 1 n
r e s e n t . " What else, pray tell, could one m
answer the above questions? Why should anyone h
any problem in fulfilling the above " r e q u e s t ' . " '
Well, I'm not satisfied with s t a t i s t i c s ; the vities I've participated in don't even begin to appi
what I am, or what I represent. At the risk of I"
dubbed a " s t a r r y - e y e d , overly sentimental fresh into whom Albany still seems like a darned gooi. <••
versify - as opposed to the unenthusiastic, all
often derogatory upperclassman — I maintain
this admiration and respect go a long way \<>w
the answer I've been looking for.
I am a student, an individual who, by my ar
ation with Albany, has assumed a responsibiliU
its reputation in the eyes of the r e s t of the w
Since I am in the teaching program, I have a,ssu:
an even greater responsibility to my future sttnlnr
in preparing myself now, and in attempting I
to prepare them.
The responsibility I feel, engendered in pari
the stature of Albany, and in part by my own p
sonal aspirations, not only contributes to a clel'iiiH
of " m e , " but also "what I r e p r e s e n t . " It's taken .-I
to four y e a r s to enable me to attempt any delition at all, and it will probably take many m
before I can begin to be really definite.
This Thanksgiving, many'of you will be hil I"
on with some variation of this question. Your
high school buddies will want to know about AUmi,
about how you're doing, and a myriad of other Hum*
Uo you know the answer? Can you " R e m e m b e r wl
you a r e , and what you represent''"' o r haven't y<
ever bothered to wonder?
atfoude Jlawli
On Campus
PAGE 6
IfcfQlnWm
(Author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boyt!"
and "Barefoot Boy With Cheek.")
by Toni Mester and Ed Wolner
KAPPA D E L T A
Another Tragedy
Are bad e d i t o r i a l s becoming a S.U.N, tradition? Following the debacle
of "An A m e r i c a n T r a g e d y " was an equally d i s a s t r o u s comment on
Rockefeller. Wliere does tbe writer get bis evidence for a s s e r t i n g
that Rocky " h a s shown such complete stupidity and such complete
lack of common s e n s e in everything he has done in recent m o n t h s . . . ? "
And whoever b a s e s his presidential vote in '04 (if Rockefeller gets
the nomination) solely on Nelson's tuition policy last January shows
an equal amount of shallow substantiation and thought. Go college
mentality in ' 6 4 .
Hove a Heart for Hartley and All That
Il s e e m s that the focal point in discussion of the administration this
s e m e s t e r is the Dean of Men. Ton much of it, unfortunately, is insipid
and based on r u m o r , b i a s , and a somewhat frenzied d e s i r e for s c a p e goatism. C r i t i c i s m is good, where it is both warrented and c o n s t r u c t i v e .
T i c k e d Off at M Y S K A N I A T i m e
Fred Smith & Co. have really been going at it full steam this s e m e s t e r —
i.e. long ' i n s t r u c t i v e ' columns on student morality, etc. — but one
proclamation really hit tlie lemon jackpot. The recommendations on
the convocation were painful. We like the idea of having s p e a k e r s from
our own institution, but it s e e m s downright assiniue to imply that
inviting P r o f e s s o r Van Doren was a breach ol tradition. Don't rule
out a good thing. And must we be subjected to a parade of student
government officers — including the thirteen walking m u m m i e s ? Don't
we have enough of petty bureaucracy the rest of the y e a r ? To quote
the Myskies: " A University in transition is in danger ol losing many
tilings..." Including our m i n d s ? ? ?
T h e r e will be a date party F r i day November 22 at F o r t O r a n g e .
Seven new m e m b e r s were pledged:
L a u r i e Weinett and Cindy Welsh,
J u n i o r s ; and Joan P o d r i s , Phyllis
Rich, Sue Haubner, Carol Walker,
and Bev Dates, Sophomores.
Candy Eckhardt '6G was elected
Sophomore I.S.C. r e p r e s e n t a t i v e .
Sue Murphy spoke about her t r i p
to India, Sunday, November 10. A
coffee hour was held with K.B.
on Monday.
PSI GAMMA
P r e s i d e n t Veronica Gillis '64 announces that the coffee hour with the
b r o t h e r s of Alpha Pi Alpha will lie
held Monday, November 25,
Pledged last Tuesday w e r e : Carol
F a m e s 'G5, and Sophomores B a r b a r a
C l a r k , Susan Judge, Judi Keyset',
Lynn Kurth, Donna Nolan, Pat Stott,
and Carol Whitmeyer.
C H I SIGMA T H E T A
President Marietta Rilieri '65
announces that the football game
Willi KD will lie held at 2'00 p.m.
tomorrow. A coffee hour will be
held with SLS Monday at 8:30 p . m .
SHOULD AULD ACQUAINTANCE
AND JAZZ LIKE THAT
I am now un elderly gentleman, full of years and aches, b u t
my thoughts keep ever turning to my undergraduate days. This
is called "arrested development."
But I cannot stop the healing tide of nostalgia t h a t washes
over me as I recall those golden campus days, those ivy-covered
buildings (actually, a t my college, there was only ivy: no bricks),
those pulse-tingling lectures on John Dryden and Cotton
Mather, the many friends I made, the many deans I bit.
I know some of you are already dreading the day when you
graduate and lose touch with all your merry classmates. It is
my pleasant task today to assure you that it need not be so;
all you have to do is join the Alumni Association and every year
you will receive a bright, newsy, chatty bulletin, chock-full of
tidings about your old buddies.
Oh, what a red-letter day it is at my house, the day the
Alumni Bulletin arrives! I cancel all my engagements, take the
phone off the hook, dismiss my resident osteopath, put the
cheetah outside, and settle down for an evening of pure pleasure
with the Bulletin and (need I add?) a good supply of Marlboro
Cigarettes.
Patching It Up With M Y S K A N I A T i m e
Well, lias the bus fiasco been cleared up? What r e m a i n s of our t r a ditional free m a r k e t ? What constitutes soliciting? How much do university students have to be protected from " e x p l o i t a t i o n ? " An early
deadline prohibits comment on Al Smith's Solicitation Hill and its
late on the Senate F l o o r , but it p l a c e s a load of power into the hands
,il Services C o m m i t t e e . The MYSKANIA ruling that Senate doesn't
have the sole power to c h a r t e r buses is necessarily oblique. We hope
lor a judicious application ol the decisions.
Speaking of Power
We sort of resent the was University Guidelines is being quoted 111
student government as il 11 wore divine revelation itself. It is at best
a motley and s e c o n d - s o u r c e explication of the way tilings a r e done
around here (from the Student P e r s o n n e l ' s point of view) and should
not be taken at face \ a l u e .
Smiles w i t h Mi les
Seator Jim has asked for student opinion a propos l i b r a n h o u r s .
We suggest .that week night hours for Friday night, regular Saturday
hours, and afternoon and evening hours for Sunday be extended on a
trial basis for about a month. W e ' r e s i n e the university will find
die student body responsive and it s e e m s well worth the expense.
More Smiles with Miles
The SA Compensation Bill proposed last week was the most a t r o c i o u s
piece of legislation ever to appear on the floor of Senate. We hope
it was cut, mashed, and thoroughly regurgitated If, tins week's Senate.
We also hope it was a joke ol s o r t s . If not, God save u s , the budget,
and Ihe cause ol voluntary ser'. me.
Allllllllrrrrrrightlllll
Chocolate covered graham c r a c k e r s to Janie Gusberti and Doug Lipperl
lor a really original and well oigain/.ed Campus Chest. Now l e t ' s eo
lug time College Howl. No?
Watch Forum ol Holmes m Decembui ; big things ai e happening.
VETS - SENIORS - UNDERGRADS
MEN WOMEN
Do you have any questions about yr ,r
military
obligations?
Would you like
to have the latest information
many
on the
programs?
SIGMA PHI SIGMA
Janie Gusberti '55 announces that
the following g i r l s were pledged last
Tuesday night: Alice Katz'OG, Sheila
Monahan 'GG, Harriett Rossoif'GG,
Susan Turbyfill 'C6, Candy Klampert
'65, Anita Lotz ' 6 5 , Marcia Schonberg 'GG.
GAMMA KAPPA PHI
President Barb Keenau '04, announces that the following g i r l s
were pledged to the sorority November 12.
Meg Steflens '64. C a r i i e D r o s t
' 6 5 . Angi An/.alone '66, Gail Bolliver '66, Katln Glowaki ' 6 6 , Rose
Koch '66. Linda Kroell '06, Carol
Marclniiit '66, and Joanie Tliomsen
'66.
PHI
SIGMA A L P H A
liai ,ii .i Hacknak, '6-1, spoke on
lit'i 11 ip to Ital . i his pasi s u m m e r .
The I al k was given at I lie Sigma
Al| 'i.a house on N'o\ end ci 1 7.
Dr. 1' liiklesleiii was eniei lamed
jl dinner i m No\ euihei Li,
A r o l l e r In-Ml Was hold w nil I'ollei
Club Moiida, . N'n.eiiihei 1H.
I lie lollou l'n gil Is v.'ei e pledged
No.,Miii ei 12: 1 limiu Gu otie, Donna
Nowah. Joy Swam Phoebe Hearsou.
ti in n Co.si el s — J (in lot s; and Carol
Com o.
an d
Mat IIMI
NOW O P E N
Won. T h u r v U n t i l 9 P . M
JOHN MISTLETOE
Ij you are interested
obligation*
llowui I
or just want to
contact*
without
A.L.RE1Svia student
SHOP
238 W a s h i n g t o n
m> mIO
mail
or
phone IV-9-10X6
"Well, fellow alums, it certainly has been a wing-dinger of a
year for us old grads! Remember Mildred Cheddar and Harry
('.•iniembert, those crazy kids who always held bands in Econ II?
Well, they're married now and living in Clovis, New Mexico,
wliere Harry rents spear-fishing equipment,and Mildred has just
given birth to a lovely L'K-pound daughter, her second in four
months. Nice going, Mildred and Harry!
"Remember Jetbro Brie, the man we voted most likely to
succeed'' Well, old .letliro is still gathering laurels! Last week
lie was voted ' M o t o n n a n of the Year' by bis fellow workers in
the Dulutlt streetcar system. 'I owe it all to my brakeman,'
s.nd .letliro in a characteristically modest acceptance speech.
Same old .letliro!
"Probably the most glamorous tunc bad by any of us old
alums was had by Francis Macomber last year. He went on a
lug game hunting safari all the way to Africa ' We received many
interesting post cards from Francis until he was, alas, accidentally shot and killed by his wife and while hunter. Tough
luck, Francis!
"Wilametta 'Deadeye' Macomber, widow of the late beloved
Francis Macomber, was married yesterday to Fred 'Sitreshot'
Sigafoos, white hunter, in a simple double-ring ceremony in
Nairobi Many happy returns, Wiluniethi and Fred!
"Well, alum.-, that just about wraps it up for this year.
Buy bonds!"
1UIKI Mux Sliuliuun
*
»
*
Old (/rails, nctc gradx, undergradu,
and iwii-grach all agree:
that good Richmond
tobacco recipe, that clean
Sclectrate
litter, hacc turned all lift)/ states of the I'nion into
Marlboro
Country.
Won't you join the throng'.'
Ave.
PHONOGRAPHS
REPAIRED
BLUE N O T E S H O P
your ISavy man on campus —
-
Sopln. II l o r e s .
The sistei s w i-.ii u. ihank Mi .
and Ml s. McKliinoh loi chapel oiling
I hei 1 ha'. I ide No\ embei I '•.
BOOK
know the jacts,
DELTA
A c t i n g President Mary Ellen
Hieeiian '6-1 wishes to announce
thai the billowing g i r l s were pledged
Nov. 25.
Ann Harry . Linda Compson, Bobbie Evans, Joan Greeuberg, Claudia
Mackey . Maureen Newman, Margie
Saul, Susan Thompson, Hetty Waner,
and Jo West, Sophomores. Also
Cindy Gale. Linda Negus, and Giua
Wasli\ lib'. Juiiiot s.
A collee hour lor the sorority
iactilty will He held next Monday.
Whenever I am having fun, a Marlboro makes the fun even
more fun. T h a t filter, t h a t flavor, that yielding soft pack, t h a t
firm Flip T o p box, never fails to heighten my pleasure whether
1 am playing Double Canfield or watching the radio or knitting
an afghan or enjoying any other diverting pursuit you might
name except, of course, spear fishing. But then, how much
sjx'iir fishing does one do in Clovis, New Mexico, where I live?
But 1 digress. Let us return to my Alumni Bulletin and the
fascinating news about my old friends and classmates. I quote
from the current issue:
\\t> ( t N I N A t AVt
HO 2 UIJI UPtN 114 * t M
JUST IN CASE YOU DIDN'T KNOW IT . . . .
ART KAPNER
Writes all types of insurance
JAKES
FOOD MARKET
504 Hudson A Y * .
Albany, N.Y.
IY 2-4211
iv 2-m*
LIFE - AUTO - FIRE
HO 5-1471
Hospitalization
75 State Street
HO 2-5581
PAGE 6
STATE UNIVERSITY N E W S , FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1963
KB in AMIA Keg League Sunberth
Waterbury Second, Potter Third
STATE UNIVERSITY N E W S . FRIDAY. N O V E M B E R 22. 1963
Kappa Beta retained its lead in the A.M.I.A. scratch bowling league with a
7-0 shut-out over TXO. The strong KB performance was led by Al Barnard
(583) and Jim Gittleman (557). KB rolled over their opponents in three straight
games, bringing its record to 14-0. Ray Lalonde set the pace for TXO with a
544 s e r i e s .
Waterbury squeezed into second place by taking seven points in its match
with the Defenders. Led by Tom Jones and John Lilga, a tough Potter five shut
out APA.
Jones, with a 559, and Lilga, with 544, sparked the Potter capture
of third place in the league standings. The Unknowns moved into fourth place
as they whipped the Holy|
Bowlers 7-0.
Dave Roegner, bowling|
for the U n k n o w n s , improved his fine 544 seriesI
of last week by cashing in
for 589 pins, It was a goodl
day for Roegner and hi si
teammate P a u l Beaudin
(567) as they led their team|
to a 2650 triple.
T h i s liigli has only been matched
by KB who duplicated this feat o n |
the s a m e day.
In the other match, the NewmanI
Club upset the Goobers 4 - 3 in a l
hard fought battle. Tony Ricciardelli f
(529) and Tim Motal (511) led the
w i n n e r s , while Dick Kimball (548)
and Kirk Ellis (544) were high f o r '
the l o s e r s .
Fairbank and KB Take Honors Again
This w e e k ' s honors go to Dick
F a i r b a n k . ( P o t t e r ) 227; Dave Roegn e r (Unknowns) 589; and the Kappa
Beta team (945).
The second keg league will commence this Thursday at 4 p.m.
at the Playdium. T e a m s and schedules a r e posted on the AMIA bulletin board.
A n o t h e r A M I A b o w l i n g s e a s o n g e t s under w a y .
NOW AT STATE COLLEGE CO-OP
A
book
that
TlirWInir I louse Mills
1050
inftft
MANDATE
FOR CHANGE
|()H
Peds 14th in NCAA MeetCAGERS OPEN AGAINST ONEONTA DEC.4
End Successful Season Five Lettermen, Two Starters, Return To The Ranks
Future Prospects Hopeful
HAMMING
IT UP
by Ron H a m i l t o n
by Gary Murdoclc
Basketball brings to the minds of many people
thoughts of dances that nobody goes to after games,
Doc Sauers' charmingpersonality at the games, s c r e a m ing fans at all the games except for the Siena game,
and the sportsmanlike cheers that issue forth from
the State side of the Armory.
Yes,
the time has come to remove the washing
machine agitator horns, drums, and bugles from
mothballs and start to limber up. This year will
bring many of the same situations that we have
laughed at and scoffed at in the past, as well as
a few new ones.
No one will ever forget the Cortland Basketball
Tourney. Just for the information of the student
body we (our basketball team) finished second. This
year attendance at post season tournaments will be
limited to dean's list students and MYSKANIA members
only. The Dean of Students will lead the cheering
section.
We are all wondering if Dan Cunha and his boys
have figured out a way to have Dick Crossett thrown
out of this year's game? While we're on the subject,
can Siena risk the Saratoga cup by having officials
that aren't too biased?
The freshmen have never seen Coach Sauers get
red while calmly reminding his boys of a mistake
or kindly assisting a referee make a difficult call.
We are wondering when he will be taking a quart of
milk to the games.
The future looks bright, for the new frosh team.
Last year's frosh were rather unfortunate and won
only two games. Last year wasn't a vintage year for
freshman athletics. Good luck to the rookie squad. We
hope that the fans will support the freshman a little
more actively this season.
Desire is an important factor in athletics, and the
varsity will take this advantage into every game.
We hope that the entire student body will take an
interest in the team. They spend three hours a day
working to give you a team to be proud of. Can you
give two hours a week to support them?
The Varsity S Club has announced their intentions
of publishing a game program. It will be free and
available at the door at all home games. We a r e
sure this will lead to greater enjoyment of the games.
Congratulations are in order for our mighty fine
Cross Country team on the job they did at Wheaton.
The other teams at the Meet were shocked to find
that we could field such a good team without scholarships.
by H a r o l d
Competing against forty-four schools in the c o l l e t
division of the N.C.A.A. cross-country championships
at Wheaton Illinois, Saturday, November 16 the Peds
finished tied for fourteenth place. The meet was won
by a strong Kansas State team which recorded a lopsided victory with only 44 points.
The University of Akron, with 174 points and
South Dakota State, with 179 points, finished second
and third respectively. Albany and Mankato (Minnesota) State Teachers tied at 331 points. Tom Robinson
led the Albany team by completing the four mile
course 28th out of a total of 216 runners who started
the race.
Team
:
U n p r e p a r e d for
Dennis Tuttle was next for Albany in 55th place
followed by John Clark who was 75th, Ken Kirik
and Howie M e r r i a m . Coach Munsey, although pleased
with the t e a m ' s performance, felt that it could have
clone considerably better if it had been better p r e pared for the course. He thought that the thick turf
of the course put the Peds at a definite disadvantage,
since they had been training o n hard g r a s s .
Royal
Treatment
r
—
—
HK.S'I KDITIUN ( Ol'Il-.S ON SAI.K NOW! "*•
STATE COLLEGE
* ~
~
Please
1
send
MANDATE
me
FOR
CHANGE
Dwight
D.
Eisenhower's
Open Your Lambert's Charge Account
1
'
i
THE SAFE WAYto stay alert
without harmful stimulants
Remittance enclosed
State
_
_
..(-
:g : : t :e;i. '•- lii : e -.'.e -..'. (• .
-._
.'..
I
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a.
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N o D o z keepa y o u m e n t a l l y
alert with the s a m e safe refresher found in coffee and
t e a . Y e t N o D o z is f a s t e r ,
handier, more reliable. Absolutely
not
habit-forming.
Next time monotony makes
you feel drowsy while driving,
working or s t u d y i n g , do us
millions d o . . . perk up with
safe, effective N o D o z t a b l e t s .
Amlhei tint pioduct ol Giuve laliotaluiies
20% OFF ON
AU. CASH SAL£S
CHARGE ACCOUNT
. ..t- .. u
.
:. a -.j a:
IDENTIflCATI 0 N \
tr
m FAIRS
EXCLUDED)
.j
Ji.aJ.'
• a ;.; t i t : . ' -•
I .'. I
SiCWAtuRI
FRANCIS J
CHARGE
CARD
.tr
LAMBERT
Jmwolet • E*f>*n
Wunhei
239
Control Ave
Repairing
- Vewelry
A l b a n y , N . Y.
AUTHORISED B U L O V A JEWElER
open evenings till 9p.m. Saturday till 6p.m.
• a:...
-
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t.'.e ' ^ u / . c r j t ' c i ! . ! i t e v . • i d.. I Ub'A C ; ' *i-'. t b: n t. I-K. ,
.J'.-.
. ,tr' •
:
A P e d w r e s t l e r w i t h the a d v a n t a g e .
-•--'?'•'
' .... -
S c h e a . e tor D e c e m b e r
T e a " . L o c k s Deptr
.:
.e
: r..or
No interest or carrying charge
Name
CM,
•:.-•:
R o b i n s o n and T u t t l e p u l l i n g a w a y .
r.
Address
L _
story of the s e a s o n :
Joe
: : a - t j : - : : . : p l a i e.
T.'.e
Other Veterans
, . . j .:.
$ 6 . 9 5 per c o p y .
C h a r g e my e s t a b l i s h e d a c c o u n t .
!
of
Floor Genera!
•ral.
J e Lou !.s. State's :. *. r
:.as ':.e tviig.'. \
! r.ee; K.r *';e
:ea:i. -uge-'.e: Jurit.c \'.e gjjr.es.
Last ;. ea: " L i t t l e J . - ' ; : .e : '
'. •• t.-.e -ea.'ii's ::i*_• st -leler.sce ~.y*?..
He is c ::.; le.'tiente-:: Pau. St.ee-
Silverman
One of these veterans is Kugent.' Monaco, 'iene,
as Coach Carcia describes him, "one hundred and
twentv three pounds of dynamite," finished last year
with a 10-0 record in league plav. He placed second
in the New York >tate Conference Tournament and
fourth in th>- 4 ! Tournament.
The
I
copies
Grapplers to Face Tough Schedule
Board and Monaco to Lead Team
i:.i
WSUA
CO-OP
135 W e s t e r n A v e n u e
s •..;'. s .:. i ; e -1 a:iie * ar n\ - .; s.
Lv: / e : . . J - . i;,e r :..s . •_ -t.ge
i\\. -:.ai le : J e l i e : S'.-i. H I J : a :ej.
. e a r s \ a' k.
Returning to the mats, the varsity wrestling squad
hope to better last y e a r ' s 4-6 record. For the past
month Coach 'Jure:a has had the boys working out
e v e n ' afternoon. This y e a r ' s squad will be led by
co-captain Dick Board and Fugcne Monaco and will
feature new memhe
as we as seasoned veterans.
ON CAMPUS
—
V e t e r a n D a n Z e h w i t h an e a s y t w o pointer in p r a c t i c e
by J o e
Just
j s lie made
America's Crusade in Europe
l i v e I'm m i l l i o n s
id
r e a d e i . s , now
Dwiglit
1), K i s e n h o w i ' i
t e l l s the s t u n ol Ins f i r s t
a i h i u i i i s t i a n o n , i l l u i i i i u a t i i i i ' loin c r u c i a l >ear.s ol change l o r the c u u n l n
he s e i ' . e d aii'l the v . o r l d tie l i v e d i n . T h e d i s t i n g u i s h e d h i s t o r i a n , Allan
Newns
i•oiiimciii.s: " H e p a i n t s a p u n i an ol h n i i s e l l which in genial
IM,nest, j i . i l c o m p l e t e n e s s is unmatched in I'l e s l d e u l lal I n e t a t i n e . . .
A l'l'-,i<
n a t i o n a l sei '. It e , ' '
J u s ' p u b l i s h e d , Mandate for Change is
a l l e j ' l , a i i la lined as 1 : i u 3 ' s iie.st t e'. e a l l l i g and l i n p u l tant book,
—
Trie Starters
Dicic C t v s s e t t is r» •* -r.e exii;.
s u r e s-ir-.e: lr. •:.« ,pe:.e:.
T:.e
otrter spvts •*-:'. :ep-er.r :••: -..-.e s . v * ::.£•
: tr.e -.earn tr, its scne-luled
sc::.:.;:.izes.
Lv.». r.as .-.• • rial tr.e
Ki.ee t: .. .e •:._• plague- '.:m all
!a-- ea:
Sec :.: 1:. s : ::.: a:.: '.eii::.; -:.e
: el- u: let - '.is:
~±\
: e •:.•:• ::.ar. • . '.-a::. - e - a:. : s:.a:; e ie a-e
v.iie
• •a;.:.:.i a r e a
i.i.1 t . a . e r s . T.\:
ear r.e car.
e\;.f. • we . pj> si:
- t- i .- e s s u r e : .
^ ;*r, '' .e ; p"- s i
Cr s s e r :.is jurat
Ze:
a. e x i t e c '
>e. A
Coach Munsey termed the contest an excellently
handled event. "They could not have treated us with
more c o u r t e s y , " commented the Coach. "Capping it
all off was the perfectly wonderful reception by our
own student body at the Albany Airport Sunday night,"
said Mr. Munsey.
"We did not think of such an event happening and
just can't put into words cur feelings when we alighted from the plane to the c h e e r s and handclaps
of this wonderful throng of students - and Mr. and
Mrs.
Hathaway too! It's the sort of thing you will
always r e m e m b e r . "
| IM iilu>Mi i
l)wi<j|ii I). Kisuiliown
to. ease off, and this is unusual." The five returnees
will have their work cut out
for them, because the other
five men are new and have
never been tested under
pressure.
Course
THE 640 SOUND
Dmijlil D
The 4th of December opens the 1963-64 basketball season at Albany. The
initial -ontest pits the Peds against Oneonta State's Red Dragons. It marks the
start of a schedule that will become more difficult. Five returning lettermen will
c a n y the brunt of the load for the ten man team. The cagers will be out to better
last year's 14-12 record. They are hoping to have better luck than last year when
they lost five contests by two or less points.
Coach R. Sauers pointed out the strengths and weakness of the team in an
interview with the S.U.News. The team has been working out since Oct. 15th
in the Page gym "cracker box" and is presently practicing in the Washington
Armory. The team is progressing according to schedule and appears to be in
good condition for the early part of the season. Coach Sauers praised the men
for the effort they have shown thus far. He said, "I sometimes have to tell them
Lynne
I If
make
and
alter
history
PAGE 7
'.'••
t e
PAGE 8
STATE UNIVERSITY N E W S . FRIDAY. N O V E M B E R 2 2 . 1 9 6 3
Movie Review
Film Succeeds on Gusto and Cast
by John Marion
Albany i s in a state of transition. A hot knife
h a s been thrust into i t s cancerous guts and i s in
the p r o c e s s of removing what h a s been festering there
for many y e a r s . Where there once were slums there
will soon be m6dern office buildings; lots once crowded
with tiny b a r s and soda shops now serve a s parking
lots.
One must r e m e m b e r , h o w e v e r , that so-called
" s l u m s " a r e not always all that the t e r m implies.
Many buildings in slum a r e a s do not fit the usual
image of the slum. Many a r e clean and reasonably
well-kept, their only fault that of being old and,
consequently, starting to slump and fall. The location
is often the only reason for the demolition of a building.
We must also r e m e m b e r that rundown apartment
buildings a r e more than slums; they a r e the homes of
many people and no matter how rundown a place
may be, it is the home of some people and they have
formed a certain emotional attachment to it. Consideration of this fact may give some insight into
the objections of many people to urban renewal.
by P a u l
A large
past
his
This is the essence of the uniqueness of the t r a n sition. The people have moved to other, similar
buildings in other sections of the city, but the old
apartments stand a s mute r e m i n d e r s of their former
inhabitants. The old corner s t o r e s , the hole-in-a-wall
b a r s , and the apartment buildings a r e the receptacles
of countle-ss m e m o r i e s for the former inhabitants.
Within the next few y e a r s all these buildings will
be gone; the m e m o r i e s , meaningless; the cancer,
destroyed; the city, purged of its oldest elements —
the elements most repugnant to the m i d d l e - c l a s s
m o r e s which rule our society. Clean, new, modern
offices will have replaced the slums; the oldest section
will now be the newest.
It will be then, when the cycle is complete, that it
can begin again and what is the newest now will
eventually become, once more, the cancer that will
have to be removed.
A & W Root Beer
DRIVE-IN
number
directed
by
friend,
John
Ford.
These
in-
The
Valance
Man
and
of
give
Viewer's
The
Baby burger
nitely
not
a
1602 WESTERN AVENUE
"JUSt Past the Northway'
from
Mc-
impression
that
in
a l l to the v i e w e r ' s
Ford,
the
is
of s u c h
of Wrath
all
that
remains
technical
alone is insufficient
or
the
His
of
k e e p s it
the
selection,
and
to
lie
control,
The
of
his
who
material.
its
course,
share
figure
McLintock
of
of
cliches.
the
rich
also
cattle
has
into
a r c often
and
even
This
is
in
it
an
of
ex-
per-
forceful.
giving
He
features
some
about
a
usual
hired
as
his
is
sell
daily
anan,
and
W a y n e ' s newly
ramrod, Edgar
inevitably
and
equallv
playing
Gordon
shyster
discipline
tlii' p a r t i c u l a r
still
discussions
r a t h e r than of
tliev
which
oi
town
age
J o n e s a s a foolish
11).
Jerry
the
Of
course
expect
it
that
would
a student
to
s h o u l d not be
with
should
not
strategically
them.
In
our
.strategic.
be n a i v e
concerned
good
grades
society
and
p l a n in net
colleges
are
su o r g a n i z e d a s to e m p h a s i z e
grad-
gelting.
is.
A
higher
education
p a r i . an e l a b o r a t e
Fverv
Pleasure Marks
And
is.
seasoned
cynicism.
In
heartening
which
is
from
can
tins
what
I find
die
discussions
dents
lack
nl
conclude
mistake
liiielleciu.il
a
ol
ol
that
growth
the
is
laci
course,
can
be
any
Luc/ak's
"Know
conunentarv
Your
of
live
Senate"
broadcast
campus
n e w s (daily
Manager.
Nick
sialed
that
as
soon
quirement
lor
a
Faculty
been
as
ascertained,
an
ol
dis-
tliev
the
—
thai
a
exhilarating,
are
tion
elegant,
n e e d anv
and
lhal
investi-
Indeed
a
ol
i s finding s u c h p l e a s u r e
it
its
be
ol
stimulating.
ollei
a
rich
be.ond
between
plays
the
or
college
The
to
Ihev
man)
foi
and
I
stuan
gelling
They
will
urdav
n i g h t s . All p e r f o r m a n c e s
I'lckeis
Tell m e why y o u c h o s e
Wit O l y m p u s for a h o m e .
I t ' s cold a n d w i n d y
up thece. and t h e
a i r is u n b e a r d b l y
t h i n ? Alfio...
may
activity
tn
see
music,
the
only
a
'in'.),
loi
the
duilj
ol
an
i.,
ol
Join,
it,r
make
r e s e r v a t i o n s tin
leas
receptions,
ti oin
wishing
io
collee h o u r s ,
banquets,
use
"extra-curricular,
the
ai
one
week
'05,
t o knoiAi
Course
Thei e
in
sllldunis
Russell
bussed
Sage
Kobiusoii
College
Medea
Novenibei
will
sharp
adapi al ion
2 I and
in the
.Slieet,
ol
pi e s e u l
on Tllill'sdu)
pel loi i n a n c e s
I'll si
baohei
Association
•) e l I ii i s '
Kill I p u d e s '
'.Hi
Sage
I'I a m a i n s
id
and
12.
will
will
He a
ai e on
Hussell
Sage
places.did you p i c k e t ?
Why did y o u c l i m b
behind
Mool e
aimw
addition
Sp
I, D e p a i t m e i . t ,
meet ing
in
loi
winking
at
Hie t h e a t r e
dool
in
can
the
be
A.It,
bought
I n l i n e die p u l -
lol i n a u c e
went
I :t
the
initialed
toadw.r.
in
sllll
needed
loi
positions
hah,I
some
have
people
Because
it i s
there!
Revue
dlrecloi
Slate
and
being
'05,
Uulvul's.11)
all
persons
Hie p i a n i s t
coiiiacl
liei
will
held
be
on
the
al
in
lor
Itevue,
Su t ui ti a •,
asks
following
into
Kappa
Helen M e s e r o l e ' 0 5 , J u d i l h
This
el!oi i
in die
ol
Held
great
ol p u b l i c
bv
scenes
epic
plav
oi
is
a< loi s pla .
A s p e c , I,
I . Govei hoi
M ssippi
postponed
V:A-,
.ill
ihe
camelled
Auditions
mornings
Comat
the
one
pari
ol
on
the
part
ol
in
open
the
Hie
Itevue
Itevue
all lutei e s t e d in inking p a r t .
ilea
ol
Theme
theme
Ihioiigh
ol
and
to
a
pel solial
ol
;i
l"""l''d
[l
"'' '
"'"•
i* litdii awl a m u s nil
.no I is ti r i i i n r i i l a i , ill i t s 11 eat -
slol V
s c h e d u l e d lo he m a d e
R o s s Lai noil ol Mi.-,-
li, l e l m i i e l v . T h e
'J
due
I
loi
in
ihe
ue-.l
Page
to
late
M
11111
sin
ia I
r
A
< !"' '"'
Iai's
o I 111 s t o i
i o m 1111' 111 a I' v
" > ''
;
li,
Hie
ll
was
past.
illie.\pecied
Liesldent
John
in
in
the
to
ol
the
students
liv
U ill,in
and
and ( n •
I' u g e n e
cor
on
mlormut i vc
"U.S.A."
Richardson
(Jn(j
s o v
b j x
wuv
stugo,
.
o n
included
to c l a r i l v
to
the
enlul're
lhal
the
bill
he
bases
Li .
article
'•'I he
Role
ol
and
' hat the poll, l e s I, >l -
ol
ami'lidlneiit
tail v el .-,11-,
bai i,ei
in
I lining
evening
' "es'la
,,l
ihe
wi II speak
i altipus''
on
the
Stale
Ihe
Mru-
Room
Dec,
Ll .
""''
Issues
'
""'
and
will
some,,
''t"
1
will
ID
reason
lor
allow' e nough
be
chartered
bus
motion
time
lor
the
Miles
lor
Goveinoi
Januai ,
his
,,l
llaiiiell
Politics
ol
.'.ill
i onlacl
soiuelllue
I'eLiiiai,
In
speaking engageiiieiil.
v ei s u ,
all
consider
lilbiiliui
Also
be-
liav e
I 111 I he I i iot 11 e.
ihe
l ! ni-
pi isi| •, ,ued
until
speeches
been
ai
iliose
'.'.oiling
i ailse ol I'l e s i d e n l Koiuiedi ' s a.ssa.ssmall,,ii
All
ne.\t
about
alilhulug).
loll'
ol
',1
inleiesled
Piiiuur
nealr.e
aiuhologv,
Ihe
who a i e
,,i, ||,e
pisl
Primer
sail,
W o I k .s
leal ning
ale
buses
student
said
dial
the
ice
could
be t a k e n
care
of
in
in
the
Would | l a c e i c\t i i n i.,i,.s
I'l e s i d e n l .
I his
.nneiidi n r III
in
com
In
Ihe
about
ooidiallv
in v lied lo a t t e n d ,
aline
was
t a k e n on the m o t i o n .
i He i ighis
being
original
gave
ol
ml r i n g e d
bill
awav
was
and
Miles
i l,e
li,.ml.- ;'l V liif
pol I
i,
'1,1, 1 epoi led
n, Vol v nig
Mated
pi e s e u l
a lellei
explaining
was
ai
the
meeting
i,,
Peter
Kerpel,
Pirei
Kuli,
Lenin a
questions.
Gold-
Leonard
HelenMan-
McCabe
James
Pessulo,
Also M a r i e t t a R a u e r i , David Sim I r e d e r 11 k
Smith,
Margaret
Siioud.
As
lo
in the
i tiles
anv
i ecei v e
Lain
is
a
National
si udent
in
loi
howevei
Carol
Wickes.
degree
eligible
Albanv
Gai y
Eliza-
John S t u r t e v a u t ,
staled
mittee
Smith,
Sorensoii,
Ann T . o . and P a t r i c i a
answei
Fisher.
Gain, M i c h a e l
beth
ihe shin i -
Cam-
DtRocco, R o s -
and
the
I .'.,, i e|,i e s e u l al I v e s wel e
Brennan,
Joseph
Anthony
loi
sent
bodv
include:
Robert
Hudtukas,
and P a t r i c i a
v acal ion. T h e I e -
i hal
Cji'c , hound
, , linings.
on
i lie b u s e s
studenl
houorarv
M i l e s . Susanne Murphy, Gary P e t r e ,
control.
( dial t m a n ,
service
Commit-
P a t r i c k C e r r a , C o l o t n b a De
liigloii,
James
the
Baichelor,
deville.
the
a blank check and
( oinmittee
benefit
specialized
Lapin.ski. William L e o
were
that
loo m u c h S e n a t e
Set v i c e s
ol
this
Kerrara,
Leona
Senate
null', nlual.s
upon,
nat-
s t e i n . R a l p h G r i m a l d i , David J e n k s ,
s h o u l d noi sei up a tiilln , moimpolv ,
I hal
a
reference
Also J o s e p h
w a s b a s e d on Hie l e e l i n g that
brings
ol
and
Francesco,
Due to a Lick oi t i m e , the m e e t i n g
action
student
the
by die N a t i o n a l
to
bridge,
Time Runs Out
no
also
student
Members
elected
one
Bonnie
and
a
m
Comwho
is
l'.lG-l
or
membership.
olilv
nominates
Seinoi s.
AA Board Increases Powers
I'l e s i d e n l
in
( o i l ins i onlei I ed ailti i-
mat lei s , ,| n,i i a m i leg late
in,
ihe
I'm v i-i Ml . ' s
ihe
I n,lie
Alhlein
o,
sei
r a p a , 11 v
ve
as
Alhlel li
I'lirsda, .
I le v, a s <|ll 11'I. t o p , unl , an
hov.e .el ,
li,,.u ,1 Would coli, iil\
tat
in
as
an
ad > ISOI .
Intel i olleg ml r
have
Hot
keen
the
pa ,i
the
an
adv isoi v
published.
Since
lloai d sei , ed uhlv
nod,
us
u
, ollld
dei i s i u i i s
II,
as
liev eg
make
an.
ol
since
Ihev
win e unl v i e c u i n i u e u d a -
public
I loll',.
In
keeping,
vv uh
a i equesl
Dual d vv il
now [iillillci/.e anv d e , i s i u i i s It I c a c h e s in I he field ol
nit I a c u l l i ' g l . i i r p o l i c i e s .
ll'olll
T h e s e Alhletn
Hoard
decisions
will
be cuiisidel ed a s Imal
L'mV el sit v pullc . .
Li e s i d e n l i nil ins , huwev el . Alhlel le
The
polli . i s , i on ei limb
that
I'l e . loiislv
old ,
ihe
Hi
Alhlel | ,
ah
i'i'l lung
lioai d sei . ml
ad . I sol V
I'l e s i d e n l
die
i apai liv
He
al Al •
it
t line
til ill.
Re
bill v ei Ml ,
wl ei e
slated
lhal
said:
''I
held
Odd
I,as
some
said
prompted
boa I d
mam
g i own
to the
ol
ll
we
ai e
going
this
lo
Stucares
have
V eai . but
loiuiallj
male
1 think
iniorined
As del uled bv the P r e s i d e n t , ml r a -
" I'lic
m i l e g l a t e pol lev would i n c l u d e I h o s e
print
actions
i e ,puii-
ihe
lacl
was
Hun
an.In
laielv
loi
deal
athletic
rxaiiiple
nl
vvnh
this
program
tins
Umalone,
would
he
the
dei Isluli lu h a v e m a l e c h e e l l e a d u i s .
also
Alhletn
li i e
which
vetsitv's
An
decision
come
ipiai lei s
s e n el
know
t hal
pi ev luig.lv onl \
I lie lloai ,1
di v isluli
his
|,v
lias
don't
A s s o c i a t i o n pal I Kill a l l v
ihe.
.should be
ol al I d e c i s i o n s .
lie
Slbllll l e s Is IllM'es.sui . . "
lie
decisions
lo give I lie Hoard si mil'
I he puwei \
bv
Division
Colli us
Ho.lib
denl
c h e e l leaden s
Power
was (pule a n x i o u s
Alhleilr
Ii,
in al I de c i sioiis , on-
spin Is j J j og i am
I'I e s i d e n l
all
be m a d e p u b l i c a s soon a s p o s s i b l e .
hum .
hilrii ullcijiuti: P o l i c y
Irulll
The
being, a
puwei
organization.
1' i e s i d e u i
ul
dual
maintains
decision
in
the
mailers
id l i i i e r i ' i i l l i ' g l a l u p o l l i ' v , All e x a m p l e
Uudei
Hirelings
I hi' llieel I ng will begin al o : 0 0 p , III,
hmioi
the
k il w a r il
ad|oiirned
listed
in
Col-
tee.
week.
was
Who
bunk.
provided
en-
p r o c e s s ol s e t t i n g up the s e r v -
ol Who's
in A m e r i c a n
Universities,
name
placement
to
bodv.
ure
h i l l , uh l e s
thai
and
Ins
loi
was
member
Students
leges
has
ional
to
tat mi I hat
slated
a
Among
Christmas
this
a . u i e , HI the , n ii'inal mot ion v. a s
It'll
P'bnor
talk
Ihe
the
1
T h e p i e ' , loirs quesi n,n was mo', ed
ol
p e o p l e vv i„, liav e e d i l e d
to
on
was also detrain,I.
•o l
executive
be a u t h o r i z e d
b u s e s loi
on
sell
I" ' " ' l " " - '
cent i i Lined
loinmelils
senaloi s
I'.lo,!.
i ead
also
SeiiJie.
i i n s ini ,i H HI was s i m i l u i
I'l i" Idem
Mi Ilwalne
Studenl
the oi igmul J in J I li ui.
ihal
,\h l l w a i n c
In i a i r
Association
i n c l u d e d , ,ne
A-l , l s o i . bo,il d
pugus
to
on
id
the
|„ , | | c
turn
Primur
he
those
on
to
I if 'j J.I i 111 it' ii I
'• acal ions
I'l e s i d e l i l
the
brought
Discussed
St, i e I -I s
loi
lowed
i he
the
V . I >ebs
'Primer" Selections
I n i b ',1,
The
individuals
Studenl
on
charier
su-
the
Main
that
As
T h e o p p o s i t i o n m a l l the p r o p o s a l s
m
in e l l e c t
moved
Benefits
motions
\ a c a l loll.
the
s e c o n d p a r t ol t he
moved
be
a vote ol
The
that
llie e>.ectiuve
was
Some
was
t,\
votes.,)
b r a n c h ol g o v e r n m e n t
to
cniu-
ordei
lei!
given
The
was
ol
ii, ,lliv
ll
Cen a
d i a l lei
' ' ' •' '• I"' 1 s o n a h t i e s
V aleimiio
Wi ««'lil
1111o u i • h
Ll . e plan,
a, ' mip.iii iiuenl v. ill
be
sllppl led
al
all J,el loi III.Hires
g
Vicloi I t a i n e i i 'h ", and Helen
\andeibuib 'nl.
I,
Moiidav,
Hall,
whole
io lhal
toe
Il
l i s I I e,il melll ol Us I vvu slllip'Cl s.
i e I a 11 • s m a n .
Il
l e g l s l a l ion.
>'oin-
o n m r . . hut with w a r m l h
,ll|,rl
' llle
on Ihe
a quasi
r , i n s i d e r JI inn
sei '. i' e
perior
the
headlines
r e q m i e 20 p o s i t i v e
s h o u l d he e s t a b l i s h e d lo p r u -
power
national
"l;lkl's
mem.,,,.
J
MI, h a s
i oh
dip
deleated
It; a g a i n s t . (All
I' . K e n n e d , .
I'oiuin
the em r e n t
I he
M o r i oho use,
scheduled
io
the
\ tde
en-
ai Mils I nl . ei sil v lias been
in
oi
powei
in
handled
' ' " I'la.
11
A minimum
,,i
was
Senator
President
i e-
ol
and
loi
President.''
into
the
the
Ii
21
Expl a n a t i o n
tin-
h o r n Ins l i t e ,
l 1
si en ei . i s Use
pei son
lo
vested
p i , ..In, e<| , , | | -
l'.n o.
l e i I ',
interested
Itevue
ol
laminate
chul'toi
powel
music
dames,
t i n ' p e l Hi' I.
Production
In si
Wai'l
the
is
Committee
11
J
De, e m b e i
-|:iG-U215,
Page
ol
la 111ce
moved
lo
this
t lie
Association
Senate
lo
powei
in
taken.
Government
a m e n d e d to i ead thai i he si l o powei
in
(Governor lianwll
Postpones Sjxwh
$ i* i
e d i n u nil p o s i t i o n s ,
Liss
v ested
Moorehouse'.s
position
' " '" •' ""i"""1"'"' -" "•" To lie
ale
State University
vacations;
"thai
u s e ol pi ojeci ions oi p e r s o n a l i t i e s
oi
ecu's
ol the p e n o d . and the
how
ol
p a r t i c l l l a l 1) t h o s e II olli the b u s i n e s s
anv
ol
is p o r t r a ' . e d
'he
seived
I he six a, IOI s a i e
II,n : . Guv
'n , Loin l a s R o s s ' n l , J i m Lohdell
'Mi,
Id,/
1 ei i ai a ' i n . L e e l a s - ,
'i,., and Sliainn llon.se 'li-1.
on
7:30 p . m . in 111 u -
stall
bill
Lee
six
;ill
c o n v e n i e n c e ol the a p p l i c a n t s ,
F p s l l o n ; Alan D r a k e 'CO, L e s l i e
Keys '05
the
tilled,
mons
Noveiiibui
ol
sole
loi
on,Hon
an I T n linn al I n r e c t i
I'hr
plav
re,rlillall,
Ih.VVS ol,
i w i , s e p a l a i r l e v e l s . ( In H i e o n e
and I lie s c i e n c e d e p u i l l u e n i s .
Kellas
l'JUO
the
Loses
Studenl
Iir, J a m e s
«ft>f^A
Hall.
Little Theal i e
sale
ol
ILI , ill
been
the
ai
Mu
Cynthia
s t a i I al
Hall.
On
"M,
a c r o p h o b i a ? Why, oP all
Guide
Intel e s l e d
Man\
a
ai u n c u t
cur-
Depart-
was
Hie Studenl I m u s e Guide o n S i l n d a v ,
I he
.it
Rubin
'Of,,
T h o m a s It) wick ' 0 5 .
Novenibei
Hoi Ii
Pelelsun
Prom
ol
adv alien,
I i ida)
Douglas
Mildred
Uobb ' n l
ie-
Irom
have
he
in die ' T i . .
I o m | Sei v ice
least
aie
Speech
U.S.A.
unl'.
1
should m a k e iho.se
,i'i . at i o n s
Mis.
tells
National
the
OH-Broudwuy
t h a t you s u f f e r
groups
whole
Association
aineiiduienl
,,,L h a p p e n
student
to
portanre
I, i the pi odUrlloh.
NOTICES
All
plav
rise
11:00 a . m . to )i::)0 p . m .
Leonard
meni.
c u l t u r a l l ) - u p l i l i uig serv i c e . "
Melcalf
will
State I'mRichardson
U.S.A. w a s dli c r i e d |
M.
,i
proposed
pri i p o s a l .
The
heginiung
plav
on s a l e at the
Ticket
Oilier,
pl o p s and I e a l l s l n
Foo J Sorv ice
through Sat-
p h r a s e h a s it, he t a k i n g
advantage
as
Cetra
the Studenl
l a i i o n s m this c o u n t r y . His p e r s o n a l
,i •, I 'rM. net
proloundl)
President
l'J.'it).
p r o d u c t i o n s IhlS Vear.
icntiv
veisiiv
cannot
ol
the
onl) , a s
melanchol)
to-
nation
The
hut the s t u -
go
hear
Theatre
Uuiversir,
ami next Moudav
majm
and
college
diversity
ll
I• •,
Tlil.s is the s e c o n d ol S t a l e I'mv ei MI .
Theal i e ' s
loin
scheduled
intellectual
classroom,
will,
John
and
in r e c o g n i z e
anv
State
and
presented
night
unselfconsciously.
own e n d , t h e n the
atmosphere
the
Shyne
he
lile
intellectual
taking
lail
Paul
will
none of t h e m
growth
quite
|i\
Passos
he held in R i c h a r d s o n 'l'.)\
give.
mark
U.S.A.
Dos
at H:.')0 p . m .
f u r t h e r J u s t i f i c a t i o n beyond
Hie p l e a s u r e ihev
dents
cynicism,
discussion,
re-
Advisor
a
by I r v C a r p e n t e r
S.U. Theatre To Present 'U.S.A.'
Nine Nightly Performances Slated
Argyros,
poem exciting . a mathematical equa-
loasi
at
strategic
Technical Director of U.S.A., John Moore, makes final preparations for the production with Jon Barden and Pauline Aranson.
at 7 and
plod die weal v path ol d u t v .
thai
the
cover-
What
is it,
Gort ?
Zeus, there's
something t h a t
puzzles m e .
intellectual
pleasurable
discussion
it
is
and a c i t i a l l l v .
onl)
precludes,
mistake
to feel for t h e m s e l v e s thai k n o w l e d g e
is
Motion to Give SA President
Sole Chartering Rights Defeated
boards
dormitories.
gort
Growth
drear)
il
a dash
a r e c o g n i t i o n ol a d i s p a r i t y
profession
growth.
ol
Cynicism
bulletin
and
fea-
posted
g a t i o n will be c o n d u c t e d .
undertaking
that
he
Sing, p l u s c o m p l e t e
Station
with
precisely
cynical.
It
a
If s t u d e n t s
I think o c c u r h e r e aiming Hie
students
hoi
fact
about
whai
inkling
in
game.
s t u d e lit
be
will
Van Dyke a s h i s
good g r a d e s t o r i n t e l l e c t u a l
L a c k of C y n i c i s m
should
games,
Holiday
foolish c o l l e g i a t e s o n .
ai
dominates.
d i s c u s s i o n s a r c still
Director,
evening's
are
point
a college c a r e e r still
7 :0 5 ) ,
'0.
g r a d e s . T h e p r a c t i c a l , e c o n o m i c end
The
Garv
(Mou.:
has
instructor,
WSUA
peristyle
include
ball
Buch-
Intellectual (More]
particular
on the
broad-
week.
publicity
each
programming
the
memberto
( T h u r s . : 10:45), b r o a d c a s t of b a s k e t -
ranch
derelict,
thai
A total of thirty-three State University at Albany students have been elected
to the national Who's Who Among- Students in American Universities and Colleges
book. All t h i r t y - t h r e e a r e in their senior year at Albany. They were elected
by their fellow seniors after Senate had submitted a list of candidates. Before
sending the names of the thirty-three students to the National Committee, they
were first approved by the Administration.
To be eligible for a c ceptance, a student must
fulfill the qualifications of
scholarship, participation
and leadership in academic
and extracurricular activities.
lie
2.
WSUA
a
ser-
will
S p e c i a l F e a t u r e s on the new WSUA
cook.
the
Uvwick.
To Membership in Who's Who
the
the
programming
stall
52 h o u r s
tured
of
m
over
Tom
A l s o p a r t i c i p a t i n g a r e Chill W i l l s ,
as
increase
cast
wife, is
Irish-tempered
de C a r l o
VOL. X L I X . NO. 2 5
33 University Seniors Elected
to
expanding
enable
in
O'llara.
D E C E M B E R 6 . 19(5(3
re-
as
facilities
will
announces
very
flight
at
studio
ship
an a m u s i n g
in h i s big d r u n k s c e n e .
business
Yvonne
and
return
i n t r o d u c e d on D e c e m b e r
course—older,
still
A L B A N Y .'}, N E W Y O R K
slapstick
vacation
A new
aimed
vices
will
after
WSUA."
format
almost
their
silly
the i n d i v i d u a l ' s
WSUA
waves
"new
si a i r s .
her
entertainment
WSUA to Present
All 'New' Format
it.
actors,
succeed
power
a bit.
Maureen
Bus and..
that
a
Cast
film
episode
funny
Legislation p a s s e d by
Senate on November 13,
1963, r e q u i r e s attendance
at at least three Senate
meetings of students who
wish to run for Senate next
February.
This applies to all s t u dents, r e g a r d l e s s of c l a s s .
— it's
Radio
character
but
acts
As
consistently
An
performance
arid
a c t i o n that c o u n t s .
for-
fun
a
western
air
advantage
the
paunchier,
ELECTIONS
people
Fri.-Sat. Il a . m . - l a.m.
or
the
to o r g a n i z e
T h e r e ' s W a y n e , of
K u p p u Mil E p s i l o n
Daily II a.m.-midnight
on
for,
D e p e n d i n g upon t h e v i e w e r , it can
combatants
force
of
the
mood
to the w i n d s .
is
sonalities.
the
baron
the
make
b e in t h e
audience.
in
downhill
incidents
cast
solely
has
Certainly
early
little
second
cellent
out of p l a c e .
Take the
it i s l i g h t , and a l l s u b t l e t y i s t h r o w n
suc-
g u s t o , and the
fallen
Excellent
in
to s e e m
the s p o n t a n e o u s l a u g h t e r of a
enjoyable.
impro-
not
A
t h e kind of film that a v i e w e r
large
It
nnwereii
^
broad
needs
t o t a l l y c o n f u s e d , and t h e d i -
hut
is
of
tie e i t h e r a s p o r a d i c a l l y funny f a r c e ,
the
specific
verge
and
the p i c t u r e
melee
does
the
tone of the e n -
film.
laughs,
them.
sheer
smoothly
Reef.
seems
gets
pervades
with
gotten,
them
must
infectious.
is
picture
for
C u t t i n g , c l o s e - u p s and t h e s e l e c t i o n
which
amateurish
problems
that
It
to hold t o g e t h e r
v i s a t i o n of D o n o v a n ' s
through
spirit
rection
t h e c l i c h e s of t h e p r e t e n t i o u s L i b e r t y
Valance
ceeds
sliding
is a gen-
polish,
cases
for
on
sufficiently
l a k e of m u d .
Grapes
s e e m s in r e c e n t y e a r s to
About
many
film,
have lost his touch.
eralized
a s flat a s a F o r d
is played
disorganized
clas-
s i c s a s T h e Informer a n d T h e
over
T h e r e i s , for e x a m p l e , a m a s s i v e
defithis is
advantage.
director
it
often
film—and
for
are
tire
It's
falling
First,
film,
however,
Ford
Tickets
"ENJOY YOURSELF, RAIN OR SHINE
UNDER OUR CAR PORT"
Don-
Advantage
picture,
about
Dyke's,
of t h e r o l e s , s u c h a s
the
But two t h i n g s k e e p t h e s e e l e m e n t s
arid c h a r a c -
newest
the
Liberty
recent
cast
shiftlessly
some
being overdone,
two h o u r s .
it i s s t i l l a n o t h e r by F o r d .
(l p . m .
Teen burger
Shot
more
The
Wayne's
Lintock,
i
Meet the Burger family'
Papa burger Mamma burger
Who
the
o v a n ' s Reef.
Department,
-- a size for every appetite
ramble
been
equipment
HOME OF THE 'BURGER FAMILY'
Van
e x t r a n e o u s i n c i d e n t s that c a u s e it to
Wayne's
have
clude
ter
of J o h n
films
Of
Never-Ending Cycle
While
o v e r u s e d for s o m e y e a r s now.
In a d d i t i o n , t h e film h a s s u b p l o t s and
South Mall
A total of 85 a c r e s in downtown Albany is now
undergoing urban renewal to make room for many
new state government buildings, known a s the South
Mill project. This project s e r v e s a dual purpose; it
not only c l e a r s out many buildings that should have
been torn down y e a r s ago, but it also provides space
for many much-needed buildings to house various
departments of the state government.
Between the time of evacuation and construction
of the new buildings, however, the state of the Mall
a r e a is unique. The vacated buildings stand like
a child's forgotten toys; they seem to realize their
uselessness and s a g under the weight of this r e a l ization. The doors a r e boarded up, the windows a r e
broken and a heavy dust settles over everything.
Now they have new inhabitants. Pigeons constantly
fly in and out through the jagged window-frames, rats
scurry through the broken glass in the c e l l a r s of
a thousand lifeless dwellings. The state of much of
the South Mall area is now one of lifelessness, a
kind of death is in the a i r .
been
Jensen
Open
lo
p a s l liulirv
have
nui
ihe p u b l i c ,
Alhleilr
g.eueialiv
lioaid
ul
been
and II s uiliiiile.s
this
cussed
President
Collins
Albanv
Would
move
be
iu
Ihe
begin
widely-dislooiball
ai
s o m e t i m e in the n e a r f u t u r e .
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