advertisement
$r
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PAGE 8
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1962
SUO Plans Spring Dance,
Notices
Jiowie
J+oudi
Chi S i g m a T h c t a
Sigma Phi S i g m a
President M a r y Ann Di Ruscio
'R2, a n n o u n c e s :
Open House for S t a t e s m e n on
Sunday from 0:30 - 0:30.
Coffee hour on Monday with
Sigma L a m b d a S i g m a .
President J u d y Rae K a m i n s k y
'62, a n n o u n c e s that (here will be a
coffee h o u r for P o t t e r Club on Monday at 6:45.
Carolyn Merrill and Rozalind
Zeichner, J u n i o r s , a r e c o - c h a i r m e n
for F o r m a l Weekend
College Asks
Preferences
The college is a s k i n g the assistance of the student body in determining housing n e e d s of the 1962-63
academic year.
All students a r e
requested to file a " H o u s i n g Pref e r e n c e " application with the College as follows:
S t u d e n t s " o n c a m p u s " (halls,
group houses, sorority and fraternity h o u s e s ! m a y obtain
their application from the Mead
Resident or p e r s o n in c h a r g e
of the building they live in.
Persons
living
off
campus
( c o m m u t e r s , p r i v a t e a p t . . etc.)
may obtain t h e i r Application
from the Housing Office, Room
11, D r a p e r Hall.
Applications
should be r e t u r n e d by Monday,
April 2.
G a m m a K a p p a Phi
Meg S m o y e r '62. Vice-President,
a n n o u n c e s that Bonnie M c l l e n r y
'65 was pledged .Monday evening.
Beta Zcta
President
Doris F d e l s t e m '62
a n n o u n c e s lha, ' ' I C following girls
were
initiated:
Evelyn
Aloisin,
Nancy
Bauman,
Patricia
Conk.
Darlene DcLio, Mary F a t a , Dollie
Guiffrc, S a I I y M r K e e . J u d y
Mensch. J a n i e Mestites. Margie
Murray,
Jeannie
Porr.
Donna
Smith, and Betty Warek, freshmen
T h e r e will be a faculty picnic on
March 30
open house from eight to nine prior
to the d a n c e .
N e w m a n Club
A Corporate C o m m u n i o n at the
10:00 Mass this S u n d a y , March 25,
at SI. P a t r i c k ' s Church will be
followed by a Continental Breakfast in the St. P a t r i c k ' s Church
Hall. Dr. Mary Goggin will speak
on " T h e R o m a n Ideal of HUMAN1TAS in St. T h o m a s Acquinas "
C.I.G.O.
T h e r e will be a meeting of all
c o m m i t t e e s T h u r s d a y , March 20, at
8:30 p.m. in B r u h a c h e r .
Resident A s s i s t a n t s
The Housing Office
announces
the opening of positions as Resident Assistants for the 1962-03
Academic Year
Resident Assis-
tants s e r v e a s counselors to students and aid the Head Residents
in the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of the buildings.
Applicants for the w o m e n ' s halls
should be J u n i o r s , Seniors or Graduates. Men should be Seniors or
Graduates.
I n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s should m a k e
application no later than April 6,
1962. Application forms a r e available in the Housing Office. Room
111, D r a p e r Hall.
A "Question and A n s w e r " period
for prospective male
applicams
will be held in the lower " E "
lounge. W a t e r b u r y Hall, next Tuesday. March 27 at 6:30 p . m . A
similar meeting for women will be
held shortly.
Check your opinions against L'M's Campus Opinion Poll 19
O What will the cold war turn into?
Phi Delta
President Sally .lone- '62. an
nounces thai Linda Krepp and
Mary M a s t r a n g e l o , freshmen, were
pledged Monday ni"hl
Sigma L a m b d a Sigma
Danny Marechek 'iij. pledge c a p
lain, a n n o u n c e s that Sigma L a m b d a
Sigma will hold it- Pledge I'arU
at M c K n o w e n ' s Grove from K p m
With the cooperation of all stu- in 1 a in tonight
dents, the Housing Office expects
In be able to c o m p l e t e a s s i g n m e n t s E d w a r d F.ldrrd Potter Cluh
of c u r r e n t l y enrolled s t u d e n t s some
\ o open house will be gi\ en Sun
time in April.
day a n n o u n c e - Hank Mails '02
T h e r e a r e no a n t i c i p a t e d changes Vice-President
in room and board c h a r g e s for resiThe pledges a r e giving a p a r t \
dence halls and g r o u p houses. Like- for m e m b e r s and d a l e s today from
wise, no c h a n g e s in r e s i d e n c e build S 30 to 12 a . m .
ings a r e foreseen
Thcta \ i O m e g a
.Inn M< Aden '63, president, an
International Film Group nounces that the pledges a r e sponsoring a p a r t y at Fort O r a n g e Le
FRIDAY - D 3 4 9 - 7:30 P.M. gmn Hall from H 12 tonight.
SIMONE
Junior Class S e n a t o r
Nominations for J u n i o r
Class
S e n a t o r to fill the v a c a n c y left
by Dale Van F p p s m a y be m a d e
next Monday, T u e s d a y and Wedn e s d a y , March 26, 27 and 28. The
nomination sheet will be posted on
the Senate Bulletin Board.
Election Commission will set t h e election date in the n e a r future.
Alden Date P a r t y
Alden Hall will hold its d a t e
p a r t y , " S a d i e H a w k i n s ' D a y " tonight from nine to midnight. Girls
m a y w e a r skirts or slacks, but no
s h o r t s will be allowed. Music will
be provided by John Tyo and his
orchestra.
R e f r e s h m e n t s will be
s e r v e d . F r e s h m a n girls m a y h a v e
extended hours
T h e r e will be an
•'
© Do a coed's chances of © With a friend's pack
getting the right man
of cigarettes on the
diminish after college?
table, would you...
§
— in -
"The Adultress"
in
French with English Suhtitles
FRIDAY - D 3 4 9 - 9:15 P.M.
Film
"Living Room of
University"
! take one 7
: i Yes
Hole (if the union on a large
Get lots more from L .M
All C i n e m a - c o p e Show
'lf)(
Double F e a t u r e - :i(K
.i.15
Inger S l c \ ens in
"The World,
The Flesh
And The Devil"
— 8:45 P.M. —
Gregorj
Peck
Frederic
SNACK BAR
Where
Universal
Characters Meet
To Discus*
J e n n i f e r .Junes
March m
"The Man in the
Gray Flannel Suit"
in color
Universal
Truths.
ews
ALBANY, N E W YORK, F R I D A Y , MARCH 30, 1962
Society to Give
Teaching Award
1
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.
A
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LwM gives you
MORE BODY
in the blend,
MORE FLAVOR
in the smoke,
MORE TASTE
through the filter.
It's the rich-flavor
leaf that does it!
HERE'S HOW MEN
AND WOMEN AT
56 COLLEGES VOTED.
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i&M's the filter cigarette for people who really like to smoke,
Q
Ity C H A R L I E BAKER
Wednesday night's Senate nieelm.u w a s short t a n oddity), but
m a n a g e d lo c o w r a multitude of
subjects
C o m m i t t e e Reports
I lie firsl item on the . v e n d a was
i niiimilleo
report
I'be Senate
li'eon ini/.itioti C o m m i t t e e , al the
r.ipiest ol Dean 'I h o m e , will view
plans of budding layouts on Hie
new c a m p u s
I'lii- action i.s m
keeping Willi tin elfurt being m a d e
by the adliiliiislralion lo e n c o u r a g e
student opinion- ol the improvenil-ill of the various facilities
The Tuition C o m m i t t e e reported
that some questions on the recent
poll led to some confusion on the
s t u d e n t s ' p a r t . For e x a m p l e : Ques.
Do you h a v e a loan'' What kind'.'
Ans
Automobile!
The
Tuition
C o m m i t t e e plans to venture on new
and more a c c u r a t e sampling. One
thai involves m o r e work, n a t u r a l l y !
'
Budgets
I lit next portion ol ilie meeting
w a s devoted to student govern
nienl budgets. Interested in where
\oiir moiiev goes. I.-How students'.'
First is the cabinet budget
All
College Reception $260, P a r e n t s '
Da\ Mho, M U M I I " I'p Day $200,
'
AcliMties Day $6u Inauguration
Da.\ $2o, l l o m e c o m i m SoUO. Student
Director;, $775, E a s t e r n S l a t e s Conlerenci lor Professional School- | u r
T e a c h e r s $:i(i(l, Publici!> and Coin
inunication $25, a n d
Reception
I S u m m i t C o n f e r e n c e ' :,;., T h i s
s e a r ' s total is $2055 an i n c r e a s e ol
$185 o u r the 1961 budget.
The Myskama liudgel is a s fid
lows: Keys and Tassels $130, Operations $35, and Reception $15. The
total is $180, and shows no c h a n g e
from last y e a r ' s budget.
T h e Student Guides Budget is also
the s a m e as last y e a r ' s total operating
costs
F o r supplies $15,
Vol. XLVII, No. 8
Four Sororities Slate Weekends;
Three Plan Annual Formal Tonight
Dance Band
The Rhythm Kings is a group of
five a r e a college s t u d e n t s .
Their
l e a d e r is J o e Mertik, :i J u n i o r at
state,
he group c o m b i n e s t a l e n t s
on the r u m p e t , s a x o p h o n e , clari
net, t r o m b o n e , guitar, piano, accordion and d r u m s , J o e h a s en
t e r t a i n e d previously mi c a m p u s
with a different group for the
Alden Date P a r t y and K a p p a Beta
a n d Alpha Pi Alpha formal weekends.
Psi C h a p t e r of Delia
Kappa
G a m m a Society is offering a S15U
s c h o l a r s h i p for the y e a r 1962-63 to
a w o m a n student p r e p a r i n g to e n t e r
the teaching profession.
The a w a r d will be m a d e on the
basis of a c a d e m i c
achievement,
s e r i o u s n e s s of purpose, professional
p r o m i s e , and financial need.
An applicant must be
1—a g r a d u a t e of one of t h e high
schools in the n o r t h - e a s t e r n zone of
New York S t a t e .
2—a student in h e r 3rd y e a r in
college with an u n d e r g r a d u a t e m a j o r or minor in education who plans
to e n t e r the teaching profession
or
a student in h e r 1th y e a r of und e r g r a d u a t e p r e p a r a t i o n to e n t e r
tin teaching profession who plans
to continue h e r p r e p a r a t i o n the following y e a r in a 5th y e a r p r o g r a m
or in g r a d u a t e school.
3—a student who h a s d e m o n s t r a t ed a c a d e m i c and professional promise in h e r p r e p a r a t i o n for a car e e r in education
•1 a student attending a college
or university in New York S t a t e .
Applications should be s u b m i t t e d
in letter form to Miss C a t h e r i n e
L e a r y , 16 Wells St., P i t t s b u r g h ,
New York, c h a i r m a n of the schol a r s h i p c o m m i t t e e , not l a t e r than
Ma> 1. 1962.
t L£ i
Four sororities will p r e s e n t their
formal weekends March 30 through
April I
K a p p a Delta will begin
their weekend by holding a dinner
d a n c e at the S h a k e r Ridge Country Club from seven to one. Lenny
Riccardi will furnish the music
C h a p e r o n e s for the event will be
Dean and M r s . Thorne, Dr. and
Mrs. Tibbelts and l)r and Mrs.
Fairbanks.
T h e r e will be a date p a r t s Sat
urday evening at C a r m e n ' s from
nine to o n e Chaperones will be
l>!\ and Mrs O'Dell. Dr. S a u e r s ,
and Mr. G a r c i a .
General chairm a n lor tlie weekend is Lil Skadberg '02
Judy Johnson '(i:i is in
dinner (lance and
c h a r g e of
n '63, of the d a t e
i 'andy Dal
party.
Chi Sigma ', heta
Chi Si g will hold a formal d a n c e
at the Thru was Motel, Friday
evening from ten to two. " T h e
N a t u r a l s " will play lor the d a n c e
On S a t u r d a y there will be an in
formal party at the Polish A m e n
Residence Council Attends
Conference At Penn State
Residence Council w a s accepted
as a provisional m e m b e r of the Intercollegiate Association of Women
Students at the Region IV Conference held at Penn State University, M a r c h 18-21. and a t t e n d e d by
66 n o r t h e a s t e r n colleges. The council will b e c o m e a p e r m a n e n t m e m ber at the national convention in
1963, to be held at the University
of O k l a h o m a .
Students
Attending
State College students attending
the conference w e r e :
Maxine
Fhrenkonig
and S a n d r a
Kehoe,
freshmen;
Penny Grasdorf '64;
Beverly Hoestery '63. Miss Priscilia Morion, Associate in Student
Personnel and Advisor to Residence Council, also attended.
Founding of Group
The Intercollegiate Association of
Women Students is a national organization founded forty y e a r s ago
a t Ohio S t a t e . It is i m p l e m e n t e d
through the local college w o m e n ' s
governing group, with annual s t a t e
m e e t s and a l t e r n a t i n g regional and
'
C
*
*•'
April 12, 13, 14
Mel I- e r n i
The R e s e a r c h Foundation of the
S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y of New York relates that it wishes to consider
a v a i l a b l e c a n d i d a t e s from Stale
College for the I n t e r - A m e r i c a n Prog r a m for A d v a n c e d Social Science
Studies in the Caribbean A r e a .
This p r o g r a m is under the auspices ol the Organization of American S t a t e s a n d will he offered heginning August lfi at the University
of P u e r t o Rico. A two-year course
will be given for g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t s
who h a v e h a d previous training in
Social Sciences.
Qualifications
The p r o g r a m foresees the highly
specialized training of a limited
n u m b e r of students who h a v e the
following qualifications: An A.B.
d e g r e e or its e q u i v a l e n t ; a good
knowledge of Spanish, since the
c o u r s e s will be conducted in this
l a n g u a g e : a knowledge of F r e n c h
for those i n t e r e s t e d in the F r e n c h s p e a k i n g c o u n t r i e s of the Caribb e a n ; a genuine interest in t h e
social scientific p r o b l e m s of the
C a r i b b e a n region, and an avowed
intent on the a p p l i c a n t ' s p a r t to
r e t u r n to h i s own country, w h e r e
the t r a i n i n g he h a s received can be
utilized.
State
Go v e r n m e n t D u d g e t s . A n d D U S i n e s s o e r v i c e s
— 7:00 P.M. —
11,'n r\ Helefonte
SUNY Offers
Caribbean
Study Grants
clowns, m a s k s , balloons a n d colored s t r e a m e r s . In addition to t h e
d a n c i n g t h e r e will be two $5.00 door
prizes given a w a y during t h e evening.
Chaperones
Chaperones as announced a r e :
Mr. W a r r e n Reich of the G e r m a n
D e p a r t m e n t , Dr. Hudson Winn of
the Biology D e p a r t m e n t , and Dr.
T h e o d o r e B a y e r of the E d u c a t i o n
Department.
The
committee
planning
t h e Z 161
d a n c e includes: Mitch S t r o m g r e n
'64, c h a i r m a n ; Rich Albano '63,
Angie Benzi '65, and A r t h u r J a m e s
McCall '65.
ShortMeetingFeaturesCommittee Reports
&
PAGE HAIL
The Student Union Organization
h a s a n n o u n c e d plans for its s p r i n g
dance, "Mardi G r a s . " The dance
is to b e held in the B r u h a c h e r Dining R o o m from 9 p . m . to 12 midnight M a r c h 31. Music will be provided by the R h y t h m Kings.
D e c o r a t i o n s will he in keeping
with
the Mardi
Gras
theme:
Senate
,' pull out one of your Ovvu?
i a mpus
SATURDAY
V
'Mardi Gras/ Saturday
Fellowships
S c h o l a r s h i p s covering full cost of
tuition, round trip plane fare to
and from San J u a n , P u e r t o Rico,
and a monthly living allowance
c a l c u l a t e d to meet the n e e d s of
the b a c h e l o r student, will be offered.
Courses
Two t y p e s of curricula will be offered:
One of these
includes
courses in techniques and m e t h o d s ;
the o t h e r consists of courses specializing in the C a r i b b e a n region.
E v e r y student is expected to
p r e p a r e a written thesis based on
his work. The University of P u e r t o
Rico will issue a M a s t e r ' s d e g r e e
to all s t u d e n ' s who c o m p l e t e the
training p r o g r a m satisfactorily.
F u r t h e r information m a y he obtained from Mr. F r a n k Carrino,
SIGNORET
\ ' e w College I'nion
t-
-lamp,
$35
and miscellaneous
costs $5 for a total ol $55
The Student Senate liudgei in
elude- the lollowmg e x p e n s e s : Sup
plies SI -So, Lab CMslant $300, Re
pail's and m a i n t e n a n c e i ol the ditto
and duplicating m a c h i n e s ) $10(1,
Identification c a r d s $80. Election
Commission $K0 S a l a n
lor SA
President ;'. luo. Accounting Service
Moo. and Rivalry, ('aiiipn
\ieht
Slalioiierj anil Fed f o u r si:>, I li
. J a l e'-.pen-.es ol SA a r e SI735 an
increase ol s r i , , , \ e r iasl \ e u •
budget "I •' li'.oo
II v\a- -uggesic-d lliat the Nciiali
Services Commission u n d e r t a k e in
vesligalioli ol business services
such as linen and insurance
Anyone who h a s any business to
bring before Senate should do so
before (his coming Wednesday,
The following weeks will be taken
up with the various activities' bud
gets
national conventions, r e p r e s e n t i n g
s e v e r a l h u n d r e d colleges throughout the country.
1AWS offers c l e a r i n g h o u s e s for
such a r e a s of college c o n c e r n s a s :
Activities, Constitutions, C o m m u t er, F i n a n c e s , Foreign S t u d e n t s ,
H o u r s , J u d i c i a r y , Orientation and
S e r v i c e P r o j e c t s . I.A.W.S. is repr e s e n t e d in the A m e r i c a n Council
of Education, National Association
of W o m e n s ' D e a n s and Counselors,
t h e White House Commision on
E d u c a t i o n , and the Association for
High Education of the National
Education Association.
Conference
Among the resolutions passed at
the conference w e r e : " W h e r e a s :
A c a d e m i c dishonesty u n d e r m i n e s
the integrity and purposes of the
university and is a recognized
p r o b l e m on college c a m p u s e s ; and
W H E R E A S : the purpose of IAWS
is to raise the s t a n d a r d s of college
w o m e n ; and W H E R E A S : Academic misconduct h a s b e c o m e an almost-accepted value a m o n g stud e n t s ; therefore BE IT RESOLVED:
that each m e m b e r
group
strive to curb a c a d e m i c dishonesty
mi the individual c a m p u s e s . "
AI si
' W H E R E A S : Much of tin
concept til "in loco p a r e n t i s " is out-
can Hall in Troy from eight-thirty
to twelve-thirty. The "Swinging
K n i g h t s " will provide the music.
An informal party will be held
Sunday from two to five. Chaperones fur the formal d a n c e will
be Dr. and Mrs. Howard, D r .
and Mrs. Fueri and Mr. and Mrs.
Staley. Dr. and .Mrs. Moore and
Mr. and Mrs. Niltefield will be
c h a p e r o n e s for the date p a r t y .
Sue Gaffney is general c h a i r m a n
of the event.
G a m m a K a p p a Phi
G a m m a K a p will hold its formal
d a n c e " S p i n g t i m e R h a p s o d y , " Friday, from nine to one in the
Fort O r a n g e Suite of t h e Sheraton-Ten Eyek. The b a n d for the
d a n c e will be 'The M a n h a t t a n s " .
On S a t u r d a y there will be a buffet
supper at the sorority house from
four to six
In the evening t h e r e
will be an informal d a t e p a r t y at
the Italian Benevolent Society from
eight to twelve. John Tyo and his
"Campus C o u n t s " will furnish the
music.
Chaperones
for the
informal
p a r t y will be Mrs. Nye, Dr. and
Mrs. A n d r e w s , Miss S a l m , Miss
Glass, Dr. and M r s . S m i t h , and
Mr. and Mrs. H a b e r . M r s . Doug
las Penfield will attend both tlie
tormal d a n c e and the d a t e p a r t y .
Meg S m o y e r '02 is g e n e r a l chairman lor the weekend.
Phi Delta
Phi Delta's annual weekend will
begin F r i d a y evening with a d a t e
party at the Italian Benevolent Society from 8:30 to 12:30.
S a t u r d a y evening a d i n n e r dunce
at the Circle Inn will climax the
weekend. " ' T h e H o l i d a y s " is the
t h e m e of the formal event.
C h a p e r o n e s include Dr. and Mrs.
Kenney, Dr. L a r n e y , Mr. and Mrs.
Ronald A l e x a n d e r and Mr. Robert
Mcllugh.
General
chairman
is
Mary Ann Gus'berti '62.
ForensicTeam
Holds Finals
The New York Slate High Schuul
' '; ' » ^^^•• <i> ;»ia- Forensic League«.. ..,.<i u» state
leetual and social g r o w t h ; t h e r e f i n a l s at State College today and
l,,n HK
'
}'}' KESOLVED That each tomorrow
' I K ' u l A U S organization r e - e v a l u a t e
|.; ;u .|, ,||.,incl ,-, sending its lop
" K ' application ol "in loco paren d e b a t e r s and lop s p e a k e r s in the
""
" " " " ' " ' respective c.impiise n , . | , | . ,,| , , r u | i n t e r p r e t a t i o n , e \
"' ' " ' l ' 11 " 1 ' 1 ' " a r r i v e al p r a c t i c e s tempuraiicous , p e a k m g . and ora
,
" " r l M l l ! l ' ' 1 ' " l h l ' , l l ' , , , l s , j | " " ' " ' lor.s
" " " " ' " s '"'' Ml>
I'lie 12a schools u Hull a r e meiii
-,., i, ,.
'"'' - ol this league a r c sending 50U
speahel s
.itiileiils as r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s to the
N " a k e r al the (oiileieiice in M I . I U
' bided
Hi
Erii Walker, I'rest
1 hi- >e,n - debate topic j - If,
' ! , l , ; " ' Femi Slate
Dr Kuberl , o l \ c d
that the lederal govern
Heriiieuler
Professor
ol
l'-\
men! should equalize educational
cholugN and special Assistant lo opportunities \>) mean-, of g r a n t s
;llr
President
Dr E d w a r d Eddy, lo the stales for e l e m e n t a r y anil
•''
President ol C h a t h a m i ullege, secniidar) education. The d e b a t e s
" r Rose Goldscn, Associate P r o will be held F r i d a y night and Sat
lessor ol Sociology and Anthropo urd.i)
afternoon;
the
speaking
log) at Cornell, Dr. Dorothy l.ipp, events will take place Saturday
Dean ol Women at Penn S t a t e , morning
William Tsitswu, Education AtJ u d g e s a r e needed lor these
' a c h e at the E m b a s s y of G h a n a , c e n t s , those who a r e i n t e r e s t
and lx.'e St L a w r e n c e , Regional ed a r e r e q u e s t e d to come to D r a p e r
Director of F u r E a s t e r n P r o g r a m s Lounge at 6:45 p in on F r i d a y or
ol tlie P e a c e Corps
8:45 a in S a t u r d a y
-v^ftimmmts**-
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1962
PAGE 2
A
Salary tO Survive
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1962
Communications
Student Association budgets have been submitted to
—
the finance minister and are now being considered by committees. The State College News budget, which will be dis- To the Editor:
On t h e w e e k e n d nf A p r i l 13-15,
cussed by Senate in two or three weeks, includes a $400 2000
s t u d e n t s w i l l Rather a t Y a l e
salary for the editor-in-chief. We would like to explain U n i v e r s i t y f o r a c o l l o q u i u m o n
why we are asking that next year's editor be paid and to " T h e C h a l l e n g e o f the C r i s i s S t a t e . "
ask the help of the student body in our efforts to have the S p o n s o r e d b y C h a l l e n g e , t h e colloq u i u m w i l l e x p l o r e t h e effect t h e
salary line accepted.
The salary attached to a position is usually based on p r o l o n g e d C o l d W a r h a s h a d o n
time, responsibility, and training. The position of editor- A m e r i c a n s o c i e t y — i t s e c o n o m y ,
in-chief of the State College News consumes enough time, pl i os hl i mt i ceanlt pa rnodc ei ns ds ei vsi,d uma il l i pt as ryyc h estabology.
entails enough responsibility, and requires enough trainS p e a k e r s at t h e c o l l o q u i u m w i l l
ing to warrant a salary.
L.
The News editor works a minimum of thirty hours a iBnacrl ut ldeet t , Mp raoxf eLsesronres r ,K eSnenneattho r BE.
ouldweek on various phases of the production of your student ing a n d S a m u e l H u n t i n g t o n , and a
newspaper — besides consuming untold hours worrying d e b a t e b e t w e e n N o r m a n T h o m a s
and planning. The position thus requires at least as much and F u l t o n L e w i s I I I . T h e protime as the position of SA president does.
g r a m w i l l also f e a t u r e a n u m b e r
Every News editor has a bigger job than the last, for of coffee s e m i n a r s at w h i c h stuwo, too, are expanding. By 1970 there will be twice as d e n t s w i l l d i s c u s s t h e i r o w n v i e w s
v a r i o u s a s p e c t s of the cnllomany State College students as there were in 1960. While fon
the school population is doubling, the output of the State | i i i u m t o p i c .
Would vou two like another drink?"
College News (if the publication is able to continue) will C h a l l e n g e is a n o n - p a r t i s a n stube multiplied by four: there will be approximately twelve dent o r g a n i z a t i o n at Y a l e U n i v e r pages contrasting with the usual six in 1960, and the paper s i t y , e x i s t i n g i n t h e b e l i e f that t h e
will probably be published twice a week. We are now pub- A m e r i c a n c o l l e g e s t u d e n t h a s an
lishing an average of eight pages a week. Therefore the o b l i g a t i o n to u n d e r s t a n d and c o n t r i \.
i*US
News has twice the expansion job of the student govern- bute to his s o c i e t y . C h a l l e n g e w o u l d
I5v P I A T T a n d M C C A R T H Y
ment: it must plan extensively for the future as well as l i k e to i n v i t e s t u d e n t s f r o m a l l colleges to a t t e n d t h e c o l l o q u i u m .
function now while it grows.
Registration blanks and further
Although many students do not realize it, the editor- i n f o r m a t i o n c a n be o b t a i n e d b y
" M e n a r c the d e v i l
. they all bring woe
in-chief has an enormous responsibility. He or she is re-w r i t i n g t o C h a l l e n g e at D w i g h t H a l l
In W i n t e r i t ' s easy to say just N O . "
sponsible for not only planning and publishing the paper Y a l e U n i v e r s i t y , N e w H a v e n , ConMary Carolyn Davis
but also for its impact long after publication. The editor n e c t i c u t . A l l a r r a n g e m e n t s f o r t h eMKN'S DKLIC.HT
is directly responsible for every word, every letter, every w e e k e n d w i l l he m a d e by ChalL a t e l y we have noticed an i n c r e a s e d n u m b e r ol s o r o r i t s sweat
punctuation mark. The responsibilities of Student Asso- lenge.
s h i r t s a r o u n d the s q u a d . Wonder what t h e n 1 is about this t i m e ol
ciation president are much more indirect than these. The T h a n k y o u f o r y o u r c o n s i d e r s y e a r w h e n the t r u e colors show'.' P e r h a p s t h e fact that p a r t y t i m e is
SA president can delegate responsibility: the State College l i n n . 1 hope I n see y o u A p r i l 13th here has s o m e t h i n g to do w i t h the sudden i n t e r e s t s . East y e a r ' s p r o b a
l i o n a r y w e e k e n d s were c a l m , cool a n d c o l l e c t e d in t h e hopes that
News editor cannot. Since the school paper is one of the
t h e r e w o u l d he no r e s t r i c t i o n s this y e a r .
\ o w w i t h that e x t r a h o u r
Y o u r s Iruls ,
major factors by which outsiders judge a school, the editor
w i l l t h e r e by a n \ s w i m m i n g
f i v e A . M . subs, o r n e w l y e m p l o y e d
R
o
b
e
r
t
deV'oursney
of the newspaper has more impact outside the school than
e l e v a t o r operators',' This y e a r we hope the w e e k e n d s a r e a b a n ' ' !
for C h a l l e n g e
the student government officers do.
of f u n w i t h o u t any u n w a n t e d c a m p u s e s : hut r e m e m b e r w h o s o u a l Yale U n i v e r s i i v
One of the main reasons for the Lireat responsibility
and w h a t y o u r e p r e s e n t ,
of this editorial position is that there is no faculty or adIS I T P O S S I B L E ?
W h i l e s t r o l l i n g t h r o u g h the p e r i s t y l e s this week w e w e r e mddonl.s
ministrative advisor. We are glad to have the opportunity
Pouring Over
shocked.
O u r eyes focused on a n e w d i s p l a y on t h e Press B u r e a u
to make all decisions ourselves. However, since the News
bulletin board
Needless to s a y , we w e r e o v e r j o y e d
N o w we a n
is self-governing, the editor has no one to whom she can
the Exchanges
w o n d e r i n g if this same d i s p l a y w i l l he up when S e p t e m b e r r o l l "pass the buck": you worry a lot more and work a lot harder
around'.'
when you know you arc totally responsible.
University of K a n s a s : The I ' m D I S T R I B U T I O N O F I D E A S
More extensive training is required for election to and w r s i l y is c o n d u c t i n g a Peoplc-loT h e o p p o r t u n i t y for a c t i v e p a r t i c i p a t i o n in Slate C o l l e g e f u n c t i o n fulfillment of the duties of editor-in-chief than for anyI'euple Hook D r u e for t h e benefit has h e r e t o f o r e been n e g l e c t e d . T h e p o t e n t i a l here is great a n d each
of
a
f
o
r
e
i
g
n
s
t
u
d
e
n
t
l
e
n
d
i
n
g
l
i
b
r
a
r
y
other SA office. A candidate must be well informed about
person c a n give s o m e t h i n g of h i m s e l f , s o m e w h e r e
T h a n k - to in
the technical and mechanical aspects of journalism, must Students a r e asked to c o n t r i b u t e t e r e s t e d o u t s i d e r s a n d Senate, is n o w possible to do just ' h i D n i
books,
the l i b r a r y
w i l l be p u i
of senate c o m m i t t e e s and c o n c e r n e d persons a r e b e i n g o r g a n i z e d now
be able to wite well, must have the knowledge and experi- into
o p e r a t i o n next fall f o r t h e use
ence to establish editorial policies, and must be well in- of f o r e i g n s t u d e n t s w h o a r e on ;i so if y o u have c o m p l a i n e d about not h a v i n g a p o s i t i o n b e f o r e V o l . I \
I'EER now.
formed about college issues. In general, a candidate must l i m i t e d b u d g e t .
SORORITY ORGANIZERS
have been a regular member ol the staff for at least two
years and a member of News Board for one year. He or I ' t i r a C o l l e g e : \ new student cen- East S u n d a y ' s episode in l l r u l o w e r lounge f r o m ll.'i w a s a l l e l i c1 i
she must have also spent many hours doing extra work ter is u n d e r c o n s t r u c t i o n al the a d d i t i o n to the p r e v a l e n t siege of i n e f f i c i e n c y s t e m m i n g f r o m I s
college
P l a n n e d f e a t u r e s i n c l u d e : The fact that the h o u s e m o t h e r s w e r e n ' t i n v i t e d , t h a t ' h e r e w a n
and seeking extra knowledge
a f o u r r o o m h e a l t h c e n t e r , a stu any p u b l i c i t y and that the ISC president d i d n ' t a p o e a r c o n t i n u e s tin
The most urgent reason for providing a salary for the dent post o f f i c e , a t w o - s t o r y f i r e t r a i n o f u n s u p e r v i s e d rush schedules a n d c o n f u s e d s o r o r i t y w e e k e n d
State College News editor is that otherwise it may very place in the m a m l o u n g e , and snack T h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n desires more s o r o r i t y c o o p e r a t i o n a n d p a r t i c i p a
soon (perhaps next semester) be impossible to find anyone l i a r and c a f e t e r i a .
lion f r o m the C r e e k s w h i c h w i l l a f f e c t ' t h e i r s t a n d i n g o n t h e nev
campus.
I l o u is this possible w i t h o u t a c e n t e r in I S C '
who will be able to take the editor's job. Incumbent editors
have no more money than anyone else. Those people who State C o l l e g e , I n d i a n a , P a . : A E V E N T U A L L Y W E D L I K E T O S E E
would be eligible for the editorship next semester just can't c a m p u s d e b a t e look place y e s t e r I m o r e duels in f r o m of M i n e r v a and c o n c e r t s in t h e c a f e t e r i a w l m I.
day b e t w e e n S t r o m T h u r m o n d f r o m
a r e c o n d u c i v e to the T . G . I . F . s p i r i t .
afford to give up one or two part time jobs to fill a position South
C a r o l i n a a n d R i c h a r d Boll
the suave suits donned more o f l e n on M o n d a y s
Congratulation
amounting to a full-time job
without pay.
ing f r o m M i s s o u r i
T h e issue d i s
Common Stater f * 4
W h e n a salary was given t o t h e S t u d e n t Association
president several years ago. it was w i t h t i n 1 goal of event u a l l y g r a n t i n g salaries to more a n d m o r e college offices
The a r g u m e n t ol " W h e r e does it s t o p ' 1 " is not v a l i d , f o r
of course it doesn't stop
at least l o r a l u n g , long t i m e
If o u r school is so eager t o keep u p w i t h t h e " b i g n a m e "
schools, it should realize that g r a n t i n g a salary to t h e
editor of t h e News is one more step in a p p r o a c h i n g t h e
standards ol these schools.
We sincerely hope t h a i I lie s t u d e n t s of State College
want t o preserve t h e i r newspaper as well as help it become
more effective
You c a n help I lie State College News by
w r i t i n g letter-, to t h e editor and by personally p e r s u a d i n g
the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d y o u r lellow s t u d e n t s t h a i t h i s
salary would be wort h w h i i e .
BY
Vol, M V I I
Friday,
THE CLASS
MAY
OF
1918
1918
M a r c h :i0, KIB2
No. H
1
Hamilton College:
The Charla
tans, a c a m p u s t h e a t r e g r o u p w i l l
p r e s o i i l T h e Z o o S t o r y by E d w a r d
\ l b e e a n d . l o h n \ 1 c \ i u l l a n ' s Waiting feu L e f t y .
(.enesen S t a l e : I he i .11, -,• plans
to present
.-MMIIII I ' a e i l n
a- ||Spring musical production
I o r d h a i n I n i v e r s i h : I h i v e ( ar
negie H a l l c o n c e r t - w i l l he p r e
senled Ibis S p r i n g at t h e 1 ' i m er
sih
\ p r o g r a in ol s t r a \ i n s k j u i l l
i n i t i a t e t h e series
;-;•:. ' / r ; r t*;^^r;z?-u,r,>:; ^;
difficulty
to D i p p i k i l l , they
also
went
bowling.
Saturday
night's
feature was
steak b r o i l e d o v e r a n open l i r e ,
Joe C a m b r i d g e a n d K e n D e v i r e
played the g u i t a r and led the
f u l k s i n g i n g . S o m e of t h e less sociable spent t h e e v e n i n g p l a y i n g a
cutthroat game of hearts.
S t u d e n t s w h o went w e r e E l l i t
S j b o s k i . Gene A l t i n a n , S e n i o r s
Jan B a r l o w , ( arol Rider.
T no
Satterlee. Juniors:
Dan Smith
Joe C a m b r i ,1 g e, S o p l i o i n u r e s ,
K >: h i e G e a r y , C a r l S a d , Hon K o c
- is. f r e s h m i n
B e v E o h r e , '(51
Da e E o h r e
'.r>8. Peg B e r n ' ( i l .
Sands Senes, .New P a l t z ,
Janet
King. Oneonta. and Ken Desire
O u t i n g ( ' b i b feels that s i n e stu
dent A s s o c i a t i o n is spending stu
d c n l f u n d s l o r i h e e a m p . m o r e stu
d e n t s should t a k e a d v a n t a g e o l
the l a c i l i l i e s o f f e r e d t h e r e The
f a r i n b o u s e , w h i c h c a n hold ovci'
t h i r t y p e o p l e , has both a gas stove
and a f i r e p l a c e T h e r e a r e e n o u g h
lishes a n d s i l v e r w a r e
lor lorly
people. (Jilting Club
encourages
a n y i n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s to go a l o n g
on t h e next t r i p to D i p p i k i l l
By K U R T S Y D O W
T h e 1962 G r e a t D e c i s i o n s Pro- diplomatic and economic foreign
g r a m at State has been u n d e r w a y policies were adequate with the
now f o r s e v e r a l sveeks.
question of recognition of Red
At the end o f e a c h m e e t i n g m e m - China.
b e r s , a p p r o x i m a t e l y 150 t h i s y e a r ,
In marked contrast with this
v o i c e t h e i r o p i n i o n s on t h e issues
evident dissatisfaction with U. S.
by saiting o n b a l l o t s p r o v i d e d i n
foreign policy in the Far East, was
each U r e a l Decisions k i t .
the overwhelming endorsement of
A t a b u l a t i o n o f t h e b a l l o t s r e - our 10-year Alliance For Progress
• u s e d on the first t h r e e t o p i c s , for the Latin American Countries.
V i e t n a m , Hvi\ C h i n a , a n d B r a z i l , About 87 percent of those voting
' e s e a l s some i n t e r e s t i n g t r e n d s in said that sve should
providethe
the t h i n k i n g of those p a r t i c i p a t i n g . funds and personnel necessary to
A general dissatisfaction
w i t h carry out the full program.
present C. S. policy i n t h e F a r
Another trend in the thinking of
East seemed to c h a r a c t e r i z e m a n y the Ureal Decisions members as
of the b a l l o t s on V i e t n a m a n d R e dr e c o r d e d in the b a l l o t s w a s t h e i r
i. l i m a When asked h o w t h e U . S. " h a r d l i n e " t o w a r d s a n y a t t e m p t s
should d e a l w i t h t h e C o m m u n i s t s at C o m m u n i s t a g g r e s s i o n
t h r e a t in Smith V i e t n a m o n l y IS
On t h e q u e s t i o n ol a n a t t e m p e d
p e n e n : ol t h e s t u d e n t s
reconi
m e n d e d we should f o l l o w present i n i l i l a r s conquest of S o u t h VietI . S. p o l i c i e s
I he p i c e n t w a s n a m l>s the C o m m u n i s t s , 56 p e r i \ en s m a l l e r on t h e q u e s t i o n of cent ol the v o t e r s f a v o r e d a r m e d
with
U. S
ground
how we sh m i d deal in t h e i n t e r n a l i n t e r v e n t i o n
t r o o p s it n e c e s s a r y , w h i l e -10 pera f f a i r s ol South V i e t n a m .
cent l a s o r e d at least i n c r e a s i n g our
i ' i i \{fd C h i n a , mils :.'J p e r c e n t
military
a i d to S o u t h V i e t n a m .
ol t h e students t h o u g h t that this
Fifty nine p e r c e n t o f t h e s t u d e n t s
c o u n l r y ' . s present p o l i c i e s w e r e sul's o l i n g tell we s h o u l d d e f e n d Quel i e i e n t lo d e t e r any f u t u r e a g g r e s m o y and M a t s u a g a i n s t a n y a t t a c k
sion lis that c o u n t r y . .Also, o n l y
lis Red C h i n a and 5,'i p e r c e n t w e r e
for a b u i l d u p i n U . S. m i l i t a r y
power throughout the F a r East.
One student s e e m e d to e x p r e s s
the o p i n i o n of t h e m a j o r i t y w h e n
he said we should l i g h t " f i r e w i t h
f i r e " in h a l t i n g C o m m u n i s t a g gression. Another c o m m e n t e d that
t h e r e w a s "no s u c h a n i m a l as
p e a c e f u l c o - e x i s t a n c e ; it j u s t g i v e s
the C o m m u n i s t s t i m e to c a r r y on
subversive a c t i v i t i e s . "
Several students suggested more
South V i e t n a m e s e s o l d i e r s should
be t r a i n e d i n g u e r r i l l a w a r f a r e so
that they m i g h t b e l t e r f i g h t the
Communists
guerrillas
in their
c o u n t r y , w h i l e o t h e r s w e r e f o r actively supporting subversive actis i l i c s on t h e C h i n a m a i n l a n d .
U r e a l D e c i s i o n s m e m b e r s also
s e e m e d to s u p p o r t a n a c t i v e p o l i c y
of U. S. l o r e i n g n a i d to u n d e r d e v e l o p e d c o u n t r i e s . A b o u t 71 percent o f t h e s t u d e n t s svere f o r i n c r e a s e d e c o n o m i c a i d to S o u t h V i e t nam.
• f u d g i n g f r o m t h e b a l l o t s , the
State s t u d e n t s m t h e U r e a l D e c i s ions P r o g r a m seem to f a v o r a n act i v e f o r e i g n p o l i c y : one w h i c h w i l l
stop C o m m u n i s t a g g r e s s i o n w h e r e v e r it m a y o c c u r , w i t h f o r c e if
necessary; one w h i c h w i l l spread
k n o w l e d g e a n d u n d e r s t a n d i n g of
d e m o c r a t i c ideals a n d o u r w a y of
life,
to f o r e i g n
lands,
through
such o r g a n i z a t i o n s as Peace C o r p s ,
and one w h i c h w i l l h e l p r a i s e tins t a n d a r d ol l i v i n g o f t h e peoples
ol i h e w o r l d
in
their
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• 111 he w l l i d w . ' l Ol, n.-i ,.-»l T i n , t-.TVI'K f-'OUJUOK NWWH ,i»s in. - I.<I re ,'pol
n,r upliiiotix <-x|iri-..s*'l In . u m . .n.n.. <n iminiunlo»ti</ii». HJ> sui-li nxprcMUMia ilo nut s i g n e d to a i d s t u d e n t s w i l d
have
n •< «-.•>*» rllv re/lott* I U vlaw.s
llllssco classes d u e In illness o r f o r
those h a v i n g
courses
back
A n e w U n i v e r s i t y C o m m i t t e e on
T h e t w e n t y - o n e m e m b e r s of Outthe A r t s , r e c e n t l y a p p o i n t e d b y
ing
C l u b spent t h e last w e e k e n d
President
Hamilton,
h a s been
a s k e d to r e v i e w t h e scope o f p r o - of t h e i r S p r i n g v a c a t i o n a l C a m p
g r a m s in t h e fine a n d p e r f o r m i n g D i p p i k i l l ,
arts
currently
being
conducted
' I h e a d v a n c e g r o u p left A l b a n y
throughout the U n i v e r s i t y .
e a r l ) ' F r i d a y m o r n i n g a n d r i ached
T h e c o m m i t t e e w i l l suggest ap- D i p p i k i l l a r o u n d
9 A . M . Alter
p r o p r i a t e A'ays by w h i c h these prob r e a k i n g a t r a i l t h r o u g h knee deep
g r a m s m i g h t be e n c o u r a g e d a n d
snow up to t h e f a r m h o u s e and i n n
e n l a r g e d a n d w i i i e x p l o r e t h e pos
v m g supplies i n , most of t h e c r e e p
Nihilities of i n t r a U n i v e r s i t y co• l a u d e d to ( l o r e M o u n t a i n to s k i
o p e r a t i o n in t h e a r t s .
I he m e m b e r s w e r e joined b\ M r
A r u in ; the m e m b e r s ol t h e c o m
and Airs l l o w i l t a n d t h e i r t h r e e
m i i t e e is D r . P a u l B r u c e P e l t i t ,
.1 i i l g h l e l s R o s a l i n e , Rein ecu. and
p r o f e s s o r of E n g l i s h a n d d i r e c t o r
Ruth
of t h e S t a l e College T h e a t r e al A l
bany.
The r e m a i n , ! , r ol i he t w e n t ) one
Oth. r
! i > r , a r e Pis - d c n l a r i l . ed late I- i , d a \ night and i arls
I bos,
• h . d i d nol go
F o s t e r S B r o w n . C o l l e g e at Os- : .iluida.N
w, go
d i i.i m a n
P n sidenl W i l sl.n.e. i n in) cd l l . p e r f e c t w c a i h i r
b a m I. P )•• -. i n nine i ' m i u i i
;, h) t o l l . i . . ' . i t i n . . i n k i n g lo t h e l a k e ,
1
Hop un wood a n d snow shoeing
Coiiec, . i ) r Rnberl W
\larvei
a s s o c i a t e d i r e c t o r ol m u s i c e d u lit' \ Eiihi'c. Pee Hero a n d C a r o l
R i d e r spent p a r i ol S a t u r d a ) clea
e a l i o n . Co,!,--,- ;• i i-red una . D r
ihe t a r e h 'ii- c a n d v, ashing
E d m u n d F o i d i n a n . c h a i r m a n ol I h e lei.
D i \ ision o l \ r : - K d u c a l i o n . i 'ollege the l a ! e - i i p p i ) ol dishes in the
D a v e Eohre
d i d some
at New P a l l / . and J o h n d r o s s e n o r , k i t c h e n
a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r o f speech a n d i n i i e h n e e d e d w o r k o n I h e l a i ' l l l
I .•
-1-.',
e l |,,\ i l l e^ e e l
d r a m a . A g r i c u l t u r a l a n d T e c h n i c a l ii , I n s t i t u t e al C o b l e s k i l l .
. i. - i p i o m u l ions , in the u as
fellas.
W h y can't (rats bid m o r e f r e q u e n t l y ' . ' '
a g r e a t e r n u m b e r of l a n t e r n s a n d d r a g o n s 'to c o n c e a l II
;e I-.
m the u n p a i n t e d p e r i s t y l e s ,
I
t h e l a r g e r classes haw- m e n - loud c o n s u m p t i o n
!... I S a l u r d a \ He
rings were finally received after a delicious meal
1
l
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M A R K T W A I N I I V O l < 0 1 l.l> I E M ) T H E T I M E
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A f t e r w a i l i n g f o r l i l l c e n n i i n u l e s we In,nils
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college l u n c l l o l i s in Ihe f u l i i r e ' '
A d e l p h i College : I he l o r e i g n s i n
d e n t s a t t e n d i n g t h e college w e r e
i eeeni Is host -. al an I n t e r n a t i o n a l F R I D A Y N I T E
7 m
I'.'dui a l i o n T e a
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a»<l ! l !•' I n n o l Sixth H a p p i n e s s
f r o m the New Y o r k ( ' i t s area were
7
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L'uests
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college
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PAGE 3
Pres.Hamilton Outing Club Visits Dippikill, Decisions Balloting Reveals
Names New Urges Students to Use Camp Student Opinion of Policies
Arts Council
By CAROL RIDER
15 percent felt that our present
t o w a r d t h e '(
College Calendar
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
ESTABLISHED
cilsscd w a s I ' S policy
So\ lei I nion
-
';:'
o H / f i f f -••:£
Its what's up front that counts
[FILTER-BLEND] is yours in Winston and only Winston.
Up from you feet rich golden tobaccos specially selected
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f*pcit cialtsmen will restore your
WJILII to top running condition and
appearance. Come in . . . compare
our lew puces and expert work Wa
are featuring the entire Speidel line
of ladies' and men's watchbands
including the sensational, new Twist'
O f lex designs in a wide variety of
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I '.irmeii
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r / / l
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like a cigarette should!
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:*07 Central Av*. Albany, N. Y
JIO 3-8220
•
STATE COLLEGE N E W S ,
PAGE 4
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1962
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S ,
State Pushes Current Comment
Building Fund Medical Association Tries
To Stop Social Legislation
Governor
Rockefeller
recently
a n n o u n c e d that his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n
will sponsor legislation to c r e a t e
By J O E GALU
a n e w S t a t e University ConstrucThe A m e r i c a n Medical Association Fund to bring about an acc e l e r a t e d p r o g r a m of c a m p u s con- tion is the leading professional orstruction. T h e fund would b e g i n ganization for g e n e r a l p r a c t i t i o n e r s
as well as other d o c t o r s and suro p e r a t i o n s May 1
geons.
T h e g o v e r n o r , at a p r e s s
conThe political outlook of the orf e r e n c e in New York City, said the
ganization
is, on the whole, highly
Fund
will be a public benefit
c o r p o r a t i o n with the single pur- c o n s e r v a t i v e on most issues, while
pose of achieving on-time comple- on s o m e it delves into the fields of
tion of the $700 million construction the r e a c t i o n a r y .
p r o g r a m r e q u i r e d by the University's M a s t e r Plan for t h e d e c a d e
I960 to 1970.
T h e F u n d would be a s e p a r a t e
a g e n c y within the University. Policy and priority decisions
with
r e g a r d to construction at the various units of the University will
be d e t e r m i n e d by the B o a r d of
T r u s t e e s , as in the past.
In effect, the Fund t a k e s the
place of the State D e p a r t m e n t of
Public Works which, e x c e p t for
d o r m i t o r i e s built by the D o r m i t o r y
Authority, h a s carried out University c a m p u s construction.
U n d e r t e r m s of the legislation,
t h r e e t r u s t e e s appointed by t h e
G o v e r n o r and approved by the Senate would direct the F u n d . T h e y
would h a v e authority as a g e n t for
the University to design, c o n s t r u c t ,
a c q u i r e and i m p r o v e all n e c e s s a r y
facilities and to utilize a wide variety of public and p r i v a t e res o u r c e s in o r d e r to c a m out the
assignment.
Suppression
Sparked By
Math Major
By ANDY N E I D E R M A N
and BOB BAKER
Many wonder about the physical
m e c h a n i c s behind the production of
" s u p p r e s s i o n " each week.
Last
T u e s d a y , Hill Spieglcr in h i ; a r t i c l e
about " s u p p r e s s i o n " for the Knick
News mentioned that it costs ten
dollars a week to put an issue out
The reason for the low cost is that
we use a m i m e o g r a p h
method.
The main e x p e n s e is p a p e r . However, not using a printer m e a n s
e x t r a work.
" s u p p r e s s i o n ' s " staff, c o n t r a r y to
popular belief, is not composed entirely of English m a j o r s , although
Us a p p e a r a n c e would suggest so
The b a c k b o n e of our publication is
a m a t h m a j o r , Bob K u r o s a k a . Bob
begins working on F r i d a y ' s issue
Monday night
lie plans the layout
and does all the typing.
Although Bob's main interests lie
.n the field of m a t h , he has been
lust as e n t h u s i a s t i c , p e r h a p s m o r e ,
about the production of our puhlica
lion. We feel he illustrates exact!)
.vhat " s u p p r e s s i o n " i- trying to
a c c o m p l i s h . There is interest and
controversy within every field be
lore " s u p p r e s s i o n " there was no
, Mice for these thoughts, " s u p p r e s -ion" w a n t s lo lie an all-inclusive
-indent endeav or
Huh lias written
two articles on math a- of today
This w e e k ' s issue contained
an
article by a science major
T h e r e is no problem
getting
a r t i c l e s from English ami social
studies m a | u r s p e r h a p s this illus
irates
their
loquaciousness
If
ciencc and m a t h majors need u
p r e c e d e n t we offer Hob K u r o s a k a
Opposition To Legislation
As a result of the A M A ' s opposition to the vast m a j o r i t y of r e c e n t
social legislation, it h a s c o m e und e r a t t a c k . The a t t a c k s h a v e been
m a d e by the D e m o c r a t i c National
C h a i r m a n , John Bailey, m a n y doctors, v a r i o u s l i b e r a l s , n u m e r o u s
" S e n i o r Citizen" g r o u p s and all the
other g r o u p s the AMA h a s m a n a g ed to a l i e n a t e .
T h e AMA h a s a l i e n a t e d
many
doctors by its d i c t a t o r i a l policies.
It recently a t t e m p t e d to set up
hospitals which would e m p l o y only
d o c t o r s who a l r e a d y belong to the
AMA; a court refused to g r a n t
w h a t e v e r kind of p e r m i s s i o n w a s
needed.
Senior citizens groups h a v e been
offended by the g r o u p ' s insistence
that Social Security Medical C a r e
for the Aged would be socialized
medicine. Socialized medicine infers the ownership by the government of all hospitals and all medical colleges. \ ' o proposal has included either of t h e s e .
The general overall legislative
views of the AMA h a v e alienated
most people who both know the
\ M A ' s position and a r e not right
wing. The AMA h a s opposed such
things as the income t a x , inheritance taxes, c o r p o r a t i o n income
tax, federal p u r e food and drug
regulations and social security.
Actions
The political opinions of the AMA
Primer Asks
Student Help
BY ANDY NEIDERMAN
and BOB BAKER
T h e r e will be a n o t h e r issue of the
P r i m e r this y e a r .
It will not be
as e l a b o r a t e an issue due to the
budget we a r e allotted.
However,
we do plan to h a v e a s u p p l e m e n t
issue come what m a y .
We invite contributions. Because
of the little time we h a v e left to
this school y e a r , we a r e m a k i n g the
d e a d l i n e for all m a n u s c r i p t s two
w e e k s from today.
The P r i m e r needs short stories,
plays, p o e m s , and e s s a y s . One of
the p r o b l e m s we ran up against
with the first issue w a s the fact
that freshmen were ignorant as to
what the P r i m e r w a s , and that it
was corning lo them as part of the
-Indent tax.
Assuming that just
about e\ cry one w ho r e a d s on ihic a m p u s know what the P r i m e r is,
• e feel that 1 wo weeks is suffi
i lent time for anyone to p r e p a r e
and hand in his or her work
We
need you and we need vnu now.
s\\T
20''
W<
W<
IMione
Albany, N.Y.
6-3610
SAV
By ANNE DUGAN
t h e d r u n k e n n e s s , o p e n i m m o r a l i t y , violent
off
ON
Ml
Diamond
Watches
Stone Rings
Ladies' Jeweln
Appliances
Best Values in Town at
iiAkoi.i) i
ifit
Central Ave
IN'KI.I
.
battles
with police'.' W h a t s u d d e n m o b i m p u l s e can m o t i v a t e a c r o w d of " 0 , 0 0 0 e d u c a t e d y o u n g men and
w o• >-.i• 11 i n t o a r a m p a g e of dost ruct ion? P e r h a p s it's
•i
•• v ay lo '".-I oil' s t e a m " . . . u *:ivag • kind of
- ' '
prcssion.
h :.!.•
..i i '•'•, '
'' i ' I
I. • <•
A
1
1..
]••••
I! it
mniily
why
ihr
are
so
man}'
i a t i o n ' s n;oM
'id i i i ; . una; | i • ; ' •
college
"adult"
u r . n l , i d?
\\'i ;,
r.now.o ,. • [••;.'; 11, ;;• fui ure.s, evei, t heir
!..,•;
b ,'. hui.r
• ; M . ' ' ',." , i!oi 'I
it v. ild a b a n d o n ? 1 n I !:>• i.- \
: : ,.. t h e
, ri , '.i i o n 11, • pri , I (i. 11>.
'• lie I ri h i e p r i c e ;, i r i
"ia;,
unbelievable,
''-.,...
vi- 1
i e t i \ it , ,
ha . e to p a y
II
you're
o l \ i 11 . . . a n d n o w y o u c a n In lp s l o p I lie n . s a n i t y .
in the ncr April
S.W'I
NOW ON SALE AT ALL NEWSSTANDS
|lgWM#'
|I:\VI:I.!.KS
Open Every
Night
T e e n Age
Account
Invited
•
''WJfflSWSSgBfl
FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1962
Value, but Shows Creativity Originality and Competence
iii
GERALD DRUG CO.
217 W e s t e r n Ave.
Doctors work a long d a y ; they
are often tired
they a r e somelimes rightfully afraid of c h a n g e ;
ilio.v tend to be c o n s e r v a t i v e . I
have no q u a r r e l with a high income
group being generally c o n s e r v a t i v e .
I r a t h e r expect it. The AMA h a s
been on the losing side in most legislative battles
I hope their rei mal of losing colli iniii's especially
with reference lo the AndersonKin;; bill which proposes to pay
hospital e x p e n s e s for aged people
with Social S e c u r i t y money.
.
T r y , Try' Has Questionable Varied A. D. Plays Reveal
mean little to m e . What m e a n s far
Priscilla P u d g e belongs to the a n i m a l s ) ; and all couples will h a v e
more is the action of the AMA with
best
sorority on c a m p u s . I m e a n , the opportunity to ride e i t h e r a
r e g a r d to such p r o b l e m s as malshe
really
does. T h e y ' r e absolute- c a m e l or an elephant. P e a n u t s and
practice and i m p r o v i n g the quality
ly
top
d
r
a
w
e r ; after all, Priscilla c r a c k e r - j a c k s a r e to be s e r v e d , and
of medical c a r e in A m e r i c a .
Pudge wouldn't be in anything but after a violent discussion a t the
The AMA h a s been ineffective in a top d r a w e r sorority . . . really. l a s t sorority m e e t i n g , it w a s decidfavors
eliminating m a l p r a c t i c e . Their own
All top d r a w e r sororities h a v e ed t h a t the weekend
statistics s t a t e t h a t 27% of the mal- fabulous weekends. J u s t everyone ( r e e e e a l l y t o p - d r a w e r f a v o r s ) will
practice is p e r f o r m e d by 1% of the dies to be invited. Priscilla asked be distributed while riding the
doctors in A m e r i c a .
Unlike law- her boy friend and he died. They c a m e l or elephant.
y e r s ' g r o u p s , t h e AMA h a s not set c a n ' t wait until the weekend to
T h e f o r m a l will be lovely. T h e
up such things as county b o a r d s to h a v e a fabulous t i m e .
g r a n d ballroom of the Waldorf
certify " g o o d " doctors.
Priscilla wouldn't think of sign- Cafeteria will be decked in s t r e a m ing out for the weekend. After all, e r s of lemon and m a g e n t a (topThe c e r t i f i c a t e s on a d o c t o r ' s
eleven-thirty-one should be late d r a w e r colors), and the Salvation
wall do not s a y t h a t the doctor is a
enough for any top-drawer person; A r m y band will provide lovely
good one. It does not say he is a
and besides, think of the s c a n d a l d a n c i n g music. C o t t a g e - c h e e s e
bad one e i t h e r . A s i m p l e , easy-toif Priscilla Pudge (the Priscilla s a l a d s , tea with lemon, and o t h e r
read certificate, with no Greek or
P u d g e ) got caught. T h e r e would specialties of the house a r c a m o n g
Latin, from a possible county board
be no top d r a w e r pledge-class next the r e f r e s h m e n t s .
Priscilla
just
could go far in r a i s i n g the level of
y e a r , a n d , what is worse, no P r i s - bought a fabulous new d r e s s for the
p r a c t i c e in A m e r i c a , but the AMA
cilla P u d g e to i m p r e s s t h e m .
big weekend.
I t ' s m a g e n t a and
has shown no i n t e r e s t in weeding
Also,
girls
can
do
awful
things
lemon
and
has
an A P P R O V E D
nut its v e r y few bad seeds.
in A H O T E L . This y e a r nothing neckline. Nothing awful will hapbecause pen.
Doctors, for the m o s t p a r t , a r e awful will take place
dedicated people, as a r e most law- H O T E L S have been eliminated by
On Sunday afternoon, a picnic
y e r s and most school t e a c h e r s , but the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n .
will be held on the tennis c o u r t s .
This y e a r Priscilla plans to h a v e The girls will sit on one side of
in all t h r e e c a t e g o r i e s t h e r e should
be professional action to maintain GOOD C L E A N F U N . An informal the tennis net and the boys on the
a high level of p r a c t i c e and ethics. party a t the Greyhound Bus Ter- o t h e r . In this way, nothing A W F U L
The A m e r i c a n Medical Associa- minal will highlight the first even- will h a p p e n .
All couples attion refers to A m e r i c a n medical ing's activities.
In c a s e of rain, the t o p - d r a w e r
c a r e as the b e s t in the world. This tending will d r e s s as buses, and
g r o u p plans to visit an art g a l l e r y .
is their a r g u m e n t for (he main- six kinds of soda-pop (with s t r a w s ! )
C o m m i t t e e - h e a d s All paintings of nude w o m e n and
tainance of the s t a t u s quo as far will be served.
that sort of thing (how l e w d ) will
as state and federal regulation is a r e - - - (Oh, skip it). Priscilla's
be placed in the gallery closet.
sorority
is
truly
lucky,
because
concerned.
Priscilla can't wait until the
they a r e having 2-1 c h a p e r o n e s (one
I do not doubt that medical c a r e for e v e r y three girls).
Her date is p r e t t y en
Nothing w e e k e n d .
in the United S t a t e s is excellent, awful will happen.
Ihused, too He's enthused for Mon
hut recent figures in the Post inOn the next afternoon, the sor- day to c o m e . Then it will be over
dicate I hat we do not lead in all ority is planning an excursion to and lie can ask someone other than
fields
The field w h e r e we trail is a local zoo. E v e r y o n e will have a Priscilla to his fraternity w e e k e n d
in reducing infant, m o r t a l i t y . The chance to see all of the funny ani- Won't that be fun? And . . . m a y
t i n t e d K i n g d o m , Sweden, Norway, mals ( t h e girls in Priscilla's sor- be . . . m a y b e , . . m a y b e . .
G e r m a n y , and m a n y other Euro- ority don't usually associate with s o m e t h i n g AWFUL will h a p p e n ! ! !
pean countries h a v e substantially
lower infant m o r t a l i t y r a t e s than
our own. Although it, can be completely a coincidence, most if not
all of the c o u n t r i e s with lower infant mortality r a l e s h a v e socialized
medicine.
If it is not a coincidence, information from the AMA
and other g r o u p s which opposed socialized m e d i c i n e and m e d i c a r e for
the aged u n d e r Social Security has
been m i s l e a d i n g ,
I listen to a r g u m e n t s both in
favor of and a g a i n s t socialized
medicine and the proposed aged
care plan c u r r e n t l y before Cong r e s s . T h e AMA and o t h e r groups
always talk about the terrible conditions in c o u n t r i e s w h e r e they
have
socialized
medicine.
The
W h a t t o u c h e s oft' t h e vicious v a c a t i o n riots in resort
question I wish these g r o u p s would
t o w n s from coast to coast'.' W h a t m a d n e s s causes
a n s w e r is "if it's so bad why h a s n ' t
a single country repealed socialized
medicine?"
. ;•
By W. H. EDWARDS
Try, Try was overly a p p a r e n t , and
Last Sunday a group of State
students presented two p e r f o r m a n ces of a one-act play by F r a n k
O' H a r a . entitled Try, Try, in the
ballroom of the K e n m o r e Hotel.
J o h n Velie directed; N o r m a Kurtzer. Richard M a r s h a l l , and Ted
P u l a s k i comprised the p l a y ' s cast.
The following c o m m e n t s a r e based
on sJie afternoon p e r f o r m a n c e .
any subtlety that the play might
have was lost. Yet, judging from
one look at the p e r f o r m a n c e of the
cast and several r e a d i n g s of the
script, I think that the play does
as well as it can as a virtuoso
piece.
Plot and T h e m e
T r y , Try is a b r a v u r a piece for
a c t o r s . Its " p l o t " is an anecdote in
the lives of an unsuccessful w r i t e r ,
J o h n , and his m i s t r e s s , Violet,
which is punctuated by the r e t u r n
from World War II of Violet's present h u s b a n d , J a c k . It p e r h a p s verges on silliness to s u m m a r i z e Try,
T r y in t e r m s of the t h e m e ; but for
those who like a b r e a t h l e s s .summ a r y : " t h e disillusioning and demoralizing effects of post-war life on
two people with each one's consequent desire to m a k e life hell for
the o i h e r . "
Mr
O'Hara
has helped
the
b r a v u r a along with what s e e m s
lo be an all-too-often m e r e t r i c u s
loading of the a c t o r s ' lines with
g a u d y imiges and flashy smiles of
the Alexander King variety, such
as
" Y o u r smile was like pink
crinoline going through a r i n g e r . "
Pile afternoon production rushed
a.'oni. a! breakneck
speed,
all
t h r e e ol the actors rode the pace
wei! but the i n t e r p r e t a t i o n ' s rapid:') resulted in a rut In r -tunned
and,.- 1 i a: tie- pla.v 's conclusion.
\ - ,i .". •
'in aimed ita! ua'iire ol
Setting
P e r h a p s the interior of the Kenmore Ballroom is beautiful when
it is used for d a n c i n g , but under
Mr. Velio's dim house lights and
s p a r e lighting plot, it took on
enough of a seedy a s p e c t to c r e a t e
the marvelous illusion t h a t a r e n a
set and ballroom t h e a t r e were not
contiguous but continuous. It w a s
hard to tell, p a r t i c u l a r l y at the
r e a r of what might m o r e aptly be
called artfully placed d e b r i s than
" s e t , " where the ballroom began
and the set left off. In at least two
senses, the ballroom b e c a m e the
set.
Value
In addition to the fact that the
proceeds of Try, Try went toward
the support of " s u p p r e s s i o n , " the
larger value of last S u n d a y ' s production was unquestionable. The
knowledge that State students such
as Mr Velie and his staff h a v e
enough dedication to leash disassociated creative energy to the formal discipline of a d r a m a t i c production -even though T r y , Try was
not the best possible choice as a
v' h i d e should be e x h i l a r a t i n g to
an) one here who make-- a seri ins
cla:m to inlelligenee
By DONALD de FANO
An overflow crowd of almost 100
squeezed into R i c h a r d s o n ' s Little
T h e a t e r on W e d n e s d a y evening to
witness the first offering of this
s e m e s t e r ' s class in Advanced Dramatics.
The Clouds
The first presentation w a s a
Robert Shelford adaption of Aristophane's The Clouds. Despite the
shinning personifications of the
clouds ( b r e a t h l e s s S a n d r a Kehoe
and Mary Robb) and the c h a r m i n g
struggle between Right and Wrong
Logic (Gloria Avener and P a t r i c i a
J a m e s ) the play never a m o u n t e d
to anything m o r e than a well organized skit. The in-group claque,
which r o a r e d at each Sam Singer
twitch and died from hilarity e v e r
time Dick N o t t i n g h a m rolled his
effete Socratic e y e s , a t t r a c t e d almost as much curiosity from the
audience as did the actors on-stage.
In sum, Anne Smith's handiwork
was kind of fun, but pretty • cak
theater.
Blood Wedding
Next c a m e the best presentation
of the evening; Act III, Scene I
of Garcia L o r c a ' s Blood Wedding.
Director H a r r i e t Berbery displayed delicate taste drawing together
elements of stagecraft and blocking to c r e a t e a single totality of
effect.
P e r h a p s Bob Widower's
choreography was excessive, but
if so it was a minor fault, Lillian
Schmidt as the Beggar Woman
revealed a surprising depth of
talent, and the brief a p p e a r a n c e ol
BradleyFolensbcc can be r e g r e t t e d
Notes on the New York Stage:
Variety Marks Winter Season
By DR. F R E D B. MILLF.TT
Phis winter, the New York the
a i r e - on and oft Broadway
has offered its c u s t o m e r s a wide
v a r i e t y of d r a m a t i c fare.
Recent
ly. for i n s t a n c e , there were such
d i v e r s e productions as F i t z g e r a l d ' s
This Side of P a r a d i s e ,
Arthur
Kopit's Oh Dad, Poor Dad, M a n i a ' s
Hung You in the Closet and I'm
F e e l i n ' So Sad, and S h a k e s p e a r e ' s
R o m e o and Juliet.
This Side of P a r a d i s e
Sydney Sloane's d r a m a t i z a t i o n of
the F i t z g e r a l d novel that m a y be
said to h a v e launched the Twenties
is
skillfully
impressionistic:
a
- o n e s of short quick scenes with
a few props on a b a r e stage, and
the a u d i e n c e impinging on three of
its sides, i! m a n a g e s , by m e a n s ol
sensitive lighting, tastefully chosen
o f f s t a g e music, and adroit acting
lo c r e a t e and sustain the nostalgic
a t m o s p h e r e of Princeton before the
First World War
When n e c e s s a r y , the props are
c b a i v e d bv a pair of ballet d a n c e r - ,
Vfoss Cohen and Julie \ r e i i a l . who
might seem to he iiicotmroiis ele
no-nts but are not -nice in \ n i o r \
I'd i i m ' s d r u n k e n -wi nes and the
••' one ol Rosalind's ma m a e ' hey
a n i n t e g r a t e d in'o the action ol
the pla>
i 'hief i ia (lit for the ' realloii and
m a i n t e n a n c e of the subtle ninnd-.
o| the pla.v is due Paul Ifoehhm 1
o in, -H-ein- to liav e been born In
pi a J A n i o n
From ihe
nt lie
r e t u r n s home Inun his prep school
g r a d u a t i o n , he is exactl) rij'lil
lie c a p t u r e s and holds the tuinla
m e n t a l naivete ol the Twenties,
which, despite an o\ erlav ol sopliis
lieation was i v profound than
,ms that is possible for youth in the
mid o c n t i i n alter two world w urs
and toe threat of inn leaf d e s l r u c
i ion
Oh Dad, Poor Dad, etc.
In the antithetical mode of fan
laslic surrealism is Kopit's Oh
Dad, Poor Dad, etc . an e x t r a v a gantly imaginative expose of the
man-eating American female. ( hit
of m a c a b r e e l e m e n t s , he has eon
Irived outrageous and
hilarious
comedy.
The fabulous!j wealthy and mal
evident widow c a r r i e s witIi her in
her travels a coffin containing Ihe
stuffed body of her loathed bus
band, a bowl holding a fish that
prefers In dine on S i a m e s e kittens,
two terrifying plants called Venus
fly traps, and a wretched s t a m m e r
ing son whom she keeps i m m u r e d
from the world and seeks to diver;
by tremendous collections of coins,
s t a m p s , anil books
At one point
in the play, the o b s c e n e plants
crow to huge proportions
and
threaten to strangle the hoy, but
in fun hi1 chops them down
Such action as the pla.v involves
dev clops a lone I wo lines The first
is Ihe modier's a t t e m p t lo secure
another v ielim an aging bill ro
mantle commodore hut after she
ha- recited a! 11 • ii" 111 and ma.L'iiili
i eni ly I he - r u n
I irv of her ma r
I led hie, lie iiiana: e-- lo craw I ol I
the -lace paralv /ed h\ the idea ol
: 'e liorriii' he has e s c a p e d .
I lie main line ol the in tmil con
II rns the attempt of an alliil'in
lillli •• ex put " w ho liv es aero-,, the
-t n e t i acourac) m a k e s Ihe avoid
aiice ol vol 'aril v nil possible i and
whom the boy has been watching
ihi'oilgh a Inline m a d e telescope, lo
seduce the little wretch and win
In in awaj from his mother.
The
bu.v hovvev ei'. driv en lo a I'rcn/)
bv having o v e r h e a r d the story ol
his mother's life, a v e n g e s himself
no womankind by strangling the
..orI at the height of her efforts to
Miluce him on his m o t h e r ' s bed
This n i g h t m a r e of erotic h o r r o r s
is ingeniously staged and brilliantly acted by Jo Van f l e e t as the
mother, Austin Pentleton a s the
son, B a r b a r a H a r r i s as the temptIress, and S a n d o r Szabo as the
commodore,
Borneo and Juliet
Of more e n d u r i n g significance
was the old Vic's tremendously
popular production of Romeo and
Juliet. The sets by the Italian director F r a n c o Zeffirelli m a d e it
perhaps the most handsome and
evocative visualization the pla.v has
ever had.
The s i r e d scenes with their violent b r a w l s and duels were immensely convincing, and the scene
of the Oapulet ball, flooded with a
rich golden light, re-created a
gorgeous
Renaissance
painting.
Zeffirelli even succeeded in devising a satisfactory tomb. Must of
those I have seen looked like ahan
iloiied one-car g a r a g e s .
The acting of the older m e m b e r s
nt the c o m p a n y , particularly Rosa
hud Atkinson as the Nurse and
Herald J a m e s as f r i a r Lawrence,
wa-i good, if not distinguished, in
the traditional mode.
John S t r i d e ' - Romeo and Joanna
D u n h a m ' s Juliet liav e accounted, in
large m e a s u r e , for the popularitv
ol tin-- production
They
have
charm and youth and env iable
technical skill
For mv l a - ! c how
ever, their modern style seemed
inappropriate for this pla.v
Romeo
struck me as a nivenile delinquent
who had wandered into the pla.v
from West Side Story, and Juliet
as an hysterical teen ager
I'liev did, to be sure, convey a
hvelv sense of physical agitation
and excitement, but they seemed
never really lo understand the
meaning of what lliey were ex
pi rieiicing. T h e difficulty,
oI
course, is that no one under forts
i except S h a k e s p e a r e ) has any idea
of the meaning of love; for this
reason, p e r h a p s the best Romeos
and Juliets have not been belated
if still a g i t a t e d , adolescents
only for its brevity. The rest of
Uie acting w a s even and approp r i a t e to the poignantly beautiful
mood of the play. As the final
curtain closed it was obvious that
the
audience
appreciation
was
sincere.
H e Who Says Yes
.
Bertolt B r e c h l ' s He Who Says
Yes, He Who Says No w a s presented after the intermission. Dir e c t e d by IngclKirg Goetze, the
play suffered from a conflict between t h e a t r i c a l style and content.
F i r m l y didactic in n a t u r e , the
u n i v e r s a l import of the play, n a m e ly that tradition is not to be held
above question and change—with
all the political and social implications of that m a n d a t e — is as
significant today as it w a s when
Brecht wrote it. But the staging
of this p l a y with the obvious intention of distancing the a c t o r s by
d e l i b e r a t e l y positing them in a
" p l a y " had the result of confusing
the a u d i e n c e by d r a w i n g attention
to t h e a t r i c a l effects and a w a y from
p e r s o n a l thought involvement. Excepting this g e n e r a l objection to
the p r e s e n t a t i o n , the effect of the
pla.v w a s firm. Dick Rogers turned in a n o t h e r c a l m , efficient perf o r m a n c e , and Douglas Ross was
i m p r e s s i v e as the Chorus.
T h e Sandbox
Bounce Scott's production of The
Sandbox by E d w a r d Albee was
s o m e t h i n g of a d i s a p p o i n t m e n t . It
- a delightful vehicle bill if never
quite c a m e alive. H a r r y Guy and
Ian Lee; were excellent as Albee
" t y p e s . " The absolute superficialit) of their respective c h a r a c t e r s ,
so n e c e s s a r y to s t r u c t u r e of the
play, w a s p e r h a p s the quality not
sufficiently a t t a i n e d by the women.
The play had its m o m e n t s , however, and the audience reception
indicated that there is a place at
Slate College for Absurd T h e a t e r ,
a fact which this r e v i e w e r is
pleased to note.
Although
the evening
wasn't
electrifying, it was not bad by
any m e a n s . The play selections
were v a r i e d ; the class in A. D.
r e v e a l e d a r e a s o n a b l e amount of
originality in staging and interprc
ed with the p e r f o r m a n c e s . I hope
that S l a t e College will continue to
lake pride in student
directed
theater.
Milne Students
Plan Production
The .Milne School will present
The Male Animal by J a m e s Thurber and Elliot Nugent. Friday, April
ii at M :iu oiu. in P a c e Hall. Tickets
lor the annual pla.v can be obtain
ed lrom Milne students for $ 75,
Tickets can be purchased at Ihe
dour for $1 00.
The Male Animal is a coined)'
based upon the marital p r o b l e m s of
a university professor who is faced
Willi the competition ol Ills wife's
old beau
Professor Turner fur
iher c o m p l i c a t e s In- lite by di.s
cussing the Sai en Vanzetti letter in
his class
The d i r e c t o r ol the production is
William K r a u s , Assistant Professor
o| English. Assistant to Ihe diree
'or is Jeff Sperr.v
The cast is: Toiiini)
Turner,
Clinton
Bourdon
Ellen
Turner,
l l i l d e g a r d e Lazzetla Joe F e r g u s o n ,
Paul F c i g e n b a u m ; Ed Keller, Bill
Kelsev
Mrs. Keller. Anne Riley;
Mean F r e d e r i c k Damon, Glenn Van
Acker Mrs D a m o n , Judy Margolis
Patricia
Stanley,
Maureen
(.l.vashien; Michael B a r n e s , Amos
Moscrip; Wally Myers, Dick Etkin:
Mabel the .Maid. Kay Koschorreck
PAGE I
Movie Reviews
By P A U L J E N S E N
T h e title of the play T h e M i r a c l e
Worker refers to Annie Sullivan,
who released the young Helen Keller from the cage in which she h a d
been imprisoned soon after b i r t h .
Deaf, d u m b , and blind, Helen m e r e ly existed within this shell, ign o r a n t of the world with which she
w a s unable to c o m m u n i c a t e . William Gibson, however, as a u t h o r of
the play, might also be c r e d i t e d
with a m i r a c l e of s o r t s : from this
d a r k and s o m b e r m a t e r i a l he h a s
fashioned a h u m o r o u s , exciting, and
thoroughly satisfying t h e a t r i c a l experience.
T h e h u m o r in the play, which w a s
p r e s e n t e d at the Strand T h e a t r e
on March 22, is welcome, a n d does
not a p p e a r out of place. Most of
it, although not all, s e e m s spont a n e o u s , arising n a t u r a l l y from t h e
situations and c h a r a c t e r s . T h e r e is
a g r e a t deal of physical action in
the play, highlighted by s e v e r a l exciting free-for-alls between Annie
and Helen.
T h e two lead roles w e r e excellently done. Eileen B r e n n a n succeeded in creating a t h r e e - d i m e n siona' portrait of the outspoken,
Irish t e a c h e r who showed Helen
what a word w a s ; Donna Z i m m e r m a n , in the difficult role of Helen,
effectively projected both the physical and mental sides of h e r handicap.
E n a b l e to see, hear, or speak,
she could only grope about, u t t e r i n g
piteous groaning sounds. This physical disability was obvious, but we
saw. in addition, the g r o u p i n g that
must have been taking place in
the d a r k n e s s ol h e r mind.
Although the supporting cast was
c o m p e t e n t , the actors occasionally
slipped into siock
characterizations. O
M. C a m p l e ' s
Captain
Keller, and T h o m a s Connolly as
Helen's older brother J a m e s , were
the main offenders.
The f o r m e r
s o m e t i m e s r e v e r t e d to the stereotyped Proud Southerner with a cond e s c e n d i n g attitude t o w a r d
the
No'th, while Mr. Connolly now and
then g a v e us the familiar Young
Man with the Cynical Viewpoint.
This defect is nearly negligible,
however, when c o m p a r e d with the
fine p e r f o r m a n c e s of the p r i n c i p a l s ,
and the excellent story. T h e s e two
e l e m e n t s h a v e combined to c r e a t e
a play which is both s e r i o u s and
e n t e r t a i n i n g , an u n c o m m o n combination.
The Bridge
One of the strongest anti-war
films of recent y e a r s is The B r i d g e ,
c u r r e n t l y on view at the D e l a w a r e .
This G e r m a n film is supplied with
English subtitles, which t r a n s l a t e
all the dialogue save a few lines
spoken by an A m e r i c a n soldier.
The time is d u r i n g World W a r
11, and the main c h a r a c t e r s a r e
seven G e r m a n schoolboys, a v e r a g e
age sixteen, who a r e drafted into
the a r m y . In o r d e r to keep t h e m
out of the fighting, they a r e assign
ed to guard an u n i m p o r t a n t bridge
whii Ii the G e r m a n s intend to blow
up themselves,
t ' n a w a r e of this,
the boys refuse in give up the
bridge and defend il d u r i n g an attack bv American tanks. The oneiii\ is fought off, but six of the boys
a r e killed doing it
At the end of
the 1:1m the useless bridge s t a n d s
i inpi.v. readv to be d y n a m i t e d .
Alioiii half ol this true story.
a d a p l e d from the lone s u r v i v o r ' s
autobiography, takes place before
ihe hoys' induction
These s c e n e s
of the school and h o m e life contrast sharply with the brutal battle
scenes to follow The audience sees
their .youthful idealism b e c o m e disillusionment
in Ihe so e a l i o d
" g l o r i e s ' ' of war
This picture is an excellent sub
stitute for such an e x p e r i e n c e , en
aiding the uninitiated to sense the
h o r r o r s , the futility and the utter
pomtlessness of modern w a r f a r e
•
,A«*ag?
.
PAGE •
In the semi-final
action
the
Goobers had b e t t e r luck us they
pounded out a 64-38 victory over
APA. T h e Goobers lumped off to
a 12 point half-time lead behind
the d e a d l y shooting of Sheehan
and M a d r a z z o who had a combined
total of 12 points in the first half,
APA w a s n e v e r able to build any
kind of offense as they were held
to 20 points in the first half. The
Goobers took a d v a n t a g e of the APA
scoring lag. and piled up 32 points
in the final half, giving t h e m the
e a s y 54-32 decision. Sheehan led
the scoring with 11 m a r k e r s and
G r e e n e netted 12. J e n k s led APA
with 9 points.
In t h e o t h e r ser"'-fin«. d u d Pott e r I gained a 52-46 verdict over
a
hard-working
Madison-Lake
s q u a d . Philips w a s high for t h e
losers and g a m e high with 16 m a r kers.
In the P o t t e r v e r s u s the All S t a r s
g a m e , the Club w a s once again victorious a s they disposed of the AllS t a r s 72-66. P o t t e r , playing without
t h e s e r v i c e s of D'Angelico and
Broornfield, c a m e from behind to
squeeze out a close victory.
Action Runs Hot And Heavy In AMIA Cage Tournament
VARSITY BASEBALL
By DAVE JENKS
"OPP'erator
This is one of those cool times of year when every
sports writer goes out of his everlovin' mind trying to find
enough stories, articles, pictures, and any other kind of
junk to fill up a complete sport's section. The basketballers
have hung up their sneakers and what have you and have
deflated all the basketballs, and the wrestlers have rolled
up their mats to make way for the spring sports, but the
spring athletes are just running around trying to get rid
of their winter spare tires and have not started to swing
yet; therefore, accordingly, hence, consequently, thereupon,
and thusly we have no news that we can put in the paper.
So we will now cleverly sneak between the bats, balls,
gloves, tennis rackets, track spikes, hurdles, and shot puts
in the equipment room, grab a basketball, inflate it. and
dribble it around a while before we could turn our pen
completely to baseball, track, and tennis.
Take Me To Your Leader
We all know that our basketball forces had
rather
great, fantastic, and tremendi (O. K., so maybe do Lret
carried away with what I'm doing sometimes) year, winning 19 and losing only 6. We probably all know also that
this was only accomplished through a united team effort.
But, every team, no matter how well it works together,
needs a leader, a man who is sure of himself, who does not
get rattled, and who can be depended upon to come
through with that big shot, rebound, or play when the
going gets tough. Yes, it is important that a team be a
team, and not a group of individuals, but it is also essential
t h a t this team have a backbone, "so to speak" (if I may
quote a member of our elite faculty). This is what made
this year's squad so good, they had the team—the Wallace,
the DeLuca, the Carmello, the Casey, the Weeks, the
Greene, the Cibulsky, and the Lyon; and they had the
backbone—the OpPEDisano.
Jim had a mighty big pair of shoes to fill when last
year's ace scorer and rebound, Don Cohen, graduated, but
in his usual relaxed, calm, unshakable way Opper was
equal to the challenge. If is even more remarkable t h a t
he has done so well when we see that Opp who is only 6' 3"
has the added disadvantage of playing in a position where
nowadays men ranging anywhere up to 6' 8", 6' 10", or even
7' are not uncommon. But anything he might lack in
basketball size he made up for with his hustle, nerve,
strength, and coordination. Whirling, twisting, bulling,
leaping, and smoothly faking his way around the hoop,
Jimmy meshed the nets with 45.2'; of his shots for a season
total of 464 points (an average of 18.6 per game). Using
his strength, often directed through his elbows, he was able
to gain position on his taller opponents and hauled down
326 rebounds.
There's More Than Just Statistics
However, Opper's most valuable assets are not indicated by his statistical status. The before mentioned leadership quality, his confidence, his unshakeability, and his
habit of coming through at the right moment are what
boost from the catagory of good to great. Who can forget his beautiful last second clutch shot that beat the Loudenville High boys this year?
CAFFE LENA
45 Phila St.
SARATOGA SPRINGS
(iALLI.RY THEATRE
Presents
.lean I'aul S a r t r e ' s
"NO EXIT"
M \ IK II
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Tickets SI.110
Students s.
I ho l a d
thai hi' doesn't let
this excellence and attention go
to
his
head,
his
friendliness,
and heller ihan a v e r a g e iei..Sf ul
humor mak
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popular typi men around the t^uail
especially wall ihc female *>ei I'
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THERE
IS NO
THEY SATISFY
HO 5-1471
(I.CM
In Ihe finals of the 1-1 contest,
Clem was pitted against Southern
s t a l e s Champion, Pat McCorinick.
who had won 17 straight m a t c h e s
Chances are, you know that Greyhound fares are less than
any other form of public transportation. What you probably
don't realize is how much less. For a pleasant surprise,
check the money-saving Greyhound fares below. You'll see
at a glance why it always pays to insist on exclusive
Greyhound Scenicruiser Service...and leave the drivinfl to us!
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AT
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shaie yom I '<m,;hts, youi c x p t n -
Co-op
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receive .
expressive ol
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LIFE-AUTO-FIRE
AT THE
Hospitalization
STATE COLLEGE
HO 2-5581
anil nothing is mora
personal, more lasting, more comsomewhere,
you! To
a
letter
'on wmil.'J he a pie< ous
Co-op
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pletely
APRIL FOOLS DAY CARDS
A
I.
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i nr.es, youi mo ,1 treasure*.] sen-
•HIT
CROW
LETTER
FOOLING
Writes All Types of Insurance
75 State Street
The 2.r>th annual r u n n i n g of the
•t-1 Wrestling T o u r n a m e n t attracted 125 of the best w r e s t l e r s in the
East r e p r e s e n t i n g 'Ml schools and
8 s t a t e s . Almost e x a c t l y one y e a r
ago Clem gained his first 4-1 title
Willi four victories.
This y e a r he again swept over
all competition to successfully defend his Hill pound division title. In
the semifinals, the Albany State
Senior met previously undefeated
Tom Koenig of Navy Pier. According to coach .Ine ( i a r c i a this was
probably his w r e s t l e r ' s
hardest
match ul the entire season, and
since he pulled a muscle in his
knee while gaining the decision, it
was probably the unliickiosl.
Crow T a k e s O v e r t i m e Battle
ing to stall his way to victory by
keeping out of C l e m ' s r e a c h . After
w a r n i n g him once, the referee
penalized the Southern w r e s t l e r for
his c o w a r d l y b a c k p e d d l i n g technique. This put the m a t c h into overtime w h e r e Crow w a s forced to
wrestle at his best, and did, easily
gaining the decision.
Due to his i m p r e s s i v e performance h e r e , he w a s e v e n predicted
by some of the 4-1 officials to take
the NAIA C h a m p i o n s h i p s at Winona, Wisconsin. But such w a s not
to be the c a s e as o u r injury-riddled
w r e s t l e r w a s edged in a v e r y close
first round m a t c h . His opponent,
Don Taylor, r e v e r s e d Clem in the
closing s e c o n d s of the bout, and
the l a t t e r had no l i m e to m a k e up
the 2 point deficit.
So Close ! ! ! !
How close did Clem come to
winning an NAIA trophy?
Even
though he lost in the first round
he c a m e m i g h t y close. Don Taylor,
C l e m ' s c o n q u e r o r , went all the way
to the semifinals, w h e r e he losl
by only one point to the m a n who
eventually b e c a m e the t o u r n a m e n t
c h a m p i o n . A h e a l t h y Clem Crow
could have very possibly gained a
National C h a m p i o n s h i p .
Albany Slate owes this lough,
hard-to-beat w r e s t l e r a vote of
t h a n k s for placing it on the National Sports scene once a g a i n ;
and w h a t e v e r the wrestling future
m a y hold in store for Clem, more
c h a m p i o n s h i p s or m a y b e even an
Olympic berth, we wish him the
best (or at least b e t t e r ) luck.
APRIL
\r
21 GREAT TOBACCOS MAKE 20 WONDERFUL SMOKES!
this s i a s o n and who over the las:
three y e a r s has not losl a decision
in -15 consecutive encounters. Bui.
with Ins injured leg and all, Crow,
u n i m p r e s s e d with such astounding
statistics, calmly ended Mr. Mcc o r m i c k ' s siring. Il was no easy
m a t c h , however, with the battle
going into o v e r t i m e . McCormiek
had gained a one p.iin! a d v a n t a g e
late in the m a t c h and was a t t e m p l -
CAN SHARE SO
MUCH WITH A
\h
in;
By DAVE J E N K S
Once again a s t a t e athlete h a s
gained national recognition. Clem
( r o w , Albany's swift moving t r a p pier, successfully defended his title
in tli" nil-pound c l a s s (if the Int e r s t a t e I n t e r c o l l e g i a t e Individual
Invitational (1-1) Wrestling Tournament held at the Case Institute of
Technology in Cleveland, Ohio, by
downing previously undefeated P a t
McC'irmick
in o v e r t i m e .
From
there it was on to the NAIA National C h a m p i o n s h i p s a t Winona,
Wisconsin. H a m p e r e d by a knee
injury, the agile Crow, who relies
(m
his speed and d e c e p t i o n , w a s
defeated by Don T a y l o r of Bloomsborough in his first round m a t c h
by a m e r e 2-0 count.
mp/Mum
ART KAPNESt
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AGED MILD, BLENDED M I L D - NOT FILTERED MILD
Wednesday April 18 Siena
Away
Friday
April 27 Potsdam
Home
Saturday
April 28 P i t t s b u r g h (2)
Home
Tuesday
May 1 Oneonta
Away
Wednesday May 2 New Paltz
Home
Saturday
May 5 Utica
Away
Tuesday
May 8 New Paltz
Away
Wednesday May 9 Siena
Home
Saturday
May 12 Oswego (2)
Home
Wednesday May 16 Oneonta
Home
Friday
* May 18 Roch. Inst. Tech. Away
Saturday
May 19 Brockport (2)
Away
Tuesday
May 22 RPI
Away
Coach: Bob Burlingame.
Home games will be played at Vets Field.
Single home games will start at 4 p.m.; double h e a d e r s
will start at 1 o.m.
FROSH BASEBALL
Friday
April 27 Hudson Valley
Away
Saturday
April 28 Coblcskill
Away
Tuesday
May 1 Hudson Valley
Home
Saturday
May 5 Hudson Valley
Home
Tuesday
May 8 RPI
Away
Saturday
May 12 Rockland
Away
Thursday
May 17 RPI
Home
Saturday
May 19 Dutchess
Home
Coach Gerald Hissert
VARSITY AND ROSH GOLF
Home
Wednesday April 18 Utiea
April 26 Siena
Home
Thursday
Tuesday
May 1 Siena
Away
Friday
May 4 Oneonta
Home
May 5 Coblcskill
A wav (Frosh)
Saturday
May 7 Utiea
Away
Monday
Thursday
May If) ABC
Home (Frosh)
May 11 P i t t s b u r g h
Home
Friday
May 14 Slate Tourney
Oswego
Monday
Away
Wednesday May 16 RPI
May 21 ABC
Away ( F r o s h )
Monday
May 22 Oneonta
Away
Tuesdav
in
ll'ST IN ( ASi: VOl! DIDN'T KNOW IT
"If it's all right with you Captain,
I think I'll drop H-OXC."
C. Crow Wins National Recognition
For Himself & His College This Year
1962 Spring Sports Schedule
Touching All
Bases
The Potter I squad came through with a spectacular 102-62 triumph over the Goobers, to win the 1962 AMIA commissioners basketball tournament. The Potter quintet
pulled away after a close first quarter, and crack shooting enabled them to hold a comfortable edge for the remainder of the game.
The first quarter score was 19-15, with Potter holding the slim lead. Cohen and
D'Angelico got the Potter offense underway as they started hitting in the second stanza.
EEP outscored the Goobers 26-18 in this quarter, and the halftime score stood at
45-32. The second half was just about a repeat of the first, as the Pottermen continued to pile up the points. Mann and Broornfield led the onslaught in the third period as the Club put the game out of reach. The Goobers were never able to challenge
Potter and were forced to settle for a 102-62 drubbing. Cohen was game high with 29
points. Broornfield contributed 24 more markers, D'Angelico scored 22, and Mann tallied 13.
Sheehan lead the Goobers offense with a 17 point effort, while teammates Greene
and Olsen chipped in 16 and 15 respectively. This victory enabled the Pottermen to compete against the All-Star team in the annual post season game.
PAGE 7
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1962
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1962
Potter Sweeps In Post-Season Cage Play:
Easily Romps In Tourney; Edges All-Stars
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PAGE 8
•
•
-
•
-
•
•
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE, FRIDAY, MARCH 30, 1962
Advanced
c a m p u s a r e included.
Students
Right R e v . Allen W. B r o w n , D.D.,
living off c a m p u s should obtain Bishop of t h e Diocese of Albany,
T h e c l a s s in A d v a n c e d D r a m a - p r e f e r e n c e c a r d s from the Housing
will be the g u e s t s p e a k e r a t the
t i c s a n n o u n c e s t h a t t r y o u t s for four Office i m m e d i a t e l y .
dinner.
o n e - a c t p l a y s will b e held tonight
R e p l a c e m e n t Elections
in R i c h a r d s o n 291 a t 7 p . m . P r o E v e n s o n g will be a t 6:30 p . m . ,
R e p l a c e m e n t elections for freshd u c e d will be A r r a b a l ' s " P i c n i c on
followed by d i n n e r at 7 p . m . All
t h e B a t t l e f i e l d , " directed by J u d i t h m a n Publicity D i r e c t o r and one
G r a b e l ; Ben C a s e y ' s " T h e F a s t e s t J u n i o r S e n a t o r will b e held Mon- E p i s c o p a l i a n s on c a m p u s a r e inI n s i g h t A l i v e , " d i r e c t e d b y W e n d y d a y and T u e s d a y from 9-3. Candi- vited to a t t e n d .
N a d l e r ; Chekhov's " S w a n S o n g , " d a t e s for Publicity D i r e c t o r a r e
E v e r y W e d n e s d a y d u r i n g Lent
d i r e c t e d by F a y e N a d l e r , and J u l e s Tom A l c a m o , Bob L u c z y n s k i , Doug
McAllister, and Sally S m i t h . J u n i o r there will be c o r p o r a t e c o m m u n i o n s
Feiffer's "Crawling Arnold."
S e n a t o r n o m i n a t i o n s a r e : F r a n k at 6:45 a . m . a t St. A n d r e w ' s .
Attention
B a n t a , Caroll Colway, F a y RichC h a n n i n g Club
P r e s i d e n t of Student Association, a r d s o n , and Betsy S e g r e t o .
S t e v e Condojani, a n n o u n c e s t h a t he
The next m e e t i n g of the ChanSEA Constitution
r e c e i v e s m a n y letters from e n t e r ning Club will be held at the h o m e
tainers ( d a n c e
b a n d s , choral
For some t i m e the S t u d e n t Edu- of Professor and Mrs. P a u l Schaeg r o u p s , single e n t e r t a i n e r s , e t c . ) cation Association h a s b e e n work- fer at 7:30 p . m., S u n d a y , April 1.
All such c o r r e s p o n d e n c e will be ing u n d e r a constitution which is
Professor William G r i m e s of the
s u b m i t t e d to the Student Union no longer functional. It is e s s e n Philosophy D e p a r t m e n t will lead a
Organization for its files. Any or- tial to the life of the organization
discussion on "An E x i s t e n t i a l i s t ' s
ganization or group m a y h a v e ac- that a new constitution be adopted.
Approach to Religious S y m b o l i s m . "
c e s s to this m a t e r i a l upon r e q u e s t
Such a constitution w a s proposed T r a n s p o r t a t i o n will be provided
at the Student Union Office.
March 26. Copies of this constitu- from B r u b a c h e r at 7:15 p. m.
tion a r e available in Miss Conklin's
D r a m a t i c s and Arts Council
office and a r e posted on t h e S E A
S t a t e College N e w s
D r a m a t i c s and Arts Council an- bulletin board. Check y o u r student
The
Stale
College N e w s is still in
n o u n c e s the election of its n e w of- mail for ballots; vote a n d r e t u r n
need of a c t i v e staff m e m b e r s .
ficers who will serve until May these ballots a t once.
1963.
They a r e J u d y Insel '63.
Positions a r e open in writing,
C a n t e r b u r y Club
President;
Karen Jurewicz
'64,
typing, c o p y r e a d i n g ,
and
other
V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ; Gloria A v n e r '64,
C a n t e r b u r y Club will hold its an- a r e a s . No e x p e r i e n c e is n e c e s s a r y .
S e c r e t a r y ; B a r b a r a Steindorf '64, nual F a c u l t y D i n n e r this S u n d a y ,
Prospective m e m b e r s s h o u l d
T r e a s u r e r ; J a c k T k a t c h '64, Try- April 1st at St. A n d r e w ' s Church, c o m e to B r u b a c h e r , Room 5 Tuesout C h a i r m a n ; Amy Scott '64, P u b - Main and Madison A v e n u e s .
day or W e d n e s d a y e v e n i n g s .
licity Director, and F r a n k R y e r s o n
'64, R e p o r t e r and Historian.
J+ouie Jtaudi
Dramatics
°7»v
Psi G a m m a
M a r y Dobeck '63, Acting P r e s i dent, a n n o u n c e s a pizza p a r t y at
the h o u s e tonight at 7:30.
Sigma Phi Sigma
J u d y R a e K a m i n s k y '62, P r e s i dent, a n n o u n c e s t h a t Linda Washb u r n '65, w a s pledged
Monday
night.
G a m m a Kappa Phi
Meg S m o y e r '62, Vice-President,
a n n o u n c e s that J e a n H c b e r g e r and
N a o m i Skolky, f r e s h m e n , w e r e initiated M o n d a y night.
Beta Zeta
P r e s i d e n t Doris Edelstein '62 ann o u n c e s t h a t a faculty c a r d p a r t y
will be held on F r i d a y night. A
toffee h o u r will be held with APA
'ii M o n d a y , April 2.
Sigma L a m b d a Sigma
D a v e S y m u l a '62, P r e s i d e n t , announces t h a t the following h a v e
been i n i t i a t e d : Rocky O'Connell '62,
Mike F i c g e l , Phil McMillan, J i m
N e a r i n g , J o e Thorpe, R o b e r t Van
W a g n e r , and H o w a r d Woodruff,
J u n i o r s ; and William A l e x a n d e r ,
Bill
Angell,
Felice
Barcellona,
George C e r e s i a , R i c h a r d Coppola,
Al Delfini, Doug Dye, Carl Healy,
Robert J a n c o , Les Keys, Ken Lockwood, D a v e Neville, Louis Opina,
J o e Procopio, B r i a n Quigley, F r e d
Rawe,
Thomas
Roche,
Robert
R y a n , Dick Sarnowski, P h i l i p Santos, John Vrtiak, and M a r t y Z a k i s .
freshmen.
Alpha P i Alpha
R a y Smith '62, P r e s i d e n t , announces that Dean C o l l a m e r "63
w a s initiated Sunday. S o p h o m o r e s
initiated
include
Mike
Hughes.
L e n n y Lapinski, Don Pond, Don
Sinclair and John S t u r t c v a n t . Also
initiated were George A n d e r s o n .
Tim Atwell, Bob B a r r e t t e , Dick
Crossett, Rick Genero, Ron H a m i l ton, Bill K e m p , J e r r y Knickerbocker, Stan Krivo. Doug L i p p o r t .
George L o m a g a , Dick Rosinski,
Stu Sager, Bill Smith, N o r m Stewa r t , Dave Suealo, Al W a g n e r . Ed
Wolner, freshmen.
T h e t a Xi O m e g a
J i m McAden '63, P r e s i d e n t , announces the following pledges w e r e
initiated S u n d a y : G a r y Belkin, William Branick, Donald Diltz. J a m e s
Hottois, Arthur
McCall,
Archie
Maker, Paul M a u r e r , J i m Morrell.
J i m Morgan, Lee P a c k m a n , Mart>
Reiss, Jon Strickland, E d w a r d Tok a s h , Dave Simons, and Stef Boarda j .
Advanced Ticket Sales
T i c k e t s for " K i s s Me, K a t e " will
go on sale W e d n e s d a y at 9 a . m .
P u r c h a s e r s a r e asked to follow the
d i r e c t i o n s which will be posted in
the peristyles.
The R e v u e will
t a k e place April 12-14.
DVAL
FILTER
DOES IT!
Tareyton delivers
the flavor...
D e a n ' s List
Additions to the P e d a g o g u e staff
of 1963 a r e L i t e r a r y E d i t o r , Liz
H o n n e t t ; F r a t e r n i t y Section Edit o r , Bill M o r a n ; and Advertising
Manager, Kaye Duers.
S t u d e n t s a r e r e m i n d e d t h a t applic a t i o n s for Resident A s s i s t a n t s for
1962-63 a r e still being r e c e i v e d .
Applications m a y be obtained from
and should be r e t u r n e d to the Housing Office, 111 D r a p e r . T h e deadline for application is S a t u r d a y ,
April 6.
West brook to Teach
At College in India
An open "Question and A n s w e r "
period for women interested in
t h e s e positions will be held Tuesd a y at 4 p . m . in the R e c r e a t i o n
Room of Alden Hall.
To Earn $ 2 5 . 0 0
"Tareyton's Dual Filter in duas partes divisa est!"
says FubliuH
Truths.
(Boom-
lioom
, A u r c l i u s , ('uli.sciini
ACTIVATFD CHARCOAL
INNER FILTER
cni.vd
pleaser.
S a y s lioom-Huum,
" T a n . y l o n >• o n e f'il I tsr cig".'ii'H l c
thai
r e a l l y d e l i v e r ^ , r l e t f u s l i b u . s . L e g i o n - ; of'sniokcr.-s a r e s w i t c h i n g .
PURK WHITE
' T r y a c o u p l e of p a c k s of T a r e y l o n s . T h e y ' r e
OUTER FILTER
the packs
Romana!"
DUAL FILTER
Tareyton
hoduU of JA* sMn+UMm JV$K€&> fv»y>atw — tXifa^o U our
"iti/Jlc name ^
in
Dr. Evan R. Collins, P r e s i d e n t
of the College, a n n o u n c e s t h a t Dr.
Clifton C. T h o r n e , who is presently
serving as Dean of Men, will be the
Director of F r e s h m a n Studies next
year.
F r e s h m a n Studies
This new p r o g r a m will a t t e m p t
to coordinate all the services of the
college which affect f r e s h m a n stud e n t s . Included in this a r e a will be
overall orientation,
a c a d e m i c
a c h i e v e m e n t , and school services.
This Yellowstone g e y s e r w a s the
source of w a r m w a t e r droplets t h a t
w e r e used in a study of t h e factors
in ice c r y s t a l formation. A r e p o r t
of this work bv the ASRC of the
University will be given
s t a t e
f^gy
Four Experts
To Discuss
Yellowstone
Dr. David B a r r y . Director of the
New York State University's Atm o s p h e r i c Sciences R e s e a r c h Center, will head a panel discussion
today at 1:00 p . m . in P a g e Hal
The topic- of the discussion will bi
R e s e a r c h at Yellowstone.
Dr. B a r r y obtained his B.S. al
Iowa S t a t e , and his M.A. and Ph.D.
at the University of Iowa.
He
t a u g h t at the State College of Iowa
and S t a t e Colleges in Minnesota
and Wisconsin.
Dr. Donald Allen. C h a i r m a n if
the Science Colloquium of the Stat."
University College at Albany, will
introduce Dr. B a r r y and his associates.
I'anel
On the panel will be lour local
scientists, all of whom attended the
ASRC Yellowstone Field S e m i n a r
N u m b e r Two last J a n u a r y 9 to F e b r u a r y 5. The s e m i n a r was supported by a g r a n t from ' h e National Science Foundation. Dr. V.
Schaefer, who was host at the Y<
lowstone s e m i n a r and is noted for
his p i o n e e r work in cloud seeding,
will p r e s e n t a report on the studies
conducted on ice crystal formation
he twenty-five scientists al the
s e m i n a r were able to use n a t u r e ' s
g e y e r s to d e t e r m i n e what f a c t o r s
effect the formation of ice c r y s t a l s
' " t n e a t m o s p h e r e . 'The effects of
electric c h a r g e and t e m p e r a t u r e
were studied intensely
On S a t u r d a y night the informal
p a r t y will be held at C a r m e n ' s
from 8:00 to 12:00, with music by
he
Department
of State in
the L a n c e r s .
Invited g u e s t s a r e Washington, D C h a s announced
Mr, and Mrs, K d w a r d Cowley and that Dr. P e r r y I). Westbrook, ProMr. and Mrs William Wilson. On fessor of English, h a s been award
ed a United S t a t e s E d u c a t i o n a l ExM c L a r e n to Report
change G r a n t . 'The purpose of the
Dr. E u g e n e M c L a r e n , C h a i r m a n
grant is to lecture in American of the College Science and Geology
Literature.
D e p a r t m e n t s , will report on a study
of snow p a t t e r n s surrounding the
Dr Westbrook ol \ oorlieesville hot s p r i n g s and Ihe air t e m p e r a t u r e
rile I.call L o w n h c i i n W a r d , a New York, will lecture in Maha relationships involved with ihe-e
$2.") no prize for the best
short raja's ('ollegc in Krnakiiliiin India p a t t e r n s
story, is offered
to all under and in C M S Cull.-' •• in Kotl.ivam
Film lo be shown
g r a d u a t e s al Slate College
Short India
Dr P a n i c I .eiiioii i hail man i 'I
stone.-, should lie s u b m i t t e d lo Dr
Ihe BlologN Depai I men! '.Mil ii
I In .i A a i d i • pro\ iilid lor in the
Mi IIwaiiii-,
Ii ichard.Miii
:'s:'
no
pot I "ii Ecological . t i l d e I ondiii I
pro* IMOIIS nt the t iillue hi Ad
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l.r. r Hi.in I p in
\ln.\ I 1
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hi
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Hi'!,i 'I llle I'llei I- .,1 I, •,;,. i a'ui .
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p.ipei
lei I HI in: and l'i -.can h ilil'oad III
. r a i l enl III II i i". ne.ii II
e\ -I'The
u d e u l ' s II.i m e eluded
III Ihe prog I am lor Ihe
ll till expei
h
ilat'i'U
T I h e Hie of a c a d e m i c * e a r llili:.'
ul
\ ] | i .,• \ lilu
Id
I he sloi \
' t or I .o'. I'llliei MI I 'on diilali - according ;., ihe pi o. i duns II
Ifltt'l est In Until mi smell
lest ' should he entered in Ihe up Mine in the Act, a l e .elected l,\
Di
Mien ' oiiinienled Ih it lb
pi r i cTii hand corner ol page one the Hoard of Foreign Scholarships
'There a r c no restriction-, r e g a r d the m e m b e r s ol « h u h are appoint report ol the panel Will be o
interest not mil) to ihe scieiitili
in;; lol'm or length
ed l,\ the President
call) inclined, bill also to the out
'The award was established over
Ihe funds used for c a r r y i n g mil d o o r s n i e n ; " R e s e a r c h al Yellow
twenty >car.s ago by Mr. J e r o m e Ihe p r o g r a m u n d e r provisions of stone
is not the scientist at work
S Lovenheim of A m s t e r d a m , New the
iMilhrighl Act a r e certain for- in his l a b o r a t o r y , but the scientist
York, in m e m o r y
us m o t h e r eign c u r r e n c i e s or credits owed to at work in the outdoors where he
Leah Lovenheim, a g r a d u a l !
State College, class of 1892
VnHeTSu.es" ^
'' ' ^
°' "'" h a n ' d . ^ " * " " C " 1 V i r ° " " " - ' n t " " '
Best Short Story
Housing P r e f e r e n c e Applications
Housing P r e f e r e n c e Applications
m u s t be filed by Monday, and all
s t u d e n t s c o m m u t i n g or living off
Universal
I n t e r v i e w s for counselors will be
held from Monday. April 9 to Fri
day. April 13 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
in the old faculty cafeteria ( w h e r e
elections were held) and on Saturday, April 11 in B r u b a c h e r from 2
to 5 p . m .
Vol. XLVII, No. 9
Thorne to Head New
Frosh Studies Program
Directors Plan
Frosh Weekend
Beta Zeta
Beta Zeta's formal will take
All those interested must sign
place on F r i d a y night at the Inn
up for an i n t e r v i e w on the Frosh
Towne Motel from 9:00 to 1:00. Mubulletin b o a r d next to the cafeteria.
sic will be provided by the Holid a y s . C h a p e r o n e s a r e Mr. and Mrs.
Theodore Bayer and Dr. and Mrs.
F r a n k Carrino.
R e s i d e n t Assistants
To Discus?
F o u r sororities a r e p r e s e n t i n g Sunday a b r u n c h will be held at
their annual w e e k e n d s April 6 the sorority h o u s e from 1:00 to 5:00.
through 8. The a c t i v i t i e s include
Sue M a c F a r l a n e '62 is c h a i r m a n
informal p a r t i e s and f o r m a l d a n c e s , for t h e w e e k e n d , and Phyllis Graz
iano '63 is in c h a r g e of p r o g r a m s .
Psi G a m m a
S i g m a Alpha
The informal p a r t y will be held
Sigma Alpha will hold its inforat S l e a s m a n ' s Hofbrau from 8:00
mal p a r t y a t C a r m e n ' s on F r i d a y
to 1:00. C h a p e r o n e s for the event
night from 8:00 to 12:00. Invited
and
Mrs.
William
Wilson
a r e Mr.
guests for the evening include Mr.
and Dr and Mrs. J a m e s RosenLopez and Mr. and Mrs. Felipe
bach.
Carrasquillo.
T h e r e will be a formal d a n c e
On S a t u r d a y night, the formal,
S a t u r d a y at G l a s s L a k e Hotel from " S p r i n g Affair," will be held from
T h e d a n c e will
9:00 to 1:00. Music will be pro- 9:00 to 1:00.
vided by Lenny R i c a r d i ' s o r c h e s t r a , be p r e s e n t e d at Crooked
Lake
Invited guests
„ a,r e ,M r,s . ,N a ,n c y Mis- Hotel, and m u s i c will be furnished
urelli and Mr. and Mrs. J a m e s by the h o t e l s band.
Chaperones
Wagner.
for the l o n n a l will be Dr. anil Mrs.
William Leue and Miss Brigitu
If w e a t h e r p e r m i t s , a picnic will
wm M a t j s o n s
be held Sunday afternoon at 1:00
On Sunday afternoon from 1:00 to
p . m . in T h a c h e r P a r k .
.r>:00, a picnic is planned at SaraM e m b e r s of the c o m m i t t e e in toga a r k .
c h a r g e of a r r a n g e m e n t s for the
Donna P a c e l l i '63 is the general
e n t i r e weekend a r e M a r i l y n Lieber- c h a i r m a n of t h e weekend.
m a n '63, c h a i r m a n , R o s e m a r y Petrick '63, and Sandi Barolet '64.
A picnic has been planned for
Thacher Park on S u n d a y at 1:00.
Co-chairmen for the weekend a r e
Carolyn Merrittt '63 and Rosalind
Zeichner '63.
A n y o n e i n t e r e s t e d in working on
t h e A d v e r t i s i n g Staff is a s k e d to
a t t e n d a m e e t i n g T h u r s d a y at 7:15
in B r u b a c h e r .
Characters Meet
Four Sororities to Present
Dances, Parties and Picnics
Sigma
Phi S i g m a ' s
informal
p a r t y will be held on F r i d a y night
from 8:30 to 12:30 at t h e Circle Inn.
Bill B u r n e t t '03. d i r e c t o r of the
The t h e m e for the p a r l y is " H a
C h a p e r o n e s ' f o r ' T h i s " e v e n t 19(32 F r o s h W e e k e n d , h a s announced
a r e Mr. and Mrs. E d w a r d Crowley the other officers: J u n e Druian '63,
and Dr. and Mrs. R i c h a r d S m i t h . will s e r v e as s e c r e t a r y , and John
Tyo '64. will s e r v e as t r e a s u r e r
On S a t u r d a y night t h e r e will be
The Board of Directors will be:
a formal p a r t y from 9:00 to 1:00
at Crooked L a k e . J o e O p p e d i s a n o ' s Dick Kelly '63, P r o g r a m Director:
band will provide m u s i c .
Chape- Andy Cibulski '03. W a t e r b u r y ; Con
rones for this event a r c Dr. and nie Crowley '63, P i e r c e : Millie Flet
Mrs. Luther A n d r e w s , Mr. and Mrs. cher '63, B r u b a c h e r : Mary Alice
H a r r y S t a l e r , and Mr. and Mrs. Lynaugh '63, Alden: Cand> DalPan
'63. S a y l e s .
. l a m e s Kouvel.
J«
Pedagogue
When; Uni-trsal
ALBANY, N E W YORK, F R I D A Y , A P R I L 6, 1962
Z464
Sigma P h i S i g m a
T h e following n a m e s a r e to be
a d d e d to the D e a n ' s List: M a r t h a
G o l e n s k y , Carol E . Greiling, E l l e n
J a c o b s , B r e n t L u c a s , Lynn C.
R a b u t and J a c q u e l i n e S p a d a f o r a .
SNACK BAR
State College News
CLIFTON
The Director of F r e s h m a n Studies will help to develop a lowerdivision p r o g r a m of one or two
y e a r s in which students will be
studying g e n e r a l b a c k g r o u n d material r a t h e r than a selected major
and minor field. Selection of a vocation and major d e p a r t m e n t would
not be n e c e s s a r y until t h e end of
the lower-division p r o g r a m .
THORNE
Cast Prepares
'Kate Opening
•\ c u r r i c u l u m
committee
has
' J L ' e n working for some t i m e on
possible course c h a n g e s . The committee is now s u b m i t t i n g a r e p o r t
to the A c a d e m i c Council concerning the r e v a m p i n g of courses and
requirements
Kiss Me, Kate, a musica
by Cole Purler, w ill be p r e s e n t e d
in Page Hall, T h u r s d a y , Friday
and Saturday, April 12, 13 and 14
Curtain lime will be 7:30 p.m .
'Thursday and 8:00, F r i d a y and Sat
urdav.
Robert Sleiuhauer '62 will direct
the Stale College Revue
lie was
also the director of Guys and Dolls
and The King and I, the r e v u e pro
ductions for the past two y e a r Steinhauer is assisted by Lee l.iss
'(if) and Virginia White '62
The
musical director is Kathy G l a s s '63,
and the c h o r e o g r a p h e r is Arlene
P a c i u n a s '63. Ted W a c k e r '63 is
serving as scenic d e s i g n e r and
stage m a n a g e r .
Dr. T h o r n e
Prior to his a p p o i n t m e n t as Dean
ol Men. Dr. 'Thorne was Director
ol G r a d u a t e Studies and an Associate Professor of Business.
Dr 'Thorne received the Bachelor of Science and M a s t e r of Science d e g r e e s from Slate College;
he obtained his d o c t o r a t e degree
at Columbia University.
Dean of Men
Committee heads include HowDr. David H a r t l e y , who was
ard Woodruff '63, c o o r d i n a t o r and g r a n t e d a leave of a b s e n c e to serve
house; Fred Smith '64, publicity as advisor on student personnel
and p r o g r a m s ; Ro Petrick '63,
services at the University of Puntickets and ushers.
jab,
Lahore, P a k i s t a n for two
'The technical staff includes P e t e r y e a r s , will r e s u m e his duties as
Pcdlz '63, lighting; Sharon Smith Dean of Men next S e p t e m b e r .
'63, make-up; Gail S u f f e r ' 6 4 , wardDr. Hartley is one of s e v e r a l visrobe mistress; and J u d y Insel '63,
iting A m e r i c a n advisors chosen by
Properties and art
the University of Chicago, in agr e e m e n t with the U.S. g o v e r n m e n t ,
on the basis of a c h i e v e m e n t in the
field of student personnel and educational psychology
Four Students Receive
Regents Fellowships
Regents College T e a c h i n g Fellow
ships have been a w a r d e d to ManI'cen M. Gillespie, Arlene M Quinn,
Caroline A S h e r m a n , and J o h n A
Winnie. Seniors al Slate
'These
students have d e m o n s t r a t e d -up
r achieveiui nt i
compel l i n e
inlliulioll open
\.".s
York
-i-nii/i
.t.it '• it sjden' in
•:ir
O l ' l ' " ' , I'll l o l l l
i
Din
'lie
on
m-h
II i b l i
gradual
u Vorl
i
hi
ll
.Hia Vt .il'iled
ll ' i l l - lo pur
\ e : -.1 a-
ll ap
M11 prep
'I
colic
Mil pi,,
hem l .
Tuition Committee
To Conduct Poll
The Senate ( ' o m m i l l e e on Tuition
announces that a tuition poll vs ill
lie conducted A pi il 9 through April
! : 'I Ills poll \\ ill lie taken ill resi
di in e lulls ami group houses,
\r
I a l l g i ' l l i l III ^ W i l l
;i
lit i
n
laki
be
•!,.•
'I. a t It
I'll'
i nil
poll
. .lie nut tut- lia - lound [hal
• i pull i- lieces-.ar> bei atlse
Ih, I ndiligs ol the last pull u r n
• mi u lial a in biguous and a larger
I'o • i section ill st lldellt opinion Is
I ni
It-How ships c a n \
annual
, i aids ol ji.iOD to $2,50(1 depending
upon liiiancial status, lor each of
The c o m m i t t e e r e q u e s t s the co(wo . w a r s of g r a d u a t e study in a iperaiion of the student body in
doctoral p r o g r a m . If the amount
rder thai reliable e v i d e n c e can
.if the fellowship grant i, less than be obtained from the" laTgeVi p..-.
the cost of tuition, the fellowship bible n u m b e r of s t u d e n t s
The in
bolder is eligible for additional formation is n e c e s s a r y to an ade
"™«
*»»?}»*
»««»"»•
™
HU.te u n d e r s t a n d i n g 'if the tuition
mg (rum $200 to $800 a y e a r
problem at Albany Stale
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