Svutoitiel and tf-iaU>uutU6,

advertisement
«*AOK 4
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S . S A T U R D A Y , MAY 9 .
1953
C
Burke, Rogers
Donnelly, Meier
Svutoitiel and tf-iaU>uutU6,
Lead Athletes
Set Activities For
Alpha
Epsilon
Phi:
Dean,
Joan
State's sororities and fraternities
The Women's Athletic Association
have held their spring elections re- Bolz '54; Sub-Dean, Marcia Gntf will be directed by Audrey Burke '54.
Dramatics, Music cently
to determine their leaders for '54; Scribe, Marilyn Isenberg '54; Her leadership will be aided by Mary
Verven, Canavan
Assume Other Posts
Dramatics and Art Council and
Music Council have released the results of their elections for new officers and members. Francis Hodge,
President of D&A Council announces that Doris Donnelly '54 will
replace him as President of the
Council. Joan DeVinney, President
of Music Council, states that Madelyn Meier '54 will be the New Directors of that group's activities.
Evenglia Verven '55 is to be the
Treasurer of D&A and Marie Devine
'56 will act as Secretary- The new
members for next year will be Jean
Hageny and Marie Devine, Sophomores.
Jan Canavan '54 and Arlene Lacy
'54 will serve as Secretary and Treasurer of Music Council respectively
New members include: Benjamin
Tucker, Diana Gura, Carol Gerety
and Sophie Kosek, Juniors; Paul
Polito, Archie Westmiller, Jane
Blake, Barbara Murnane, Jean Shaw
and Alice Waren, Sophomores.
Feurbach, Carella
Will Co-direct /GC
Henry Feurbach and Lucille Carella, Seniors, have been elected Cochairmen of Inter-Group Council
for the coming year. Feurbach will
act as chairman for the first semester and Miss Carella will direct the
activities for the second semester.
Marie Mortelliti '54, will serve as
coresponding secretary. The other
officers include Jaye Sroczyniski '56,
Recording Secretary and Ronald
Petty '56, Treasurer.
the coming year. With the exception
of Alpha Pi Alpha, whose elections
have not yet taken place, the following officers have been announced:
This year's Edward Eldred Potter
Club award to the outstanding male
member of the Senior class goes to
Dean Strickland.
Kappa Delta: President, Mabel
Schweizer '54; Vice-President, Beatrice Lehan '54; Recording Secretary.
Marilyn Gadd '55; Corresponding
Secretary, Lorna Galbraith '55,
Treasurer, Mary Dvorak '55; Rush
Captain and Inter-Sorority Representative, Olga Komanowski '55.
Psi Gamma: President, Frances
Allen '54; Vice-President, Sophia
Kosek '55; Recording Secretary, Lucy
Johns '55; Corresponding Secretary,
Marion Mabre '55; ISC Representative, Karen Lunde '56.
Chi Sigma Theta: President, Jane
Freaney '54; Vice-President, Madelyn
Meier '54, Secretary, Nan McEvoy
'55; Treasurer, Ann Tobey '55; Alumni Secretary, Sue Barnhart '50:
ISC Representative, Joan C'arlin '55.
Hanevy To Lead
Publicity Affairs
John Hanevy '54, has been named
Press Bureau Director according to
Mary Jane Dewey '53, present Director. Assisting Hanevy is AssistantDirector, Milton Siler '55, SecretaryTreasurer, Zoe-Ann Laurie '55; and
Marilyn House '56, Historian.
The following people have been
appointed members of the organization: Olina Fusco, Esther Goldstein, Marilyn House, Beverly Wales,
Theresa Cardamon, and Thomascina Pagan, Sophomores.
Press Bureau work is in conjunction with the Public Relations Office in an attempt to recognize outstanding students in their local
newspapers.
Rush Chairman, Marilyn Werbalowsky '55; Treasurer, Joyce Diamant
'55; ISC Representative, Phyllis Krakower '54.
Gamma Kappa Phi: President,
Mary Ann Frascatore '54; Vice-President, Maureen Fitzgerald '54; Treasurer, Marie Elder '54; Recording Secretary, Doris Mehan '55; Corresponding Secretary, Rose Mary Bertsch
'54; Rush Captain and ISC Representative, Dolores Montalbano '55.
Beta Zeta: President, Carol Schreiner '54; Vice-President, Barbara Law
'54; Treasurer, Evelyn Katusak '54;
Secretary, Barbara Devitt '55; Secretary-Treasurer, Lucretia D'Andrea
'55; ISC Representative, Angela Knvanaugh '55.
Edward Eldred Potter Club: President, James Finnen '54; Vice-President, Peter McManus '54; Treasurer, Howard Brewster '55; Clerk, Joseph Kelly '56; Alumni Secretary,
Sigmund Smith '56; IFC Representative, Robert Sage '55.
Kappa Beta: President, Arnold
Smith '54; Vice-President, John Wilson '54; Treasurer, Ronald Ferguson
'54; Secretary. Marvin Goldstein '56;
IFC members, Robert Sturm and
Kenneth Schoonmaker, S e n i o r s ;
Member at Large, Richard Kirsch
'54.
Sigma Lambda Sifftna: President,
Eugene Webb '54; Vice-President,
Maurice Hamlin '55; Corresponding
Secretary, James Wrinn '56; Rusli
Captain, Richard Kelly '54; Recording Secretary, Frank Santoro '56.
Radio Council Chooses Or(icers
Radio Council officers for 1953-54
have been revealed by William
Floyd '54. Filling the office of President will be Jean Rasey '54, with
Nancy Feder '55, acting as Vicepresident. The other officers include
Secretary Doris Hagen '54. and
Treasurer, Sylvia Semmler '54.
Pugsley '54, who wlil serve as VicePresident. Zoe Ann Laurie '55 will
act as the Treasurer and Gina Hilfiker '56, will serve as Secretary of
the Association. The Office Manager of the Association will be Betty
Miller and Olga Komanowski has
been elected as Publicity Director.
Three representatives from the
classes have also been selected. Barbara Stemple is to serve from '54
while Marjorie Liddell and Esther
Goldstein will fill the positions from
'55 and '56 respectively.
Francis Streeter '53, has announced the names of the new officers for the coming year. Francis
Rogers '54, has been selected as pres ident and Donald Lein '55, will act
as Vice-President.
The other oficers include Treasurer, Robert Sage '55; and Secretary, Samuel Krchniak '56.
The Grand Marshal of Campus
Commission for the following year
will be Joy Longo '54. Benjamin
Friedman '55, who has been elected
Treasurer, and Joan Mitchell '56,
who will serve as Secretary, will assist Miss Longo in the direction of
the commission.
The list of new members of Campus Commission from the Class of
'55 includes Philips Campbell, Rosa
Colacicco, and Elizabeth Becker.
The following Sophomores also have
been appointed to the group: Beverly Gufstafson, Maura Newman, and
Miss Mitchell.
Forum Names
New Officers
Forum Board of Politics has released its officers for the year '53'54. Paul Saimond and Robert
Reigle, Seniors, will serve as President and Vice-President of the
group respectively, while Edward
Lehman '54 will fill the position of
Secretary and Clarence Mosher Ti5
The honorary societies of State will take the duties of the Treasurhave chosen their leaders for next er.
year. The presiding officers are as
Willis Bosch, Joan Boxer, and
follows: Kurt Rosenbaum '54, Pi Mary
Pree, Juniors have reGamma Mu and Charles Milham '54. ceived La
Board recognition. AdditionPi Omega Pi.
al replacements to the organization
Assisting Rosenbaum will be Paul consist of Donald Mathews and RiSaimond, Shirley Nellis, and Frank chard Kirsch, Seniors.
Shepard. Seniors, as Vice-President,
Secretary and Treasurer, respective- Select Chernoff For Primer Editor;
ly.
Name Literary Staff Assistants
Henry Hull '54 will act as ViceMadelon Knoerzer '53, Editor of
President of Pi Omega Pi with Ethel
Martin '53 as Secretary and Frank this year's Primer has announced
Shepard and Jane Staples, Seniors the following staff for the magaas Treasurer and Historian, respect- zine next year. Serving in the capacity of editor will be Marvin
ively.
New members of Tau Kappa Alpha Chernoff '54. Assisting Chernoff will
are Phyllis Penny, Arthur Hagy and be Stephanie Patricia Byrne as LitAnita Lilenfeld,, Seniors, and Janus erary Editor, and Joan Carlin '55 as
Business Manager.
Finnen '54.
Honorary Groups
Elect Officers
Z-457
NEW
YORK. FRIDAY, MAY 13,
ft
$4i
;
1953
%
*
VOL. XXXVII NO. 2 7 Hfc
Greeks To Hold
D
D- •
O/cf Myskania Moves Out As New Thirteen Are Tapped;
y \ Q J 0 Present
Cheers, Tears, Hand-Shaking, Hugs, Mark Momentous Event c i. i r .
banquets, Picnics ^ ^ ^ ^
^ ^ ^ ^
H^MT
^ ^ M
^ ^ ^ M M * n S ' , s " F* n t «Y/
SLS, APA Schedule
Formats At Ten Eyck
Futterer Will Direct
Period Play In Page
The Fraternity-Sorority scene for
this weekend includes SLS and APA
weekends, Potter Club banquet,
Gamma Kap senior banquet and
Beta Zeta faculty picnic.
The SLS formal, "Serenade," will
be Saturday from 9 p. m. to 1 a. m.
in the Rose Lounge of the Ten Eyck
Hotel, with music by Johnny Costa's
Orchestra, and the SLS picnic will
be Sunday at Thatcher Park, announces Daniel Kelly '53, general
chairman of the weekend. Chairman
for the picnic is Henry Berleth '54.
and other chairmen for the formal
include: chaperones, Philips Campbell '55; programs and decorations,
George Hathaway '54. Chaperones
will be Dr. and Mrs. Rich, Mr. and
Mrs. Lemon, and Mr. and Mrs. Larney.
APA will have a banquet in the
Empire Room of the Ten Eyck Saturday at 7 p. m. followed by a formal until 1 a.m.,
and the APA picni„ win
HP in' ; r'hfl^hp"r"pnrk"flf'in
W l
,„
l l " S o r d i n i to Charles
rn^n
.'neTrSnnn
t
weekend^ Other chairmen are din
ner and dance, Robert Burns '55;
picnic. Walter Render '54; program
Richard Bailey '54; flowers, John
Granito and William Floyd, seniors.
New officers as reported by John
Zongrone '54, president: presidenl
Richard Bailey '54; vice-president,
Leo Bennett '54; pledge master,
Thomas Mullen '55; secretary. Robert Sawyer '54; and treasurer, Walter Rehder '54.
Potter Club will have a banquet
at Jack's from 6 to 9 p. m. Saturday,
Gamma
Kap will
a senior
banauet
Monday
at have
6 p m
'according
to Elizabeth Hunter, and Dorio
Hagen seniors, co-chairmen. Beta
Zeta will hold its annual faculty
picnic from 2:30 to 6 p. m. Sunday,
reports Barbara Law '54. social
chairman.
Vocal Groups
Will Perform
M O R E P E O P L E S M O K E C A M E L S than any other cigarette!
ALBANY,
cA
0// *I
News'
State Co
CC Names Longo
Grand Marshal
Tonight at 8:30 p.m. in Page Hall,
the curtain will rise on the Spring
Music Festival presented by Music
Council, according to Joan DeVinney '53, president. The vocal ensembles, conducted by Karl A. B.
Peterson, Assistant Professor of Music, will include The Collegiate Singers, The Choralette.s, the Men's Glee
Club and the Women's Chorus.
Among the numbers sung by The
Collegiate Singers will be "O Sing
Your Songs," by Noble Cain; "Lacrymosa," by Mozart; Suesse's "The
Night is Young" and "Holiday Song"
by Schuman. The Men's Glee Club
will sing "Passing By," by PurcellBurleigh and "De Animals A-comin '
by Bartholomew. The songs by The
Choralettes will include "Prayer of
The Music Maker" by Flocring, and
"Rock-A-Bye, Baby" by Wilson. The
Women's Chorus will sing Clokey's
"Nights" and "Lolly toodum," an
American Folk Song.
There will be two soloists perlonning. Frank Gionnone '54, will sing
a baritone solo "Cri Tu" from "The
Masked Ball" by Veidi, and Louli'-e
Pet field '53 will sing a soprano so'.o
"Voi Che Sapete" from "The Marriage of Figaro" by Mozart. Accompanists for the vocal groups and soloists are Priscilla Jones, and Robert
Stuart, Seniors and Lucretia D'Andrea '55.
The Instrumental Ensembles, ineluding the Orchestra, String Ensemble and Woodwind Quintet, eonducted by Dr. Charles F. Stoke.s,
Protcssor ol Music, gave their concert last night, in Page.
"fhere will be no admission charged
for the concert tonight.
The AD spring play "Berkeley
Square," a fantasy by John Balderston, will be presented in Page Hall
Auditorium on May 22 and 23 at
8:30 p.m. The production is under
the direction of Agnes E. Futterer,
Professor of English, and the cast
consists of Advanced Dramatics students.
The play is set in the eighteenth
century and the present. Period furniture is being supplied by Van
Heusen Charles Co. Costumes of the
eighteenth century are being made
by the costume committee and a
professional seamstress. Special costume effects will be supplied by a
L. to r. Madeleine Payne, Faith Hanson, Sylvia Semmler, Nell Brown, Peter McManus, Kathleen Ander- N e w Y o r k c i t y costumer.
son, Frances Allen, Kathleen Oberst, Dolores Donnelly, John Allasio, Patricia Dan, Jo Anne Doyle, Marvin
"\yhen the curtain rises," says
Chernoff.
John Laing, "the audience will be
.
..
-—
transposed to the glamorous age of
»nHH "' - r w WPVP the words we t i m e w e h a d f e a r s o I a n a l l - g i r l T h e n f o l l o w e d t h e t h r i u o f t h e T h f a n c y b a l l s ' D r J o h n s o n ' R e y n sa°'g before t L tradiUoLl and im- Myskania.
morning, as JoAnn Doyle, sobbing olds, Gainsborough, w i g s , hoop
pressive tapping of the new MysBut not for long, for the next to and stumbling, kissed all three men skirts and delightful frippery. The
kania began. Rosie and Hal stood be tapped was Neil Brown, who and hugged the girls and took her age of reason, of Voltaire, of resolemnly by and awaited the mo- grinned modestly as he shook hands place as Coy's successor. JoAnn partee will be contrasted to the life
m e n t tu
"""ounce the name of the with our three lovely ladies, to the glowed with joy and surprise as the of today, through the delightful
new occupant of seat number one. disappointment of all present. A Assembly cheered its approval of story of a man's trip into the past.'
loud cheer greeted the tapping of her election. The last seat was givAll seats are reserved. Admission
And thusly the new, revised, shor- Fete McManus, who also shook en to Marvin Chernoff, who more
for non-student tax holders will be
tened ceremony began. The lucky hands demurely. Katie Anderson, than filled it
thirteen took their places one by open-mouuie7with^mazement;was "The*7x7itement and anticipation ^ ^ s ^ l i ' ^ h o n o r ^ a n a ^ m S s V b e
one, with prudent handshaking and dia'.'ged bv Hodge to the stage to was over, and Student Association
. . . . . .. . . . .. . ..
hasty kisses. The first seat went to f :i Rosie's shoes. Ruth Dunne step- sat back in their chairs, viewed the Jpresented
" „ Z l , „ „ „at
_ „the
„ . , ^ticket
. . f _ booth
. ^ „ ^ _ l nin. . !the
!}e
Lower
Draper peristyle when purchMadeleine Payne, who hid her ex- ped aside as Fran Allen bounced in- beautiful thirteen, and reflected on
citement behind bewildered eyes to seat number seven. Annie O., ap- ^ e T c h ^ " Only guessed'could be ^ t f t o t o
toe?r
rtSnfta^Sd
and a beaming snule. Faith Hanson propnately enough, bestowed her made about how the new Myskania t i c k e t ^0 t n e
performance.
was the next to be tapped. Faithie blessing on Little Obey, who said will measure up to the old. Only
took the news in her stride, and later that her feeling at the time opinions could be offered as to how
o r , Paul B. Pettit Assistant Procalmly let the old Myskie carry her was "simply indescribable." Dodie well they will work together. But fessor of English, is in charge of
on stage. Bobbie Newcombe gave up Donnelly, John Allasio and Pat Dean one thing was sure in everyone's sets which are being" constructed bv
h e r Seat t0 Sy Semmler
- a n d b>' this were the next three to be named, mind: they certainly are beautiful! the stagecraft classes. The cast in
eludes: Marietta Wiles, Richard Jacobson, Janise Smith, Louis Vion,
Walter Goodell, Seniors; Frances
Hopkins, Stanley Howlett, JoAnn
Doyle, John Laing, Diane Wheeler,
Frederick Crumb, Margaret Eckert,
Doris Hagen, John Jacobus, Juniors.
Office;
SA To Consider Budgets
Students To Sign Brown
For Interviews
Sign-up sheets for interviews for
next year's junior guides will be
posted on the Student Personnel
bulletin board outside Room 110,
first floor Draper today, announce
Nan McEvoy and Custer Quick, jun •
inrQ rinirio phnivmpn
lois Guide cha men.
interviews
be given by
all Quick
next
week
and will will
be conducted
and Miss McEvoy.
Junior Guides will be assigned
members of tlie incoming freshman
class and will write to them during
the summer. When the members of
the class of '57 arrive on campus
next fall Junior Guides will be on
hand to acquaint them with State.
Guides will be ready to help with
problems and will introduce the new
students to the rules and traditions
of the college.
'Primer' To Release
New Issue Monday
The 1953 edition of Primer. State's
literary annual, will be available
Monday, according to Madelon
Knoerzer, Editor. The issues will h»
distributed from 11 a. m. until 2:30
p.m. outside the cafeteria.
Included in this vein's Primer are
.-tones bv Marvin Chernoff and
Faith Hanson, .Seniors, and contribulions by George Hathaway '54.
Marietta Wiles 7,3. announces that
the Primer also includes several selections ol original poetry.
Mrs. Knoerzer states that copies
can be obtained by presentation of
a student tax ticket or fee receipt,
Primer is published by Student Associatiun and includes exclusively
literary, poetic and artistic work
original with members of HA.
Assumes
Committee chairmen are: Frances
Ciliberti, Assistant Director; Dolores
Donnelly, sets; Doris Hagen cosOld and new members of Student
tumes; John Laing, publicity; John
Council convened Wednesday eve- commented in expressing his appre- Jacobus, props; Marcia Griff, house;
Juniors; Kay Wright '53, stage crew:
ning to hear committee reports, a elation.
Norma de Roos, lights, and Frederick
final budget discussion, a new Con
,
„ ,. „ •, ,
, ..,
Miss Dean. Chairman of the Con- Crumb, sound effects.
s l l t u l l o n f01. R a d i o G u l l d | a n d t h e g U u t l ( j n C o m r a l t t e e | r e a d t h e p r 0 .
The p 0 S ed constitution for Radio Guild.
a g e n d a f o r today's assembly.
meeting was interrupted for a brief The Guild will include a Council of Committee Will Post
l j a n - v f 0 r t h e r e t , r l n B President six to fifteen members and a group
of Associates. Council passed Miss Examination Schedule
John Lannon.
Keller's proposal to accept the new
The schedule of final exams which
Today in Assembly, Lannon '53, Constitution.
not yet ready for release will be
President of SA. will install the new
The State College News budget is
and placed in promofficers. The old officers will retire, was read by Roderick Hilsinger '53, mimeographed
inent places when completed, ana d Neil
»
Brown '54, President, will chairman of Student Board of Fin- nounces the Committee on Examina'Jreslde over t h e Assemblyance, and accepted by Council. The tion Schedules, which is headed by
„ ,
,.
.,,
, , proposed lowered Student Tax was £,„..<, G. Carrino, instructor in
,ill,k
Languages and Charles AnBudget discussions will conclude ftpproved a n d C o u n c l l extended its FModern
drews,
Professor of Physics.
the activities.
apprec ation to Hilsinger for his coJoseph Lombard! '53, Chairman of operation and attendance at StuThe committee also reports the
the Rivalry Committee, suggested d e m C o u n c » meetings.
progress made in its effort to reduce the number of exam conflicts
two year
revisions
of rivalry that
rulesthere
for
next
and announced
to expedite reporting of semester
will be a Rivalry Bulletin Board ingrades and to maintain a convenstalled in the college. Rose Mary Judicial Body Selects
ient distribution of exams, particuKeller '53, placed in the form of a
larly for freshmen. It has been found
motion the proposal to substitute Next Year s Leaders
The thirteen incoming seniors that under the present system
Girls' Rivalry Soccer for Girls' Field who
were tapped to become the 1953- though students were not restricted
Hockey. Council approved.
54 Myskania at last Saturday's Mov- by exam conflicts in their choice of
Up Day ceremonies met lor the
DeWitt Combs'55, moved that the mg-Up Day ceremonies met for the courses, only 15 conflicts, involving
Rivalry Banner Hunt be conducted first time Tuesday evening, May 12, only 30 students were necessary. 50"i
in the same manner as this year and chose officers from their num- of the exam papers had been written
with an amendment proposed by ber to lead them in their year ahead, by the end of Wednesday evening of
Patricia Dean '54, that Myskania Heading the honorary judicial body the first week. All examination
auain post riddles or clues. Council will be Patricia Dean who has been grades were recorded before the be
passed the motion contrary to the elected chairman ol the group, ginning of the second semester
recommendation of Lombard! to Madeleine Payne will assist her as classes,
limit the Hunt to outside of the vice - chairman
ol
organization,
The committee requests that it be
college buildings.
Kathleen Oberst will act as secretary
'
and Sylvia Semmler will hold the permitted to continue the present
While Lannon's attention was di- job of treasurer, In the capacity of method of scheduling exams next
reded to a constitution, several parliamentarian will be JoAnne year. It is believed that there will
Council members entered the Gov- Doyle. Kathleen Anderson will be be by then a basis for arrangement
eminent Loom with gifts for the re- mistress of ceremonies. The new of exam grouping for use in registiring president and refreshments. Myskania will preside at this week's tration without restricting choice of
"It's like a birthday party," Lannon assembly today.
courses.
STATE COLLBflE NEW«. PHIDAY. MAY 18, 1083
r^Aoia
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
ESTABLISHED
•V
VOL. XXXVII
MAY
1016
THE CLASS OP
1918
May 15, 1953
Gommon-StcUe>i
J|^^^^|g
By J. KOREA and R. HUGHES
LOOKING AHEAD
Another Moving-Up Day has come and gone and I •
Student Association elections turned out just ah
the way we expected; with a few surprises here :
there. All in all things seem to be looking bright
the coming year, and we hope that they will stay 11
way. You, the student body have elected your lead.
support them.
No, 27
Members of lite NEWS staff limy be reached Tuusiluy
and WeUneM'diiy from 7 to 11 p.m. at 2-3H20, Hit. 11.
I'hones: I.yncli. 80-03121 Ashfleld, H-:ir,8tt; Blilred, *J-ll«t12;
tierlg, 2-01112i Surtes, 2-382(1,
The undergraduate newapupor of the New York State College for Teachers: published every Friday of the College
year by the NEWS Board for the Student Association.
CATHERINE LYNCH
IRENE EI.DRED - SALLY OERIO - - JOYCE SURTES - ROI1KKT ASHFIKM) •
RAYMOND WOLI'K MABEL HC'IIWEIZEH
MARY ANN RKILINU
JOANNE MOORE - WILLARI) RB1TZ - EYELYN RUBEN - DEAN ZCCH - - - -
.
- - .
.
.
.
Editor-in-Chief
Co-ManuRlng Editor
The election also showed up the fact that not
many people bothered to vote this year. The nun
of ballets cast was rather small when compared •
former years. The trouble lies partially In the fact
not everyone has an assembly seat. Perhaps if tl
people were to take a little more interest in Stui
Government, we would have more ballots cast in
next election.
. CO-MIIHIIKIIIK Editor
I'ublle RelntloiiH Editor
SportN Editor
- - - Junior SportN Member
HiiHlnoHB-AdvertlHlng Manager
. clrPuliitiwn-KxfliuiiKi' Editor
Associate Editor
Associate Editor
Associate Editor
Associate Editor
All communications should uu addressed to the editor and
must lie signed. Names will he withhold upon request.
The STATE COLLEGE NEWS asaumes no responsibility
for opinions expressed In Its columns or communications
as such expressions do nor necessarily reflect Its view
W e Came, W e Saw, W e Conquered
We, the new leaders of Student Government and
Campus organizations have been elected to positions of great responsibility. Others have felt that
we are capable of handling these positions. Do we,
too, feel adequate, or are we trembling in our shoes
at the thought? For the first time in our lives, we
will be handling thousands of dollars belonging to
others which they have willingly and confidently
placed under our control. Well may we shiver.
But next vear we will gain confidence. It will be
uo to us to decide the issues which will be presented
up to us to ciecicie tne issues w n c n w i i De piestnitti
to us. In past years, we have let other leaders establish the policies, then passed our vote of consent,
Now we must determine the policv. We must weigh
,
'
i,r
-i
,,
.,• i
the pros and cons. We must consider the ethical
right or wrong, the theory versus the practicality,
the desire of the few versus that of the many We
must cooperate in this endeavor in order to present
1UU91 Luuyc.au. u, L.. o
i
to the Student Body a unified opinion, lnere will
be diverse opinions among us. There should be tlissention. or we will fail to present a true, honest
view of the subjects in question
If Student Association is to have faith in us, we
must have faith in ourselves. veil.
People have
done
our
should
strive
jobs before, and done them wen. We
n c suuuiu
.-m.vc
to do them as well or better if it is in our power to
do so. Here is the opportunity we have been waiting
f o r - a chance to prove our supposed abilities. Many
changes have been made this past year by farsighted people. Rivalry has been shortened to a few
months' activities so that the strain on the students
participating, especially the freshmen will be lessened considerably. The All College Revue, which
many predicted would lie a fiasco, was extremely
successful, and will undoubtedly be a permanent
event on the calendar in future years. Next vear it
is our turn to be creative. We will introduce novel
ideas for acceptance or rejection. We, with the consent of the Student Body, may decide to eliminate
some facet of tradition; perhaps even set a new traditional precedent.
Suggestions have been made for expanding the
curriculum, and for providing more valuable experiences in the field of professional training. We
may be asked by the administrative and departmental heads to assist them in the planning and execution of such programs. Through these activities
we will serve our electorate in the best means pi is
sible. Not only will we be gaining self-reliance, assurance, and valuable acquaintances, but we will
be contributing benefits to the educational wealth
of all students.
With the additions to the College buildings under
construction, we may be faced with the prootem
of adequate seating for Student Association for the
fall semester. Will the question of a representative
form of government be raised again? Perhaps. Will
these additions cause a monopoly of the calendar
by the Dramatics classes during the limited time
allowed for laboratory plays? Will the feasibility
of football be brought to the fore again? These
are only a few of the numerous issues that may confront us during the coming year.
Yes, the decisions rest in our hands. Let us hope
that those who have elected us will cooperate with
us. We cannot and should not make the decisions
ourselves. It is the duty of the people who have
chosen us to inform us of their feelings and stands
on issues. We will depend upon them to advise us
We will establish the policy, yes, but we will not
dictate it. By voting, the students have given voice
to their belief in the maturity of our judgment. May
their action during the coming year prove to us the
maturity of theirs.
StAtE C O L L t a l N t W i .
faster
"WE must determine the policy."
Pa/UiHf (lemabkb
S. B. F.
Student Board of Finance seems to be having H
of trouble making budget recommendations stick. '1 •
spend a week going over and investigating a partii .
budget, and then when they find that some line sin
be changed, Student Association gives back the mm:
with about five minutes discussion. We can't see
use of having a Student Board of Finance if
recommendations made are disregarded. This i v
isn't a wicked ogre that likes to devour tiny organ:
tions, it is a group that you have elected to work
the budgets and keep them from getting too high
going against the State College Constitution. Be:
you give any more money away, disregarding the sta
ments of the Board, find out the facts and vote
telligently.
t
•, ••
i
i
SPRING SONGS
By JOHN LANNON
Tonight in Page Hall, Music Council is presenti:, ,
Having been given this space for and criticisms in the academic line. their second evening of their Annual Spring Mu.
Festival. Tonight's entertainment will be presented i
a few parting remarks I can't help
AA h
d e d a n d u offeri
the choral groups of the college. We hope all that . <
but think that this is the first true n e w a n d b e t £ e r
h c i e s a t o u r ex _
able will attend.
opportunity I have had to express p e nse, yet to our benefit. Much needW own opinions on subjects around e d e q m p m e n t a n d l a u n d r y s e r v i c e AWARDS?
which v^
has^ been^ soAraMP
drastically
needed
The question of awards for WAA is mostly one
*n*
nPP^
school T m i g n t Just toss out a few ^ . ^
included in the budget for next principle. ThGse against the awards will probably ,i
lines ot thought as they come to my are
year.
that people should go out for these sports becau
head.
A successful exchange program they enjoy them, and therefore not be paid for speii'i
First I was entirely pleased and
satisfied with the years activities. was established and proves to ing Student Association money. The other side ot iv
student Council and Myskania were
question is one of honoring and recognizing ecu.!...
by far more active than in the past hold a tremendous potential in fur women for outstanding achievement in intramm. 1
and produced more in a far reach- thering inter-collegiate relations sports. Think over these two sides of the question b.'
' n & "W t n a n m a n y a former group. Another foreign student can come fore you cast your vote today in assembly.
I n t h e c o m i n g y e a r t n e s e c n a n g e s t 0 o u r college next year thanks to
A. D. PRESENTS
w i l l b e c o m e apparent and I hope the efforts of our students and facDon't forget "Berkeley Square," a fantasy whn-li
successful. The interest in Council ulty.
will be presented on May 22 and 23 by the Advann I
meetings was noticeable since there
„
accomplishments
I
with
tn
Dramatics students. The spring play has always hi"',
S l n ^ t h a n T p r l v S ' e a r . My'- *™ * / « ^ f ™ ^
^ one of the highlights of the year and we urge all '•>
W
W
ar
I f\
^ !!T
" attend.
k a n i a ' s forums did not pan out but ?**
important,
with
the results offallthewith
planningproposed
will be \™™
J?u the^ growth
^ w of™ the^
0Z
evident
-""•"-"" this
»"« ' " " "'*" the
""= i " " F ^ « college
I'm afraid it is necessary to AROUND THE CAMPUS
Don't forget to pick up your copy of the Primer
^ a n R ^ a ^ t h e r e to make3 vou think b e c o m e a l i t t l e m o r e l i b e r a l w i t h o u r
^ T Z n f ^ which will be distributed this Monday . . . The Raila n d d e c i d e w h e t h e r you want them " X p T . i n X n f
to replace the former rules. The 0 ° J e « £ ' £ f ^ e ^ £ l n X tow Production which most of us saw last Saturday mil
was one of the cleverest bits of satire we have CM
changessinRivalry willbe great and Money cught not to be handed out seen in Page . . . Copies of the exam schedule will
1
at random but our extreme
eUiness
posted next week in prominent places around the C<
' >i
J f ^ * ™ * 5 a b s e n c e Jrom?hc"
'
»
a t c e r t a l n t i m e s c o u l d be
Handbook
'
abandoned lege . . . The S.I.S. system which was recently Inaui
urated by the administration seems to be worku
S
A s o{ n e x t y e a r t h e i , w i U b e n e w S a ^ C ^ ^ g r S S U " S £
quite well . . . All Seniors, don't forget to pay your si
committees functioning with both expand and can justify this expan- you don't want to slip up this late in the game
faculty and student members which s i o n o r if n e w activities and requests Wc are still looking for the MUD party . . .Congrat
wiU »ve ^ r y pupil in every de- are made they should be recognized lations to the able Seniors who made it possible for
paicmeni an outlet ioi suggestion., as valuable to the college and to the to have a banner on MUD.
individuals if it be the case.
THE"END
W i t n t n e n e w ofncei s anci
IUMJAL'
Q*t 7L* <1euii*i
'
the reSince this is our last issue, we would like to th.i:
ittrvtn
/» / w
luutn
commendations from this year's or- the News Board for giving us the privilege of writ,
By K1IODA BERGER
ganizations
canconcerned.
forsee a fine
term this column, and all those who offered their sugi"
of
office for Iall
However,
tions and comments to us throughout the year '
The Tulip Festival is holding the "all concerned" means you—so how have tried to do a good job, and we have had fun
spotlight in the Albany Area thin about digging in someplace next year ing it. We hope that whoever writes this column in
weekend. Tonight the Tulip Queen so you, too, may claim part of State's year will have as much fun as we have hud. To '
and her court will brighten the co- gains as your own.
new CommonStaters we say, good-luck.
ronation ceremonies staged on the
Julie and Bob
lake and in the boat house In Washington Park.
Q04fUfU44UC(Ui0*U
In connection with the festivities
the Albany Institute of History and
Art will be showing its fourth annual
College
Calendar
tulip show until tomorrow noon. The Dear Editor,
Last week the News neglected tJ
arrangements are entitled, "Our
print this list of donors who gave
Dutch Heritage
The Port"orallo American Legion b l o o d Monday, May 4.
FRIDAY, MAY 15
Band is presenting its Spring Band
Philip G. Kane, Earl Hare, Betty 8:30 p.m. Music Festival Chorus Concert, Pane Ah
torium.
concert tonight at 8:15 p.m. in the McConnell, Thomas L. Gorman,
Philip Livingston J u n i o r High Thy 11 L. Ladd, Jr., Morris D. HamSchool. Tickets are $1.00. They may "n, Le Roy Negus, Yvonne Kloost- SATURDAY, MAY 10
p.m. Potter Club Banquet, Jack's.
be purchased at the door or by cop.- erman, Mary Lavery, Ann Marie 6
p.m. Alpha Pi Alpha Banquet and Formal, Ki
fading H. David VanDyck.
Hug, Konrad Maler, Jack Cardello, 7
pire Room, Ten Eyck.
Morton Gould and his orchestra Mary Murray, Ray Cottrell, Nancy
9
p.m. Sigma Lambda Sigma F o r m a l , It
will be featured on Radio Council's Wawro, Ann Conklin, Shirley TuckLounge, Ten Eyck.
"Musically Speaking" heard over er, Sara Hoyt, Virginia Hilfker, Wi!WABY at 6:30 p.m. tomorrow. The Ham Urquhart, Arline Grier, Arnold SUNDAY, MAY 17
orchestra will render a medley of Smith, Lloyd Loop, Richard Gallun, 9
a.m. Pierce Hall May Breakfast.
songs by various composers.
Stuart Theohary, Francis Fay, John
1
p.m. Alpha Pi Alpha Picnic, Thatcher Park
The Princeton Seminary Choir is Horton, John Morrisey, Karl PeterSigma Lambda Sigma Picnic, Thatch
appearing at the Madison Avenue son, Mary Terry, Ann McDougal.
Park.
Presbyterian Church this Sunday at Angela Kavanagh, Philip Bartel. 2:30 p.m. Beta Zeta Faculty Picnic.
7:30 p.m. The public is invited.
Evelyn Erdle, Joseph Patrick, Jane
Thornton Wilder's "The Hapoy Santer, DouglasNielson, Bob Lunder- MONDAY, MAY 18
Journey" and scenes from "A Mid- Kan, Arnold Scholberg, Matilda Ma- <i
p.m. Gamma Kappa Phi Senior Banquet, Yi
summer Night's Dream," "Androcles touf, John Lucas, James Fox, Marion
zi's.
and The Lion," and "Julius Caesar" Howard,
Don Capuano, Jack Camsi
Aliki
will be dramatized by the Trinity P' >
Apostolides, Marilyn TUESDAY, MAY 111
Players at the Parish Hall at the Burke, Thomas Hogue, Doris Mehan, 7
p.m. SCA Workshop Meeting, Brubacher.
corner of Lark and Lancaster Streets Carol Gerety, Paul Pettlt, Raymond
THURSDAY,
MAY 21
tomorrow night at 8:30 p.m. Student Trabucco, Wendell Borden, John
IVCF Meeting, Draper Hall.
rates are $.50.
Fitzgibbons, William McCormick, 12 noon
"High Noon" and "African Queen" Geoffrey Fletcher, Charles Cullen, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, MAY 23 AND ti
are at the Madison through Satur- I l e n e Brezinsky, Palmlna Calabrese,
8:30 p.m. Advanced Dramatics Spring Play, Pun
day.
IContinued on Puue 3, Column V
Auditorium.
FRIDAY. MAY 18. 1083
PA0K t
Kebaili To Speak Separates, Flats, Short Haircuts Council Names Office Releases
About Africa,
Mark Choice Of State Students New Members Student Housing
New members of Residence CounBy ESTHER MAYAKIS
275 men polled ordered a brush cut cil have been announced by Julie Registration Rules
Western World
and ROSE MARY KELLER
when In the barber's chair, Then, Korba '53, Retiring President. These
The Consul-Adjoint of France at
New York. M. Mejid Kebaili will
speak on "North Africa and the
Western World" at the Albany Academy for Girls, 155 Washington
Avenue, at 4 p. m. Tuesday, announces Dr. Arline F. Preston, Instructor in Modern Languages. M.
Kebaili will speak under the auspices of the Alliance Francaise of
Schenectady of which Miss Preston
is the Albany representative.
Born in Tunis, Tunisia, M. le Consul Is well qualified to speak on this
subject. After completing his advanced study in Paris, he was mobilized in 1939 and as a member of
a resistance network, he prepared
for the Allied invasion of North Africa in 1942. In 1945 he entered the
diplomatic service and worked for
four years in the field of foreign
affairs.
All interested students are urged
to attend, states Miss Preston.
(Continued from Page 2, Column 3 <
Robert Ward, Fay Burns, Sheila
Stanger, Thomas Soule, Marie DcSeve, Charles Andrews, Daniel Robinson, John Paul Ward, Mary AmCossaboom, Norma Joan DeRoos,
Barbara Cumber, Doris Emons, Phlllis Raymond, Nancy Hansard, William Wilcox, Theodore Mayer, Richard Bailey, Gilbert Waldman, Francis Dunning, Joseph Derby, Elizabeth
Rocker, Leonard Davis, Walt Rehclcr
Frank Mayer, Roger Hawver, Robert
Coan, Donald White. Josephine Oiuliano, Raymond Champlln, Anna
Marie Yanarolla, Rudolph Schmidt,
Edwin Munro, Ellen Reisinger, Clayton Gravlin, Charles Lusk, Carroll
Judd, Pete McManus, Bradley Griffin, Betty Miller,
Thank you,
Marie DeScvc
When the cold, continuously rainy
weather was finally interceded by
sunny spring, the members of Co.
124 class, a Distributive Education
course at State College, took to the
hallways of the school to poll the
apparel of the college students—
Gallup style. With paper and pen In
hand, the pollsters checked on
items such as shoes, hair cuts and
styles, matching neckties and socks
—the students' complete ensemble.
The men of State College donned
sport shirts in preference to the
white dress shirts. It is interesting
to note that those who wore the
white shirts, wore the conventional
four-in-hand, printed necktie rather than the plain or Slim Jim necktie which are the vogue in fashion
circles now. Of all those surveyed
who wore neckties, only 25 per cent
had matching socks.
With the current empnasls on fashion trends '.". neckties, the pollsters found that no Kentucky Colonels or hand knit ties were worn;
while only 80 men out of 300 tabulated wore lies at all. Of these 80
men. eight wore bow ties.
Further surveying of the State
man's apparel shows that suits are
the most prevalent which must be
due to the fact that practice teachers are required to be attired in this
outfit. Sport jackets are the next
favorite Item in the college man's
fashion wardrobe.
The conservative male at State
completes his ensemble with brown
oxfords. Loafers have not left the
• renc, since 34 per cent consider
I hem as part of their attire. On the
campus can be found white buck
.'hoes completing the traditional
college outfit. At State 18 per cent
of the Statesmen have joined this
group and find that they are just
as attractive on becoming a dusty
grey after some wear.
In a survey taken of men's haircuts, it was found that 110 of the
too, it was noticeable that onethird of the men forewent the routine shave in the morning,
Women Prefer Separates
Women of State prefer full skirts
with sleeveless blouses which are
usually white in color and ornamented with floral accessories, Out
of 264 women who don dresses, 149
arc print or plaid with pastel colored dresses a close recond with 71 out
of the total wearing this outfit.
Suits were in- a very light minority with only ten on the State campus among 546 women surveyed, wearing them.
Various types of footwear were
seen on the dainty feet of State's
co-eds. Dress flats were in the majority with loafers slightly behind
Heels, worn mostly by practice
teachers, and sneakers, worn mostly
by the sporty ladies, were also high
on the list. Suede oxfords, saddle
shoes, white bucks, and summer
sandals were all in the fashion picUire but with slight note.
Short Haircuts Most Popular
Among Coeds
In the hair style scene among the
women, the pollsters proved that the
short hair cuts were the most favored. One out of four women displayed locks of curled, medium
length hairdoes. Several women continued to wear their hair in a long
bob or page boy while nine per cent
•-'ported a pony tail and in some
cases horse tails. ,
Except for rims the women at
State tend to be shying away from
jewelry. The belt fad has come to
this campus and has stayed on even
with the commencing of summer
wear.
Students at State College have
proven themselves to be conservative, but well-dressed people. The
survey further showed that the students on this campus are rather reluctant in picking up current fashion
trends.
li.cmbers under the supervision of
the Dean of Women and the Faculty
Housing Committee enforce the
residence regulations.
Members for '53-'54 are: Kappa
Delta, Ruth Richter, new President;
Gamma Kappa Phi, Marie Elder;
Phi Delta, Doris Emens; Psi Gamma. Anne Van Aken; Beta Zeta,
Madeleine Payne; Alpha Epsilon
Phi, Dillies Mansky; Chi Sigma
Theta, Margaret Guinan; Newman
Hall, Marie Dapolito; Brubacher
Hall, Jean Rasey. Since Pierce Hall's
new officers have not been announced yet, the tenth name can not
be released at this time. Miss Richter will also be president ex-officio
of Judicial Board.
Shower Shocks
Tanning Coeds
Across the great Sahara, near
an oasis situated in a certain
Greek theater, there can be seen
State's version of the Ziegfeld
girls. These tan-bent beauties,
draped alluringly on old Army
blankets, were drinking in the
sun, among other things, and
l i s t e n i n g to classic lectures
broadcast by Mel Allen.
The basking was interrupted
by the furtive heaving of a pail
of water from an upstairs window. Reports that the deluge
was a prop to the Great Flood
Scene of a recent epic have not
yet been confirmed. However,
the girls were wearing bathing
suits.
Bodies cooled as tempers heated, and there was a mass exodus
from the field. The culprit is still
at large. Some itinerant Bostonlans, discovered under a YMCA
towel a spilt bottle of suntan oil.
Query: Will a salvage derrick be
erected?
Students To File Forms
For Summer Residence
The Student Personnel Office hi::
released information concerning student housing for both the summer
session and for the fall semester.
All students attending summer
school are requested to file applications for rooms in Brubacher Hall
before leaving for home in June.
These forms are available in rooms
110 and 138. All undergraduates must
live in Brubacher unless they have
the permission of the Dean of Men
or of the Dean of Women to live
elsewhere.
Students who have indicated their
desire to live in one of the college
residence halls during the coming
school year are asked to watch the
bulletin board outside room 110 for
an announcement concerning contracts and assignments to varior.s
halls.
To apply for a dormitory job students should fill out a registration
form in the Placement office as soon
as possible.
Students who wish to live off campus are reminded that they may live
only in rooms or apartments which
are approved by the Student Personnel Office. There will be a file of
approved rooms and apartments
available in the Student Persomel
Office in September. Students des'ring to find their own accommodations before that time should not
obligate themselves until the approval of the SPO has been obtained.
tCAMELS
-fbr3Q days
andffAI/0R
THERE MUST BE A REASON WHY
Camel is America's most popular
cigarette —leading all other brands
by billions! Camels have the two
things smokers want most —rich, full
flavor and cool, cool mildness...
pack after pack! Try Camels for 30
days and see how mild, how flavorful,
how thoroughly enjoyable they are
as your steady smoke!
It. J. IW-ymiHU Tobueco Co., Wlrmon-Stilom, N. C
^~^
„^^^
~w*~~
More People Smoke CAMELS -rhanoryothercigareHe
•TATI COLL10I HWtn. FRIDAY. MAY IS, <W*
Mat 4
STATE
Proposed Student Association Budget J J f ^ J J ^
C a m p u s Commission
Debate Council
D 8t A Council
Forum
F r e s h m a n Handbook
I n t e r - G r o u p Council
M. A. A
Music Council
Myskania
Pedagogue
Press B u r e a u
Primer
Radio Council
SMILES
S. C. A. G. S
S t a t e College News
Student Bd. of F i n a n c e
S t u d e n t Council
Student Union Board
Typewriter Pool
W. A. A
(Additional Appropriations)
184
1,322
763
$
81.00
896.00
21.00
495.00
61.00
40.00
40.50
100.00
5.00
2.50
30.00
$1,772.00
500.00
Total
$1,272.00
Myskania
$ 811.00* Election Supplies
$ 35.00
25.00 Pedagogue
40.00
25.00 Keys
95.00
10.00 Stationery
16.00
15.00 Moving-Up Day Supplies ....
6.00
$ 101.00
Total
$ 886.00
Dramatics a n d Arts Council
Productions
$1,100.00
Advanced Dramatics
750.00
Elementary Dramatics
150.00
Pedagogue
40.00
Memberships
2.00
Keys
30.00
Tournament
Miscellaneous
10.00
Affiliates
50.00
Total
$ 192.00
Pedagogue
1400 Students «< $4.50
$6,300.00
Estimated Cost
8,466.00
Less estimated income
a i F r o m non - budgetary
organizations on c a m pus
1,285.00
bi Outside advertising .... 881.00
Total
$6,300 00
(See Ped lines under b u d g e t !
Total Expenses
$2,132.00 C a m p u s Commission
$ 25.00
Less Est. Income
600.00 Debate Council
25.00
D & A Council
40.00
Total
$1,533.00 Forum
25.00
Forum of Politics
I n t e r - G r o u p Council
25.00
Pedagogue
$ 25 00 Men's Athletic Association ..
80 00
Speakers
150.00 Music Council
40.00
Mailing
15 00 Myskania
40.00
Publicity
20.00 Press Bureau
25.00
Soapbox
125.00 Primer
25.00
Conferences
164.00* Radio Council
25 00
SMILES
25.00
Total
..$ 499.0P S t a t e College News
40.00
F r e s h m a n Handbook
S t u d e n t Board of F i n a n c e
25.00
Printing (1200copiesi
..$ 560.00 Student Council
40.00
Cuts
16.00 WAA
80.00
Map
52.00 S t u d e n t Union Board
25.00
Mailing
25.00
Envelopes
Total
$ 610.00
Telephone
5.00
Press Bureau
Pictures
7.00
Pedagogue
$ 25.00
Postage
40.00
Total
$ 665.00 Supplies
65.00
I n t e r - G r o u p Council
Keys
20.00
Conferences
$ 53.00
Speaker
25.00
Total
$ 150.00
Transportation and Pastage
23.00
55.00 Primer
Dance
$ 450.00
10.00 Printing
Publicity
25.00
25.00 Pedagogue
Pedagogue
9.00
15.00 Miscellaneous
Literature
Total
$ 206.00
Men's Athletic Association
Awards
$ 75.00
Equipment
021.00
Administration
25.00
Club Activities
90.00
First Aid
20.00
Pedagogue
60.00
Rental (Swlmmlngi
90.00
Total
$ 981.00
Totnl Expenses
Less Est. Advertising
Total
Radio Council
Busfares, phone calls
53 N. Lake Ave.,
Near Washington Ave.
2 BARBERS
We Aim To Plcww
Stationery
Tapes
Pedagogue
Publicity
Miscellaneous
10.00
13.0"
25.00
10.00
10.00
Total
SMILES
Pedagogue
Operations
Transportation
Parties a n d Picnics
$
78.00
$
25.00
15.00
105.00
89.00
Total
$ 234.00
State College Association of G r a d u ate Students
250 S t u d e n t s <ii $1.00
$ 250.00
State College News
Printing
$3,612.00
Cuts and P h o t o g r a p h y
456.20
Pedagogue
40.00
Circulation a n d exchange .. 127.65
Press Association
21.55
Public Relations
19.49
Keys
52.50
Conferences
264.52
T r a n s p o r t a t i o n to Hudson 117.52
Supplies
92.43
Total Expenses
Less Est. Advertising
$4,803.86
1,200.00
Total
$3,604.00
Student Board of Finance
Keys
$ 25.00
Pedagogue
25 0C
Supplies and postage
30.00
Total
Student Council
Directory (1800)
Keys
Conferences
Supplies
Pedagogue
S. A. Activities
Assembly
$
80.00
$ 300.00
75.00
114.00
45.00
40.00
60.00
10.00
Total
$ 644.00
Student Union Board
Coffee Hours 2 <?t $30
$ 45.00
Basketball dances 8 «i $24 100 00
Pedagogue
25.00
Secretarial
15.00
Board Sponsored Dance
100.00
Maintenance
65.00
Conference
68.0r,
Decorations
14.00
Periodicals and Newspapers
14.00
Gerald Drug Co.
217 Western Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
. $ 447.00
$
10.00
Capitol Press
PRINTERS
53-A No. Lake Ave.
(Near Washington Ave.)
"JIMMY"—Hair Stylist
Telephone 3-9740
Two religious clubs have scheduled
meetings for next week: SCA will
hold a work meeting Tuesday a t 7
p.m. in Brubacher. IVCF will h e a r
the Reverend Stewart
Merriam
speak on the topic, " T h e G r e a t
Paul," in room 141 of D r a p e r a t 12
noon Thursday, according to William Whitwer '53, President.
Louella Ptacek '55, President of
SCA, h a s announced t h a t a delegation will be sent from S t a t e College
to the Champlain Conference sponsored by the New York S t u d e n t
Christian Movement. T h e conference, which will be held J u n e 11-18.
is open to all college s t u d e n t s and
will center a r o u n d the t h e m e , "Is
Christ the Alternative?"
T h e principal speaker will be Dr.
H. Richard Niebuhr, Professor o'
Christian Ethics, Yale
Divinity
School and author of "The M e a n i n g
of Revelation" and "Christ a n d Cu! •
ture." Students interested in a t t e n d ing t h e Champlain
Conference
should contact Mary LaPree '55, conference chairman.
Hillel will hold a breakfast a t the
Washington Avenue synagogue "l
10:30 a.m. Sunday. The program will
include a guest speaker and the installation of new officers.
Keys
Come In
UH Before
Total
Typewriter Pool
One new machine
Ribbons
Cleaning
Repairs
Included in these new members
are Dolores M o n t a b a n o '55, Mary
J a n e Fisher, Eleanor Goldman, Ross
Hack, Linda Niles, M a r i a n n e Peckh a m , Sondra Schecter, Alan Weiner,
a n d William Wilcox, Sophomores.
Home Run
BYTRAIN!
$ 540.00
$ 138.00
12.00
15.00
20.03
Total
$ 185.00
Women's Athletic Association
Activities
$ 256.00
Awards
125.00
Conferences and camps .... 230.00
Cheerleaders
30.00
Maintenance and Equipment
125.00
Operating Expenses
230.00
Printing
40.00
Miscellaneous
20.00
Pedagogue
80.00
Total
$1,136.00
Estimated Budget for 195354
$19,907
Estimated income:
1430 Undergraduates
at
$13
$18.590.<M)
175 G r a d u a t e students at
$6.50
$ 1.137 r)0
Coke Concession
250.00
Total
$19,977.50
or
$19,978
Estimated Budget Surplus $
71.00
THE
I T ' S A HIT I The fun of a
train trip home with friends . . .
enjoying roomy comfort and
swell dining-car meals.
4?*0*f 0i4A focOtcL
goalie or center halfback on a soccer t e a m or those of a center or
guard on a basketball team or those
of a pitcher on the baseball team.
We'll all have to wait until next
year to see if there be someone as
versatile and competent at Pete Telfer. Pete, a great athlete, made AilAmerican honorable mention last
season for his sterling performance
as a goalie. T h i s year Peter r e t u r n ed to the basketball courts and
proved to be t h e take-charge guy
when the chips were down. Who will
be elected to Pete's position?
Who w 11 follow in Dean Strickland's footsteps and do as much as
he did to make soccer a standout
sport here at S t a t e ? Not known for
his color on t h e field, his t e a m mates will verify t h a t he is a great
guy to have on your side in a close
game. Will there be another "Red"
McCormick, who was Co-captain
this year with Dean to take over on
the wing position to make it again
a scoring t h r e a t ? Will whoever succeeds Red also duplicate his mound
feats on the baseball team. It's a
tough assignment for anyone.
When the basketball season rolls
around, we'll need someone to fill
Bob Taber's position at center.
"Tabe," who was captain of last
year's squad, played 4 years of varsity ball as a Ped. Whoever is
"Tabe's" successor will have to work
hard to keep the position an efficient one. Bud Prout won't be here
either. Bud, a transfer, last year
quickly worked himself into the pattern and became one of those valuable reserve men t h a t every good
team likes to have on the roster.
Another baseball man, who will
step down at the end of the spring
searon is Herb Egert. Herb, a right
handed pitcher, h a s turned in some
fine games over the past two seasons
for the Statesmen.
Other men who lent a valuable
helping hand to varsity athletics
while u n d e r g r a d u a t e s are Doug Nielsen, manager of the soccer and
baseball teams for the past two seasons, and Joe McCormack, who
handled the job of manager in basketball for the past couple of seasons also. Tom Benenati has wrapped ankles and acted in capacity as
a trainer for the last time at State.
Another guy who has stepped clown
is Abel B l a t t m a n , my predecessor
as .sports editor. It is going to be
funny and hard to work without
Abel, whom I turned to so often for
advice. I would like to thank Abe
for all the advice he has given me
and the experience t h a t I have gained under him during the last two
years. I hope I can fill this position as efficiently as he did.
STUDIO
Dial 4-1125
HOLLYWOOD COMES
EAST TO TAKE
YOUR PORTRAIT
OPEN 9:00 to 5:30 DAILY
T E L E P H O N E 4-9703
811 MADISON AVENUE
Evenings by a p p o i n t m e n t
I T ' S A S T E A L I You and
two or morn frionds can nach
Biivu 25% of regular r o u n d - t r i p
coach farow by travoling home
and back togothor on G r o u p
Plan tickets. Those tickets aro
good generally between points
more t h a n 100 milos a p a r t . Or
a group of 25 or inoro can each
savi! 2H% by handing home in
tin' same direction a t the sumo
time . . . then roLurning either
togothor or s e p a r a t e l y .
FLORIST &
(JREENHOUSE
College Florists for Years
Special Attention
for
Sororities and Fraternities
Albany, New York
L. G. Balfour Co.
FRATERNITY
JEWELRY
Budges
Kings
Steins
Jewelry
Gifts
Favor*
Stationery
Frog-ram*
Club Pins
Keys
Medals
Trophies
Write or Call
CARL SORF.NSEN
30 Murray Ave. Waterford, N.Y.
Telephone Tiny
Adams 82503
By DOTT1E MEHAN
WAA's last social function of t h r
college year will t a k e place
this
weekend at C a m p J o h n s t o n when,
the Spring Spreers take over. T h e r e
will be food a n d fun a n d awards a n d
should prove a s always to be a good
get-together.
We were pleased with the slate
of WAA officers announced last S a t urday on Moving U p Day.
Last
year's officers can justly turn away
from their duties feeling they have
left a Job well done, a n d they should
feel assured t h a t they have entrusted their duties to capable h a n d s .
Very best of luck to the newly elected officers.
It surprised us somewhat to find
t h a t the WAA budget submitted to
S t u d e n t Board of F i n a n c e met with
seme questions. T h e recommendations made a r e probably workable
and plausible. I t is conceivable t h a t
either the system of m a k i n g awards
be revised by WAA to cut expenses
or else less expensive awards could
be purchased. WAA would probably
be more t h a n willing to cooperate
with such a measure. We are in favoi
of the cheerleaders receiving recognition for their efforts in the form
of some sort of an award, although
the honor attending such a position
is great.
T h e outcome of the motion made
in last Friday's assembly should
prove interesting.
If WAA is not allowed to give
awards to those girls who accumulate the designated hours, a certain
core will be removed t h a t makes
WAA organizations workable. Re
move this a n d you remove some of
the effectiveness of WAA.
And now at the end of this, our
last column may we say t h a t in spite
of the ups a n d downs, the writing
has been a pleasure. A bid of
thanks to those who have made it
pleasureable.
Mud Activities
Reach Climax
After J u p i t e r Pluvius got carried away last Wednesday evening some S t a t e Students went
on a spree themselves. The festivities were centered around
Dorm Field a n d
Beverwyck
Park, and consisted of coed wading, track a n d field events,
baseball, a n d football. Joe Purely nipped a fine softball game in
the bud, but the aspiring a t h letes retired to Beverwyck Park
to continue operations.
Rumor h a s it t h a t the instigators were Overton,
Inglis,
Fisher, and Burroughs; however
Konsky, Niles, Juliano, Kubas,
and Rogers as the guilty rabble
rousers. For the house directors:
our reliable sources point to
The above mentioned can be
held responsible for the muddy
shower rooms in the
various
residence halls.
Theatre
PALACE ALBANY NOW
NEVER LET ME (JO
Clark liable
and
Gene Tlcrncy
also
REMAINS TO HE SEEN
Cannon, Overton,
WAA Plans
DcMichicI Pace
Sports Wind-up
Peds With Stick
T h e h i g h light of WAA sports season will be t h e a n n u a l spring spree
held a t C a m p Johnson, C h a t h a m ,
New York. A bus will leave from the
front of Pierce Hall at 10 a. m„ S a t urday, May 16 a n d will return in
time for supper around 5:30 the same
day.
T h e highlights of t h e day's
p r o g r a m will be softball, badminton,
swimming (don't forget your b a t h ing s u i t a n d a n extra pair of shoes—
in case you fall in), a n d horseshoes.
A l u n c h will be served by the officers of WAA. At t h e end of the day
a w a r d s will be given to all those who
have e a r n e d credit hours, a n d the
newly elected officers will be installed. T h e program will be held
RAIN or S H I N E ! The sign up sheet
for all girls is posted on the WAA
board. B a r b a r a Stemple is in charge
of t h i s p r o g r a m and she urges all
those interested to come.
T h i s weekend the S t a t e baseballers will Journey to the North C o u n try in hopes of enhancing their 3-2
record. Today they will play a n afternoon - everting double - h e a d e r
against Plattsburg s t a t e Teachers a t
Plattsburg, a n d will play a single
game S a t u r d a y at Potsdam. Probable
pitchers for these contests are De
Combs (2-2), Red McCormick (0-0),
and J o h n Zidik (1-0).
Last Tuesday afternoon at H a r t wick College Joe Garcia's Varsiteer *
lost t h e i r second game by a o n e - m a n
run m a r g i n as the men from Oneonta rallied for two runs in the last
half of the n i n t h to squeeze out a 76 decision. De Combs absorbed his
second setback against as m a n y wins.
This was another heartbreaking d e feat for De as the Statesmen could
not h a n g on to a four run lead which
T h o s e who do not have full credit they racked up in the opening i n n at t h e time awards are given may ing.
still e a r n hours in the two remainSage, DeMichiell Sluggers
ing school weeks.
Bob Sage led off the game with
A n o t h e r inter-collegiate playdp.y
will be held a t the Green Mountain a long double to left field, and after
J u n i o r College, Saturday, May 23rri. Ducky Leln struck out, Al C a n n o n
It is the last meet of the season singled to score Sage and moved
and will be held for softball honors around on the play on Sage a n d a
between S t a t e and surrounding col- passed ball. T h e n cleanup m a n Bob
leges. T h e t e a m h a s been chosen and Dreher drew a pass and scored as
will be posted on WAA Bulletin Bob DeMichiell blasted a three-base
wallop into the right-field corner.
Board.
S t a t e got a n o t h e r run in the fourth
Due to the rainy weather not too on singles by Rodgers, Combs, a n d
m a n y girls' sports have been held Leln, a n d another in the seventh on
WAA a n n o u n c e s t h a t girls may three free passes given up by the
t u r n in their hours for tennis and Hartwick pitcher. However, Hartwick
softball any time they play. These rallied behind the slugging of K a t z
h o u r s do not have to be supervised. and Lambert, and went on to win
Co-ed b a d m i n t o n is still being he'd behind the fine relief work of J a g in t h e gym every Tuesday and ielski and Sciacca.
T h u r s d a y from 7-9
If interest in
this sport continues a mixed t o u r n a - Tukc Two from Utica
m e n t will be held next year.
Last S a t u r d a y the Peds turned In
T h e ping-pong t o u r n a m e n t h a s two beautiful games as they trounced
finally been completed. Lou Urbano Utica College, 6-3 and 2-0, once
and R u t h Richter are the doublet agin led by t h e fine hurling of Dc
Combs and J o h n Zidik. The first
champions.
Archery will be held on dorm field g a m e was a thriller all the way with
S t a t e sewing it up with three runs
every Monday and Thursday after in the seventh inning on Boom Boom
school from 3:30-5:30, if the weather Cannon's single for two RBI's. Al
permits.
went around on the play at the
All tumbling hours are to be fin- plate and an error. Red McCormick
ished up this week. WAA hints t h a t started for S t a t e and gave way to
advanced tumbling and beginning Herb Egert after allowing four hits
tumbling will be sponsored next and two runs in four innings. T h e
year. Life saving still continues at Hoss went one inning and t h e n
the Jewish Community Center.
Combs took over to put the game on
WAA h a s the necessary equipment ice.
for golf, so practice up.
Zidik Stars on Mound
J o h n Zidik showed a fine assortment of pitches in blanking Utica
J o h n n y was in complete control all
2-0 on three hits In the second game.
the way, and never was in trouble.
S t a t e scored in the first inning on
Sage's walk and stolen base, C a n Player
AB II Av. non's hit, and a fielder's choice,
Cannon
20 7 .350 and in the fourth Inning as Dreher
DeMichiell
17 (i .353 walked, a n d scored on an error and
Dreher
13 3 .231 an outfield fly.
Leln
15 3 .200
T h e Box Score
Murphy
11 1 .091
AB R II
Overton
16 5 .313 S t a t e
5
1 1
Sage
10 4 .211 Sage, ss
5 0 1
Stella
15 2 .133 Leln, If
5
1 3
Rogers
3 1 .333 C a n u a n , 2b
3 2
0
Al C a n n o n leads the team with Dreher, c.
4
1 2
the most runs, 0, and the most RBI's, De Mlchlell, rf.
5 0
1
4. Bob Dreher, the team's clean up Overton, of
3 0 0
m a n leads the club In the free pass Stella, 3b
3
1 I
d e p a r t m e n t with 7. Bob Sage Is the Rodgers, lb.
4 0 1
biggest thief on the team with 4 Combs, |).
stolen bases to his credit. Bob has
37
6 10
yet to be caught In a stealing at- Totals
tempt.
DeMichiell Tops
Peds With .353
H. F. Honikel & Son
(ill ADS
PHARMACISTS
Founded 1905
Phene 4-2088
167 Central Ave.
ALBANY, N. T.
(let ji head start on your
Phone 62-0116
TEMPERANCE
/Zouleocrtd Ca^ete^ia
198 Central Ave., Cor. Robin
Because of t h e adverse weather
conditions which have prevailed in
Albany since the Softball season h a s
been underway, J o h n Allasio has
announced a new I M Softball s c h e dule. Under the old system, each
team would play each other once and
at the end of t h e regular season the
top four teams would engage in the
playoffs. Since so many games have
been rained out, it was impossible
to finish the league before final exams started. Now, each team will
play its scheduled opponent twice or
three times, whichever the case may
be. The way the league is set up,
it is a double elimination playoff.
If a team loses two games, it is eliminated from the playoffs.
There
are some h a r d feelings about this
system, but if some system h a d n ' t
been worked out, the season would
have finished without playoffs. In
a compromise like this, someone is
bound to feel t h a t they are being
given a raw deal, but it is better to
have someone feel a little p u t out
t h a n to miss out on the IM c h a m pionships for such an important
sport.
APA, St. Mary's Tie
Under the new playoff
system,
APA and St. Marys tangled on Page
Field Wednesday afternoon In the
second game of their series.
The
game progressed rather well until
the last inning and then, as usual,
Albany got its daily ration of w a t c .
Big Bob Tabor and J o h n Allasio were
locked up in a 2 to 2 pitchers duel.
Both Tabe and J o h n looked very impressive to the opposing hitters.
Both boys had plenty of stuff a n a
they had the opposing hitters lofting pop flies to the infield.
Doug
Adamson a n d Dave Burroughs did
the catching for St. Marys and APA
respectively. This game will go into
the book as a tie and the two teams
will play the rubber match
next
week.
Club Reaches the Biscuits for 33
Tuesday on Page Field, Potter u n loaded a 23 run attack on the Biscuits. After the dust had cleared
and two Biscuit hurlers had been
bombed the final score was 23 to 3
in favor of the Club. Pete Teller
stood aside and Jim Finnen and
Gerry McDonald did the chucking
for the Club. These two will tangle
Thursday in the second game of the
playoff series.
Monday night on Page Field, the
heretofore winless APAchies benf
the Hayseeds 7 to 3. Bob Strauber
went all the way for the APAchies
and Dick Kirsh took the loss for the
Hayseeds. Ed Steele and Bugs Everard did the catching for the winners
and losers respectively.
Monday afternoon on Page, APA
bombed the St. Marys DPs for 17
runs. St. Marys got only two runs
off John Allasio. J o h n Eldridge and
Bob Tabor did the pitching for the
losers. Dave Burroughs and Charlie
Cullen worked behind the plate for
APA, while Doug Adamson went the
rout for the losers.
SENIORS
TELEPHONE 4-0017
You Leave
TAVERN
State Bows To Hartwick, 7 - 6
Win Doubleheader From Utica
Corner Ontario & Benson
'Portrait At Its Finest"
Albany 6, N. Y.
S A F E AT H O M E I You'll
got homo p r o m p t l y an planned
. . . with ull-wouther curtuinty
no other tin vol can m a t c h .
CONSULT YOUR LOCAL RAILROAD TICKET
AOENT WELL IN ADVANCE OF DEPARTURE
DATE FOR DETAILED INFORMATION
EASTERN
RAILROADS
N#ll
Allasio,IM Prexy
M a n y people were elected to fill
positions last S a t u r d a y , but there Announces New
are a n u m b e r of o t h e r s which
could never be listed on the MUD
program. Positions like those of a Playoff Schedule
By B O B A S U t T E L D
HAGUE
COLLEGE, F R A T E R N I T Y
SORORITY PRINTING
170 South Pearl Street
Several D r a m a t i c s a n d Art Club
tryouts h a v e completed t h e i r h o u r s
in Dramatics a n d Art projects and
have been n a m e d to D r a m a t i c s and
A r t s Affiliates, a n n o u n c e s K a y
Wright '53, president. To become a n
affiliate a tryout m u s t have 25 hours
in different types of work.
94.00
ALL T Y P E S
George D. Jeoney & Sons
Felicia's
Beauty Salon
Work Meef/ng
P h o n e 6-8610
$ 484.00
37.00
And See
Joe's Barber Shop
$20,053
$20,006
TOTAL
Breakdown of Additional AppropriaMusic Council
tions (1952-53):
Primer
$
10.00 Faculty Concert
Myskania
6.90 Artist Concert
I n t e r - G r o u p Council
4.50 S t u d e n t Concert
Forum
8.24 OperettaNews
100.00 May Concert
Pedagogue
Total
$ 129.64 Keys
Equipment
U. S. P. O. Permit
1953-54
Albany League of Arts
Campus Commission
$ 11.00 Miscellaneous
Commons
30.00
Victrola
Total Expenditures
35.00
Keys
25.00
Less Est. Income
Pedagogue
Total
Debate Council
Trips
Keys
Pedagogue
Stationery, Telephone
Books
. 1953-54
$ 100
886
1,533
499
665
206
981
1,272
192
6,300
150
447
78
234
175
3,604
80
641
540
185
1,135
1952-53
$ 105
900
1,545
374
629
185
859
1,274
185
6,300
150
463
78
210
250
3,717
65
653
527
196
1,388
1951-58
$ 140
900
1,491
324
588
185
635
1,277
182
6,300
150
463
65
300
200
3,461
293
783
D&A Affiliates
Name Members
coLLiartfcifeWS.FRIDAY, MAY is. ISSi
FIFE INSURANCE POLICY
Ask about our low cost plan damned for future
teachers
ARTHUR R. KAPNER
75 State St,
Tel. 5-1471
CAFETERIA
LOCATED AT
167 CENTRAL AVENUE
84 STATE STREET
134 STATE STREET
•
•
RECORDS
FILMS DEVELOPED
Blue Note Shop
156 Central Ave.
tt-IMl
Open Evenings Until 9
.,>*>'
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY, MAY- «•. 4083
PA0Y6
Faculty Footnotes
New Constitution Thomas ft. Qitaon, Professor of Dr.
Randolph Gardner, Marvin more College, Saratoga, to particiHealth, is attending conferences Blythe, and Elizabeth Glass, runer- pate In the spring meeting of the
11 and 12 of the New York visors in the Mathematics Depart- Hudson Valley Chapter of the AmerChanges Council May
State Council for Health Teachers. ment in the Milne School attended
Meetings are being held at the State meetings of the New York State As- ican Association of Teachers of
French and German, Dr, Wesley
Building and Brubacher
To Radio Guild Education
sociation of Mathematics Teachers Childers, Professor of Modern LanHall.
A new constitution for Radio Council, changing Its organization, was
passed toy Student Council on Wednesday night. The name of this new
organization will be Radio Guild
and its purpose will be to provide
radio experience for students and to
inform the public of college and
community activities.
at Syracuse May 1 and 2.
Members of tne Mathematics Department attended a meeting of the
On May 2 Dr. Wesley ChildAmerican Mathematics Association ers, Annette Dobbin, Carl Odenon May 9. They observed classes kirchen, William Meyer, Dr. WUat West Point. At one of the meet- lard Skidmore, Dr. Marion Smith
ings Nura Turner, Instructor ot of the American Association of
Mathematics, gave a 45 minute paper Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese
entitled "Color and Mathematics.
and Lois Williams traveled to Skid-
Pan Amigos Releases
Recent Election Results
Ronald Kanen '54, retiring President of Pan Amigos State College
club for Spanish students, has announced the results of the election
guages, Frank Carrino, instructor in of officers held Monday.
Modern Languages, jack Krall, Instructor in Modern Languages in the
New officers for the coming school
Milne School, and Edwin Munro, As- year, 1953-54, are as follows: Marie
sistant Professor in Modern Languages, were present at the meeting McCaffrey '54, President; Thomason May 9, at Russell Sage College, ina Pagan '56, Secretary, and WilTroy.
liam La Barr '56, Treasurer,
Don't you want to try a cigarette
with a record like this?
The governing body of the Guild
will be Radio Council and Radio
Associates will be a minor body acting as a try-out system for candidates for the Council. Tne Council
shall consist of no fewer than six
and no more than fifteen active
members, who will be required for
this Council to function as an organization under the Student Association budget. New members shall
be elected by active members of Radio Council from the list of tryouts fulfilling the Associates requirements.
1 . THE QUALITY CONTRAST between Chesterfield and other leading cigarettes is
a revealing story. Recent chemical analyses give an index of good quality for the
country's six leading cigarette brands.
~
The Radio Associates will function
under a point system and candidates earning a minimum of 15
points within two school semesters
automatically become members of
Associates. The officers of Radio
Council: president, vice president,
secretary and treasurer shall be
elected by a majority of all active
members of Council.
The index of good quality table-a ratio of high sugar to low nicotineshows Chesterfield quality highest
. . . 15% higher than its nearest competitor and Chesterfield quality 31% higher than
the average of the five other leading brands.
Residence Halls
Choose Officers
The new officers of Brubacher
Hall were installed at breakfast last
Sunday and Pierce Hall officers will
be announced and installed at its
May Breakfast Sunday.
The new officers of Brubacher
Hall, as announced by Marjorle Alguire '53, President, are: president,
Jean Rasey '54; vice-presidents, Natalie Green '54, and Zoe Ann Laurie
u5; treasurer, Marilyn Gadd '55;
sports director, Edna Standley '55;
t,ong leader, Sara Hoyt '55.
Pierce Hall will hold its annual
May Breakfast next Sunday at 9
a. m., according to Aliki Apostolldes
'63, President, The new officers for
1953-54 will be announced and installed.
OF THEM ALL!
All seniors living at Pierce and
the officers will be honored and
g.ven corsages. The guests at the
breakfast will be Dean Ellen Stokes,
Dr. Minnie Scotland, Professor of
Biology, Mrs. Bertha Brimmer, Secretary of the Alumni Association,
and Dr. Matie Green. Chairman of
the breakfast is Kathryn Cowell '54.
2 . First to Give You Premium
Quality in Regular and
K i n g - s i z e . . . much milder
with an extraordinarily good
taste—and for your pocketbook,
Chesterfield is today's best
cigarette buy.
•yiMmfi°UJm!SS*
College Submits
Admission Data
The Office of Admissions has released the following Information
concerning the number of admissions
lor next year, sis of May 1, 1953.
There have been 855 applications,
474 of which have been admitted,
100 rejected, 147 withdrawals, 77 still
to be Interviewed and 51 pendlni,
further records. The 474 application;,
admitted Include 274 for the A.B.
Degree, 114 for the B.S. Degree ar.cl
8(1 for the BS.C'o. Degree. The ratio
of women to men will be approximately 3 to 1, with 319 women UIKI
155 men.
• I . A Report Never Before
Made About a Cigarette.
For well over a year a medical
specialist has been giving a
group of Chesterfield smokers
n
/KtMO^SIZj
Choice of Young America
A recent survey made in 2 74 leading colleges and >
universities shows Chesterfield is the largest seller. [
in
Inter-Fraternity Council
Elects New Officers
Inter-fraternity Council has elected next year's officers. They are:
Robert Sage '55, President; Leo Bennett '54, Vice-President; Kenneth
Schoonmaker '54, Treasurer; WllHum Llmage '55, Secretary.
Members of the 1953-1054 Council
are; Richard Bailey. Henry Berlelh
James Plnneii, Peter McManus, Arnold Smith, Robert Sturm, Eugene
Webb, Seniors, and Custer Quick 'SB,
• • • • • • • • • •
TT
p5
U66ETT < -
MYt
TOBACCO CO.
LKJ6ET1
l MttRS TOBACCO CO
regular
examinations
every t w o m o n t h s . H e reports
. . . no adverse effects to
nose, throat and sinuses
from smoking Chesterfield.
BESTNRYDU
Copynjlu lint, l.i
i i j, Mvms TOBACCO Co,
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