Primer Opens Three Contests To Student Body Qacutty QoobuUei.

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PAGE e
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY,
Primer Opens
Three Contests
To Student Body
DECEMBER
3,
1948
n \ "i'
Formal Dinners, Suppers
Qacutty QoobuUei. Library Secures Cords Available
To End Rush Period
(Continued from Page 1, Column o)
Mr. R. S. Knouse, professor of Record Albums
For Registration the
second sorority, If she does not
merchandising has been attending
receive a bid from her second
the American Vocational AssociaAccording to the Registrar's Of- choice, but does from her third, she
tion Convention in Milwaukee
fice, all students must secure cards will be obligated to join the third.
Wednesday through Friday. He will For Student Use
Several contests open to the gen- attend meetings concerned with
eral student body are now being distributive education and the
of distributive education
conducted by Primer. These include training
the annual cover design contest, teachers.
Mr. Knouse will also attend a
a prize illustration contest, and
meeting of the National Association
one for the prize short story.
Joseph Keefe '50, Editor of the of State Supervisors and Teachers
Primer, has announced that only Trainers in Distributive Education.
Dr. Charles L. Andrews of the
three manuscripts have been submitted to the literary staff to date. Physics Department will speak at
All of these are now in the art the meeting of the American Physiroom, where they are being illus- cal Society at the University of
Chicago on the subject of "Diffractrated.
tion Patterns of Electromagnetic
He also announces that the an- Waves Near Rods and Apertures."
nual contest for the cover design of The lecture will concern work done
the Primer is now under way. The by Dr. Andrews over the past five
winner of the contest will receive years at the Research Laboratory
ten dollars and written credit for of General Electric.
the design in the Primer. Anyone
Msis Ruth Card, Instructor in
interested in submitting an entry
should consult the posters in lower Biology, was married to Mr. Lester
Draper for the rules of the contest. Hannett Wednesday, November 24.
Miss Helen James, Assistant ColA prize illustration contest will
lege
Librarian, attended the conalso be conducted. The object of
this contest will be to produce a ference of Eastern College Librarpicture 4;;i x 7 1 - inches in one or ians at Columbia University, New
two colors suitable for line repro- York City, on Saturday, November
duction. The prize for this contest, 27.
which closes December 16, is five
dollars, and a Primer credit line.
The prize story contest will begin
January 3. Contestants will be asked to write a story of less than 2500
words based on the prize illustration. The closing date for this contest will be February 7. The winner
of this contest will receive the spotlight of the magazine center spread,
and a two color illustration. Members of the Primer staff are not
eligible for this contest.
"Tschaikowsky's Piano concerto
number 1 in B flat minor," "Highlights from Puccini's Madame Buttery," "Bach Organ Music Played
by E. Power Biggs" and "Russian
Folk Songs Sung by Alexander Kipnis" are the newest record albums
available at the college library, according to Miss Mary Elizabeth
Cobb, College Librarian. These albums may be borrowed at any time
during the day and should be returned at any time on the following clay. Records borrowed on Friday are due the following Monday.
A list of all the albums in the
library is available at the main
desk. Miss Marion Soule, Library
Assistant in charge of audio-visual
aids, is responsible for the records
and anyone wishing to take out selections should contact her.
The library also acknowledges
gifts from I lie following members
of the faculty and student body:
Mrs. Anna K. Barsam, Dr. Gertrude
E. Douglas, Mr. Thomas Gibson,
for registration for the second semester of 1948-'49 school year next
week. These cards must be returned
to the Registrar's Office as soon as
possible. Freshmen are requested to
coma in on Monday and Tuesday,
upperclassmen and graduate students on Thursday and Friday.
Any students who expect to complete their undergraduate work in
January and who are planning to
raturn next semester to begin work
on their Master's Degree must also
[He an application lor such degree
at the same time. Any students who
ire not expecting to return to college next semester should notify
the office to that effect.
Dr. Harry W. Hastings, Mr. Clarence Hidley, Miss H. Carolyn Howard. Miss Mabel E. Jackman, Mr.
Everson Kinn. Dr. Milton Nelson,
Miss Anna E. Pierce, Dr. Charles
Stokes and Mr. Burgess.
Any rushee who refuses to accept
a pledge from a sorority which she
has mentioned in her preference
blank, shall be ineligible for general sorority rushing and bidding
for one year from the date of her
refusal. Any woman who breaks her
pledge shall be ineligible for a period of two years. A pledge, wishing
to be formally initiated, must have
maintained a "C" average until that
time.
Formal bids will be in Student
Mail Tuesday morning. Silent period will terminate 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, when pledge services will be
held.
Schedule Address By Stewart
Pi Gamma Mu members will hear
an address by Dr. Watt Stewart,
Professor or History, on "The Recent Revolution in Latin America"
at a regular meeting of the fraternity, Wednesday, according to Marvin Wayne '49, President. Dr. Stewart's address will be open to any
person who desires to attend.
CHESTERFIELD is the
cigarette I smoke in
my new picture,
WALDORF
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MIKE FISK
Campus Representative
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Untight Win, tarn &. Mm« TUB,
lO,
1948
CHRISTMAS
TO ALL
VOL. XXXIII NO. 11
Aurania Club To Open Doors Tonight To State
For Annual Inter - Fraternity, Inter - Sorority Ball
Sororities Close
Rushing Period
With Pledging
Welcome Frosh Girls
With Buffet Suppers;
No Group Fills Quota
Sorority rushing was concluded
Tuesday night with pledge services
and suppers, at which 100 freshmen
women, two Sophomores, three
Juniors, and one transfer student
were pledged. The acceptance quota
was raised to 20 girls per sorority,
and therefore there has been an
increase of 14 women over last year.
However, no sorority succeeded in
filling its quota.
Following is the list of pledges:
Kappa Delta
Joan Bennett, Janet Bookstaver,
Lois Cosman, Jean Faville, Joyce
Hampel, Helen Pilcher, Evelyn
Swenson, Margaret Shutt, Joyce
Leavitt, Ruth LaGraff, Doris Van
Evera, Jean Hope Rugg, Marion
Newton, Laura Griffin, freshmen,
Judith Davis, Transfer.
Psi Gamma
Veronica
Thornton,
Kathleen
Ryan, Mary Ann Fitzgerald, Margaret Gemmell, Ann Sullivan, Rosemary Stevens, Olga Bajjaly, Ann
Adams, freshmen.
Chi Sigma Theta
Arlene Everson, Kathleen Donovan, Virginia Farrell, Jean Powers,
Patricia Kirwin, Marcia Walsh,
Elaine Sawner, Joan Bostwick,
Jeaninne Burke, Ailecn O'Brien,
Patricia Graff, Beatrice Magee,
Ruth Hopper, Florence Kloser, Ann
Reed, Ann Gorman, freshmen; Natalie Murray '50.
Alpha Kpsilon l'hi
Charlotte Alter, Edna Balshan,
Jacqueline Coplon, Shirley Feinstein, Helena Grossman, Adele
Hochberg, Lillian Kaminsky, Roslyn Lacks, Helene Patlen, Marilyn
Rapp, Eleanor Rosenblum, Ruth
Sliair, Elaine Shampansky, Rita
Stanger, Beatrice Swire, Elaine
Tinkelman, Estelle Weisblatt, freshmen; Doris Brody, Miriam Koblenz,
Sophomores.
Be - Zeta
Esse Juengllng, Victoria Eade,
Evelyn Kamke, Kay Carpenter,
Jeanne Hayes, Betty Adams, Mary
Borys, Blanche Bus, Janet Rose,
Anita Racine, Patricia Devltt, freshmen; Marilyn Cohen 'SO.
Gamma Kappa l'hi
Antoinette Blaisinff, Eugenia Cer(Continuta on Page 3, Column S)
Tlie Modern Language and English Departments arc to add new
courses to their curricula next semester and for the year 1040-50.
Dr, Shields Mcllwaine, professor
of English, has announced the addition of En. hill wliich is to be a
course In Phonetics. This course,
winch is to be required ol those who
plan to major in English and minor
in Speech, will be taught by Dr.
Paul
Boomsliler,
professor
of
Speech, commencing next semester.
Dr. J. Wesley Ohllders, professor
of Spanish and head of the Department of Modern Languages, has announced the addition ol several new
courses. These are:
A course in scientific German, Ge.
5, which is to be a two hour course.
French IIS, a course in French
civilization. This is a one semester
three hour course.
French 304, advanced. This Is to
(Continued on Pago 6, Column 6)
Snowy Christmas
Will Be Theme
For Decorations
Classes To Sing
For Rivalry Points
During Assembly
DeGarmo Judges Potatoes,
Competes In National Contest
Farmers are not the only ones
to judge potatoes. Students do
it, too. In fact, one of State's
students is quite superior at it.
Lindley DeGarmo '50, came out
first in last year's contest for
prize potato judgers, and fifth
in this year's contest.
He doesn't just judge spuds,
though. He can actually tell you,
just from glancing at the eyes
(of the potato, that is) whether
that particular apple of the
ground is a sharp Long Islander,
or whether it is native Californian.
DeGarmo is connected with
the vegetable department of the
4-H club, r u n know, heat,
hunger, horror, and hollandaise).
That's where he got his learning.
DeGarmo is now taking part
in a national contest for judging vegetables in Detroit, Michigan. He is on one of two teams
competing in the contest representing New York State.
EEP Schedules
Party, SLS Plans
Annual Caroling
Eldred Edward Potter Club will
hold an informal date partj tomorrow night for member*;, pledges, ana
faculty members, according to Harold Vaughn '50, Chairman, Sigma
Lambda Sigma's traditional Carol
Sing will take place Thursday, with
Jacob and Margaret Schule, Seniors,
acting as Co-Chairmen.
Potter Club will entertain its
guests at the fraternity house, 415
State Street, from ii to 11:30 p. m.
The committees for the evening are:
Refreshments, Leonard Skolnick '50,
Jack Feightal '51, George Poulos,
Graduate; Entertainment. William
Pawluckie '49; Decorations, Mi:hacl
Cortese
'50;
Clean-up,
Walter
Schick, Graduate, Jack Kirby '49,
Richard Feathers '50.
The SLS sing will also include a
dale party lor those members
wblnng to bring dates. Those attending will meet in the rear of
Draner at 7:30 p. m. The group will
proceed from there and will visit
the various group houses on campus. This includes the college dormitories and all sorority and fraternity houses.
The sing has been traditional
since 1937 and has been held each
year since that time, with the exception of the war years.
A d d New Courses
To College Curriculum A n n e x , V a n Derzee
T U X E I) 0 S
15^ B'WAY
State College News
MERRY
To H o l d Xmas Parties
Christmas parties have been
scheduled by the men living in
Sayles Annex and Van Derzee Hall,
and their guests.
The men ol Sayles Hall Annex
will celebrate the approaching holidays with a date party, tomorrow
evening at H:3() p. in., according to
David B. Caiman '51, social chairman. Eugene Petrie and Gerald
Dunn, Sophomores, are in charge
of refreshments, Dr. and Mrs.
Charles Andrews have been invited
to attend as chuperones.
Van Derzee Hall will begin its
annual Christmas celebration on
December 1(1, with a dinner in the
lounge at li p. in., followed by carol
singing. A vie dance is scheduled
to last from H:30 to 11 p. in., and
at twelve, Santa will bring gifts
accompanied by poems lo all the
men of the house, according to
Robert Frasca 'SO, social chairman.
Today's assembly will consist of
the annual Rivalry Sing between
the
freshman
and
Sophomore
classes. Also slated for the program
are nominations for delegates to
the Eastern States Association Conference, and an announcement concerning the Myskania Christmas
Party.
The annual Rivalry Sing between
the freshmen and the Sophomores
will take place this morning. Each
class will sing a class fight song, an
original class alma mater, and a
song to the rival class.
The procedure for seating for the
sing has been announced by Perry
Pless '49, Grand Marshal. The
Sophomores and Juniors in the balcony will remain in their seats. The
freshmen in the left hand section
ifacing the stagci will remain seated until all the other freshmen are
out. The frosh in the section on the
right will move immediately to the
center section, so that the center
section will contain both groups,
leaving the right section vacant, so
the Juniors can move to their new
seats. The center section will leave,
one row at a time, and go down the
right stair case to the Junior section downstairs. The Juniors will
move to their right and go up the
stairway nearest Richardson Hall to
the section left empty by the freshmen. After all the Juniors have left
their seat.1, the Seniors will move
to their right and up the same
stair case to till the left section,
which will be emptied by the last
freshmen.
A report will also be given on the
recent ICA conference, held at
Brockport by members of the State
delegation. Nominations for delegates to the Eastern States Association meeting will also take place.
Myskania W i l l Hold
Annual Xmas Party
Thursday night, Myskania will
hold its annual Christmas party at
the Albany Home lor Children in
the Home's Chapel, according to
Catherine Donnelly '49, Chairman
of Myskania.
Millard Smith '49, will play Santa
Claus at the younger children's
parly, which will be held from 4:30
to 6:30 p.m., and Ronald Roekhill
'51, will be Santa at the older children's party at 7 p.m. Ellen Fay '49,
I he Good Fairy on Station WROW,
will portray the Good Fairy for the
youngsters in the afternoon.
A collection will be taken up in
assembly today to help defray the
expenses of tood and decorations.
Cartons for all classes have been
placed in lower Draper Hall, and
Mi.ss Donnelly urges all students to
buy their gilts as soon as possible.
She also asks that sorority members
attend the Christmas party before
going lo ihep- group house affairs.
Commuters' Club Will Stage
Seasonal Festivity Tomorrow
The Commuters' Club Christmas
laity will be held m the Commons,
tomorrow, from H to 12 p. in., according to Co-Chairmen Paul LeBruii
and Paul Wilbur, Sophomores, The
evening will Include dancing, entertainment and refreshments.
The committees lor the affair include: Entertainment, Helen Galliano '41); Refreshments, Paul l,eBrun '51. Mitchell Burkowsky '5a;
Tickets, Mary McGuire '52, Admission will be twenty-live cents and
everyone Is Invited to attend.
Co-Chairmen Announce
Completion Of Plans j y
For All-College Affair
Tonight the doors of the Aurania
Club will open for the annual
Christmas Ball which is sponsored
by Inter-Fratemity-Inter-Sorority
Council. Fred Clute and his orchestra will furnish the music from
9 p. m. until 1 a. m., according to
Co-chairmen
Helen Cook and
Richard Zeller, Seniors.
The Aurania Club will be decorated in a theme fitting to the season
of the year. Everson Kinn '49,
Chairman of the Decoration ComHELEN COOK
mittee, has made plans for decoraPresident, Inter-Sorority Council tions for the effect of a snowy
Christmas.
Open To All Students
Miss Cook and Zeller wish to remind students that the ball is not
restricted to sorority and fraternity
members. Any student and his guest
may attend. They also wish to explain the presentation of a smaller
dance this year. Last year a name
orchestra was hired and the Christmas Ball was held in a large place.
However, Inter-Fraternity - InterSorority Council lost money because
attendance was not large enough.
This year the Council wishes to
present a smaller dance and hopes
to remain financially in the black.
Tickets are still on sale at the
booth at the door of the Commons.
Persons attending the ball will be
able to purchase tickets at the door
for $3.00 per bid.
List Committee Heads
Other committee heads are: Mary
Jane Peris, Orchestra; Abraham
Trop, Flace; Jean Tolman, Bids;
Dolores Sloekcr, Programs; Marvin
Wayne, Chaperonos; Thomas Lisker '49, Concession; and Earl Jones
IMC'HAIM) ZELLER
President, Inter-Fraternity Council '50, Publicity.
Chaperones for the Christmas
Ball will be: Mr. Frank Carrino;
(Continued on Page 3, Column bJ
Religious Clubs S/afe
Big-4 'Holiday Time' Futterer Releases Cast
Wednesday evening at 11 p. in.,
Page Hall will be the scene of the
Religious Clubs annual Big-4. The
presentation, called "Holiday Time,"
is sponsored jointly by Hillel, Newman Club, and Student Christian
Association, and is under the chairmanship ol Jean Hoffman '49,
Catherine Noonan '50, and Barbara
Carpenter '51. Unlike previous years'
productions, there will be no admission charged.
The Liiinaletfes, under the direction ol Mr. Karl Peterson, Instructor of Music, will open the program
by singing Christmas Carols. Dancing in the gym will follow the program.
Narrators tor the various religious
groups will be Hosalyn hacks '52,
Hillel; Anthony I rociiilo 'SO, Newman; and Harold White 'SO. Nancy
Burdlck '51, Kenneth Wade and
Murui Dessimoz, freshmen, SCA.
Other committees include: Lights,
Jean Valchovic '49 and Edythe Kelleher '50; Publicity, Jean Teal '51,
Elaine Slutkol'l 'SI, and Earl Jones
'SO; Decorations, Barbara Stein,
Marilyn Stnhlow, Helen Agnello,
Sophomores, and Robert Donnelly
Programs, Rhoda Stelier, Robert Ulilholtz, Helen Moeller, Sopho
mores, and Kalherine Dando and
Marietta Wiles, freshmen;
and
Make-up, Rhoda Klber 'SO, and Dorothy Mann '51.
For ED Productions
The easts for the Elementary
Dramatics plays, which will bo presented on January 18, have been
released by Miss Agnes Futterer,
Assistant Professor of English and
Director of the plays.
Cast in "The Happy Journey," a
comedy by Thornton Wilder, are
Jacqueline Mann '51, Ma; Beverly
Huber 'SO, Carolina; Henry Smith
'52, Arthur; Frederick Knoerzer '51,
Pa; Jane Cook '51, Beulah; Joseph
Keefe '50, Stage Manager.
The cast for "The Feast of Ortolans" by Maxwell Anderson includes
Stuart Goldman '51, Pomplgnon;
Joseph Crueilla 'SO, Beaumarchais:
Maynard Playfoot '51, Champforl;
Barbara Carpenter '51, Duchess Du
Gramont; Martin Bush '50, Condoreet; Dorothy Mann '51, Mile. De
Sombreuil; Walter Keller '51, Philippe of Orleans; Richard Gutta '51,
La Harpe; Carolyn Williams '51,
Theroigne; Harry Mills '49, Chenier; Joseph Purdy '51, General
Ctlstine; George Kline '51, La Fayette; James Baumgarten '50, Servant; George Christy '50, Chef;
Frederick Knoezer '51, St. Cusflne.
The roles in "A Husband For
Mag" by Julia Brainard Carson are
to be played bv Anita Fox '51, Mag;
Donald Ely '51, Dooglas; Joseph
PUrd.V '51, Tammas; Joan Ferine
'51, Janet; Walter Keller '51, Rob;
Joseph Crueilla '50, Angus; Edwurd
Kyle '52, Peter.
STATE COLLEGE N E W S . FRIDAY, DECEMBER
Mat i
10.
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S .
1848
QommonStaUb
The Greek Situation
Criticism of both the fraternities and sororities
in general and of their intolerance and rushing
systems in particular has been steadily increasing.
It would seem that certain groups are receiving
undue criticism for an existing situation which is
certainly no fault of theirs. The restricted membership policies in effect today were originated
about twenty years ago when State College was
not the progressive, tolerant college it is today.
Because of the discrimination at that time, fraternities and sororities were organized in direct
opposition to each other. The active chapters are
aware of the changes in attitude since that time
and have endeavored to remedy the situation. They
have not found it easy, however, to convince the
original founders, who, in many cases, are the most
active alumni, that things are not the the same
and that times necessitate a change. Representatives from local chapters of national fraternities
have appeared at the national conventions to fight
for the removal of the discrimination clause but,
to date, they have not been successful.
The important thing is that the active members
are trying to make the change but the change, of
necessity, will be gradual.
Interfraternity Council plans to have a meeting
in the very near future to discuss the insertion of
a clause, concerning the postponement of bidding,
in the Inter-fraternity Council constitution. If the
plan goes through, and there is every indication
that it will, freshmen men will not receive bids
until sometime before spring recess.
If the sororities will follow the lead, State College will be well rid of the intensified rushing system. The crowded schedules of the students of this
college will not permit constant rushing from September to March and by prolonging it, the rushing
will be gradual and better for all concerned. Sorority women and freshmen will be given the opportunity to really KNOW each other instead of
being forced to judge on a false basis which has
been the case in the past.
Let's face it! The situation has needed to be
remedied for a long time. Action is in order!
AR eminder
Last week in assembly, a plea was made for
Christmas presents for the children at the Albany
Home. Cartons were placed in the corridors by the
members of Myskania and the various age groups
were published in last week's NEWS,
Less than one week remains before the party at
the home and the cartons are far from overflowing,
We're not asking the impossible this time.
Fifteen minutes of your time and fifty cents of
your money is very little when it is measured in
terms of the bang those kids get out of opening
your presents.
And if you'd like to get a little of the Vuletide
spirit before attending the Christmas parties at
the group houses, come to the party and see for
yourself,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established M«y
1916
By the Class ol 1918
RATING—ALL-AMERICAN
December 10, 1948
Vol. X X X I I I
No. 11
Member
DUtrlliiiior
Associated Collegiate ProuB
fulh'glati! Ulgost
The undergraduate newspaper of the New York Shite Collego for Tonobom; published every Friday of Hie college
yuur liy the NEWS Board for Hi Student AHUoelallon.
Phonos: I'ulver, Spencer, and Furlong, 2-IU2K; Landau,
Troy, 27S- W; WflltO and Jerue, K-U2H7. Members of the
news staff may be reached Tuesday and Wednesday from
7 ID 11:30 P. M. at 8-0407.
The New Board
JEAN P U L V E R
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
- P U B L I C R E L A T I O N S EDITOR
ELSIE L A N D A U .
JEAN SPENCER
M A N A G I N G EDITOR
ROBERT VAN DAM
SPORTS EDITOR
V I R G I N I A WAITE
- •
C I R C U L A T I O N MANAGER
MARION FURLONG .
ADVERTISING
AUDREY JERUE • •
ADVERTISING
GLORIA DONATO
. .
BUSINESS
RODNEY F E L D E R
. •
BUSINESS
ROSEMARY S T O D D A R D
EXCHANGE EDITOR
RUTH COOKINGHAM A6SOCIATE EDITOR
BERNADETTE FREEL
A 6 S O C I A T E EDITOR
SHIRLEY WILTSE • •
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
All communication! should be addressed lo the editor and
Blast be signed. Names will be withheld upon reiiU'St.
The STATIC CULLIO(iH MOWS assumes no responsibility
for opinion! expressed In lt« columns or communications
is Mich expressions do not necessarily reflect Its view.
ISSUE E D I T O R
Bernadette Free)
By BILL LYONS
Last Tuesday being t h e seventh
anniversary of P e a r l Harbor, i t was
fitting t h a t t h e d r a m a t i c p r e s e n t a tion for t h e evening should include
a war tragedy. P e r h a p s even more
a p p r o p r i a t e was t h e audience r e a c tion to this tragedy. T h e s t u d e n t
body h a d considerable difficulty in
realizing t h a t t h e play was a t r a g edy, a n d having realized it, they
were r a t h e r loathe to a d m i t t h e
fact. T h e fault does n o t lie completely on t h e shoulders of o u r illiterate, however; the cast contributed to t h e initial confusion.
Both Joe Keefe as a tough (?) G.I.,
a n d M a r t i n B u s h as t h e C a p t a i n
were unconvincing,. Joe outshouted
t h e mildest Sergeant I have seen
outside S-l, but I was left with t h e
conviction t h a t they h a d both been
politely raised in a cultured a t m o sphere. This is nice to know but
added n o t h i n g to t h e reality of t h e
d r a m a . Let it be said t h a t w h e n
t h e audience was put in the mood
by t h e better performances, t h e
A look
production went amazingly well.
T h e entire supporting cast was excellent b u t special bows go t o M m e s .
Lyons a n d Noonan for their prop
a n d set work, to Joe Purdy, Ellen
Pay, Tlnk W h i t p e n a n d D a n Rider
for excellent performances, a n d to
J o e Orucilla for t h e a u t h e n t i c costuming.
T h e second production, a light
(almost nebulous) farce, was t a k e n
to t h e audience's h e a r t like a suckling baby. T h e redeeming factor in
a n otherwise dull fare was Dick
Clemen's performance as t h e h u s band. Also, the girls were a t t r a c tively dressed.
A brief word on t h e intermission
e n t e r t a i n m e n t . B a t t l i n g an i m p o lite audience, a clunking helmet
liner, someone h a m m e r i n g backstage, a n d a bad cold, Joe Crucilla,
accompanied by Pinky Smith, r e galed us with four fine tenor n u m bers. I hope we can expect more of
same in t h e n e a r future.
At *1Ue Q<zctl
By MARVIN
LANSKY
t h a t recipients must practice for a
length of time in areas which lack
sufficient medical care.
4. G o v e r n m e n t subsidy of medical colleges.
T h e A.M.A. has tried successfully
a plan of mass h e a l t h insurance in
Michigan.
T h e workers pay the
p r e m i u m by payroll deduction a n d
receive medical care for selves a n d
family in r e t u r n for this payment—
not for free! T h e g o v e r n m e n t acts as
the insurance company or u n d e r writer a n d adjusts premiums to suit
actual costs of the program so t h a t
each person pays for his s h a r e of
medical attention.
T h e a u t h o r of the Soapbox article
bases his enthusiasm for the Ewing
P l a n on the fact t h a t t h e A.M.A.
is opposing it. College level t h i n k This author goes on to interpret ing can do a better job t h a n j u d g the Ewing Plan to be a d m i n i s t e r e d ing a proposal by its enemies!
by local committees of doctors and
"administrators"—in other words,
politics and medicine. T h e case of
J o h n Doe who can pick his personal
physician for illness is described,
but are we assured t h a t Mr. Doe's
physician has enough political in- To t h e Editor:
fluence to be on the local panel of
" C a m p u s heartache"—yes, that's
doctors? If you w a n t more informa- a n a m e t h a t has been given to the
tion about panels of doctors, ask sorority. No one but one of those
your physician about
Workmen's who h a s n ' t "made it" has any conCompensation racket in this a n d ception of how it feels.
other states.
As it is true with many who come
Agreed t h a t medical service can lo State, we had no experience with
be Improved ias can most other sororities. We are not the type of
t h i n g s ) . T h e government can dis- people who put on an act so we just
charge it.s obligation to provide bet- went along our own way.
ter medical service a t lower cost in
Naturally, we were bewildered
t h e following ways—none of which a n d shy. Gradually, we became acpermit the politician to tell the climated to the college system.
doctor whom a n d how to t r e a t :
T h e n , we noticed a peculiar p h e 1. Government subsidy of medi- nomena—other
girls were
being
cal research.
asked to lunch—the mailboxes were
2. Government subsidy of hospi- full.
tals—there's an acute shortage.
Day after day we went down to
3. G o v e r n m e n t scholarships
for t h e mailbox, hopefully, but we almedical training with t h e provision ways came away e m p t y - h a n d e d .
After a time, we gave up looking.
It was apparently no use. Already,
some girls were being dropped,
i T h a t ' s a nice thing about this
place—you don't go down with a
bang. It's gradual, i
To the Editor:
It never seemed to make much
We wish to apologize for the er- difference. Most of the frosh were
rors In the Directory, especially lo "on the fence" about .sororities.
Beta Zeta for omitting them from Chance was the deciding factor.
the list of group houses. We will Some, of course, are definite indevouch personally for the correct- pendents or sorority girls.
ness of the proof, but. evidently the
Then, we found t h a t we were inprinter dropped the slug when he structed about making a careful
was compiling the pages. For those choice. II sounds as though it were
who do not know Beta Zeta's ad- up to everyone to be one way or the
dress, it is litlu Madison Avenue, other. This confuses us.
phone 2-32(1(1.
Formal dinners were held. But
Because many people did not pick associates who were on the fence
up their Directories when the desk got off. They were different. They
was opened, there will be someone were .sorority enthusiasts.
They
on duty from U a.m. to 4 p.m. to- didn't talk the same and they didn't
day. G r a d u a t e students are entitled net the same,
to a Directory with their .student
We wonder what Is wrong with
lax ticket.
the many of us for whom F a t e
We would like to take this op- made the decision. We would like
portunity to thank Miss Hulchlns, t h e opportunity to decide about this
I he Art Department, and everyone status independent or Greek.
who served on our stall for I heir
There are knots In our chests toexcellent cooperation.
night. In our bewilderment and unSincerely,
certainty, does this herald an " u n Dorothy K. Purr
known" future.
Frances J. ITiinuguii, Co-Editors
We wonder.
Two I'rosh
Our contemporary, Soapbox, p u b lished in this week's Issue an a r t icle entitled "AMA vs. F e d e r a l
Health Insurance Program."
The
evidence used to back up the conclusions is an example of crass use
of statistics without showing w h a t
statistics really m e a n . T a k e for example, the fact t h a t "75% of A m e r ican Males are being t u r n e d down
by post-war draft boards." Does this
m e a n t h a t 75% of our m e n are u n h e a l t h y ? Why, it only m e a n s t h a t
World W a r II 4F's are being called
up for rejection. T h e n we are told
t h a t a 4% reduction from payrolls
will pay all costs of medical service for workers. And does the 4%
come out of thin air? It will merely
be added to prices causing even
higher prices.
Gosn+nu+iicatvonl
'omnuuuca tiOHl
The Common-Btater
is given the widest latitude a s
author of this column, although
his viewpoints
do
not neceaaarily
reflect
those of the STATI COLLIOI
NEWS.
COOPERATION NEEDED
Mr. Fulvio, tl"j college treasurer, gave us t h e info
on t h e cafeteria plan. T h e N E W S covered t h e following highlights back in S e p t e m b e r b u t for those who
missed them, here they a r e :
1. Any profits would be r e t u r n e d t o the subscribers
in any way t h a t they voted to distribute t h e m . Dividends, better food, etc.
2. T h e m a n a g e r would be on a fiat salary basis.
No commission or profits deal.
3. Administration a n d policy would be determined
by a council composed of s t u d e n t subscribers with
faculty advisors.
4. It would be on a five day a week basis a t $100
per semester. This is t h e best estimate t h a t could be
set until t h e plan was operating.
I t is strictly for the benefit of the s t u d e n t s but the
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n m u s t h a v e a n a d e q u a t e s t u d e n t subscription before it can sign contracts, hire help, etc.
A full semester subscription is necessary because s t u dents dropping out half way t h r u t h e program would
upset it. T h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n will meet us half way
but t h e students will decide t h e outcome.
HOT ROCK IDEA
Can a deal be worked with one of the m e r c h a n t s
associations to give discounts on purchases with the
presentation of a S t u d e n t T a x card? It has worked
elsewhere.
SCHOOL S P I R I T
T h e basketball players appreciated the swell t u r n out for their first games but they were embarrassed
by the spectator reaction to the t e m p e r flare-ups
among the visiting players. S t a t e players will tell you
t h a t it can h a p p e n to a n y o n e in the h e a t of a game
and they felt t h a t the booing, especially during the
foul shots, w a s n o t sportsmanlike.
WIIA' H O P P E N E D
. . . to t h e c o m m i t t e e composed of Juniors and
faculty members to investigate the possibility of
working with t h e children's groups . . . with credit hours
given for such work? T h e s t u d e n t commitlee m e m bers a r e still interested, t h e opportunities for such
work in Albany is plentiful, a n d t h e newly formed
All S t a t e C o m m u n i t y Service has initiated t h e basic
groundwork. Support from our education d e p a r t m e n t
is still lacking. Guess t h a t it's easier to theorize in
lectures.
THE I M P O R T A N T I S S U E
If you don't think t h a t t h e frat-sorority question
is a n i m p o r t a n t one, m a k e sure you read this week's
Letter to the Editor. T h e r e are three solutions; remove t h e organizations from campus, form new organizations, or increase t h e present membership. T h e
h u m a n desire for organization m a k e the first impractical. New organizations would probably increase
t h e present financial problems. The third iooks best.
More people would be t a k e n care of, thereby decreasing the "left out" h u r t a n d it would bolster the weakened finances t h a t the sororities in particular are
now feeling.
T h a t frat and sorority members a r e aware of the
defects is shown in this week's editorial and Mike
Capuano's letter of last week. More active individual
interest will help clear up the question and benefit
the entire school. On t h e other h a n d . . .
. . . the sororities deserve a pat on the back for
their buffet suppers a n d formal dinners. These affairs, t h a t end t h e much criticized rushing period,
are indications of t h e cooperation and enjoyment t h a t
sororities can provide.
Merry C h r i s t m a s and we'll see you all next year.
College
Calendar
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10
3:30 p.m.
IVCF Bible study. Mrs. Travis leading. Room 150,
9 p.m.-l a.m.
I n t e r - Sorority - I n t e r - F r a t e r n i t y
Christinas Ball, Aurania Club.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11
8:15 p.m.
IVCF Tri-City Area meeting, YWCA
Little T h e a t r e .
8:30 p.m.
Hlllel C h a n u k k a h
Party,
Temple
Ohav Sholom.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12
15
P" 1 SCA C h r i s t m a s Chapel,
Unitarian
Chapel.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 13
!) a.ni.-3:30 p . m . C a m p u s Commission Sale til all unclaimed articles, Commons
TUESDAY, DECEMBER II
3:30 p.m.
SCA Discussion, "Background of Protestantism," Lounge.
" I3111'
Pan Amigt).s meet ing and C h r i s t m a s
Party, Commons.
WEDNESDAY, DEI EMBER 15
;,:;il)
l)m
Clinton S q u a r e Neighborhood House
Christmas Party.
All students invited.
11 ) m
l Religious Clubs Big Four, "Holiday
Time." Page Hull.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10
* : 3 ° !""•
Myskania Christinas Party for younger children, Albany Home.
7
I'-1"Myskania Party for older children,
Albany Home.
8-12 p.in.
Sorority Date Parlies.
11 p.m.-l ii.m. Sorority House parlies
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17
8:30 p.m.
IVCF Bible Study.. Mrs Travis leader,
Room 15t).
FRIDAY, D E C E M B E R
10,
1948
PAOE S
Hillel, S C A Plan Debate Council WSSF Depicts Living Conditions Signum Laudis
Chanukkah Party, To Meet RPI,
O f Homeless Greek Students
Holds Initiation
a r e being m a d e of
Christmas Chapel Plattsburg State s t r"Buildings
a n g e m a t e r i a l s everywhere t o - tions. Ordinarily, no m e a t is in- For Members
day, but t h e beaverboards with cluded.
IVCF To Lead Meeting,
Visitor To Aid IZFA
Activities scheduled by t h e religious clubs include several plans for
.Holiday
celebrations.
Hillel
has
scheduled its a n n u a l C h a n u k k a h
P a r t y , and SCA h a s planned its
a n n u a l Christmas Chapel.
Other
religious activities include a visit to
t h e S t a t e College c h a p t e r by a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e ol IZFA, a n d a n I V C F sponsorecl Tri-City Area Meeting.
Tomorrow evening from 8:30 to
11:30 p. m., Hillel will hold its a n n u a l C h a n u k k a h Farty at Temple
O h a v Sholom, according to Marvin
W a y n e '49, President. Tlrere will be
dancing, and Lotkas, traditional
C h a n u k k a h delicacy, will be served.
I n v i t a t i o n s have been issued to
Union and R P I . George Kline a n d
B a r b a r a Stein, Sophomores, are coc h a i r m e n ol this holiday festival.
S u n d a y evening a t (i p. m., the
f r e s h m e n will have charge of t h e
a n n u a l Christinas Chapel in the
U n i t a r i a n Church, K a t h e r i n e G r a n t
'40, President ol SCA, h a s a n n o u n c e d . T h e service will center
a r o u n d a reading, "The Virgin Mary
to the Christ Child," by Evelyn
Swcnson.
Choral
accompaniment
will be rendered by t h e F r o s h Choir,
a n d p a g e a n t r y scenes will be acted
o u t to accompany the reading.
A new series of discussion groups
on "Devil's Advocate" will begin
T u e s d a y afternoon, a t 3:30 p. m.,
in the Lounge. Dr. Frances Colby,
I n s t r u c t o r in English, will open the
series by discussing "Background
ol Protestantism." Cocoa and s a n d wiches will be served a l t e r t h e
meet ing.
Helen Eaton '41), President of
IVCF, has announced t h a t the
m o n t h l y Tri-City Area meeting will
be held tomorrow night a t 8:15 p. m.
in the YWCA Little T h e a t e r . Rev.
Vernon Grounds, a member of the
faculty at the Bible Seminary,
J o h n s o n City. New York, will speak,
liis topic being "Heart of CbrisLianity." S t u d e n t s of all the colleges
in the Albany - Troy - S c h e n e c t a d y
a r e a are invited to a t t e n d .
A field representative of I n t e r collegiate Zionist Federation of
America will visit the S t a t e c h a p t e r
of IZFA during the early pari of
next week, according to J u d i t h Oxe n h a n d l c r '51, program c h a i r m a n .
T h e visitor will aid the S t a t e group
in planning its activities for the
coming semester.
Resolved: T h a t the Communist
P a r t y Be Outlawed. Resolved: T h a t
We Teach Sex Education in Public
Schools. On these two resolutions
t h e Debate Council shall next week
take its s t a n d : negatively for the
former, a n d affirmatively for the
latter. Molly Mulligan '50, and Abr a h a m Trop '49, will represent S t a t e
over t h e air In the debate relating
to the Communist P a r t y December
13. R P I will take the affirmative.
December 14 S t a t e will be represented by Mary Odack '49, and
George Christy '50, on t h e radio in
a debate with Plattsburg S t a t e
T e a c h e r s ' College on sex education
in connection with public schools.
S t a t e will uphold the affirmative
of the resolution.
L a t e r in the week S t a t e will meet
Oswego S t a t e T e a c h e r s ' College in
the first home debate this semester.
Resolved: T h a t there should be
Federal Aid to Education, will be
debated
affirmatively
by
Alice
Gersh '51, and Mary Alice Rega '50.
Sororities Plan
Xmas Festivities
All S t a t e College Sororities will
hold Christmas parties at their respective houses, T h u r s d a y night.
The houses will be open to sorority
members and their guests until 12
p. m, From 11 p. m. until 1 a. m.
the sororities will hold parties for
women only. Women attending these
parties must be in the houses by
their regular week day hours. However, they will not have to be at
their own residence halls until 1
a. m.
Beta Zeta Sorority will sponsor
a hayride to Slingerlands, tomorrow n i g h t from 7:30 until 9:30 p. m.
After the hayride there will be a
parly a t the Beta Zeta house until
12 midnight. G e n e r a l C h a i r m a n is
Mary Odak '49.
German Students
Plan Xmas Party
Mr. William Meyer, Instructor in
G e r m a n , has announced that the
s t u d e n t s of I hat d e p a r t m e n t have
planned a party wnich will be held
from 7:30 to 12 p. m„ J a n u a r y 7, at
IkTinania Hall in Troy.
Ursula Neuhaus '49, C h a i r m a n ,
plans to have skits, .singing and
dancing lor the people who signed
lo all end. T h e affair is to be called "Bunter Abend." T h e only requirement, is t h a t G e r m a n be spoken. First year students will be admitted on this condition.
Mr. Charles Stokes, head of the
Mr. Meyer, with some of the more
Music Department, has released t h e
advanced students, will lead I lie
oust lor flic Gilbert and Sullivan
discussions.
operetta, "Pirates ol Penzance," to
be presented in early March. Alter Sororities Welcome Pledges
two weeks ol try-outs the following At Services, Bullet Suppers
principles and understudies have iContinued from Page 1, Column i>
been selected: Major General, Harry lllle, Phyllis Charron, Maureen DaMills '49, Malcolm Sterling '49; Pi- vis, Dorothy DeCieco, Gene Donor a l e King, Gordon Bennett '52, van, Phebe Fuller, T h e l m a Houek,
C h r i s t i a n a Llevestro '50; Frederic, Belly
Laughlin,
Marilyn
Lewis,
Allen Campbell '411, Joseph Crucil- Margaret MeCourt, Barbara Moran,
la '50; Sgt. of Police, Malcolm Grace Parrette, Madeltiine Weitlauf,
Sterling, Chrlstiaan l.ievesiro; Ma- Owen Gallivan, Ireshmen; Claire
bel. Elsie Thorpe '49, Bernadlne Humeston '50.
HnydiT '49; Edith, Bernadlne S n y - Phi Delta
der, P U'olhy I'assarelli; Kate, VirMarjoi'ie Davis, Shirley English,
ginia Waite '49, Claryec J e a n n e
Evelyn
birdie, Marjoi'ie
Parwell,
P e r r e t t a '51; Isabel, Shirley Casler
Marion Gorskie, J e a n n e Hamilton,
•;,u; R u t h , .lean Holl'man '49, .loan
Julie
Isaakseil,
Alma
Jakenian,
Wl'iiteraft '51. Tryouls will lie held
Fredcricka McKeown, J a n e Mincknext Moiida.N for the par! ol S a m ler, Mary Lou Noble, Patricia Puruel.
cell, Beverly Rinebold, Margaret
Sinythc, Soma Stepaniiin, Joan TiTo Issue Scholarship Checks
lus, Eleanor 'Pweedlc, Lois Twiss,
Janet Wimbert, Ireshmen
Scholarship checks arc expected
shorllj and will lie issued as soon
i lie iiioiie\ becomes available
;1„
'l,-,,in Hi,, si.ile, according to Miss
Hutli Lape, Registrar.
Fraternity Jewelers
II Hi,, iiiolic.\
arrives
during
('| i ii: I mas \ ae.il em ami II It i*
HAIH.KK,
STEINS,
KINGS
liniclical, the checks will lie mulled
J E W E L R Y G I F T S , FAVORS
to students
STATIONERY,
I'ROORAlvrS
CLUB PINS,
KKYS
MKDAI.S
TROPHIES
Stokes Releases Cast
For Spring Operetta
which Americans are becoming a c quainted seems like p r e - w a r luxury
in comparison to the Hatzilkyrlakon
Refugee Center here, where walls
are m a d e of blankets a n d rugs."
T h e above quote was taken from
a release from t h e World S t u d e n t
Service f u n u a n d p e r t a i n s to the
conditions u n d e r which s t u d e n t s in
Athens, Greece lind themselves living. WSS.f is -supported by contributions from t h e s t u d e n t bodies of
American Colleges a n d was one of
the services included under the
Campus Chest Drive, here.
T h e article goes on to say t h a t
before the war, Hatzilkyriakon was
a n o r p h a n a g e — a large building
with long open dormitories lor the
children. Wow converted into a
center for Greek refugees from
countries to the North, a shortage
of building m a t e r i a l s h a s made it
impossible lo p a r t i t i o n off individual rooms or living quarters for
families. In place of a n y t h i n g more
substantial, lamily units have m a d e
private quarters for themselves by
hanging blankets and rugs in such
a way t h a t they form little square
cubicles. Inside these rooms, entire
families oat, sleep and m a n a g e to
do some cooking.
Hatzykriakon, which houses most
of the refugee students from o t h e r
Balkan countries, has separate provisions for single men a n d women,
who are housed in tents behind the
main building. Many of the students
there, since they lied with their
families, live in the "Woolen-walled"
rooms of the main building, however.
T h e center has a large central
kitchen, but no dining hall. T h e
people living in the center go to
the kitchen eaeli day to draw their
rations, and then return to their
own quarters lo eat it. Only one
meal a day is served, and the food
is poor. On special holidays a little
meat may be included in the r a -
Pan Amigos Meeting
To Include Xmas Party
On Tuesday evening at K p. in. in
the Commons, P a n Amigos will hold
a me. ling, to be followed by a
Christmas party, according to Audrey J e r u e '49, President.
Featured in the evening's entert a i n m e n t will be Helen Marie Moellar '51, and Mary Borys '52. each
of whom will perform a Spanish
dance. Several natives of South
America will speak about. Christinas
customs in their countries. This will
be followed by group singing of
C h r i s t m a s carols.
F r e n c h Club and Classical Club
will be guests of Pan Amigos al this
parly, and all students, not just
members ol these three clubs, are
n n i l e d lo a t t e n d the affair.
Stokes Releases Regulations
Regarding Christmas Trees
T H E COLLEGE
JEWELER
103 Central Ave.
Fred Clute To Furnish
Music A t Xmas Ball
(Continued from Page 1, Column 51
Instructor in S p a n i s h ; Dr. J. Weslev d i d d e r s , Professor of Spanish,
and Mrs. Chiltlers; Dr. Edward L.
Cooper, Assistant Professor of Commerce, and Mrs. Cooper; Mr. Howard Flicrl. Instructor in Social Studies, and Mrs. Flicrl; Mr. Karl A.
Peterson, Instructor in Music; Mr.
Harry S. .-rice, Jr., Instructor in
Social Studies, and Mrs. Price; Dr.
Theodore G. S t a n d i n g , Professor of
Sociology, and Mrs. S t a n d i n g ; and
Dr. Charles F. Stokes, Professor of
Music, and Mrs Stokes.
SMILES Requests Volunteers
For Chiistmas Party Committees
There will be a sign-up sheet on
I he S M I L E S bulletin board for all
per: ons interested in working on
the refreshment, publicity, or gift
wrapping committee lor the Myskania Christinas parly to be held
December Hi, according to Allan
Campbell '51, C h a i r m a n ol SMILES.
Nelson, Wallace Preside
In Ingle Room Ceremony;
Rich, Guest Speaker
Signum Laudis, Honorary Scholastic F r a t e r n i t y , held a n initiation
Tuesdny n i g h t a t 8 p. m. in t h e
Ingle Room a t Pierce Hall for its
newly n a m e d members, according to
President Helen H a b e r m a n '49.
Dr. Milton G. Nelson, Acting
President, a n d Dr. Edith Wallace,
Assistant Professor of Latin, officiated at the ceremony. Dr. T o w n send Rich, I n s t r u c t o r in English,
was the speaker of t h e evening.
Mrs. Naomi T i m m e r m a n , I n s t r u c t o r
in Chemistry, Ann May, G r a d u a t e ,
and Donald Langsley '49, p l a n n e d
and executed the initiation. P r e s e n t
besides t h e new members were formerly initiated members of t h e
Senior class, faculty members, and
faculty who are members of P h i
Beta Kappa.
T h e new members of S i g n u m
Laudis are William C. B a h n , Jr.,
Helen H a b e r m a n , Robert H a r d t ,
Jean Hoffman, Marie Holz, Mary
Horan, Olive L'Henreux, Gina Lisi,
Norman Madsen, Marie M a r k h a m ,
Emory Osborn, William S h e e h a n ,
and Clifford Wingate, Seniors.
Signum Laudis is composed of
those Seniors who r a n k among the
highest ten per cent of their class
in academic standing. Four p e r
cent of this group is chosen in t h e
fall of their Junior year, four per
cent is chosen in t h e fall of their
Senior year, and the remaining two
per cent in the spring of their S e n ior year. T h e Senior having the
highest average of those chosen becomes president of the organization.
Continue To Display Photos
In College Photography Show
T h e Photography Show, which
has been on display since Monday,
will continue to exhibit s t u d e n t
photography until December 15, according to Miss R u t h E. Hutchins,
Assistant Professor of Art.
This show, which features both
candid and planned shots of college
life and other activities, can be
seen on the second floor of Draper.
SPECIAL!
Wednesday,
December
15, '48
Ma keel Ham
Candied Sweet Potatoes
Choice of Beverage & Dessert
15 cents
STATE COLLEGE
CAFETERIA
TIK ONE ON!
Hows, Regular
1O K
SEE
LINC
*
Windsors
SAI.I:
MARZELLO
—
TRI-C0RNER
DANCE
Mai Pappin & Orchestra
8:30 - 11:30
Every Saturday Nijfht
SWEET SHOP
Refreshments Sold
Admission 50c
Home Made ICK CREAM
CARL SORENSEN
WATKKFORD,
NEW
Tel. 644
T h e Science Club will hold a
meeting T h u r s d a y in Room 150,
Huested, a t 7:30 p. m. Election of
officers will follow the order of
business.
T h e principal speaker of the evening will be Harold Story '49, whose
topic is "Wave F o r m s and the Use
of the Oscilloscope."
Also, the Eastern N. Y. section of
the American Chemical Society will
meet Tuesday a t 8:15 p. in. in Room
20, Richardson. Mr. D. J. Parsons,
Scientific Chief of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Laboratory,
Washington, will speak on "Chemistry in the F.B.f. Laboratory."
Where all the Students Meet
SODAS — CANDY
Write or Call
Announce Plans
For Science u u o
S t u d e n t s who are planning Christmas parties al the college between
now and vacation are reminded by
Di'itn ol Women, Ellen C. Stokes,
thai Eire Regulations prohibit the
use ol Christmas trees in public
institutions, Any oilier decorations
which are used must be lire-proofed.
L. (i. Balfour Co.
OTTO R. MENDE
I n spite of the conditions prevailing in t h e Hatzykriakon, the
conditions t h e r e are better t h a n those
u n d e r which m a n y students in the
area live. Some students are living
u n d e r the bleachers a t t h e Athens
University athletic stadium, Other
students a r e living in shops where
the proprietors allow t h e m to sleep
after closing hours, or in warehouses n e a r the docks.
W S S F representatives in Athens
have supplied materials for some
students to build their own hostels.
During the next year, the delegates
in Greece, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Elmendorf, of Dallas, Texas, hope to
obtain enough supplies to allow
doubling of t h e present hostel capacity. In addition, s t u d e n t relief offices will continue to issue food
supplies for supplementary feeding
in student c a n t e e n s in the city.
- SANDWICHES
Luncheon Served Daily
YORK
~
" O P E N DAILY AT 8 A. M.
Trinity Methodist
LARK & LANCASTER
...ZZJ
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S . F R I D A Y , D E C E M B E R
PAGE 4
Keglers Top Pharmacy,
Open Lead Over Siena
Waa-cMaa
By M I C K E Y SEAMAN
T o d a t e t h e r e have been exactly
six couples w h o h a v e done t h e i r
p a r t w i t h regard t o t h e ping pong
tourney. As yet t h e r e a r e still eight
r o u n d s to be played before t h e a c t u a l play-offs can begin. We hope
these girls realize t h a t all of t h e
first r o u n d m a t c h e s m u s t be finished before vacation or these players will be eliminated. Let's get
busy on this, kids, a n d see if all of
t h e second round can't be completed before vacation.
T h e fencing t e a m is off to a good
s t a r t . Twenty-four girls, a n d very
enthusiastic ones, too, are giving up
their time to try their skill a t t h i s
sport. Practice is held every Sat.
from one to two in t h e Milne gym.
T h e instructor, who was formerly
a m e m b e r of t h e La Salle fencing
team, is Gerry Firth, '52.
As usual, WAA is looking ahead.
They are making plans for a n o t h e r
open meeting in the near future
so t h a t plans can be m a d e for the
proposed conference a t S t a t e n e x t
year and suggestions offered r e garding winter sports. W a t c h t h e
WAA Bulletin Board for the date
of this meeting and come to air
your grievances there.
Which is the most attractive bulletin board in lower Draper? WAA's,
of course! Congratulations on such
an attractive set up. It certainly
makes us stop—and look!
W A A Begins
Basketball Season
WAA basketball league games
will get underway on Saturday
morning in Page gym at ten o'clock,
T h e next scheduled game will be
played on Tuesday and Wednesday
nights, starting a t seven o'clock.
F o r t h e first p a r t of the season,
the sixteen teams have been divided a t r a n d o m into two leagues.
St. T h o m a s More, Phi Delta, Pierce
A, Sayles B, A. E. Phi, Chi Sigma,
and Psi G a m m a make up League I.
League II consists of G a m m a K a p ,
K.D., Newman, Commuters, Sayles
A, Western, Beta Zeta, and Pierce
B.
G a m e s must be forfeited if the
teams do not have at least five
players and a scorer present within
five minutes of t h e scheduled times.
T h e games will be scheduled a
week in advance and will be posted
on the WAA Bulletin Board.
T h e schedule until the Christmas
vacation:
Saturday, December 11, 1948
10:00-10:30 St. T h o m a s More-Phi
Dclt
10:30-11:00 G a m m a K a p p a - K a p p a
Delta
11:00-11:30 Pierce A-Sayles B
11:30-12:00 Newman - Commuters
Tuseday, December 14, 1948
7:00-7:30 A. E. Phi-Chi Sig
7:30-8:00 Sayles A-Westein
8:00-8:30 Grads-Ps! G a m m a
8:30-9:00 Beta Zeta-Plerce B
9:00-9:30 SI. T h o m a s More-Pierce
A
Wednesday, December 15, 1948
7:00-7:30 G a m m a K a p p a - N e w m a n
7:30-8:00 Phi Delta-Saylcs li
8:00-8:30 Kappa Delta-Co
mters
8:30-9:00 A. E. P h l - G r a d s
9:00-9:30 Sayles A-Bctu /.eta
Making a brilliant
comeback,
State's Varsity basketball team almost pulled a startling upset over
N.Y.S. Maritime Academy last F r i day night. T h e cagers proved it was
Opening W e d n e s d a y night's m a t c h
not a " h o t . n i g h t " by taking Willimantic S t a t e Teachers on S a t u r - with a t r e m e n d o u s 1003 game, t h e
Varsity Bowling squad went o n to
day night.
sweep t h e t h r e e - g a m e set from AlTrailing by the count of 22-6 in bany P h a r m a c y . I n recent weeks,
the first period, S t a t e looked like a the P h a r m a c i s t s have been a r a t h beaten tjam, b u t t h e n the Peds' er troublesome crew due to their
offense began to click and with ability to knock off t h e top teams.
T o m O'Brien leading a secpnd p e - But t h e S t a t e s m e n
safeguarded
riod spurge, S t a t e came within hail- their first place m a r g i n by taking
ing distance of Maritime. T h e sec- an early lead a n d were never h e a d ond half opened with a "new" ed. I n fact, S t a t e now holds a three
S t a t e team, led by Sy Fersh, slowly game lead over second place Siena,
shortening t h e lead. A see-saw bat- because t h e lads from Loudonville
tle during t h e fourth quarter saw dropped two decisions out of three
S t a t e come within one point of the to A.B.C.
victors only to have several breaks
In compiling t h a t 1003 single
go against them. T h e final count
game, s o m e o u t s t a n d i n g individual
was 58-53 in favor of the visitors
performances were recorded. Don
who were paced by red-headed
McDonald's 233 a n d Diz Dickinson's
Coogan and Jerry Timony.
220 were t h e big guns of the S t a t e
Provin-, t h a t they can fight hard, attack. F r a n Mullin put together
t h e S t a t e s m e n cams back S a t u r d a y games of 199, 188, a n d 189 for a
night to take Willimantic in tow, total of 576 to lead in t h a t d e p a r t D4-4U. Although the score shows a ment. Also in t h e 500 bracket were
close game, S t a t e had no trouble McDonald with 557 and Dickinson
in gaining their first win of t h e with 537.
y^ung .season. After a close first
T h e Varsity will roll against
half, Stat.' slowly pulled away u n - A.B.C. in t h e i r last m a t c h before
til they had a comfortable margin vacation. T h e m a t c h is scheduled
of 14 points. Seeing the game was for Wednesday n i g h t at nine a t the
well in hand, Coach
Hathaway Playdium.
started to empty the bench to give S l a t e
1
2
3
To.
the second stringers a chance to McDonald
233 145 179 557
see what they could do. For the Walsh
157 162 175 494
second night in a row, F c r s h led Farley
194 153 146 493
his team in scoring although Ed Dickinson
220 165 152 537
Matthews gave t h e crowd a thrill- Mullin
199 188 189 576
in.; time at the close of the first
half by putting on a scoring spree
Totals
1003 813 841 2657
of nine points including several
To.
;>
1
3
Pharmacy
beautiful shots.
265
147
118
Dardano
132 254
122
T h e J.V.'s lost two games to Lipp- Sweet
147 167 186 500
m a n ' s P h a r m a c y and A.B.C. by t h e Zotta
146 186 133 465
scores ol 4G-39 and 43-38 respec- Adsit
145 183 182 510
Abbott
tively.
146
146
Haut'k
STATE
190 190
Player
FG IT' T P Brown
Mar/, l b
0
1
1
Totals
. . 707 800 823 2330
George
2
0
4
O'Brien
3
3
9
Present s t a n d i n g s :
Carter
0
0
0 Team
W L
Fersh
5
3
13 S t a t e
20
7
Matthews
3
0
6 Siena
17 10
Lansky
2
3
7 R.P.I
17 10
Warden
4
0
8 Pharmacy
15 12
Brown
1
3
5 A.B.C
10 17
Law
2 25
Totals
20
13
53
WILLIMANTIC
MA urn .ME
I'hiyir
FG I P T P Plaver
FG F P T P
VanDi r/.;e
0
3
0
0
0
3 Carberry
Turner
0
0
2
2
n2 0 Lavalee
Lorenz .
4
10 Selnvka
1
2
4
Coogan
8
19 Solnick
3
5
4
14
Messersmitl
0
0
0 Tracy
1
0
2
15 Katninski
Timonev
6
3
(i
4
16
6 Burdick
' minors
2
o
2
1
5
Watson
1
3
Irlic
0
0
0
Johnson
1
1
3
Totals
16
21
Totals
16
14 46
S'l ATE
Player
l'(i I T
p
I)
2
\Tarz Ho
1
George
2
1
5
•i
i;
O'Brien
2
1)
0
Carter
0
Fersh
5
•1
11
•1
Matthews
1
')
4
I 'inskv
1
2
0
Wir'en
0
(1
(j
Wotherby
0
0
Brown
7
" P o r t r a i t u r e At Its Finest"
'.! :i
Jiusto
2
3
7
McDonald Hits Season's
High Game With 233
THE
HAGUE
STUDIO
19
Tot.,1s
U/*WV5
(JU&Mj
THROUGHOUT
THI
Y I A R .
WITH
G l f T S T H A T GO O N G I V I N G
Givu Magu/inoi—ilio gifts thai go on giving.
Just placo youi orclun with m, by phono or
mail. You (to no timu consuming shopping —wo
take caro ol all duluils and at absolutely no
ciiunjti to you for our lervicu.
HUNDREDS Of MAGAZINti
Representative
• * .
54
• * •
LAST
tor TIME, LIFE, FORTUNE
TO
TAKE
YOUR PORTRAIT
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S .
1048
"Sfofe The Best" W A A Kegler$
Say Delegates
Get Underway
T h r e e tired b u t thoroughly s a t i s fled delegates r e t u r n e d t o Albany
from Syracuse after spending last
week-end a t t h e a n n u a l conference
of t h e New York S t a t e W o m a n ' s
Athletic Association. S a y A d a m s ,
Matteson, a n d Smith, S t a t e ' s r e p resentatives, " I n comparison with
t h e other colleges, o u r own WAA
h a s a m u c h better p r o g r a m a n d
more participation a n d interest."
T h i s year's delegation m a r k e d
S t a t e College's first year of p a r t i c i pation in the organization in which
some thirty New York S t a t e colleges hold membership. Although
p l a n s have n o t yet been confirmed,
it Is hoped t h a t t h e conference c a n
be held a t Albany n e x t year.
Our delegates enthusiastically r e port t h a t the woman's athletic p r o g r a m here compared favorably w i t h
t h e majority of o t h e r colleges a n d
t h a t , in most cases, ours offers more
varied a n d better organized activities. The State group led discussion
on the organization of i n t r a m u r a l
sports.
I n a speech given by t h e Vassar
Director of Physical Education, five
points were listed as included in
t h e Association p r o g r a m : t h e social and psychological i m p o r t a n c e
of athletics, t h e c o n t i n u a n c e of a t h letics beyond college life, need for
athletics for people of all ages,
m a i n t e n a n c e of high s p o r t s m a n s h i p
s t a n d a r d s t h r o u g h sports, a n d t h e
m a i n t e n a n c e of s t a n d a r d s set up
by the National Athletic F e d e r a tion
New
ideas
on
administrative
problems,
on
organization
and
awards were found by the delegates
who hope to incorporate these into
State's W o m a n ' s Athletic p r o g r a m .
From
all a p p e a r a n c e s , S t a t e ' s
T h e initial games in t h e WAA
Bowling League were rolled on
Monday a n d T h u r s d a y afternoons
on t h e Rice Alleys, M a t c h e s will
continue on these days t h r o u g h o u t
t h e winter season.
According to Edythe Kelleher a n d
Audrey Weller, Bowling c a p t a i n s ,
e a c h team in t h e league will bowl
t w o games in each m a t c h with one
point awarded for each game. M o n day's opener found Pierce Hall a n d
G a m m a K a p p a in t h e lead by t a k ing two games from Beta Zeta a n d
Chi Sig respectively. Sayles Hall
a n d P h i Delta split, each winningone point.
T e a m h i g h was rolled by G a m m a
K a p p a , h i t t i n g 560 in both games.
Lee C h e a t h a m , bowling for the
Sayles Hall team, was h i g h bowler
for t h e day averaging 140.5. J o a n
Keyton, of t h e Chi Sig t e a m , averaged second high with 136.
Next week's schedule finds Chi
Sig bowling A. E. Phi, G a m m a K a p pa against Wren, a n d Sayles w i t h
Pierce on Monday, while T h u r s d a y ' s
m a t c h e s include Beta Zeta vs. Newman, K a p p a Delta vs. Psi G a m m a ,
and P h i Delta vs. t h e frosh.
T e a m scores:
TEAM
1st game 2nd g a m e
Beta Zeta
398
400
Chi Sig
494
535
Gamma Kappa
560
560
Phi Delta
492
508
Pierce
504
557
Sayles
555
466
participation in this organization
should lead to t h e long overdue i n terest in athletics beyond the n a r r o w scope of one school, a n d should
g 0 a long way toward bringing coathletics into t h e inter-collegec j
iate realm.
. B y PAUL B U C H M A N .
Peter Rabbit g a t h e r e d his family
about him. I t was story t i m e again,
a n d his brood settled comfortably
around him, a n t i c i p a t i n g a n o t h e r
tale about t h e world of m e n . A
warm fire glowed in t h e fireplace,
and a fresh supply of both lettuce
and carrots beckoned to all in a
nearby bowl. I t w a s a comfortable
scene. Peter took a long puff on his
pipe, gazed thoughtfully a t t h e little assemblage before h i m a n d began.
Abe Is Born
"Once upon a time, in t h e world
"He should be a model to all of
you, my children ( T h e r e were thirty-four little rabbits sitting around
t h e tire t h a t n i g h t . , . He w a s a picture of industry. While going to
school in Troy, he won t h r e e letters
in Varsity sports, was elected president of his Sophomore class and
again of his Senior class. Not only
that, he worked as h a r d as Bre'r
Beaver outside of school hours. Yes,
he was no loafer. After school he
worked behind a soda fountain, and
on weekends, he set up pins in a
bowling alley.
"Then he went to war. You children are too young to know what
war is, because in the animal world,
war was outlawed m a n y years ago.
He came out of the war still in one
piece, and still with his sense of
humor, his personality, his friendliness intact.
Abe In College
T J ™ , 6 / 6 " ' t0 C ° l e g e ' W h d l
I hope
of youtomay
do some
day
also.
Heallwanted
become
a teach
er. This was his sole aim, and he
applied himself to it industriously,
H did other things, too, though
went out for basketball, playtrn on the Varsity from his freshm a n year on t h r o u g h became active in a fraternity called . . ah . .
the name escapes me now . . . it
s t a r t s . . . Sigma something or the
other . . . besides which lie worked
after school hours selling neckties
and soda jerking a t Howard J o h n son's. T h a t ' s w h a t I admired about
AbD Marzello. He was always busy.
You'd never see h i m wasting time
on u n i m p o r t a n t things. No sir. Not
t h a t it was all work a n d n o play
with him—he knew how to have a
good time—like t h a t wild night in
Ithaca. . . .
"There was so much goodness in
him too. He was very popular with
children. One s u m m e r he worked
as a swimming instructor at a boys'
camp. Before t h a t he was a director or something of a boys' club In
his home town. He was respected
by everybody for the work t h a t he
did with children.
Food For T h o u g h t
"Most of all though, keep him in
mind when you gel tired of weeding the lettuce patch, or get, too
lazy to help clean up the house
sometime. T h e r e a r e n ' t many peoi k ' nowadays that .send themselves
T r o u g h college like lie did—didn't
want to burden his family with the
' xtra expense, so l e was entirely
'•elf-* ufTiclent."
A
'It's getting late, now. All you
bunnies run along to bed Hurry
now."
DOUGLAS
GIFT
f/iv
CERTIFICATE
or
A
PAIR
Miic/iinulutm
STYLE
895
of
Older
DOUGLAS
SHOES
Step into your Douglas
perfect
2662
a Douglas
with a pair of our Finest Douglas
10,
1S48
PAOE
Gift Certificate
OPEN
first half before S t a t e finally took
the lead on baskets toy M a t t h e w s ,
Warden, Carter,
and
Matthews
again. T h e count for half time was
27-24, In favor of t h e P e d s .
S t a t e Lead Cut
T h e second half opened with
At the end of this Wednesday's
P i t t s b u r g h cutting down S t a t e ' s
lead on goals by L a v a r a n d o a n d bowling, two teams remain u n d e Garrow and a foul by Nephew. W a r - Seated, Potter Club and KDR. Close
T h e Volleyball games for both
men and women, which were to
have been played yesterday, have
been postponed until second semester due to t h e impossibility of securing t h e gym because of events
previously scheduled. T h e committee will a n n o u n c e the play-off date
as soon as a r r a n g e m e n t s can be
made for use of the gym.
Garrow Stars
With 29 Points
State Faces Maritime,
Queens On The Road
-
EEP, KDR Lead
Bowling League
A last minute field hgoal by Ed d e n c a m e t h r o u & h w i t » a b a s k e t J ^ ' l a r e
••
and it was followed up by a lay-up Derzee.
the
BeaVel S
'
iUKl
by
Totals
25
PLATTSBURG
Player
FG
Nephew
4
Storonsky
1
Stackowicz
4
Garrow
11
Brannigan
2
Fedole
0
Otis
0
Lavarando
1
Totals
23
FP TP
2
10
0
2
0
8
7
29
0
4
2
2
0
0
1
3
12
TELEPHONE
1-0017
MADISON
AVENUE
§£&. saving I
again. Curler brought S l a t e back
with a set before Bob Brown made
a foul shot. Nephew netted a b a s ket which was followed up by a
long set by O'Brien. Garrow tossed
in Plattsburg's last basket of the
Ask y o u r h o m e town t i c k e t
agent a b o u t "College Special"
r o u n d t r i p s . T h e y e n a b l e you to
t a k e a d v a n t a g e of a v a i l a b l e
r o u n d - t r i p f a r e s w i t h nn e x t r a
long t i m e limit . . . a n d 1 0 - d a y
s t o p - o v e r p r i v i l e g e s in b o t h d i rections !
(let a " C o l l e g e S p e c i a l " w h e n
you c o m e b a c k a l t e r C h r i s t m a s .
T h e n u s e it t o g o h o m e f o r
S p r i n g Vacation, Your home
town t i c k e t a g e n t will h a v e
t h e s e s p e c i a l t i c k e t s for s a l e t o
t e a c h e r s a n d s t u d e n t s from U e e e m l i e r 2 5 to J a n u a r y lti.
H. F. Honikel & Son
IMiarmacirtti
Established 1905
Phone 4-WS8
157 Central Art.
ALBANY, N. T.
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
For a Time and
Money-Saving Trip
Goby train
MASS.
ALBAKT, N. T .
3 17 R I V E R S T It E E T — T R O Y
Men's a n d Women's KIIOCK
l—~—
IT'S CONVENIENT—
COMFORTABLE—SAFE
Ask fur it either way . . . both
trade-marks
452 BROADWAY — ALBANY
198-200 C E N T R A L AVKNUF.
t i n by t r a i n a n d m a k e mire of a
f u l l - l i m e v a c a t i o n . You'll h a v e
mure time a t home with your
f a m i l y a n d f r i e n d s w h e n you
t r a v e l in t h e d e p e n d a b l e , allw e a t h e r c o m f o r t of m o d e r n
c o a c h e s o r s l e e p i n g c a r s . See
your railroad ticket agent tod a y . .. FOR S U R E !
MANY HAPPY RETURNS
58
"MEET AND EAT AT THE BOUL"
Men's Shoes Inclusively
fill
info
Christmas Vacation!
„~>-
59
9
Shoes.
W. I . DOUGLAS f SHOE C O . , BROCKTON I S ,
™
Where There's Coke
There's Hospitality
^-
appointment
V
F e r s h sent State a h e a d on a ' b a s k e t Barnes to one. L a m p m a n h a d a 460
final period.
w c o n n e c t - t r i P l e f o r t h e Beavers while Bros
With Garrow racking nn rwpntv and two foul shots. G a r r o-••
nine points for Plattsburg the Peds e d a g a i n a n d L a n s k y t e a m e d w i t h S ° ^ r ° l k C 4 H°-„ l o r , '• ? e l T '
had their t o u g h e s t g a m e o f t h e y l a r M a r f l l 0 t o *n* s t a t e o u t l n f r o n t T T c a m s t a n d i n B ' s to date a r e : W L
by
f e polnts as the third
t.......
h u s far.
QUarter
I*"
..... Leading throughout most
,. ,,
KDR
9
end ec
, L .
,
,
., . , „ P n t l / P r
«
o f t h e first half, Plattsburg, u n d e r
plattsbui
was far
Coach Ray James, came within sec- as they opened
'B
from
finished
™™ei
o
the last period with Beavers
8
oncls of a chance to win the g a m e
. ,
VDZ
7
lght &trai ht
ints m a d e o n
bas
rebound taken bv Stackowicz P
,
e
P°
A
with ten seconds left gave t h e vis- kets by Stackowicz and G a r r o w and */-•=,
t w o touls by Gnn
itors only enough time to brine the
' o w . M a t t h e w s a n d <?ents
.....
acl:
nit
for
two
lnts
Fealless
Flvc
ball up the court. Time ran out and Garrow
^ a n s k y esank
a n o t,h e r ,l a y - u pP °after Fools
2
s t a t e won its second game of t h e Storonsky
'
""
had connected.
A foul "by Jerks
season.
L a v a r a n d o tied t h e g a m e a t 49-49, K B
Plattsburg Takes Early Lead
only
to have S t a t e take a seven Faculty
A
P i v o t b v Garrow and lay-up by point lead on a pair by Marzello,
Individual high averages:
Stackowicz gave Plattsburg a four and a lay-up by W a r d e n . Garrow Name—Team
ml
l e a d earl
in t n e rlrs
P°
>'
t quar- made a foul shot followed by L a n Monroe, SLS
, t e r ' O'Brien sank a lay-up only to ^ ' , . ,, ,, w
, , , ,
Rapacz, VDZ
t,
its
KJ S s l x U 1 l l e k l t o a l w l l l c h p u t
llu
have
value nullified by a hook SFed's
out in front, 52-51. Nephew Burt. Beavers
s n o t bv
Garrow. Lansky h i t with a a n d Matthews swapped baskets. Jack, Jerks
set snot
and
O'Brien scored after B r a n n i g a n hit from t h e corner. Reno, Potter
two
brilliant passes from Brown to Marzello tossed in a foul a n d G a r Cortese, P o t t e r ....
Marzcllo to O'Brien
, ., . to tie the game
. , row batted In a rebound to bring DeLucco, G e n t s
at six all.
attsburg came back t h e s c o r e t o 5 7 . ^ T h e n w l t h t h e L n n B , J e r k s
H
!TC P 0 1 " t S ° n l y t 0 S<?e S t a t G clock running out. M a t t h e w s "made Bennett, Fools .
1411
le up the score once again on a t h e c l i n c n e r ° n a j
, h t Morrts, K D R
,42
f
t n w L \ n T S k 5 T d " a y " U P " " a w the hoop. Stackowicz threw '
"
'
toy O
U'Brien.
Alter aa nn oo tt hh ee rr exchange
exchange in
with sixteen points. Bayer and
by
B n e n . After
, n two
, w n „n on ii nnUt s a n' d, tthen"took"tt
„ SraVe
otn(
l l n n lnnir
of baskets, t h e upstaters took a six r . b 0 u n d as the a a m e ended
S t e a r n s chipped In with eight each
point lead on two baskets by G a r - j y £ Win
On the road this weekend, S t a t e
row and a pair of fouls by t h e same
' s t a t e ' s J V ' s scored their first opposes Maritime Academy on Frim a n and Feclele. Lansky hit with w i n o f t h e
. b v d o w n l n D e l h l , d a y night and Queens College Sat
a n o t h e r set before Garrow scored 4 5 . 3 2 A 1 K * a e h n p a c e d t h e b n t t a c k u r c l a v . °
——
'
STATE
Player
FG F F T P
3
5
Marzello
1
0
8
O'Brien
4
Carter
3
0
6
Karpiak
0
0
0
Fersh
2
3
7
Matthews
6
1
13
Lansky
,
6
1
13
Warden
3
(i
0
1
1
Brown
0
9:00 to 5:30 DAILY
Evenings
Rivalry Volleyball Postponed
With t h e exception of the sing,
t h e r e will be n o more rivalry events
scheduled until J a n u a r y , according
to J a m e s Brophy, C h a i r m a n of t h e
Rivalry C o m m i t t e e .
Stylet
. . . or
8
Varsity Nips Plattsburg Cagers
In The Final Seconds Of Play
$7.95 $10.95
Shoe Store . . . and flep out with the
Gift for Christmas,
Pel.'r Rabbit took a n o t h e r long
puff on his corn-cob pipe, ami
smilingly watched his family scamper off.
FRIDAY. DECEMBER
PIIONR I-131S
^-
TO CHOOSf FROM I
State Gfflkgs Go-op.
Authorized
Hi
HOLLYWOOD COMES
SPREAD
0
Mullin's High 3
Clinches Victory
State Drops Opener;
Defeats Willimantic
lO,
mean the same
thing.
BOintD UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
ALBANY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
IQ IV4U, ri.o Cu.u Lulu Company
. T ^.«-^--V^ P .--^-^r-----rrT>T^'>-"-»"*«*W y ^»'*'~--*--T-«l
AMERICAN
RAILROADS
PACJB
•
Mr. Elmer Mathews, Director ot
Teacher Placement Bureau, was in
charge of the New York state Institutional Teacher Placement Association meeting at Syracuse, December 2. Representatives of various
teacher training institutions gathered together to discuss problems,
general and specific, concerning the
Anti-Discrimination Law.
Mr. Mathews was elected vicepresident of t h j organization.
Mr. Reno S. Knouse, 'Professor of
Merchandising, has written two articles which appear in the December issues of the "New York State
Education" magazine and the
"United Business Education Forum."
The articles published in "New
York State Education" is entitled
"Teacher Training in Distributive
Education" and deals with the
graduate and undergraduate programs at State College. The other
article is entitled "Student Layout
Analysts." This is a description of
a practical educational project completed in the W. M. Whitney and
Company store by students in the
Merchandising classes.
Mr. Reno S. Knouse has also been
scheduled to speak at the Interchurchmen's Fellowship Meeting on
"Teacher Training in Distributive
Education," December 13.
Dr. Watt Stewart, Professor of
History, was editor of a section of
the "Handbook of Latin American
Studies" entitled "South American
History: Tne National Period"
Number 13.
Mr. Reno S. Knouse attended the
American Vocational Association
Convention in Milwaukee, December 1, 2, and 3.
Dr. Wallace W. Taylor, Professor
and Supervisor in Social Studies,
also of the Education department,
presided over the General Session
Meeting of the National Council for
Social Studies discussing "International Relationships." He is also
chairman of the committee on International Relationships. Dr. Taylor has been elected to the Board
of Directors, National Council for
Social Studies.
Miss Elnora Drafahl, Instructor
in English, was the guest expert on
WTRY, Troy, in the program "How
Do You Pronounce it?" sponsored
by the Russell Sage Speech Department, December 3. December 7, Miss Drafahl was moderator
for a panel discussion "What Is the
Position of the Negro in the U. S.?"
The panel was also broadcast over
WTR'i, Troy.
Miss Millicent Haines, Instructor
in Social Studies, is the author of
an article in the November 1948 issue of "Educational Leadership,"
the Journal of the Association for
-Supervision and Curriculum Development of I he National Education
Association. Miss Haines' article is
entitled, "Thinking Straight About
Facts and Figures," and appears on
page 100.
Dr. Wallace W. Taylor of the Education department reviewed Warren
Moscow's recent book, "Politics In
the Empire State" in the Citizen •
ship Journal, Vol. IV No. 1 Pall
1948.
Dr. Paul C. Lemon, Professor of
Biology, will be the presiding chairman at I lie Society of American
Foresters on the topic of "Application of Science to Range Resource
Problems East of the Mississippi
River." The meeting will be held in
•he Statler Mol"l. Boston, Massachusetts, December IB.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY, DECEMBER lO, 1 0 4 8
Express Company
Establishes Plan
To Aid Students
The establishment of a new Educational Travel Division by the American Express Company, to aid
faculty members and students who
contemplate traveling abroad to
study in foreign universities, has
been announced by Ralph T. Reed,
company president.
The new division gives advice on
scholastic requirements, academic
calendar and dormitory space, and
answers other questions regarding
universities in 36 countries throughout the world.
In addition, students who travel
abroad during their vacations can
receive from the new Educational
Travel Division valuable aid on
where their most educational trip
lies.
The information was gathered
through the help of the colleges
concerned, the Institute of International Education, the Veterans Administration, and foreign consulates. A brochure, "To Study Abroad"
has been prepared and is available
at any office of the company.
Hurry, Buy Your Bid Today
For The Christmas Blowout
Hurry . . . Hurry . . . Hurry!
This is your last chance to go
to the Christmas Formal and
perhaps to get a date. If you
can't get a girl (or fellow, as
the case may be) why, just ask
the first person you bump into
today. Don't bump too hard or
they may not trust you on a
dance floor. If they say "NO"
then ask the second person.
What's the matter, are you
proud?
Don't be so grossly schmo-ish
as to say that you can't dance.
Anybody can. Or at least everybody makes a poor attempt. If
you're too weary after a long
week of classroom drudgery,
you can always find a quiet corner to nap in. You don't have
to stay long, anyway.
What! You don't have three
dollars? That's silly—everyone
has three dollars at some tinie
during their lives, and now happens to be the time.
And you're so lucky! There
just happens to be a few bids
left, and they saved them for
you alone.
Library Releases Mail Smiles Pamphlets
To Teachers' Colleges
Vacation Rules
Pamphle ts c o n c e r n i n g
the
Term papers due immediately
upon return from Christmas vacation can now be compiled during
the "vacation." Miss Mary E. Cobb,
Librarian, has announced that books
on reserve can be borrowed for the
period beginning Thursday, December 16, and ending Monday, January
3, at 9:10 a. in. However, all books
not returned by 9:10 a. m. Monday
morning will be subjected to the
following fines: twenty-five cents
for the first hour, or fraction thereof, that it is overdue, and five cents
for each succeeding hour, up to a
maximum of sixty cents for the
first day. For each succeeding day
an additional twenty-five cents is
charged to the purchase price of
the book.
At present the library is having
an exhibit of books for vacation
reading. The exhibit is entitled,
"Heme for Christmas." Every student at State is urged to read at
least one book just for pleasure
over the holidays.
Regular "two week loan books"
may be borrowed till next week and
will not be due until Wednesday.
SMILES organization have been
mailed to the 230 teachers' colleges
in the United States, according to
Jean Ineson '49, Editor.
This booklet explains the organization and history of SMILES, and
tells of the various student activities at the Albany Home for Children throughout the year. A letter
of introduction by John Jennings,
asking the student presidents to
consider the possibility of organizing
a SMILES group in their respective
schools, accompanied the pamphlet.
Mcllwaine, Childers Schedule
New Courses In Departments
/Continued from Paye 1, Column 1)
be offered first semester to balance
the graduate program.
Spanish 224, readings in Medieval
literature, is a one semester three
hour course.
Spanish 225, Picaresque Novel, a
one semester three hour course.
Spanish 226, studies in Spanish
poetry, a ane semester three hour
course.
Spanish 237, advanced phonetics,
a one semester three hour course.
M y smoke is CHESTERFIELD
in my new picture, WHEN
M Y BABY SMILES AT ME.
I always smoke CHESTERFIELDS.
They're MILDER...
It's MY cigarette.
SI AIIH INC. IN
W 111: N M V MA It V S M I L li S AT M l<
A Mill C R N T U H V - I ' D X
TI.CI I NK.OI.I IK I'HODt'C I ION
SINCE SEPTEMBER(20, 1948
10,408 COLLEGE STUDENTS
HAVE CHANGED TO
THERE'S A REASON:
*Jheu
'ft n
C
MORE COLLEGE STUDENTS SMOKE CHESTERFIELDS than any other Cigarette
lupvlljllu IVW, LlOOIIl & M , i . , | i . | « u i U '
BY LATEST, NATIONAL SURVEY
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