ty ED Will Stage One-Act Plays In Page Tuesday

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ALBANY, NEW YORK,
Today'sAssembly ED Will Stage
To Feature Sins One-Act Plays
By Rival Classes In Page Tuesday
Think back, all you with that
"vacation's-over" look, to the
second assembly before Christmas and liberation, and you'll
remember dropping your last
pieces of silver into the box passed among us for contributions
for the Christmas party given to
the kids at the Albany Home for
Children. Well, Myskania would
like to let you all know what a
big success this affair turned out
to be, thanks to your own generosity, co-operation on the part
of many students, and also to a
bit of the Christmas spirit revealed by Albany merchants contacted for refreshments.
Special recognition goes to
Paul Anast's store, which contributed fifty-four pounds of
candy absolutely free of charge,
and to Brook's Doughnut Store,
which donated one-half of all
the doughnuts purchased.
And in case you were wondering about the final resting place
of those odd nickels and dimes
that always turn up after such
affairs, the probable outcome,
says Myskania, will be their return to Smiles, the organization
responsible for such
heartwarming enterprises as this one.
The Elementary Dramatics class
will present their annual production next Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. in
Page Hall. Miss Agnes Futterer,
Assistant Professor of English, Is
directing.
The program consists of a folk
Opening the rivalry sing in Assembly this morning, the freshmen play, "The Kelly Kid" by Norris and
Loterok. This is a story of a small
will give their fight song before boy who being pursued by the polStudent Association for rivalry ice seeks refuge with three Irish
points. Next week the music de- ladies. The cast consists of Jeanne
partment of State College will pre- Valachovic and Robert Wilcox, Juniors; Lorice Schain, Pauline Thompsent their annual concert in Assem- son, Rose Mary Willsey, and Wilbly under the direction of Dr. liam Lyons, Sophomores. A child
Charles P. Stokes, Professor of Mu- from the Albany Home for Children
sic, and Mr. Karl A. Peterson, In- will also participate in the play.
A drama, "The Doctor's Duty" by
structor of Music.
Luigl Pirandello, is about a man
Rivalry singing will begin with who having killed a person attempts
the freshman fight song, followed to commit suicide. The cast for this
play includes Joseph Cruicilla, Maby the Sophomore fight song. Next bel Totten, Judith Serebnick, Richin order is the freshman song to the ard Clark, James Baumgarten, MarSophomores, and then the Sopho- garet Howard, and George Christy,
more song to the freshmen. The Sophomores.
program will be completed with the
The third play, "The Ugly Duckclass alma maters, freshmen again ling," is a comedy by A. A. Milne.
The plot centers around a homely
singing first.
princess whose parents are trying
Before th e sing begins, the fresh- to marry her off to eligible suitmen will move downstairs to take ors. The cast includes Acher Borthe place of the Junior class which ton, Joan French, Rhoda Riber,
will at the same time proceed to Martin Bush, Shirley Shapiro, Anthony Prochilo, and Earle Jones,
the balcony.
Sophomores.
Judges for the event are Dr.
Committees for this production
Charles F. Stokes, Professor of Mu- consist of Publicity, headed by Earle
Inter-Group Council will direct
sic; Mr. Karl A. Peterson, Instruc- Jones, with Hope Shaugnessy, Doro- an observation of National Brothtor of Music; Dr. William G. Mey- thy Conway, and Ruth Franbach; erhood Week during February, sponer, Instructor in German; Justine House, William Lyons, Acher Bor- sored by the National Conference of
Maloney, '48; and Marjorie Smith, ton and Lorice Schain; Properties, Christians and Jews in an attempt
'49. The songs are to be judged on Richard
Baumgarten,
Pauline to promote national unity and brothoriginality, execution and musical Thompson, Margaret Howard, and erhood.
quality.
Joseph Cruicilla; Lights, Marjorie
Robert Freyer and William DumSouthwick and Richard Clark; Cos- bleton, Sophomores, will act as CoThe decision of the judges will tumes, Joan French, Rose Mary Chairmen. Dr. Plager of Siena Colbe given to Grand Marshall Helen Willsey, Mabel Totten, and Martin lege, a member of the New York
Kisiel, '48, who will hand the result Bush; Sets, Phyllis Wittpen, Grace State Commission Against Racial
to the President of Student Associa- Friedman, George Christy, Joan Discrimination, has been scheduled
tion.
Farrell, Judith Serebnick, Anthony as a speaker for the observation.
Prochilo, Bernadette Frecl, KathThe recent re-organization of
Next Friday's assembly program erine Noonan, and Rhoda Rlber;
Inter-Group
Council to permit cowill be divided into three sections Sound Effects, Marjorie Lyons, Maof all activities was anconsisting of selections given by the bel Totten, Bernadette Freel, and ordination
by Joy Simon, '49, ChairWomen's Chorus, under the direc- Shirley Shapiro. All committee nounced
man of Inter-Group Council, at the
tion of Mr. Peterson; the Orches- members are Sophomores excepting beginning of the year. A co-ordintra, directed by Dr. Stokes; and the Robert Wilcox, '49, who is working ating board with a member from
Men's Chorus, also led by Mr. Pet- on sets.
each class will direct and relate all
erson.
activities of the council. The board
consists of the following: Roger
The Women's Chorus will sing
Nielson, '48, Joy Simon, '49, Molly
"Clouds," an Ernest Charles num- Second Term Classes
Mulligan,'50 and Esther Schofield '51.
ber, and "Begin the Beguine"; the
Inter-Group Council has originMen's Chorus is lo perform the To Begin February 3
ated an Intercollegiate Board to
"Riff Song" and "Stout-Hearted
According to the office of the follow-up the conference of NoMen." Orchestra selections are
the "Bacharal" from "The Seasons," Registrar, second semester classes, vember 7 and 8th. Fifteen corresby Glazovnow, and Strauss's "Per- will begin Tuesday, February 3. pondents will maintain personal
Freshmen will pny fees on January contact with those college reprepetual Motion."
26 and upperclassmen and graduate sentatives who attend the conferEach year a musical program is students will pay fees as follows: ence. Lois Prescott, '51, is Chairpresented to the student body to A-L, January 27; M-Z, January 28. man of the correspondence group.
make them aware of the work done
All students who do not intend to Inter-Group Council will publish a
by the music department. The re- continue their studies for the second bi-monthly newsletter with news of
cent addition of Mr. Carl Peterson, semester are requested to notify the Inter-Group work clone in colleges
Instructor of Music, has heldep to Office of the Registrar. Students in this area and In other sections
widen the scope of State's musical who are beginning graduate study of the State. Roger Nielson, '48, has
activiteis. This assembly will mark the second semester are requested been appointed Editor of this newsthe first public appearance of the lo submit the graduate application leltcr to keep State College informmens' chorus which was organised form which Is secured in the Office ed of Inter-Group events at other
colleges.
of the Registrar.
this fall.
State's Annual Concert
To Be Held Next Friday
By Music Department
IGC Organizes
To Coordinate
Council Activities
28
—
VOL. xxxii NO:; IS
FRIDAY, JAN. 0, 1047
Chrisimat Party Succeeds,
Thanks To Well-Wishers
st;
College Inaugurates
Cadet Teacher Plan
18 Seniors To Practice
In
Six Area Schools
ReleasesDuring
Second Semester
Stokes
Cast Members
For "Pinafore"
Members of the cast for the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta "H.M.S.
Pinafore," or "The Lass That Loved
A Sailor," have been chosen by Dr.
Charles F, Stokes, Professor of Music, who will direct the presentation. The operetta is to be performed by the operetta class March 12
and 13 in 'Page Hall auditorium.
Roles are as follows: The Right
Honorable Sir Joseph Porter, K. C.
B. (First Lord of the Admiralty),
Harold Mills, '49; Captain Corcoran (Commander of H.MJ3, Pinafore), Earle Snow, Graduate; Ralph
Rackstraw (Able Seaman), Clarence
Olsen, Graduate; Dick Deadeye
(Able Seaman), Charles Chase,
Graduate; Bill Bobstay (Boatswain's
Mate), Stuart Campbell, '48; Bock
Becket (Carpenter's Mate), Charles
Miller, '49; Josephine (The Captain's Daughter), Jean Snow, Graduate; Cousin Hebe (Sir Joseph's
First Cousin). Justine Maloney, '48;
Little Buttercup (A Port Bumboat
Woman), Margaret Franks, and
Jean Hoffman, Juniors.
A new plan for cadet teaching in
area schools will be introduced into
the English department next semester. Beginning in February, nine
English majors from the Senior
class will go as practice teachers
into the Watervliet, Bethlehem Central, Roesselville, Voorheesville, Ravena, and Coeyman's high schools.
They will teach for eight weeks.
The plan will probably be expanded to include at least three other
departments next fall, according to
Dr. Robert Frederick, Director of
Training, and a member of the
planning and adjustment committee. Other members of the committee are Dr. Watt Stewart, Professor of History, and Dr. Harry
Hastings, Professor of English.
Cadet teachers will act as assistants to a master teacher, a regular
teacher at the high school. They
will carry a full day's schedule and
responsibilities. After the eight
weeks, the nine cadets will be replaced by other practice teachers.
To Receive Eight Hours Credit
Eight hours of credit are given
for the eight weeks. Special courses
and adjustments will be made in
the English and Social Studies departments for those who will miss
school time. All departments are
cooperating.
Understudying the above parts
are Harold White, '50, Stuart Campbell, '48, Walter Campbell, Helen
Eaton, and Margaret Franks, Juniors.
Other minor characters which
Mary Elizabeth Conklin, Instruchave not yet been chosen are the tor and Supervisor in English, will
First Lord's Sister, His Cousins, His act as field supervisor of the six
area schools, which have promised
Aunts, Sailors and Marines.
fullest cooperation.
The tentative list of Seniors and
the schools at which they will teach
follows:
Commons Project
First eight weeks: Eugenia BaraNears Completion nowski,
Roesselville; Eloise Worth,
The final steps in the interior
decoration of the Commons are underway. Campus Commission has
obtained gray and maroon material
for the drapes and these will be
made by Myskania and Student
Council.
Helen Kisiel, '48, Grand Marshal,
has announced that the tables and
chairs that were decided on by the
student body during its last business meeting have been ordered
and the company expects to deliver
them in early February.
The rcdecoration started during
Christmas vacation when the administration took on the job of seeing that the Commons was completely painted. Besides a complete paint job on the walls and
ceilings, the floors were reflnished
and the bannisters were reinforced.
Organizations desiring murals or
caricatures on the walls should contact the Campus Commission and
arrange the details between the
Commission and cooperating art
Prom Promises Pulchritude, Many Melodies, Much Mullin; students.
As soon as possible the class banwill be arranged on the wall
Saturday Spot Suggests Banquet Banter, Voluminous Vittles ners
with the latest class numerals
Tradition! Relaxation! Corona- itiated on Friday evening by the at $2.40 a couple, will be on sale nearest the stairs.
tion! Such words can only begin to semi-formal dance at the Auninla in the Commons Tuesday through
Friday, February 3 to 8.
describe the big Junior weekend Club, Larry Auclette and his orchPlans are tentative as yet for the
planned for February 0 and 7. Yes, estra will furnish not only the mu- Informal gathering Saturday after- Donnelly Sets Deadline
sic for dancing but also the accom'49 is at it again. At what you say? paniment while Stale's own Fran noon, but Saturday night will be O n Concession Bids
Well, it Is like this.
Mullin vocalizes. General chair- devoted to the traditional Junior
Miss Cathrine Donnelly, '49, GenElizabeth Ann Gibson,
Following In the footsteps of the man, Dale Wood, lias promised that banquet,
classes of 1047 and 194H, the present the orchestra will piny from 0 p. m. Chairman of the banquet, has stat- eral Chairman of State Fair, has
that nil group houses,
Junior class Is combining Its ambi- until 2 a. m. with an hour for Inter- ed that as yet the place has not announced
sororities,
fraternities,
and other
been
chosen,
but
announcement
tion and determination to curry on
groups on campus wishing to partimission.
All
girls
will
have
3
o'clock
will
be
made
when
a
decision
is
the traditional Junior weekend. We
cipate in this annual affair, should
reached.
said traditional In the first line be- hours.
The "Red Devils" seem to be de- hand Into her by Friday, January
cause the entire weekend Is centered
Just a minute! That Is not all!
lfl, their bid for a concession. Each
around tradition. Certainly the The evening will reach Its climax termined to start the second sem- bid should be a list of three different
custom of a weekend completely as the Prom Queen enters 'mid the ester off In the right frame of mind. types of concessions In the order of
tuken over by the Juniors Is as old strains of "Pomp and circumstance." The sophlstocated beauty of the their preference.
and respected a tradition as any at Rita Coleman, occupant of last prom combined with the friendly
James Brophy, '49, will head the
Statu, State would not be college year's throne, will return to crown atmosphere of the banquet should
without Its Junior prom and ban- this year's regent, chosen as the result in a bang-up weekend long finance committee, while Qeraldlne
quet.
most beautiful girl In the Junior to be remembered by all who share Cooperman, '50, Is In charge of general publicity,
class.
Tickets for the dunce, priced In Its fun and good times.
The weekend activities will be in-
Roesselville; Ruth Bessel, Voorheesville; Dorothy Diffin, Bethlehem
Central; Mary Fleming, Bethlehem
Central; Bette Jayne Jones, Watervliet; Gloria Gilbert, Watervliet;
Marjorie Lotz, Ravena; Jane McGuinness, Coeymans.
Second eight weeks: Muriel
Woods,
Roesselville;
Madelyn
Brelch, Roesselville; Wanda Tomasik, Voorheesville; Shirley Webb,
Bethlehem Central; Mary Quinn,
Bethlehem Central; Hazel Engdahl,
Watervliet; Barbara Druschel, Watervliet; Carol Clark, Ravena; Mary
lmmett, Coeymans.
To Supplement Milne Program
The purpose of the program is
to supplement Milne practice teaching by giving more practical experience, and to promote closer relations between State College and
the high schools of the state.
The present set up represents the
results of many years planning, but
Is entirely experimental, explains
Dr Frederick. Although the program will continue noxt year, It is
subject to many changes. Dr.
Frederick states, "The class of 1948
Is witnessing a very significant development in the history of the
college, one for which we have long
been planning. The class of '48 can
be proud of the fact that it is the
class which inaugurated cadet
teaching In the high schools of the
state."
Application! Art Available
For Infirmary Fte Refund
Forms for making application for
refunds of Infirmary fees are now
available in Room 300 A. All those
students holding the new Insurance
policies must make application before March 1st, according to Nancy
Walsh, '48, Secretary of Student
Board of Finance.
/JC
M0t a
More Cooperation . . .
•TATE COUUtOt NtW» FRIDAY, JAN. t>, '1*4?
*TATI COLLIOI NIWl.FRIDAY, J A N . * , 1*47
"Oti, RmUlf Vltf Simple .
tf
Blind Man'4. Blu^
get the support of the majority of
the voters.
By EUGENE MoLAREN «.
Explain Multiple Elections
This Reporter is given the widest latitude as author
We now come to elections like of this column, although his viewpoint* do not necesthose for Student Council In which sarily reflect those of the STATS COLWOB NEWS.
more than one office must be filled
from one list of candidates. In this
Since this is the first issue of the New Year, it is
case, the voting system used depend!' customary to list our own resolutions and make a
entirely on the general objective of much longer list of resolutions which other people
the election. The present voting should keep. I t is always good to have a certain
system was set up with this objec- time to stop, look briefly back, and take a few mintive—to provide for representation utes to reflect on accomplishments and failures, the
The preferential system we use of all sections of class opinion in happy and the unhappy moments, with a view toward
Is essentially very simple, In spite proportion to the strength of those improvement. However, we have never believed in
of what you may have heard. In an sections within the class. By this hard and fast resolutions, but merely think It is betelection for a single office, like class way it is hoped that a Student ter to do what is believed to be right as seen at the
president, it is designed to enable Council truly representative of the time, with no apologies. We quote the translation of
the class to vote on as many can- four classes can be obtained. If you the proverb we learned this week in German class:
didates is it may want to, and still agree with the objective, the pres- "The road to Hell is paved with good resolutions."
If people have definite plans on the issues at to put Into ofice the sne who act- ent voting system follows easily.
Since no one would pay any attention to the resoluhas the support of the class.
When several people are to be tions anyhow, space may as well be conserved.
hand- why can't they present them to the com- ually
Whenever more than two people elected, they obviously cannot all New Practice Teaching Set-up
mittee during the months they are working on are nominated for one office, it is get
a majority of the votes. Therethe problem? Why is it always so necessary to quite possible for no one candidate fore, a number of votes must be We've heard both pro and con criticism of the new
wait until the committee appears before assembly to get a majority right away, i. e. found which four and only four of full time teaching deal. While it will undoubtedly
more than half of the votes. That is the candidates can get. This num- prove invaluable to the student, the complaint has
to drop these little bombshells?
what usually happens here. Of ber is called a quota. For one office arisen that it will, from a practical viewpoint, cause
The names of the members of these committees course, we could declare the person it is one more than half the votes; quite some inconvenience and monetary outlay for
a plurality elected, i. e. the for two, one more than a third; for the people concerned. Carfare adds up, and seniors
are all announced in assembly and it would be an with
largest number of votes; but that three, one more than a fourth; for who hold student offices will be seriously handicapped
easy matter to contact them. In case we should would hardly be a democratic meth- four, one more than a fifth; or, the
the performance of their duties. Maybe these comforget the names, we do have a president for ourod. For example, in the recent Fresh- number of votes divided by one in
plaints
can be straightened out when the plan begins
Student Association and she does keep a record man election, the largest number of mor e than the number of offices to operation.
obtained right away by any be filled plus one. When 300 vote
of such things. All ideas and suggestions are more votes
candidate for Secretary was 47 votes for 4 class representatives the quota A Freshman Speaks
than welcome to these committees, but when ideas out of 266.
is therefore 61. Notice 4 times 61 Since sometimes a newcomer will see many things
aren't expressed until the committee has finally
equals 244; the last candidate de- an older resident has become so accustomed that he
Some
way
must
be
found
which
feated can get only 56 votes. If you is blind to them, we have asked a freshmen to give
reported the results of their labors, they only serve
a clear-cut majority to one of lower the quota to 60, five candidates his impressions of State College. It follows:
to antagonize and to postpone any action on the gives
the candidates. One method which can be elected.
State College—My Diary
problem in question.
is commonly used, and was used
Once
a
quota
has
been
set,
the
here once, provides for a run-off
Sept.—Frosh Camp—what a swell way to get acThe insurance question and the work on the election between the two candidates ballots are counted in essentially the quainted! But too many Long Islanders; still had lots
same
way
as
for
one
office.
The
lowremodeling of the Commons brought the issue to a getting the highest number of votes. est candidates are eliminated one of fun. Oh those beanies but we're proud of them and
head. Flans presented in assembly when these In the run-off one of the two must by one until four candidates have that's that Myskania? Who do they think they are,
a majority. That is quite true,
but I guess they can't help it. Well the college seems
questions were brought up only resulted in a post- get
but there is a serious fallacy in this the quota or only four are left. Since good but it hasn't any football team and Where's the
the
sum
of
the
quotas
is
244,
almost
ponement of any definite action. Issues should be line of argument. The fallacy lies
in the class contributes to campus? Most of my teachers seem okay but oh that
discussed during the meetings but not to the point in assuming that one of the top two everyone
the election of a Council member. pre-med course from Dorwaldt.
will
always
get
the
support
of
a
mawhere a whole new plan if suddenly thrown into the
before any of the other candi- Furthermore, half of the class elects
Oct. Gee, the longer I'm here, the better I like
laps of the student body and activities must cease jority
dates who have been eliminated in half the representatives, one quar- it. The Commons, Lounge, the Bull. Glad to see that
ter
elects
one
quarter
and
smaller
to discuss the new plan.
the run-off. The example I have
Campus Day had a queen worthy of the title. Don't
cited before—the Freshman elec- groups have their scattered votes miss the big-time football anymore. Rather spend
concentrated
on
one
candidate
in
Much time and many rises in blood pressure tion for Secretary—shows the utter
Saturdays in the library anyhow!! How come the
the run-offs. This is the idea called upperclass girls are so nice to the frosh girls? Alwould be saved if such plans were presented to the foolishness of this assumption. If proportional
representation or P.R. ways taking them to lunch at the Bowl.
committees beforehand so they may investigate the such a run-off had been held among Distribution of Surplus
the
top
three
or
the
top
four,
it
possibilities then. Committee members aren't long- would have been mathematically
Nov. Just think—only a few weeks to Thanksgiving
only real complication lies in
haired orgies ready to spit in the eye of the first one possible for either the third or theThequestion
of what is called a and home. No book work then. Found out what St.
to venture a suggestion. Committees are formed fourth candidate to receive a ma- surplus. It might happen that some- Mary's is. I do feel sorry for the boys up there cause
merely to organize work on a certain question. Any jority of the vote. Starting with the one gets more than 61 votes or what- girls aren't allowed in. That rushing gets me, especrun-offs at the top is therefore not ever the quota happens to be. For ially some of those rules. I overheard one of them
student may offer plans.
a sound method.
example, in last year's election for say, "Sorry, I can't speak to my roommate—she's sorStudent Council, the Class of '49 ority." Oh those elections. Dunn has just started—
In the future, what do you say we try to be a
gave 133 out of 256 first choices to the truth is we are going to back our officers until
Start
At
Bottom
little more considerate and instead of slamming a If the solution does not lie in start- on e candidate. This excess over the the green gremlins finally win rivalry. Vacation i.s
committee's work -and offering a brand new plan, ing the run-offs at the top, it ob- quota,
called a surplus, must be getting closer and term papers are assigned too. It's
consult the committee first. The committees formed viously lies in starting at the bot- distributed somehow if the other here—and gone.
in Student Association work hard and sometimes tom; that is, in having a run-off candidates are to be able to get a Dec. Heard Mumbles Thornhill i.s coming to State.
among all but the lowest candidate, quota also, and if large numbers of
under handicaps. They deserve all the coopera- and
In continuing to eliminate the ballots are not to be wasted. Form- Stan Abrams says so. Basketball team is okay. Plan to
tion we can give them.
lowest candidates one by one in each erly, we distributed the surplus by see rest of the home games. College work is hard
successive runoff. This can be done taking the excess ballots off the but social life i.s more than enough to make up for it.
very easily by marking just one bal- top of the candidate's pile and re- Jan. Hit tune of the week, "Serenade of the Bells"
lot preferentially and taking care of distributing them according to the bells to classes. Vacation was so good, but what is
next choice marked on those ballots. the gleam coming out of the Commons? What is
the run-offs in the count.
This method is evidently not much that new look? I guess the girls want to carry around
How and why is this done? If you good.
more weight. And what is that white stuff on the
STATE COLLEGE NEWS have voted for one out of a number
Quite aside of the temptation to ground? (Ed.'s Note. There was a heavy frost In New
of candidates, you will naturally help your friends by taking the York and Long Island according to our friends from
Ettablishcd May 1916
vote for him again each time his "right" ballots, It is absolutely im- the North country.)
name appears on the run-off ballot; possible to select ballots completely
By the Class o M 9 1 8
I guess I'll close now cause I've got to finish that
all the more so since there are fewer representative of the candidate's
and fewer other candidates compet- whole pile. It is therefore necessary term paper.
RATING—ALL-AMERICAN
ing for your vote. Only when the to redistribute all the ballots but at Jr. From Coining
Although it hasn't been advertised much, the next
Vol. X X X I I
J a n u a r y 9, 1948
No. 12 person you have voted for is elim- a lower value. Thus, under the pres- big dance here will be the Junior Prom, on Friday,
inate do you have to switch your ent system, if your vote is marked
support to on e of the other candi- for a candidate who needs only February 6—Just four week.) from tonight. Most of us
Member
Distributor
will be over the effects of Claude Thornhill by then
AMHOCIIIICKI Collegiate Prosa
Colloglnto DI«oal dates. You do this by indicating 9/10ths of the votes he receives, you and can enjoy the music of Larry Audette and his orThe undnrgraduato nowHpuiiur of tlio Now York Stilts Col- a second choice on your original will give him 9/10ths of your ballot chestra from Schenectady, featuring our own Fran
lege for Toiioliorsj piibllHliml every Frldny of tlio college ballot. Thus, as long as your first
year by tlio NEWS Ilonrd for tlio Stlldon! AHKOI-IIIMOII. choice Is still running your vote and the other l/10th to your second Mullin as vocalist, Get your dates early!
IMIOIIOS: Miiy, 2-fllM; Coleman ami Rochtord, 2-0120; SSlnnl, counts for him on each run-off, choice. In this way the element of '48 Is the year
3-0988; Clark 2-0870. Member, of tbo nows stuff may bo called a distribution, When he is chance, Introduced by the selection
Our own private poll on the question, "When the
renelieil TWIH,, anil Wed. from 7 to 11:30 I', M. m 3-IIID7.
of only some of the ballots for counteliminated because he has the small- ing, and formerly decisive in about old year passed out?" has established the fact that
est number of votes, then you trans- half of our elections, is eliminated. the average State College student celebrated sanely,
fer your vote to the one of the re- At all times, your ballot i.s fully but managed to stay out to see the first sun of 19411
rise, Happy New Year.
maining candidates whom you fa- counted.
vor. Should he, In turn, be elimin- Elimination of Candidates
ated, your next choice is considered,
The Newt Board
In the multiple election, thereand so on. All this Is done step by
step, or run-off by run-off, by thoso fore, your ballot goes to your first
ANN MAY
KPITUN-IN-CHIKF
who count the ballots. This idea Is choice as long as he is running and
CAROL CLARK
MANAGING EDITOR
called
"the single transferable bal- to the extent that he needs it, If
ELLEN ROCHFORD
MANAGING EDITOR
lot".
That
Is the preferential^ he is eliminated, your ballot goes SATURDAY, JANUARY 10, 1048
PAULA T l C H Y
SPOUT. EDITOR
Citizens Legislative Conference, Ten Eyck Hotel,
term
for
a
series
of run-offs which to your second choice; if he does not
FRANCES Z I N N I
CIRCULATION MANAGER
starts with all the candidates, con- need all of your ballot, he gets what MONDAY, JANUARY 12
RITA COLEMAN
ADVERTISING
he needs and the rest goes to your
C H A R L O T T E LALLY
. U a l N E . S MANAGER tinues by eliminating the lowest canLost and Found Sale, Commons Balcony.
second choice. The same procedure
ELSIE LANDAU
A.SOCIATE EDITOR didates one by one and transferring
Is used If ft candidate gets a surplus TUESDAY, JANUARY 13
JEAN CULVER
•
ASSOCIATE EDITOR their ballots to the next cholco markalter on 0 of the other candidates
JEAN SPENCER •
ASSOCIATE EDITOR ed on those ballots, and stops as
:):.')0 P.M. Commerce Students Meeting, Room 301.
soon as one of the candidates either been eliminated In a run-off.
7:30 P.M. Meeting of Christian Science Organizahas a maorlty or Is the only ono Splits in Surplus Distribution
tion, Room loo, Draper.
When bullots are split In a surplus
left, In each run-off, or distribuB:30 P.M.—Elementary Dramatics production, Page
distribution
very
cumbersome
fraction,
your
vote
is
counted
for
that
A l l ruiiiiiiiiiilcaliiiiiH MIIOIIIII b e aililreHiieil t o tlio e d i t o r a n d
Hall.
m u s t be Hlglied.
M i n i o n w i l l he w i t h h e l d u p o n r e m i i o i l . one of the candidates whom you pre- tions may be produced. For example,
T h e NTATIO C O M . K O I C N J S W H uumiiiieH n o r e u p o n M l b l l l t y fer to the others still running,
In last year's election for Myskanla, THURSDAY, JANUARY 15
f o r o p i n i o n * iixiii-i'ioied In llii c o l u m n ! ) o r C O I O O I I I I I I H I I I O N H
one candidate had a surplus of 30 12:05 P.M.-IVOF Noon Worship, Room 28,
an Kiich u i p r e t m i f i m i d o n o t n e e e H u a r l l y r o f l e e t llii v i e w .
In this manner the preferential votes out of 163. That would mean
4:30 P.M.—Student-Faculty
Committee Meeting,
system determines with complete splitting each of those 163 votes Into
Dean Stokes' Office
accuracy and without the slightest two parts—one of 133/163 for the
opportunity for finagling which one
FRIDAY, JANUARY 16
(Continued on Page 6, Column V
of the candidates can moat readily
3:30 P.M.-Room 150-1VOF Bible Study Group.
Committees are not formed to be ignored 1
Yet, the general attitude around State seems
to.be that committees were formed to be heckled
and those on the committees are malicious characters
attempting to embezzle money from the surplus.
This year, two issues in particular have demanded committee work and when both committees presented their final reports to assembly after
months of hard work and investigation, other
plans, directly opposing theirs, were offered from
the floor. We are not trying to stifle free discussion. Healthy discussions are the growth vitamins
of any organization but too many vitamins can
be dangerous.
Sditofa Note:
Many requests have been made
for some explanation of the theory
behind the preferential voting system. We believe that student dissatisfaction with this system exists because of the lack of understanding of its fundamental principles. In an attempt to clear up
misuderstanding, we are printing
the following explanation.
College Calendai
M i l l
State Officials
SEB Anticipates '-• E X A M I N A T I O N
Withhold Views Fewer Teachers
On University In Grade Schools
Group
Commission Members
To Assemble Monday
It is important that all Seniors ni. aio
and Graduate students come to the C o 2 io
bureau of Teacher Placement In E(] ' 1 3 1
Milne, In order to indicate their K d ' ooo
preference for being employed as B n ' 2 1 0
Elementary or High School teach- F r . 1
ers. According to a communication
received from the office of Elmer Go. 1
G. Mathews, Director of Student I'll. .100
Employment, the SEB expects to SSpo . 2 0 8
receive numerous demands for all '
kinds of teachers trained in elementary school work.
State officials, contacted by the
NEWS last Wednesday, declined to
comment on the New York State
University
Commission's
recommendations affecting the Teachers'
Colleges of New York. Oswald D.
Heck, Speaker of the State Assembly and Commission member, explained that all information relative to the findings of the ComThe communication reads as folmission is withheld by a gentlemen's
agreement and could only be re- lows: "There has been an increasing demand over the past two years
leased by the body as a whole.
for teachers In the elementary and
junior high levels and this year
Recommend Colleges Be Cut
The research staff of the Univer- seems to be no exception. Now that
the state has a salary law which
sity Commission, according to the has
increased the benefits to most
N. Y. Times, recommended that the teachers
the chance of making a
eleven teacher training colleges be reasonable salary in the lower
cut to a half a dozen and that the grades of the public schools has beenrollment of those six be doubled. come state-wide.
Also proposed was that Albany
State College be enlarged to faciliThe war babies are beginning to
tate the training of elementary show their numbers in our schools
teachers and possibly students go- and the superintendents and prining into government work.
cipals are hard pressed to meet the
demand with qualified personnel.
•I
Commission to Convene
These fields hold promise of brisk Art II!)
Hi.
The two-year-old commission will development and advancement for
8
convene here in Albany on January those who are qualified and wish to CC oo .. 21 IS
12 to adopt final recommendations participate."
I'ln. a
to submit to the State legislature.
K n . 2(11
F r . 1(1(1
Confronting them is the task of
I l y . 121
deciding between two drafts on proL a , 108
grams to be initiated in higher eduL I . 213A
cation.
1 ' . (• . 201
faculty
The original draft submitted to
the Commission concerned the establishment of numerous community colleges throughout New York
State. John E. Burton, State Budget Director, feeling that "undue
emphasis" was being placed on
community colleges, presented an
alternative draft to the Commission.
This draft presented a four-point
program as follows: Acquisition of
an existing university by the state,
extension of financial aid to medical schools, enlarged scholarships
(New York State has for years
granted 4,000 scholarships), and
state aided community colleges —
managed and initiated locally.
Among the objections is that
either recommendation, If accepted
by the state, will add an expense
of hundreds of millions to an already $750,000,000 state budget.
There Is also the question of fitting
the proposed plan,'; into the present
educational set up of New York
State.
Qootnotel
Dr. Watt Stewart, Professor of
History, attended a meeting of the
American Historical Association in
Cleveland, Ohio, on December 29
and 30.
Dr. Elaine Forsyth, Assistant
Professor of Geography, was' married during Christmas vacation to
Dr. Lloyd Allen Cook of Wayne
University, Detroit, Michigan.
Dr. Gertrude Douglas, Assistant
Professor of Biology, and Dr.
Charles Andrews, Professor of Physics, attended the annual conference of the American Association
for the Advancement of Science,
held from December 2fi to January
1, in Chicago.
Dr. Andrews gave a thirty minute demonstration on "Microwaves
As Teaching Aids" at the meeting
of the American Association of
Physics teachers held during the
conference. He has written several
articles In relation to this subject
for the General Electric Company
and has received inquiries from scientists
in Germany,
England,
France and Scotland requesting additional information about teaching
methods,
State To Present
PTA Program
The
Three members of the State College faculty will participate In a
radio program over Station WROW
on Tuesday, January 13, 9:30 to 10
p.m., through the cooperation of
the Albany District of the Parent
Teacher Association.
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.Monday, I'l-liiiniiy 2
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JUNIOR PROM
FEBRUARY <>
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
THONE
H, F. Honikel & Son
Pharmacists
Phono <t-2f>30
157 C e n t r a l Ave.
ALBANY, N. Y.
5-1913
"MEET AND EAT AT THE BOUL"
Est ubllshed 1005
198 200 CENTRAL A V E N U E
ALBANY, N. V
I). H. LIFE AGENT FOR
Student Medical Expense
Also
AM, TYPES OF INSURANCE
MFE
ANNUITIES
FIRE
HI IUU.AUY
AUTOMOBILE
HOOKS
AUTHOR R. KAPNER
78 STATE ST.
54471
STATIONERY
STATE-COLLEGE
COOP
OTTO R. MENDE
103 C E N T R A L AVE
h
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Group
Tuesday, January »%•
Oroup F
purpose of the conference
was to report the advances made In
the different fields of science and
to familiarize the scientists with
the new methods used In the control of disease.
The program will consist of a Verrey, Hancock Resign
panel discussion on teachers' col- As Organization Heads
leges by Dr. Shields Mcllwaine,
Raymond Verrey, Graduate, has
Professor of English; Dr, Robert W.
Frederick, Professor of Education; resigned as President of Kappa Phi
Dr. ,J. Wesley Childers, Professor of Kappa, honorary education fraternity. Alan Stone, Graduate, was
Spanish.
elected to fill the vacancy at a meetRecordings ol the State College ing on January fl. Marlon Hunchoral groups, made by Dr. Floyd cock, '48, tendered her resignation
Hendrlckson, will be played before as President of Pi Gamma Mu, honand after the discussion, Mr. Karl orary Social Studios fraternity, due
Peterson, Instructor of Music, dir- to tiie fact that she will bo gradected flic chorus.
uated in February,
The decision to allot this time
was made after Mrs. Richard Bennett,, Director of the Albany District, read "Plain Talk about Teachers Colleges" by Dr. Mcllwaine,
which, she believes contains the kind
of Informal ion the public should
hear.
R
Snttmlii.v,
A I'. Ill
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10. S. •!
Kr. 2
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2:00 P.M.
Thursday, Jiiniiur.r %t
»:00 A . M .
SCHEDULE^
GIFTS
CARDS
• T A T * , e o U L M t NKW»,PRIDAYi JAIfc; f , t * « r
PA0E 4
•TATE C O L L K J I ftRWt FRIDAY, SAH. t , 1#47
Roguish Resolutions Raise Cam;
Revealing Resolvers Do Same
Editor's
New Year's came again this year,
and as usual brought resolutions
with it. However, either the people
at State are too bashful to admit
that they have made and broken
many already, or else they were
just too wise to make them in the
first place. As a result, the following represent the work of only a
few students.
In keeping with the spirit of the
season, exam season, that is, Gloria
Sottile, 'SO, expressed the sentiments
of many when she said, "I'm going
to classes every day now so that I
can use my cuts during exam week."
Along the same line, Rhoda Riber,
'50, remarked that she wasn't going
to cause the librarians any more
trouble—she plans to spend all her
free time in the Commons. Not to
be out-done, Helma Rosenberg, '50,
quoted Benjamin Franklin, when she
said, "Don't let studies interfere
with your college education."
On general campus issues, Renee
Harris, '50, was overheard telling a
friend that she planned to buy a
pair of rose-colored sun-glasses especially for the Commons. SaraCaruso, '50, said that she intended
to make the most of Leap Year. Her
motto Is to "Grab a mate at State
in '48."
From the male element the resolutions were varied. Robert Freyer,
'50, has decided never to stir his
coffee with his left hand—he received a spoon for Xmas, Earle
Jones, '50, has announced that he
won't be walking in the rain barefoot because he might grow. Harvey Milk, '51, has promised not to
look at the "New Look."
In the opinion of many the following are a few of the resolutions
that should have been made, but
weren't:
1. The president of Signum Laudis will not make Dean's List.
Note:
2. Assembly attendance will not
The editorial referred to below
be compulsory.
appeared in a December issue of
3. State will become nationally the Evangelist, the Catholic newspaper for the Diocese of Albany.
famous.
4. Our new president will be tall, Students wishing to read this editorial may do so on the P.O. Bulledark, handsome, and Stately.
5. Sororities and frats will not tin board.
"rush" through their first semester.
According to an editorial In the
6. We will have formats every
weekend with a different "name Evangelist of December 5, 1947, the
band" a t each for those who can't State Department of Education and
make the holiday affairs.
7. Exams will be scheduled only our parents have "cause for alarm".
for those who want them and a t We are being exposed to "crass mathe stooge's own convenience.
terialism" and "sniping a t religious
6. The library will be made Into beliefs" here at State. Furthermore,
a swimming pool, so that more people will see t h e inside of Hawley we may now find a "left-wing
strain" In our sociology classes.
Hall.
The first of these charges
9. The buildings will be made
smoke-proof and students will learn the editorial does not attempt to
to inhale so that cigarettes will be support by any evidence whatsoever.
seen in lower Draper and the P.O. The second charge is derived from
once more.
the fact that our Professor of Sociology, Doctor Theodore Standing, is
acting chairman of the Albany
Chapter of the Progressive Citizens
of America. This, according to the
editorial, gets him "the accolade of
praise" from Moscow through Henry
Wallace as intermediary. Since, according to the editorial, the "PCA
Is anything but 100% American In
A used clothing drive for European its convictions and purposes", there
students is now being conducted by should now be fear of "the evident
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship danger of infiltration of radical
under the supervision of Robert Pet- thought and foreign ideologies into
ers, '49. IVCF is also sponsoring the the American way of life". Against
CARE drive for cash contributions these dangers, the editorial confor food to be sent t o European
cludes, our educational system must
countries.
be safeguarded.
Contributions for t h e clothing
While I have myself attacked the
drive must consist of clean, usable POA in public meetings, including
clothing of any size; it should be one of State College students, there
placed in the box located In the lower are some things in this editorial with
hall of Draper. Money for CARE which I cannot agree. Upon careful
may be given to any IVCF member. examination my sociology notes reThe weight of all clothing con- veal
no dangerous
"left-wing
tributed will be doubled by the War strains". But suppose they did. Is
Relief Commission, national promo- a restriction of academic freedom
ters of the program, before being likely to help us in arriving at solusent out of the United States.
tions to the complex problems of
IVCF Sponsors
Food-Clothing
European Drive
Vaughn once again displays his vocal versatility—backed
up by the Moon Maids. You'll like this record—so lend an earl
Another great record is the one belonging to Camel cigarettes.
More people are smoking Camels than ever before!
Try Camels! Discover for yourself why, with smokers who
have tried and compared, Camels are the "choice of experience"!
/*
OH *lUe flench
modern wciety? Is not freedom of tional Catholic Rural Life Conferexpression, on and off the campus, ence), as His Eminence (Cardinal
a prerequisite of real progress? Sure- Strltch) pointed out, believes that
ly the editor of the Evangelist would farmers ought to be organized Into
not demand or expect that a profes- their own economic associations, not
sing Catholic instructor a t State alone to advance their own economic
adapt the "strain" of his teaching interests but to promote the general
to ideological standards determined economic welfare. This part of the
Conference's program is unpopular,
by others.
of course, in certain influential quarWhat about the "danger of infil- ters and will be bitterly resisted.
tration of radical thought and for- But the Conference will not be deeign ideologies"? It might be pointed
out that practically all "ideologies" terred in the slightest by phony
in the United States, from Catho- charges of 'communism', for it knows
licism to Keynesian economics, are only too well that among the best
importations. Even the Statue of friends the communists have in the
Liberty comes from overseas. The United States are those greedy ingrowth of some foreign ideologies in dividuals and corporations which are
this country is due to their free ac- concentrating land ownership in the
ceptance by some of the people; the hands of the few."
lack of growth of other foreign
ideologies is due to their rejection. Gerhard Weinberg, '48. We agree
This free process of acceptance and with Mr. Weinberg's statement and
rejection, together with native modi- request its publication in the State
fication and growth, has produced College NEWS.
the ideological part of "the American way of life". If that way of life
Leonard A. Koblenz, '49
is to persist and grow, that process
Frederick C. Baron, '49
of acceptance and rejection must be
Gilford W. Wingate, '49
allowed to continue freely. The idea
that academic freedom must be reWarren W. Reich, '49
stricted to what some one or some
Stella MacLaren, '48
group considers to be in the best
Peter N. Youmans, '48
Interests of society, with criticism
Gerl Cooperman, '60
allowed only if it Is completely within the existing order — the idea
Joy Simon, '49
lauded by Stalin as intra-party
C. Rogers Nielson, '48
democracy — is one which we can
E. Baranowskl, '48
safely leave to the Russians.
M. Ardlto, '48
The solution for today's mass conJ. Skavina, '49
fusion does not lie in mass hysteria.
J. W. Jennings, '49
In a discussion of communist seM. E. Franks, '49
mantics on the same page of the
Chrlstiaan Llevestro, 'S9
Evangelist, the Reverend James M.
Glllis says, "The word most freMary J. Cooper, '49
quently used by communists to conJo Ann Joslln, '49
demn all who disagree with them
Jane Doherty, '49
is "fascist*". Let us not follow this
Bonnie J. Lewis, '49
path and call all with whom we disagree, communists, or imply that
Marjorie Williams, '49
they are. We might profit more from
Hilda Rivenburg-h, '49
adopting the attitude evidenced in
James Lawson, 'SO
the column by the Reverend
Jean
Wilcox, '48
George G. Higglns adjoining the
editorial.
"The Conference (NaG. Llsi. '49
.By PAULA FICHY.
Now that 48 has taken the place
of dear old 47 on the calenders it
St. Mike's Hand Team
looks like a good year, what with
the presidential election, Leap year
The Carpetbaggers, chalking up
State's varsity kekglers dropped
and a winning basketball team.
another win in MAA's "B" League, their match with the Albany Colretained their lead in the Intro- lege of Pharmacy Wednesday, bowThe Varsity has gotten off to a Sporting a record of four wins in
mural contest by defeating the Pot- ing by a 2-1 count. The loss sent
promising start in this '47-'48 sea- their five initial games, State will
ter PUls 31-20. In the "A" League, State into a second place tie with
son. The team has already won gun for their fifth win against
the E E. P. Varsity remained un- R.P.I. In the inter-collegiate leamore games in the 4 weeks of play Hamilton tomorrow night. This
„ ,,, ,
, ,„ , .
Siena retained its first place
than it won in the entire '46-'47 game will be played at Hamilton, i n ° n T T f n l ? / " f v W e d i ! f H S d a / o r ^ n v , " defeated by taking an easy victory gue.
position, and R.P.I. swept its match
over
the
Gents.
season. Counting the Alumni open- the Varsity returning for a home L T ' n f i t a defeatedBetaZeta 3 7
to stay in the lead-challenging
er the squad won 3 out of 17 games game with the Maritime Academy ™ g*** „ ! » ? 1B S t„ h^El «tJ Monday's Games
position.
In the Initial contest on Monday
last sea/on a n d l j » « a * g » J * * ^
^
, 3 1 * 8 8 T%£* £ J t l f t
Pharmacy lead-off the match by
4 out of 5 opponents this year. Prom
state carried a three-game win £ a m m a K a p p a , P h i h e l d o n t 0 ^ night, all five of Potter's Varsity
Houck's 185
men went wild, racking up 71 points evening's opener.
all indications the remander of the streak Into the St. Michael's game, o n d p l a c e wffh a r e c o r d o £ 3 a n d 0 .
season should follow its opening December 12, but dropped a 64-45 Atythe s a m e U m e S a y l e s t o o k p o s . while the Gents pushed in 21. Bort- paced the Pharmacists in their
P * " 1 ; , , , , . . . . .. . . h
iecls™'
I T p B r i e n and Basil s e s s i o n o f t n e d o r m l e a g u e l e a d b y nick and Justo shared honors with 185 jaced the Pharmacists In their
14 poinst each for the winners. Mul- opening win. Coming Into the secProbability is high that there are Karplak chipped in ten points defeating North Hall 24-4' and
to be busses to take students to a t apiece to pace State while O'Donnell Tommy More Hall 34-5 This gives lin, with 13, Moleszerske with 12, ond game, the Statesmen began to
least one of the "away" games after was high with fifteen for the win- t n e g i r l s f r o m partridge Street a and Miller with 11, completed the hit the alleys with more accuracy.
Bortnick chipped in with a
exams.
ners.
record of 4 and 0. Pierce took Wren Potter scoring. Dave Duncombe was Marty
208 game and Joe Carosella hit
..
,
State resumed its winning ways Hall, 18-9, to retain second place. high scorer for the Carpetbaggers the timber for 205. State's winning
With the change in weather also on December 13, downing a favored
Other games played this week in- while Bob Sorenson topped the Pills margin was thirty-six pins. I n the
came a change in the WAA bulletin Middlebury team by nine points, elude Newman's win over Tommy scoring list.
third and final game the Pharmaboard. Granted it looks like a work The final score was 52-43. State More house, 17-5, and Chi Sigma
The E.RP. Sceeps forfeited their cists rolled to a 775-722 win. Adsit
of a r t but may we here and now was on the top end of a 26-22 score Theta's defeat of A.E.Phi, 14-12, on game scheduled against the Ramb- lead the Pharmacy five with 176,
make a small criticism. We believe at half-time, after a two-point lead Tuesday and, on Wednesday night, lers in a "B" League contest.
while Dlz Dickinson's 187 was top
a bulletin board is mainly for the at the end of the first quarter. At wren's 18-13 defeat of Newman
Although the teams have not single for State. Although they
purpose of announcements and the end of the third period State Hall.
played an even number of games dropped the match the State bowlitems of general interest. If it loses led, 40 to 32, and in the final
Both of Sayles' games were free- due to cancellation of contests be- ers had a higher pin total than the
its functional purpose it should no period the Purple and Gold scoring affairs in which they had fore vacation, the team standings to Pharmacy 2362-2317.
longer masquerade under the name scored twelve points to the Ver- the advantage over their opponents date find the Pinks, K.D.R. and the
1 •£ 3 T.
State
of "Bulletin" board.
mooter's five to put the game on from start to finish.
As it stands now all announce- Ice.
In the Phi Delta Beta Zeta game Potter Varsity undefeated In theDickinson
157 145 187 439
'
A"
League.
The
Carpetbaggers
and
ments are tacked about 2 inches
STATE
the winners trailed 2-5 at the end Ramblers remain undefeated In the Carosella
146 205 141 492
above the bottom and drape over
FG P P TP of the first quarter and 4-7 a t the
Parley
145 151 112 408
2
the baseboard. This is especially Marzello
2
6 half; however, they held the BZ for- "B" League.
Bartalck
136 208 145 429
6
Standings:
2
poor if the paper happens to be a Schick
2
wards scoreless in the second half
Mullin
160 187 136 483
0
sign-up sheet. The signatures of George
2
4 and went on to win with Tilden
"A" League
0
the students become so illegible that Fersh
0
Won Lost
Totals
744 896 722 2362
0 tossing in six points and Koch two. Team
0
even they can't read them.
Kirby
2
4 The contest against KD was all in E.E.P. Varsity
2
2 10 phi Delt's favor, with them leading Pinks
The appearance of the Board Karplak
4
1
1
2
3 T
Pharmacy
2 10 11-4, at the half.
would also be greatly improved if O'Brien
4
K.D.R
1
Adslt
172 179 176 527
0
the announcements posted were Wheeler
0
0 The only "close" game of the week Gents
1
Witters
156 15rl 144 451
3
1
Coles
occurred when Chi Sig guards held St. Mary's Angels
0
more standard in character.
,
}
Hauck
185 147 164 496
2
0
Gamma Kap to a 5-4 score at theS.L.S
0
Dardeno
113 159 156 408
Lansky
1
half.
"B" League
Abbott
156 124 155 435
Outing Club Is holding a meetTotals
18
9 45
Team
Won Lost
ing at 7:30 Monday nite to make
Carpet baggers
2 0 Totals
782 760 775 2317
plans for a ski trip to North Adams
ST. MICHAEL'S
Ramblers
2 0
Novel
Ski
Club
Adds
on Saturday, January 17.
Individual
Averages:
(to date)
FP
T
P
PG
Shamrocks
1
Mulhns
177
1
13
Dean
6
Potter Pills
1
Dickinson
175
0
0 To Winter Program
Fitzgibbons
0
Van Derzee
0
Martnlck
166
0
0 Plans for the creation of a ski- St. Mary Beavers
Russell
0
Jayvees Clash With
0
Farley
153
Kasparovich
3
3
9 ing club have been under discussion E.E.P. Sceeps
0
Carasella
138
Tyl
0
0
0 between Coach Hathaway and enABC Five Tonight
Coffey
4
2 10 thusiastic sportsters. Beginners are
pa Beta bowed in a «-l contest to
1
1
3 welcome, since a class for instrucPointing for their third win of Yankowski
SLS.
Canboy
0
0
0
tion
in
the
art
of
skiing
will
be
conthe season, State's Junior Varsity
Justo, of the Potter team, rolled
Van Derzee, Potter
6
3 15 ducted by Coach Hathaway.
will meet Albany Business College at Guter
the high single of the afternoon,
O'Donnell
0
0
0
As
yet,
hours
for
meetings
have
the Albany Y.M.C.A. at 8 o'clock.
1
Shadzoc
0
0
0 not been set In order that they may Lead Bowling Tourney hitting 256, while Walsh, another
Tonight's game will be the Jayvee's S
' „„.
Potter man, captured high honors
CU U !U
4
4
12
be arranged most advantageously to
seventh of a nineteen game sched- • " *
for the three games with 659.
1
0
2 the greatest number of those wishTierney
In contests rolled before the vaule.
The following team standings
ing to participate. From all ap-cation recess, EEP and Van Derzee
After bowing
in their season
Totals
25 14 64 pearances, it is most likely that the remained tied In the Intramural have been announced by the MAA
openers to Potter Club, and Lippclub will go into action Saturday Bowling League with nine wins and Bowling Captains:
man's Pharmacy, the Jayvees took
Team
Won Lost
afternoons.
no defeats for each team. In third EEP
STATE
two from Skidmore. Next on the
9 0
Classes
will
probably
be
held
in
place is SLS with 7 wins and 2Van Derzee
FG PP T P
cage card was the overtime loss to
9 0
4 Washington Park. There is a pos- losses.
0
Schick
2
Pharmacy by a 40-39 count. Mai
SLS
7 2
0 slbility that trips to the Heidelbergs
0
0
Palleck paced the Junior States- Marzello
4 5
In games rolled Wcdnesdav nft- KDR
might
be
arranged.
Other
possl13
3
5
men in this thriller, chipping in George
3 6
ernoon, EEP took the Jerks In three KB
bilities
are
weekend
jaunts
to
Camp
8
4
Persh
2
with five field goals and a foul.
2 7
2 Johnson or use of the municipal games. Van Derzee took three Beavers
0
1
2 7
from the Angels and KDR captur- Angels
Traveling to Middlebury, the Jr Kirby
g
golf
course.
2
Varsity pushed the Verm'onters all Karplak
2
0 9
Personal possession of equipment ed all three from the Beavers. Kap- Jerks
2 j2
O'Brien
5
the way in losing 49-43. The Mid
0 is not necessary .since the WAA lias
0
0
dies grabbed an early lead, but were Wheeler
3 four pairs of skis with harnesses
1
1
forced to play out Uio string with Coles
4 unci poles accessible to those who
0
2
their first team to keep ahead of Lansky
do not own such equipment. Those
the fast-stepping Jayvees. Jim Wordesiring to purchase skis can take
I'otiils
20
12
52
den, Paul Carter and Mai Palleck
advantage of the opportunities afpaced the Statesmen.
forded by the WAA store for obMIDDLEBURY
With four long drills behind them
FG FP TP taining equipment at wholesale
the Jayvees are set to give A.B.C. Tola
2
2 price.
0
a battle tonight. Coach "Bolo" Maurer
0
0
3
Marsland has been scrimmaging the Tracy
1
9
4
Jayvees in long sessions in order Works
5
2 12
to have (he Junior Statesmen at Winsor
0
1
1
their best for tonight's encounter. Whulen
4
0
a
Dave Wetherby, Bill Dunn with Stevens
0
5
5
Worden, Palleck and Carter make
—
up the starting five.
Totals
1(! 11 43
In IM Leagues
Tie For Second
1.. D,fe.t Ol s««on Say/es, Phi Delf
Pace Hoop Tilts
THE
HAGUE
STUDIO
Where all the Students Meet
"Portraiture At Its Finest"
^
HOLLYWOOD
/Wore feqpfe, are. W * » £
ik* mr before, I
•
Varsity Invades Hamilton; EEP, Baggers Varsity Bowlers
Downs Middlebury Five Hold Top Places Bow To Pharm;
•%•
cms
PAfll
SWEET SHOP
EAST
COMES
TO TAKE
VOUR PORTRAIT
M4y9 #^*j4e%eH^^W •"JNreT^ AftVele^l* e^A,
"Dentyne Chewing
Home Made ICE CREAM
OPEN 9:00 to 6:30 DAILY
SODAS — CANDY - SANDWICHES
Evenings by appointment
Luncheon Served Daily
TRLEPHONE 4-0017
•• #. b w M l 1 * . «... < K * I H « H , N. f.
11
;;:;:" ";;T, OPEN DAILY AT • A. ML
Gum!"
,: zs
811 MADISON AVENUK
"Well, rub my eye*-if I'm dreaming of delicious
Dentyne Chewing Gum, don't wake me up I- Iffl
•II set for that keen, cleen t a s t e - a n d do I like
the way Dentyne helps keep my teeth white, tool
Dentyne Gum-—Made Only By Adamt
.
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
•TATE C O U k i a t NtW», FRIDAY, JAN. t , 1*47
Mart
ALBANY, N. Y;
direction of Miss Agnes E. Futterer,
Assistant Professor of, English,, will
be p r e s e n t t r i n ' Page ttttlli Ttfcsdny
night a t 8:30 p.m.
The traditional Junior Weekend
will be held February 6-7 with the
prom and coronation on Friday night
The cadet teaching program will and the class banquet on Saturday
go into effect with 18 English ma- night.
ors
going to area schools for 8- All group houses, fraternities, sorThe Faculty Committee from Representatives from State Col- week periods.
orities, etc. who wish to participate
Student Council will meet with the lege Forum, and from statewide lain State Fair, February 28, must
student committee from the fac- bor, veteran, consumer, civic, fra- The annual E. D. plays, under the
ulty next Thursday, January 15, in
the office of Dr. Ellen C. Stokes, ternal, and religious organizations
Dean of Women. These committees will participate in the Citizens Legwill discuss student-faculty rela- islative Conference of New York
tions with the purpose of furthering co-operation between the twoState. The conference will convene
at the Ten Eyck Hotel on Saturday,
groups.
Members of the ' faculty serving January 10.
on their committee are Dr. Ellen C.
The purpose of the conference is
Stokes, Dean of Women; Dr. Min- to help work out a program geared
nie B. Scotland, Assistant Profes//
sor of Biology; Miss Agnes E. Fut- to the interests of the majority of
the
people
of
New
York
State,
to
terer, Assistant Professor of English; Dr. Charles P. Stokes, Profes- bring this program to the attention
sor of Music; and Dr. Caroline A. of the legislature, and to provide a
Lester, Instructor of Mathematics. basis for achieving its enactment
Student Council members on the into law.
committee are Alice Prindle Walsh
and Gloria Gilbert, Seniors; Robert
Saturday's program will include
Wilcox, '48; Geraldine Cooperman registration, a general session, and
THE DEAN OF
and William Lyons, Sophomores; panel discussions on state aid for
and Helmuth Schultze, '91.
city budgets, housing and rent conAMERICA'S SPORTS WRITERS
Last y e a r
these committees trol, farmer and consumer, and labrought about changes in the ori- bor and civil liberties.
entation program, re-arrangement
of assembly seating, and other matters pertaining to conditions a t
State College.
Students, Faculty Forum -Delegates
Schedule Meeting To Participate
On Co-operation At Conference
News Brieh
hand their bids for-concessions to
Cathrine Donnelly, '49, by next Friday.
Registration for second semester
will be held January 26-28. Classes
will begin February 3.
The cast for the operetta, "H.M.S.
Pinafore," which will be presented
March 12-13, has been announced
by Dr. Charles F. Stokes, Professor
of Music.
Slate Program
For State College
A student radio committee repreAn open house sponsored by the senting State College, will take part
Art 6 class in Visual Aids Monday in a Public Service program on Staand Tuesday will feature material tion WROW on January 30. The
in all major and minor fields of- program is broadcast every Friday
fered at State. The exhibit will be at 4:15 p.m., and has been arranged
open from 9 a. m. until 5 p. m. both for all colleges In this area Including
days, with Art students there at all Union, R.P.I., Skidmore, Russell
times. Miss Ruth Hutchins, head of Sage and Siena.
the Art department Is directing the
The State College committee conactivities of the class sponsoring
sists of Joseph Roulier '48, Chairthe exhibit.
man; Dorothy Midgley, '47, Edith
Dell and Annalee Levine, Seniors,
and Peter and June Youmans, JunAnnounce Mimeograph Rules
iors.
In the future all organizations According to Miss Mary Elizabeth
that have their mimeographing Conklin, who released the informadone by Campus Commission must tion, the purpose of the program is
submit their material to Susan to bring to radio listeners an u p Miller, '50, a t least twenty-four to-date picture on what is going on
hours In advance,
in colleges in this area.
A final word to those who may be
running for office sometime. Often
in reconjt years candidates have
claimed that some other candidate
had found a way to beat the system. Don't worry. Under this system, there Is no mysterious way of
marking or not marking one ballot
which makes it count more effectively than any other ballot. Those
who believe they have found an
opening for finagling arc fooling
neither you nor the system, but
themselves.
Texts Claim System Accurate
You may see from an this Vv-.iy the
.system we have adopted Is referred
to by the texts on preferential voting as the best and most accurate
in existence.
Remember, though,
Mark your preferences carefully in
exactly the order in which you consider the candidates. If thai is what
you put into the ballot box, that is
what will come out.
Gerhard Weinberg '48
that it does not guarantee intelligent
voting. That is your job. Your intelligent or unintelligent voting will
give you intelligent or unintelligent
results correct to two decimal places.
Jaddi&#Ffccajfeb
tfmnfla/idffie
Vilwn i/o/( c/ia/tae to
C/ustrr/iefr/
T i l l ] F I R S T T H I N G VOL WILL
NOTICE i s IIIIIH
MILDNESS
O/HPt/HlflO/t
Ilw/f/.r
A'rs/ '/a/jdccos
J ^ A L W A I S MILDER
J | ? B E T T E R TASTING
0 € O 4 ) L i ; i t SMOKING
pwc
"Buy Where the Flowers Grow"
FLORIST & GREENHOUSE
Corner ol
"State" Representatives
JACK BROPHY
ONTARIO & BENSON
GEORGE BOULOS
UIAL4-U25
WALT SCHICK
COLLEGE FLORIST FOR YEARS
——-Special Attention to Sororities and Fraternities
ews
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1047
I»
C«pyri|hl 1948, liooin I Mu» UIACC* CV
Ito^
VOL.. XXXI NO. 1 2
E D Students To Present
Three Plays Tuesday
*7o Qvunan 107 QlaUU
Robert Bartman, a former
member of the class of fortythree, returned recently from
Vienna and Salzburg, In Austria,
where he has spent seevral years.
Monday he spoke to members of
Dr. Meyer's German 107 classes,
discussing the conditions he encountered, during his years in
Austria and Germany.
Release Casts
Mieras To Lead
For Productions
SCA Discussion
On Prejudice
Mr. Leo R. Noonan, Representative Assemblyman from Cattaraugus
County, and a former superintendent of schools, will be presented in
A f t e r LortQ A b s e n c e
assembly this morning by Commuters' Club to speak on the pending
Futterer W i l l Direct
Fraternities released their bids legislation on teachers' pay which
This former State student had
before vacatioon, and ninety-nine is now before the Assembly. VotFarce, Comedy, Drama
men accepted their bids. This tops the ing will take place on the MAA an unusual position, working with
sorority pledge number by nine. The resolution concerning line trans- the United States Forces in AusIn Page A t 8:30 P.M.
SCA and Newman Club will close
fraternities again held pledge ser- fers which was discussed in the last tria De-Naziflcation. Mr. Bart- their semester activities with meet_,.
• „„„,.„,„ ,„ ,,
„ „ „ ... ML
vices after four years of being "in assembly before vacation. Next Pri- man was in charge of a civilian ings this week. Canterbury Club . , T o ^ ^ J l ^ J ?
IJ" I I£§
abstentia." Initiation will take cUy, January 17, a concert by the internment camp In Austria,
,MMr
place next semester.
chorus and orchestra under the where high-ranking members of has made arrangements for a Cor- S*-^•J$^£&ffi
porate Communion Service at St. K S & S * £ § & S 8 & £
Kappa Delta Rho
direction of Dr. Charles Stoses, Pro- the Storm Troopers were confined,
following
the
defeat
of
Henry Druschel, Harold Weber, lessor of Music, will be given in asftsn"mester1programUnday t 0 * * **&SwTi
d f t m t ^ i
Seniors, William Baldwin, Donald sembly and a plaque is to be pre- Germany
its semester progiam.
n e s E F u t t e r e r > A s s i s t a n t professor
Bergen, Robert Dickinson, Marlyn sented in memory of Donald White,
The general meeting of SCA will o f English, will direct,
Mr. Bartman expects to return
McClintock, Juniors, Robertson Bak- a former member "f the Clasi of '48.
take place a t the Booker T. Wash- T n e t i U e o f t h e f a r c e i s » A M a n
er, William Blasberg, John Brophy,
Mr. Noonan studied a t Boston to State College next semester, to ington
Center, Wednesday. The should Have a Wife," written by
Donald Dickinson, Robert Peters, College, Harvard and at Blackstone complete his Senior year, which
will meet in the Lounge at L l s a R e m bova. I t is a story of two
Clifton Thorne, Harry Williams, College .•" Law. He has worried as was interrupted by the war. He members
P. M. and depart in a body actresses, Malpomene Wimpus and
Sophomores, William Dumbleton, a newspaper reporter and later was will graduate in June with the 7:30
from there. A panel discussion has Adelaide Adala Dade, who are vying
Robert Eaton, Donald Hoyt, Basil city editor of the Quinery 1Tele- class of '47.
been planned on the topic, "How f o r the affections of the same man.
Karpiak, Emory Osborn, Thomas gram. For eighteen years In was
to Control Group Prejudices." Mar- mcidently, the man is already marTrainor, David Vincent, freshmen, principal of Farmersville High
ion Mieras, 48, will be discussion r l e d ) b u t t n e y d o n > t k n o w lt_
and Robert Bennett, Graduate stu- School and at the present time is a.
leader while the moderator will be c a s t | o r Farce
dent.
member of the Assembly Committee
I
a representative of the local Coun- Malpomene—Ellen Sargent, '49.
Kappa Beta
on Public Educatim.
O U p i e S cil against Discrimination. Other Adelaide—Louise McArdle, '49.
Calvin Zlppin, Senior, Samuel
In addition to the conesrt in next
participants in the panel will be Delores Smith—Beverly Sittig, '49.
Scott, Junior, Alvin Feklman, Thorn- week's assembly, there will be the
Kathryn Booth, '47, Muriel Owens Maiden aunt — Geraldine Mullaas Llsker, Marvin Wayne, Sopho- presentation of a bronze plaque in
and Harry Philip Williams, Sopho- ney, '49.
Hired girl—Annette Gardiner, '49.
mores, Irwin Baumel, Seymour memory of Donald White, a former
mores, and Leonard Weeks, '50.
Charlie—Marvin Wayne, '49.
Fersh, Lawrence Fried, Fred Jacobs, member of the Junior class, who
SCA plans to send delegates to
Props—J. Stuart Campbell, '48.
Charles Margolin, Norman Pomer- died last summer. This plaque Is
the Eastern New York State Stuantz, Arnold Rice, Samuel Schalit, to be presented by Alice Williams,
, ,
_,
dent Christian Movement Confer- Mrs. McGillicuddy—Gloria Jaffer,
Henry Traub, ireshmen, David Tra- President of the Class of '48, In be Adrlenne Iorio, 48, game captain, e n c e t 0 b e h e l d a t V a s s a r college, '48.
chenberg, Graduate student
half of the class. Both the Junior n a s announced that four couples February 14 to 16. The theme of Archie—Joseph Francello, '49.
Potter Club
class and Myskania are responsible from State College have entered the conference is 'The Christian
Florist boy—Martin Bush, '50.
ciyde~Cook, Henry Ruback, Elmo for the instigation of plans for this scores in the National Intercollegi- Student's International ResponsiThree young things — Patricia
blllty
Sparks, Seniors, Russell Bailey, memorial. The money was taken a t p B r i d e p Tournament The scores
"
Devlin, Beatrice Hartman, and AuMartin Bortnick, Jack Kirby, George from the Student Association sur'B
"
. '
,~~ Newman Club will conduct its drey Jerue, Sophomores.
Poulos, Fred Root, Juniors, Albert plus and the plaque is to be affixed e n t e l ' € d w e r e t n o s e received in the m e e t m g Thursday at Newman Hall.
Three young men—Frank Grinzi,
Beninati, Ronald Dixon, Bruce Han- to the piano in Page Hall.
play-offs in Pierce Hall Monday, prior to the business meeting, there Thomas Llsker, and Jacob Schuhle,
sen, John Jennings, Rober. KittAt a Student Council meeting December 16.
will be Benediction in the Chapel. Sophomores,
redge, Robert Kloepful, Donald Lan- Eloise Worth, Alice Prindle, Juniors,
The business meeting will consist "The Dreamy Kid"
sky, Waller Schick, Leonard Skol- Jean Pulver, '49, and Geraldine
Before the play-offs there were of the nomination and election of The drama is entitled "The
nick, Joseph Zanchelli, Sophomores, Cooperman, '50, were appointed to five couples remaining, but one a new president, due to the resig- Dreamy Kid" by Eugene O'Neil. The
nation ofA n n
Joseph Carosella, Clifford Crooks, take charge of State Fair.
couple defaulted and was automat- w
Cullinan, '47, who dreamy kid is a tough young kid
il1
Lindley DeGarmo, Richard FeathA report was made by the com- fcally eliminated
graduate at the end of first whose sister, Ceeley Ann, is Conors, Kenneth George, Edward Gor- mittee that was appointed to see
'
'
semester, and a speaker afterwards, stantly trying to keep him from the
don,
Robert
Horsmon.
Benjamin
about
the
possibilities
of
a
new
The
four
remaining
couples
who
Refreshments
will be served and clutches of the police, and of his
Jackson, Earle Jones, John King, mimeograph machine that a macht n e r e w111 b e
played
32
rounds
each
areClardancing
directly fol- gfrl,
who has
bad influence Irene,
upon him.
Thea scene
of the
Joseph Kotzin, John Lang, Walter ine will be purchased as soon as ence Oarr-Ray Pohl, Seniors, score
lowing the meeting.
play
is
the
deathbed
of
the "kid's"
Lockwood,
Thomas
McCracken, one is available.
7490; Judith Dube-Jean Elting, The Corporate Communion for
Pierce McGrath, John Moore, John
In the last assembly before vaca- Seniors, score 4260; Gloria Baker, Episcopal students at 8 A. M. Sun- mother, Mammy Saunders.
The cast:
Morley, Thomas O'Brien, Anthony tion, it was pointed out that when '46-Donald Herold, '48, score 1430; day at St. Andrew's Church will be
The "Kid"—John Lubey, Jr., '48.
Prochilo, Lyle Walsh, freshmen.
the Men's Athletic Association sub- Martha Dunlay-Margery Pender, followed by communion breakfast
miller! its hudffPt Inst snrinsr mnnv «U«WIM, uunmy-iviurgery
rentier, IUUUVVOU u,y w i > " " « " ' u ' i »'«•""»»
Ceeley Ann—D. Marie Grieco, '49.
Sigma Lambda Sigma
Irene—Marianne Standing, '49.
Charles Chase, Senior, Johin Ham- of the tern were v e r T ndefin te S e n i o r s ' s c o r e 1 2 1 1 ' The couple who which is to be served in the Rec
of
Mammy Saunders—Mary Alethea
mond, Gilbert Holliday, G. Rogers since there had been no budget * u , sixteen Canterbury Club, requests that all
Juniors,
played
Nielson, Joseph Stenard, Juniors, a period of several years on which ,.° . „ , , " m , „ c „„„ n „ f „ n
who plan to attend sign up on theCheatham, '49.
Frederick Baron, Robert Bottomley, to base estimates, and that it has I0U1K1S w l D n a s c o l e 0 I " " •
"Shall We Join the Ladies?" by
Canterbury Club bulletin board.
Sir James Barrie is a comedy which
John Coulter, John Favreau, Joseph been necessary to make several These scores were sent in to the
takes place in the country house of
Francello, Harold Mills, Henry changes thus far this year and that tournament board where they will
an English lord. It is a story of
O'Meara, Michael Portanova, Mer- more are anticipated. Because it is D e 00 mpared with scores of other
the revenge which the lord is seekton Thayer, Gifl'ord Wingate, Soph- often desirable to make line trans- colleges represented in the toumaing for the mysterious killing of his
omores, Richard Clark, Paul Filipi, fers on short notice without waiting m e n t ftlld r a t e d accordingly
brother.
Peter Havey, Christian Liev"-fro, for the weekly meeting of the StuAbrahaiu Marzello, John O'Connor, dent Board of Finance, a resolution
The eight contestants will play
The cast:
Warren Reich, Philip ShefTer, Don- was made to amend the Constl- the final rounds sent from Chicago
The host—Harold H. Mills, Jr„ '49.
aid Taylor. Lloyd Taylor, freshmen. (Continued on Page 6, Column 2) Saturday, February 8.
Lady Jane—Margaret Franks, '49.
Mrs. Preen—Margaret Hoefner, '49.
Gloria Gilbert, '48, chairman of
the Student Union Board, has an- Mr. Preen—Frederick Baron, '49.
Sir Joseph—Marvin Sultan, '49.
nounced that a Student Union Day
Mr. Valle—William Cornwell, '48.
will be conducted Thursday noon
rhythm. Her adaptability was so in the Commons. Suzanne Hildreth, Mr. Gourley—Everson Kinn, '49.
Pearl Piinius, brilliant
young
amazing and her progress so no- '48, is general chairman, and Alice Mrs. Castre—Joan Wurzler, '49.
dancer, was all set to become a docLady Wrathle—Jeannette Biggs,
ticeable that In May, 1941, she won Williams, '48, is in charge of pubtor and was majoring in psychology
'48.
a scholarship offered by the New licity.
at college when dancing claimed
Dance Group in New York City.
Miss Valle—Jean Ineson, '49.
her most unexpectedly—and quite
fortunately for the entertainment
At about this same time, tire NYA The feature attraction of the day Mrs. Bland — Dorothy Midgeley,
world. Willi her dance troupe, indance group was discontinued and will be a fish pond, where State's '49.
cluding drummers, sinners, and
Miss Primus went from one unre- available men will be confined by
Captain Jennings — Robert Ten
pianists, Miss Primus will present
lated job to another—from a wold- strings on their feet, behind a Eyck, '47
primitive dances, blues and Jazz,
er-burner at the Todd Shipyard In screen. The women will bid for Miss Isit—Eleanor E. Lofthouse,
spirituals, and dances of protest, at
Hoboken to a teacher of health co- chances at the strings in the "dream '49.
a performance at !):;») P. M. Weducation in Manhattan and Brooklyn stream." The highest bidder will be T l l e butler—B. William Blasberg,
nesday, February ft, in Page Hall
summer schools.
allowed to "nail a male," according
under the auspices of the Dramatic
In the latter part of 1942, she to Miss Gilbert, and dance with (Continued from Page 3, Column $J
and Art and Inter-Group Councils,
seriously began to think about him. Phillip Lashinsky, '47, is In
dancing as a career and started lo charge of the fish pond.
Horn in Trinidad, British West
Indies, Miss Primus came to the
study with representatives of nil This is the first student union Sponsor French Art Exhibit
United States when she was very
the various dance techniques.
Day of the year. Admission to the
young and attended Hunter College
Finally, In 1943, Miss Primus was Commons will be five cents, and no Miss Ruth Hutchins, Assistant
High School and Hunter College.
ready to give her first professional one will be allowed to enter, u»li>ss Professor of Fine Arts, has a n nonnced that the art department is
Her ambition was to be n doctor
concert as a recognized artist. Her i)t> pays,
sponsoring an exhibit of French
and It was with that in mind that
debut took placa at the New York
paintings In the upper hall of
she took her HA. in biology and
City Young Men's Hebrew Associaprc-medloal sciences. Later she
tion, which makes a practice ol w
• . D —. Draper next week. This exhibit is
r
m
took graduate courses In health edgiving new dancers an opportunity M y e L o n t e s t b l a n k s In r . U .to take the place of a showing of
PKARL PRIMUS
student work which has been postucation and psychology.
to appear bofore the public.
_ . .. , ,
. a
„
In 1040, willi no posit ion open to
Though Miss Primus had been
Entry blanks for the Sammy Kaye poned until after examinations.
dancing a satisfactory poetry contest' are now available. The pictures taken from pages of
her In the field for which she wasno previous training of any kind finding
qualified, she went to the National along this line, she was able, means of expression — particularly students who wish to enter the the French magazine Illustration,
youth Administration and was through her innate vitality and the expression of her feelings about contest may obtain them at the P. are reproductions of 19th century
placed in their dance group as an sense of motion to translate the her nice a i d about democracy—she O. The closing date for submit- paintings currently being shown in
under-study. Although she had had movemenis she was taught into (Continued on Page 3, Column 3) ting poems is February 27.
the National Gallery In Washington.
4 State C
In Intercollegiate
Bridge Contest
ff
(Continued from Page 8, Column 3)
elected candidate and one of 30/163
for each second choice. To avoid
such complications,
each
ballot is made equal ot 100 points. In
this case that meant that 81.33
points from each ballot were retained by the elected candidate while
the voter could give 18 points to his
second choice. Since no ballot value
can be created, fractions of a surplus point are always omitted. This
loss does not affect the election as
long as a small number of offices is
being filled. In the Myskania election used as an example here, the
average loss per ballot was .001072.
Thus, you get proportional representation correct, to all Intents and
purposes, to two decimal places.
Z.444
Greeks Offer Bids
To. Fellows
AAt. State
.
YOURSELF A WINNER
"U'4, Really Veny Simple .
ollege
State
Four Fraternities Commuters Club
Announce List Brings Speaker
O f 99 Pledges To Assembly
* PICK THE ABC CIGARETTE
FOR MILDNESS A N D YOU PICK
Art Students Sponsor
Visual Aids Display
LIBRARY
To Raise Money
For Student Union
Pearl Primus To 'Trip The Light Fantastic, Feb. 5
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