State's Varsity Cagers NoseOutABC44-39 Gamma Kap Six Hold Top Place

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i i ' >• * -'•--{ i
PACK, * .
STATE COLLEGE NEWS,, FRIDAY,
MARCH 1. .1040
State's Varsity Cagers
NoseOutABC44-39
By FRANK WOODWORTH
Gamma Kap Six
Hold Top Place
In Basket League
There seems to be considerable
Newman Tops Phi Delt;
agitation over the ping-pong situation. Recent practice has shown
Rares Upset BZ 13-11
that there are far too many pingMARY LIZ SULLIVAN
State added another basketball
There were surprises In the air
pong enthusiasts than present faFirst we think it only right to triumph when it defeated Albany
.,,,,
:ii'„.
m u ^ ,,„„f Tuesday night as two unconquered
give apologies where they are due. Business College Wednesday night
cilities can accommodate. The best t e a m s £ o w e d ta d e f e a t a n d ^
One of our very dear friends seems a t Page Hall Gym to the tune of
m
possible solution to this problem G a m m a Kap squad undisputed leadto have been very much offended at 44-39.
^
In the first quarter Combs started The WAA bowling-league continued seems to be the purchase of a new e r s 0 fI i ..
b a s k e t b a l l ,„.„...
something we wrote last week. The
n e Da
table. We suggest that a Men's
sKer,Dan league. The
,
,.
one time friend Is Tlchy who spent State off with a set shot. Christo- .. .
week as two more matches were Athletic Association committee in- number 13 seemed to have a magic
a perfectly miserable afternoon pher, ABC's forward tried several rthis
ol e
Friday because of curious people long shots but failed to tally. Enos, s e t f o/ r ° « - ™ey resulted in an up- vestigate the cost of a new table spell as Phi Delt lost to Newman
Moreland, beaten by Gamma and equipment, then present this 1 3 . 1 0 a n d t n e R a r e g d o w n e d B z 13 _
who wanted to know what size shoe high scorer for ABC, pushed three K a
exciting, well-fought
and a draw in the Psi Gam- information to Student Association n { t
she wears—the horrible part of it of his several points through the c h,P,
6
isl
8 m a t c n a s e a c h t e a m w o n with a recommendation that we „ fml mu cp B„
is that she had to tell them that hoop. Marsland, Combs, and Fee- n e
buy
a
new
table.
We
are
sure
that
«
game.
she wears size nine. That isn't so ney each made foul shots and Combs °
The Newman-Phi Delt contest was
In last Thursday's match, Gam- the members of Student Association
horrible when you stop to think of then tallied on a pass from Evans.
would approve this purchase.
the lively curtain-raiser on these
how high the sizes go in shoes. The Lubiniecki and Combs matched ma Kap beat Moreland by over 100
We also have had maintenance mid-season upsets. Each team wary
part that really killed her was when foul shots. ABC again tried long pins in t h e first game, the total difficulties. Recently MAA bought of the other, the first quarter lacked
shots
but
failed
to
score.
Combs
score
being
654-543.
The
second
some fellow in the Commons decided
four new paddles and they are al- precise playing and ended 2-2. The
to try on her shoe t o see just how tallied another basket when Mullin game also went to Gamma Kap by a ready in a deplorable condition. I t next period saw Newman gain t h e
came
in
for
Evans.
Marsland,
a
score
of
616-589.
Dikeman
of
the
big it really was—well it fit him, so
has been the habit of participants three point lead they held for the
now he knows. The moral is—either hard fighter, forced ABC to call a Moreland squad, rolled the highest to throw the paddles down on the rest of the game. Maggio and Tilden
time
out.
McGrath
scored
on
a
single
of
167
with
Pedisich
of
Gamdon't go to the Commons or else pushup and State TOOK THE BALL ma Kap following close behind with benches after they have finished each made eight points for their
if you must go then go in your stock- down but failed to score. ABC tried a 162.
using them. This is probably done respective teams but Cooper's steady
ing feet.
a pass but Mullin intercepted and
Tire second tie of the season oc- more in carelessness than in malice pass-work and Sulich's clever r e Some Memoirs
passed to Marsland who failed to curred Tuesday when Psi Gam and but it results in rapid deterioration coveries balanced the scales in NewRemember Camp Johnston — this score _ as the quarter ended 9-6 in 0 n i s i g e a c n bowled winning games. of equipment. Paddles are not made man's favor,
is just to remind you that it is still State's favor.
There were no exceptional scores to stand such rough treatment. The
cork covering becomes loosened and BZ Upset
there. At least we think it is! Fourth Second Quarter
during the match, the high single be- chips. MAA cannot afford to re- The game between the Rares and
page seems so odd this year with so
„ u
, _
, . . . , ing rolled by Regan of Psi Gam with plenlsh athletic supplies that are B Z did not indicate an upset in
little mention of Camp Johnston. We
Combs and Enos matched shots g
worn out by carelessness. Let's the early stages as t h e BZ team
can remember the days when that and Feeney added a foul point. 14 ' N o l a
c h i g i , h,h scorer
make an effort to be more thought- o p e n e d their drive. They managed
was a source of one of our main Simmons made one under the bas- d
j
|erdo* f Psi
135 Dins
stories. Well we better not say any- ? « W h f£n C ° m b „ S f?fc t i e ^ b a l TO Gam, holding the record of 186 in ful of the equipment that we now t o k e e p t h e spirited Rares in check
u n t i i the last quarter when Davidson
thing—we may have to rely on S ? ^ i ? ? d M . a r s l a 5 ^ l o s t ">• the tournament, evidently wasn't have.
e v e n e d t h e s c o r e t o 11 11
Camp Johnston yet. Anyway since
Athletic
Questionnaires
" - Inthe
6
0
u
to
a r b o w l i n g o n l y 1 0 2a n d 9 2
hoX
? t"""
h e "D ba s ak est ' k,,eKloe
t P
^ til S1 »
» '
'
f r( ^ nIefa3
we really haven't heard anything— s™
1 , i, si Gam took the first game 566 to
„,
, , ... , . ,
..,,, closing minutes of the period a foul
could be that the dear old camp is S S ^ f ^ S v , ' ? ' b ° ^ 5 3 1 a n d . O h i Sig the second, 583.
We would like to devote a little w a s c a n e d o n BZ and Olmstead sank
snowed under. One good thing that OHare and McGrath had missed ru„a_r ,a„m, _a K „ _
foul
shots.
Marsland
fought
hard
^
"
P
KalLS
2
Tl.
Av.
the snow is bringing is an opporABC's basket, but O'Hare tap- O sborne
118 107 225 113 among the men of the college. The
tunity for a new sport club at State. under
purpose
of
these
questionnaires
is
Gamma
Kap Tops KD
ped one in. Combs scored on a nice p „ r i !„ l r H
1q q
162 301 151
, '„ ,
,, „ ,
If enough people are interested, a set shot and McGrath added a point ^ x "
\9R 118 246 123 to find out where the male athletic T„ n, e l,e a „
interest lies so we can devote our
* ™ l e a d f e l ? themselves
skiing club may be organized. If on a foul shot. Evans came back p „ ' „
\Zn 100 222 111 new
v a n
athletic program to your needs g» ?
exhibition of the team-work
some cars can be obtained, then per- in for Marsland. Enos and Sim- worth
147 129 276 138 and desires. We, therefore, would t h a t P"* t h ™ , o n top when they
haps some skiing trips to Vermont mons both missed foul shots then Moreland
appreciate a 100% response to these overwhelmed the KD squad 23-5.
may be made. The only suggestion Enos scored and State started pass- riu, a m Q „
,„
we have to make about this is that ing the ball around. Reed scored ulKLUl'lA
" ' 167 304 152
circulars. In that way only can we T r u e ' t h e y d l d n fc m e e t w i t h
^
102 108 210 105 adjust our program to fit your likes m u c h opposition but they proved
the organization be a little on the the last basket of the half with Boyton
111 226 113
lis
X
that
speedy side. When something of State ahead 20-12. I t was only in S°*
lg 96 174 87 and dislikes. Please fill these out
all who plan to challenge their
this type is discussed the snow usu- the last few seconds of the quarter ,,„„,,„::':"
>,< 107 218 109 conscientiously so we can judge crown will meet a determined wellally begins to melt, so maybe if the that State really started to pass "acKiiage
what you really want. We now knit team.
in
members of the club hurry up, at
118 237 119 have enough men to formulate a The other game of the evening
the
ball
around.
Daly
119
least one or two trips can be taken
02 194 97 nhys.cal education program but it was a match between the Whiz Kids
before the spring thaws!
Third Quarter
Yerdon
102 111! 218 109 is imperative that, we have your and Tommy More. The Whiz Kids
Complaint Dept.
Sweeney
100 98 201 101 full cooperation to make it a well triumphed 14-12 m a close but
So many things came in under
sloppy game. League games played
Feeney opened up this quarter Kisiel
103 127 269 135 organized program.
this heading that it is sometimes with a basket and Feeney added Regan ZZZZZZZZ. 142
, ,
, „ . .. .,
on Saturday saw the Rares winhard to try to talk about the ones three more points to this score, c\y\ SJ„.
124 230 115 Intramural Basket hull
.
.
i, , _ _
, . „ ,..
that are the most important. One Christopher made a foul shot and Mather
106 315 240 123
ring over P.si Gamma 14-6, with
thing that was brought up this week; Combs scored on a pass from Fee- Nolan ..ZZZZZZ.ZZ. i l114
l
227 114
The intramural basketball list is Davidson making nine of the points
concerns the gym floor. The kids ney. On a fast break, Simmons DoiiardZZZZZZ'. 113 96 184 92 mounting rather slowly. At the for her team. A decisive Moreland
are supposed to wear sneaks when failed to tally but Combs scored on Rourke
88 114 227 114 present writing there are only 21 victory was evident over Farrell in a
they have gym, but in some way a trick shot. The ball changed Pender ............... 113
names s.'jned. If enoinh of you near shut-out game 27-1. The other
'ZZZZZ
or other,
the floor is becoming hands several times until Enos
fellows are interested we will be two games that were scheduled were
scratched. Also both the fellows and pushed through a basket. On a
able to set up an intramural sched- awarded by forfeit, KD to Phi Deli,
the girls are registering complaints pass from Bortnick Combs again
ule for the remainder of the sea- and Tommy More to Sayles.
as to the dust on the floor which came through with a shot typical of
son. Otherwise, the list will merely
the
kind
which
made
him
high
leaves them, as one of the girls put
be another sheet of wasted paper.
scorer
of
the
game.
McGrath
It, "coal black." When the girls
Due to various activities in the gym RETURN BOUTS SCHEDULED
it will be
one, night
,/Continued
,,,,,:
, ,from
•
, Col. ,!'
matched
these
two
points
and
addfinish gym and the fellows finish
, but
,available
, it
,. will
.,,only
, ' possible
umiv
h.
Ui x
The
second
game
In
the
rivalry
per
week
be
to
.
„
'
•'
'
ed
two
more
on
a
pair
of
foul
shots.
basketball practice, they are more
FG FP TP
,
,
schedule two o.- more games in one Lubiniecki, f '' '
than ready for the showers—in fact Lubiniecki circled both teams ands e r l e s w i.„
l
3
n bt>
on
1
a workable
will be Herrlngton. f
I^W
Wednesday to
night.
As soonnumber,
as the teams
list increases
baths would be more to the point scored. Bortnick made a foul shot
0
in the Page Hall gymself < ed and games will begin. Don't ^.rlslopher. f ZZ ZZZZ.'. 0
and do more good. Couldn't some- and Evans and Simmons went in for wafternoon,
2
hen
Uie
hesitate
because
you
feel
that
you
,
,
,.
,
Bortnick
and
Marsland.
Enos
undefeated
Sophomore
;
nn
f
(|
Enos, c
thing be done about this—like swish22
sc uacl w i u a a l n m e e t l h e
aren't skilled enough In basketball Sm.'th, e
B l l r s t o f U lFreshman
ing a mop back and.forth once In a scored twice but Mullin and Reed s llx I n UlL
t)
c
to play. Our purpose in setting up O'Hare, g
in
quick
succession
gained
back
the
'
rivalry
while?
2
lost points. Feeney made a foul games, the Sophomores defeated the this program is to give you an op- McGrath,
It)
portunity to make yourselves more DuNuzzo.
shot to end the quarter with State Freshmen 36-11.
0
still ahead.
In order to win the rivalry credit proficient and to erase some of the
in basketball, a team must claim abdominal lumps that have made
Totals
Fourth Quarter
if the themselves prominent. Quit hitting
14 11 39
t w o o u t 0f l n r e e
games,
Score a! hall-time: 20-12 State.
Hon nick to Mullin to Feeney set Sophomores arc again successful on me on the head. Lashinsky!!
Stated next games will be with
up a score for State. Enos tallied Wednesday, they will automatically
and Christopher and Feeney match- come Into possession of the coveted Rcses to the Student Body
Siena on March 5, and Albanv
eel foul shots. Christopher again three rivalry points, while a Frosh
It seems fitting and proper here Pharmacy on March 7. The first
MAA's ping-pong tournament con- made a foul shot. Enos and Reed victory would necessitate a third
to
commend the student body for Us game w.U be away while the Phurm
tinues this week as nine singles committed a double foul, but only game between the two classes bea m o w l H l ; r jll,v, (l l l t S U U e
l
'
matches and one doubles match have Enos made the point. On a nice fore it final winner would be deter- enthusiastic support of the basket- «
ball
team.
The
good
attendance
••• — •
•••
been played off in the first round. puss Heed sto*:ped Enos' fry for a mined,
In the singles, Weber took two goal. On a fast break Mullin do- The Freshman icam showed a and cheering at the home games
REWARD
out of three games from Pavreau; fended ABC's basket, alone. In great deal of improvement over the leaves little to be desired. The fellor
Wc.'iner set Feeney back two In a quick order Heed, Enos, and Feeney Myska.nia-Frosh name when they lows on the team give a lot of their
Gold-top, Maroon
row; Lashingsky defeated Soderlind; seared foul goals. Enos scored the met the Sophs, However, the ex-time to basketball and your team
loyally shows them that It is Lime
Miner downed O'Meara; Mullin beat last basket for either team and then perl combination of Quinn and Til- well
EVERSHARI' FOUNTAIN PEN
spent.
Krtll; Mallery upset Nagengast in State froze the ball in the closing (\>>i\, Sophomores, will prove a chalWanted lor its sentimental value
two out of three; and Dickinson seoonds ot play, The game ended lenge to the hopeful Frosh basNotify MARIE MARKHAM '44
wlth State on the top end of a 44- ketecrs. The addition of Lytic,
turned baek Dowe two straight.
Frosh guard and Soulieh, Frosh forSullivan, winner of a match with 39 scon
ward, will prove important to the
Palevsky. last week, was defeated by Box Scon
Frosh, With the additional pracWelner In a half-mark play-off.
Pharmiicisls
STATE
tice which both teams have had t B T A f l l . l S H f D l o o s
COMPLIMENTS
Other matches yet to take place in
FG Fl" TP
PHONG "t 20^(1
since their last encounter, anything
this stage of the MAA singles are; Combs, t ...
10
IB7 CENTRAL AVE
3 23 may bo expected. In any event, it
OF
Weber vs. the victor of the Wag- Heed, f
2
1
A L B A N Y . N. Y.
5j'. promises to be a hard fought, excitner-Smlth contest; Lashinsky vs. Feeney, f .
2
11 ing game,
4
Miner; Mullin vs. the winner of the Kloepi'el, l
0
0
0
Bolles-Oarr game; and Mallery vs. Mullin, c
2
1
0
Simmons, c
Dickinson.
1
2
0
1
I
3
Only one first round match In the Bortnick, c
0
1)
0
MAA doubles has ben played so fur. Evans, g ...
Western & Quail
1
1
00
This was the Mullin-Weiner vs. Marsland, g
2();i Central Ave.
15c n game for school leagues
Bortnlck-Feeney contest, in which
Totals
17 10 44
from
0
A.M.
to
0
P.M.
the Mullin-Weiner combination was
210 Central Avonue Albany, N. Y.
victorious.
(Continued on Paya l, Column 5)
Return Bouts Scheduled
With Siena, Pharmacy
Gamma Kap's
Bowling String
Leads In League
' 4 8 - ' 4 9 Clash
In Second Game
Ping-Pong Sets
Near Semi-Finals
H. F. taiktl & Son
CAMPUS
CENTRAL
Barber Shop
RI0E ALLEYS
RESTAURANT
State College News
Z.444
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY,
MARCH 8. 1046
New Merit Tests Will Meet Need Class O f 1946
Tops Dean's List
For Higher Standards In Teaching
For 1st Semester
Psychology, Philosophy Teachers Grouped
According to a pattern set a t
Skinner To Make Hearts
"Young And Gay" In Page
VOL. XXX NO. 18
Assembly Today
W i l l Consider
Myslcania Issue
Her heart's still young and
gay, so she's following it to
State.
Five years ago last September,
Basis O f Examinations Syracuse, eligibility lists will place The Dean's List for first semester, Cornelia Otis Skinner, famous
Changes In Constitution
teachers in the following groups: 1945-46, released for publication by authoress, actress, monologist,
With the gradual increase in com- kindergarten through third grade, Dean Milton G. Nelson, contains and radio star, made her first
Delay Scheduled Debate
petition and salaries in the teach- fourth through sixth grade, seventh 234 'names as compared with 245 appearance in Page Hall. State
ing profession, the natural result through eighth or ninth grades, the first semester of last year and liked Miss Skinner, so, on April
Between Rival Classes
would be an increase in the schol- and for high schools in the following 204 in 1943. On the current list, 53 3, Dramatics and Arts Council
astic and professional standards re- fields: art, biology, chemistry, com- names are from the freshman class will again present the famous
The assembly program this mornquired of the teachers. That this mercial, English, French, science, which is identical with the number star to the students of State.
ing will be a business meeting a t
is a fact is being evidenced by the German, guidance, home economics, of freshmen on dean's list last year
She has just completed a sucwhich t h e discussion of t h e new
establishment in many schools of industrial arts, Italian, Latin, li- and 11 more than the number in
cessful run on Broadway playconstitution will continue. The
merit lists based on examinations brary science, mathematics, music, 1943. Sixty-nine Sophomores or ing the lead in John Golden's
rivalry debate, originally planned
of professional and subject matter physical education, social studies, 24% of the class are on Dean's List production, "The Theatre." Miss
for today's program has been postgiven to teachers.
Spanish, and trade and industrial and, as in 1945 with 83 and 1943 Skinner is best known a t the poned until next Friday in order t o
System New in N. Y.
subjects. When the final results with 69, the greatest number of stu- present time as the co-author
allow the discussion.
Although this system h a s been are weighed the professional exam- dents on the list are Sophomores. with Emily Kimbrough of Our
The motion on the floor will be
used in other states, it is a recent ination and scholarship will be con- 23.9% of the Junior Class or 58 Hearts Were Young and Gay.
that
proposing a new method by
sidered
first
with
the
subject
field
students have achieved a B average
innovation in New York because
This mistress of all dramatic which Myskania shall be chosen.
examination
and
experience
rating
as compared with 45 in 1945 and 38 trades will portray her combined
the high standards recognized in
The motion as presented contains
in '43. Traditionally, the Seniors
State Teachers Colleges here have second.
talents to State In the form of
the following points:
have the highest percentage of stuhitherto deemed them superfluous. The Future Teacher
monologues. A true theatre
Myskania Motion
dents
on
Dean's
List.
31%
or
54
Their use does not incidate any
artist
arrives
in
Page
direct
What do the development of merFirst, Myskania shall submit a
Seniors are on the list in comparifrom Broadway.
lowering of the standards set by the it lists mean to future teachers?
list of no more than ten names to
Education Department for teachers, Primarily, if their use is wide- son with 64 in 1945 and 55 in 1943.
Student Association. These names
but rather an effort towards unpre- spread, teaching standards will be' Seniors
may be either accepted or rejected
judiced and fair method of picking raised with scholarship and teachThe entire list follows: Class of
by a majority vote of the student
the most capable teacher from a ing ability achieving greatest im- 1946 and Accelerated 1947: Elaine
body.
portance. With less emphasis plac- Alton, Mildred Barnard, Joan Bcrmultitude of applicants.
Second: Myskania shall also subThe public school system of Syra- ed on experience, it indicates great- brich, Harriet Brinkman, Ruth Camit a recommended list of no less
cuse, New York, is the recognized er possibilities for newcomers in pala, Ruth Card, Margery Cramer,
than four names which are to be
leader in using the merit list as a the teaching profession to obtain James Crandell, Mary E. Dailey,
voted on preferentially by the Stustandard for hiring teachers. First positions in larger school systems Patricia Dunning, Thelma Elliott,
dent Association. Any member of
introduced there in 1939, new ex- provided their scholarship and Elizabeth Faust, Patricia Feehan,
To Take Over Office Student Association may add addiJean Ferris, Herbert Ford, Lucille
aminations are to be given March capability warrant such.
tional names to this list. This
Ganley, Julia Geores, Henry Ger16 of this year, with the results to
A s Weinberg Resigns makes
a total of no less than 14
mond, Nellie Glod, Virginia Greenbecome effective as soon afterward
which would be submitted by
mun, Jean Griffin, Blanche Hait,
as they may be evaluated.
Sweeping past the quota on thenames
Priscilla Hayes, Doris Ives, Doris second distribution, Ruth Bentley, Myskania. The first ten names
Merit Test Contest
Jenks, Adele Kasper, Selma Kreis- '47, won the position of Vice-Presi- would be generally recommended
Of what are the examinations
bcrg, Karl Limbacher, Beverly Link, dent of Student Association by a while the last four would include
comprised?
Georgenc Lovecky, Gloria McFer- margin of 154 votes over her near- those whom any member of MysProfessionally, they will cover the
ran, Josephine Maggio, Pauline My- est competitor, Betty Rose Hilt, '47. kania felt was qualified for the
principles and philosophy of eduers, Celia Nager, Muriel Navy, Marl- Election for this office was held position.
Motion's Provisions
cation. Child psychology will be
anna Neise, Blanche Packer, Shir- last Friday in assembly.
stressed for elementary teachers
ley Passow, Anne Peterson, BarOn the first distribution Miss The motion on the floor also inand adolescent psychology for secbara Reiff, Dorothy Rider, Carmela Bentley led the other two candi- cludes a provision whereby any vaHarriet Brinkman, '46, President Russo, Gloria Russo, Elnor Shaw,
ondary teachers.
dates, Miss Hilt, and Dick Smith, cancy in Myskania shall be filled in
of Student Christian Association,
Examinations on subject matter has announced the schedules for Genevieve Smithling, Virginia Tuck- '47, by a sizeable number of votes. accordance with the regular sucw.'ll nl-o be somewhat different for the [acuity visits and Lenten Lec- er, Barbara Updyke, Geraldine Van Smith was eliminated on the first cession to office plan as stated in
elementary and secondary school tures. Hillel will hold a Purlin Allen, Roberta Van Aukcn, Edna distribution, and the 86 of his 155 the Constitution.
teachers. Curricular methods and pai'iy March n . according to Jo-Van Poperlng, Mollie Weinstein, votes that went to Miss Bentley The two lists of names would be
materials, psychology for various seph Palevsky, '4C, President. Rev- Eunice Wood, Margaret Worsley, were more than sufficient to swing posted 18 days before Moving-Up
age levels in elementary grades, and erend Forens Emery of Schenectady Genevieve Young.
the election. Following are the Day. Voting would take place in
the knowledge and use of written will address the joint monthly meet- Juniors
numerical tabulations for the elec- assembly one week before MovingUp Day. The new President of
English will be covered in the tests ing of the area chapters of InterClass of 1947: Jean Alverson, Bou- tion.
Student Association would autogiven to teachers of kindergarten Varsity Christian Fellowship on dina Armstrong, Ruth Bentley, Julia Numerical Tabulations
matically become a member of
through eighth grade teachers. For March 16.
Boxer, Ludima Burton, Mary Ann
669
Myskania according to this motion.
secondary teachers, examinations Faculty Visits
Carey, Thelma
Carlson, Helen
Quota =
— 1 = 336
will be given which include knowlIf the motion on the floor is votCaughran, Edward Cohen, Anna
2
Dr. Charles Andrews, Professor of Cunningham, Mary Da Brescia, Eleedge of the subject field and meted upon before the end of tire asNominees
1
2
hodology of the subject. In fields Physics, will receive a student group anor Durbeck, Dolores Ganslow, Bentley
sembly program discussion of the
323 409
involving training in skills, perfor- In his home this afternoon at 5:30 for Shirley Gross, Dorothy Hladik, Lois
Constitution will continue.
Hilt
189
255
mance tests will constitute part of an informal visit and supper. The Holstein, Mary Honcharik, Helen
155
next group will be entertained by Dr. Honeycombe, Lois Hutchinson, Ger- Smith
the examination.
2
5
Elizabeth Morris, Professor of Edu- trude Kasper, Helen Kilbourne, Blanks
cation, at 7:30 P. M„ Thursday. Dr.
Meadows Announces
Total
669 669
/Continued on -page lh Col. 1)
J. Allan Hicks, Professor of Guidance, will have a group March 27,
Camera Club Exhibit
and Miss Katherlne Wheeling, Assistant Professor and Supervisor In
Paul Meadows, '48, President of
English, March 29. Students interCamera Club, has announced that
ested in attending these informal
this organization will sponsor a
get-togethers may sign up on the
print exhibit from May 13 to May
SC/V
bulletin
board.
Offer To Repay Help Lenten Lectures
20 on second floor Draper. The closHe was a struggling young musidate for all entries will be May
W i t h Cash O r Cognac Days of Holy Week and their sig- cian — she, his lovely inspiration. Envisioning himself In the role of ing
6.
nificance wdll be discussed at theMusic Council's "Norwegian Nights" Peer Gynt, Grieg goes to the palace
The General Association of theLenten Lectures. Reverend Arthur brings to life the music of Edward of lhe Mountain King, Bill Mallery. All prints must be at least five
Students of Montpellier in Herault, Adams of the First Presbyterian Grieg, famous Norwegian composer, Here he gazes at the beauty of the by seven Inches in size, and there
France, has sent an appeal for help Church will lead the first meeting played by Harold Weber.
king's daughter and succumbs to is no maximum size. All work must
to the students of this college. It at Sayles Hall at 3:00 P. M„ Sunday.
her
charms. His passion cools, be done by the entrant himself, and
Nina Hagerup, Justine Maloney,
is a request for the food that is soThe second will be conducted by
however,
when she betrays in a there is no limit to the number of
urgently needed by these students Reverend LeRoy Brandt of Delmar, proves an inspiration for the music dance her half animal character. entries that may bo made by one
of
Grieg.
Thoughts
of
her
act
as
a
of a war-disheveled country.
SCA advisor, at Phi Delta Sunday. stimulus for his composing. His Downcast, he turns away only to person.
Entries should be given to MarNow the war is over; the occu- March 17. and the third by Rever- poverty prevents their marriage, so meet another fair damsel. Solvejg,
pation forces have left and attempts end Raymond Clee from the First. he has his agent Otter, Al Read, Agnes Young, sings to him and he ion Mieras, Erna Burns, Hazel Engare being made to restore the Reformed Church. Reverend Ho- negotiate with the government for realizes that at last he has found dahl or Rosemary Ryan, Sophohis true love.
mores. The judges for the exhibit
France of former years. This re- burl Goewey, pastor of the Trinity a pension.
D0
Dr. Milton G. Nelson, Dean
conversion, however, is slow, and Methodist Church, will preside at
But when the Oriental dancer will
But Mervyn McClintock, playing
of
the
College; Dr. Floyd Henriclcthe need for food is .still acute, Con- Hie filial lecture at Pierce Hall, the part of the irate papa, steps Anitra begins her song and dance
sequently i hey have appealed to March 31.
Into the foreground with a forbid- his intentions begin lo waver. Just son, Assistant Professor of Educatheir American fellow-students for
ding
hand. Edward is not good in time he remembers that he must tion; and Miss Ruth Hutchlns, AsI'uiiin Party
aid.
enough
for his daughter so he In-be faithful to Solvejg and hastily sistant Professor of Fine Arts.
Belly Rose Diamond, '4(i, and
Rita Shapiro, '48, have been chosen vites another pension-seeking mu- leaves to avoid temptation.
Offer Payment
Life cannot all be happiness even
The request includes foods such co-chairmen of the Purim party, sician to vie for Nina's hand.
Then Grieg's love life Is inter- in a dream and Peer Gynt is called New Junior Staff Member
us coffee, chocolate, powdered milk, which will be held from 2:30 to 5:00
canned meals and oilier foodstuffs P. M., .Sunday, March 17, In therupt eil by the advent of another to the bedside of his dying mother. Appointed To Debate Council
Avenue
Synagogue. musician, Herr Bjornsen. Joe Pal- Solvejg cheers her saddened lover
which can be shipped easily. These Washington
Marianne Davis, '46, President of
arc all foods common to Americans There will be refreshments and en- evsky as Bjornsen comes to visit with a final song and Grieg awak- Debate
Council, has announced that
ens.
but, precious to the French people. tertainment, and the event is open Grieg.
He returns to reality and hisBetty Rose Hilt, '47, has been apDuring this visit, Grieg, his soul
The students of Monfepellier in only to Hillel members.
a member of Debate CounSally Holmes, '47, President of stirred by the beauty of the sur- friends, thrilled with his dream, of- pointed
return have suggested that they
cil from the Junior Class. Miss
might repay their American com- Inler-Viu'slty Christian Fellowship, rounding mountains, wanders out fer a festival In his honor. In the Davis also stated that Dr. Roland
rades either in money or else in has announced that the joint Into the countryside. In the course midst of all this gnyety, Otter ar- Burton, Professor of English, will
equivalent supplies of cognac and monthly meeting will be held Sat- of his stroll, his weary feet seek a rives with the glad tidings that the meet soon with the freshman deafter-dinner wines. This would be urday, March 10, at 11:00 P, M. in resting plnce and as ho lies down, pension has been granted. So papa baters to help them prepare for the
determined by those Americans the Green Room of the Wellington sleep overtakes him and his dream Is thwarted, Grieg gets the girl and rivalry debate.
inspiration continues.
"Peer Gynt" takes form.
Hotel.
contributing.
Bentley Wins
Vice-Presidency
Student Groups
To Visit Homes
O f Professors
French Students
Appeal For Food
"Norwegian Nights To Portray
Romance O f Grieg In Music
PAOB a
STATE C O L L E G E N E W S , FRIDAY, M A R C H 8 . 1 0 4 6
PAGE
STATE COLLEGE N E W S , FRIDAY, M A R C H 8 , 1 9 4 6
2
// The Glory That W . ,
Greece-
Siena Tops State Squad
In Close Contest, 46-45
2>tia
^om4H44HieaiMU
The Grandeur That Was Rome
I n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h S t A W C o w U O * NEWS p o l i c y
„
„
-,
„.„ .
„
, ,
,,
.,,
F O R T H I S W E E K — " L e t ' s be M u g w u m p s ! " — w e
present, t h e following d i s s e r t a t i o n , t h e c o n t e n t s of
F
6
,
,T.
/-<• -i
w h i c h w e g l e a n e d in L a t i n 108 class ( R o m a n C i v i l 1
ization ) a n d w h i c h c o n c e r n e v e n t s t h a t o c c u r r e d
;
z - i ' i i .
a p p r o x i m a t e l y 2,000 y e a r s a g o . C e r t a i n l y s u c h a
s p a n of v e a r s w o u l d g u a r a n t e e t h a t a n y issues m e n 1
, •
°
• ,
i
tioned m u s t be non-controversial, unless we are
so sunerslitioii'3 a s t o t h e believe t h a t old a d a g e :
'
,
" H i s t o r y r e p e a t s itself.
, _ , . . . , . .
I t s e e m s t h a t a t t h e p e a k of G r e e k civilization,
;i t i m e w h e n all m e n w e r e i n t e l l i g e n t a n d civilized,
t h e r e e x i s t e d in G r e e c e t h e O l y m p i c c o n t e s t s . T h e s e
' • , , ,
, „„ „ „ ' _ i ' f „ ^ m m M In Which
c o n t e s t s i n c l u d e d a l a r g e v a r i e t y of g a m e s in w h i c h
an
3>ata
To
. the Editor:
to decide how a n y organization is
I n t h e event t h a t Myskania is to choose Its m e m b e r s unless they
abolished h e r e is a plan which I in t h e organization agree,
t h i n k will provide for t h e necessary
T h e issue could be said to be
functl
o n s of a judiciary body. T h e cold reality vs. sentimentality. T h e
only secrecy in this organization seeming cold reality is, in t r u t h , t h e
w i n
be
t h a t
of
election results s e n t i m e n t a l product of t h e times.
t h r o u g h o u t t h e year, a n d carrying We w a n t democracy down to t h e
By MINDY WARSHAW
t h e a n n u a l Moving-Up Day point w h e r e t h e e n t i r e family t a k e s
out
traditions.
a s t a n d i n g vote on how m a n y m i n ARTICLE I
utes t h e breakfast eggs should be
T h e s e n t i m e n t a l side of F R O M T H E HALLS O F . . .
T l l c n a m e o f t h i s organization shall cooked.
be Senior Judiciary Body.
t h e picture—realistically m a y cause
*'red F a n c h e r , '47, h a s been a M a r i n e — s t a t i o n e d
ARTICLE I I
S T A T E 15 years from now, if we a t P a w l s I s l a n d , S o u t h Carolina—for some time now.
T h e judicial power of t h e Associa- c h a n g e t h e m e t h o d of selection, to • • • Mr. S l a c k - S h u r e , P r e s i d e n t - I n - L a w of S t u d e n t
tion shall be vested in this body.
sit up a n d say—"where's t h e t r a d i - Association, r e t u r n s home, a full-fledged civilian t h i s
wee e kwill. . p.r i n
t youryou
boyfriend's
n a mfrom
e andS taadlde r estill
s s . Oinr
ARTICLE I I I
tion (other t h a n P r o s h beanies, etc.) w
(Have
got friends
colleges?" I t bolls clown to t h i s
.the
. . sif
your
boyfriend's
especially
ho ar nad sslight
o m e , we
T h i s body shall be composed of t h e which
t h a t sets
STATE
a
p
a
r
t
from
o
t
h
e
r
e
r
v
i
c
e
?
If
so,
let
us
in
on
it.
F
c
h a rwill
ge
method, in t h e eyes of t h e
p a y will
you p trhi ne t slight
c h a r g e . . .n )a m e a n d a d d r e s s . Oi
following members:
colleges?"
I t isboils
to t h i s : we
your boyfriend's
s t u d e n t body,
moredown
practical?
,f v
P r e s i d e n t S t u d e n t Association
'
will
T H Eboyfriend's
R I D I C U L Oespecially
U S TO T h
HaEn d Ss oTm
OeR, KweCLUB
F r e s h m e n are impressed
by" M"y-s-- F R O M ™»'
k
a
n
i
a
because
they
t
a
k
e
t
h
e
orT h e K r e m l H a i r Tonic Co., is s p o n s o r i n g the snootp r e s l d e n t
Women>s
Athletic
Asso
ganization as a whole a n d do n o t iest a d v e r t i s e m e n t these days, f e a t u r i n g a "red hot
t h e G r e e k s p e c t a t o r s d e l i g h t e d b e c a u s e of t h e skill
ciation
judge by individuals. On the o t h e r tip" from the Stork Club's barber, J o h n Anzalone,
a n d k n o w l e d g e of form t h a t w e r e s h o w n t h e r e i n . P r e s i d e n t S t u d e n t Christian Asso
hand,
groups of upper classmen on w h a t t h e "scalp r e q u i r e m e n t s " a r e for a guest to
T h e r e w e r e c h a r i o t r a c e s — j u d g e d on t h e skill of t h e
elation
,
. ,
,
•
i ° ,,
;,,A„aA
„„ fl 1Q P r e s i d e n t Dramatics and Arts Coun w a n t a popular election—it's t h e be a d m i t t e d p a s t the famous red rope in the Club's
Democratic way—because they hhaavvee "°, »«"»;•">« *«••",••"•. • - • • • • " .
'
'iccharioteers . . . boxing bouts—judged on the
bc
ci]
another candidate.
Regardless of o bwb ya i n lt c°t ulrt os loalf v ai s hm ia n t e wn l°t 'h nS a y s M l ' mA fnl z ae l * £•
'
V : l l e li
skill a n d form of t h e c o n t e s t a n t s . . . a t h l e t i c g a m e s p r e s i d e n t Music Council « n N E W S how you choose Myskania there will °
f
"
"
I
f
f
.
"
'
h c
always be gripes wherever personali» £ rope go up on the m a n with tousled, u n k e m ppt
— w i t h a w a r d s g i v e n for t e c h n i q u e r a t h e r t h a n for P r e s i d e n t Debate Council
HPd
enter
inln
it
hair.
Ho c e r t a i n l y doesn t belong in the S t o r k Club.
1
1
U
w i nTnhiennu c a m e m e j * u m a n w ^ " - "
Senior Class
_T,
• , President
™
" »>»•«••"
ties enter into it.
'•"
' . . . >
' Then
Thon wc
i w see
scp the Romeo witl'
(use Kreml
with
w
i nngs. e c i u e n t i n f i l t r a t i o n of G r e e k C u l t u r e i n t o E
c h i e f STATU COU.K
t hien nm
E dd ii ttoorr- i n -Pedagogue
P o p u l a r election is not t h e solu p l a s t e r e d - d o w n locks of whom Mr. Anzalone says,
Club
T
h
e
n
c
a
m
e
t
h
e
R
o
m
a
n
c
o
n
q
u
e
s
t
of
G
r
e
e
c
e
,
a
n
d
E
c
U
t
o
r
Primer
the consequent i i m i u a
p r e s i d e n t Newman C
Hon, particularly t h i s year because "He plastered his hair down with grease a n d found
b
,...,
l i t ' jjiucii.dt.ii in.,
tt hi eeh t sR oamn aa n a uEn m
pLi r ew. n i The
c n a u o l l a,-c e s , DUX_ & Director
1. T h e ~~Zl
merits
e n ) . Press
m i ] e l Bureau
e
u
u
u
„~.~
j«t,'*.""«r.«
IV of
".. rie t uur n i n g~ , , stu
' . 1 himself socially taboo. P a s t e d down h a i r s t a m p e d him
6
dents
are
not
known
to
the
general
. , „ / ..-,<= „*.-..... ,
,
, , . — •- ,
, ,,
fights
a
n
d
a
t
h
l
e
t
i
c
c
o
n
t
e
s
t
s
w
e
r
e
i
n
c
o
r
p
o
r
a
t
e
d
i
n
t
o
„
„„,._ -D,,f nc; u s u a l o v e r w h e l m i n g rivnnrl Mnrshal
ueiiis
uuu miuwu
„f,,,i„„i-arci,„^„
« . . . ,• ^ "mit ; , a-"-*",,.,*,! a s a BIKUIU
gigolo, v(use
Kreml . . . ) MNext, is
p o r t r a y e d the
' o
Om a n
' amusements
-•-.u.t! a„_J ,^. „ J, , oJl J ^ ramrwllplniinB
R
B
^
f S S S ^ K S S Athletic Association
o d y - t h e r e f o r e it
n f a i r £, £. ,, », • .» .£ , type of„ hair-do,
c hv.a r a c t,e r s p o r t t h e
M O ™ « . . U . . ssttuuddeenntt bbody—thcrelore
it is
is uunfair
, • i and, the
n
Ruo„m
i n « amusei
- « - a p e u o d ot a e ^ a "
C h a i r m a n I n t e r - G r o u p Council
to t h e m .
.
.
- the -c h a-r a c •t e-r spor •p
Ca
council
bird's n e s t type of hair-do, and
t1S Jo
f l e
b t
of
ARTICLE i v
p o wRe or m ce a. u sTe hd e c h a r i o t races b e c a m e e \ e n t s s p o n
2. T h e seniors are t h e only class " J l*l b Vb e c aaulsse° t h*o ,yl , T e d f !1 ' ° ?e t, M°
° / rk
l h e " ", r p° e
d?o w
actually
qualified
vote,
. 7",
„
''"
°
? ?°
T r
K
cnrprl for t h e color a n d g l a m o u r ; t h e boxing DOUIS.
duties of this orrganization
—•— to
-- picture
. - • h a vofi. n g-3 °^„ m . ^'How
B tui«inwun nn u
n b i a s->e d over-all
u n c o u t h he looks, says the barber, "with
soreci
u iee cuiui
-•-,
b
„u„,,i^i„„„ i,n ,.nrl with ri.nndi'iiff flake
flakes. So carecaresored lor
lor m
t u i u i aa u u B6 . .
._>__ _c u ....*„_Tfnrrpf « , « . in".. . a u u c o
u n b i a s e d over-all picture of 3 h u._
an
i g s h o u l d o r s u t t enr e d with dandruff
t u r n e d i n t o f a n n i n g **r*»™
° brute o
, slmU be
^
^
^
,
^
^
) Colw
mwork.
appearance,„
(
Kreml .
) e s s a i 3 0 l l t his a p p e a r a n c e ! " (use
a n d s i n c e all t h i s still n o t s a t s t y t n e n u g e
, a
•
^
interpret college
3. T h e r e would be more ill feel- u m n i s t , B N o t o : j don't believe it! C a n ' t you j u s t pict h e i n s t i t u t i o n of g l a d i a t o r i a l c o m b a t s in a m p i n
apply such ing a n d h u r t feelings if a n open list t u r o T o m m v M a n v i l l e being ejected from the S t o r k
tradltions
a n d
to
the-ders was originated. For long hours, the honinfractions thereof of c a n d i d a t e s were published.
is s h o w i n ? ( S p e a k i n g of
penaltles for
c , u b b e c a u s e h i s dandruff
theaters was o b
gold-and-silver
h a v e been provided for by
4. G r o u p politics would h a v e a n
Manville, I wonder if he h a s his d a n d r u f f
as
o r e d c i t i z e n s of R ° ™ ™>i Id sit in
t h e legislation of t h e S t u d e n t A s - open field to operate.
fc
monogrammed
.)
glittering halls watching, with nappy n o i r u i . u
«
e
5. You c a n post a list of com
miitttteeeess tthhaatt aa person
person hhaass w o r k e*d O P I N I O N
aa t ltnhee l h e i g h t oi
m
a
n
k
i
l
l
i
n
g
a
n
o
t
h
e
r
.
O
n
e
d
a
y
,
m
s
g
u
a
r
d
i
a
n
s
...„
„ _.
i,
Zn
-id c) To act as class guardians
W
is uit SLIUM
such aa Bg 'r^e "a 't ipart of every
" ' aol 1r a l a n d 6 c u l t u r a l- d. e c a d>e n c e- -•, t.ha
.. students
,..
U t uUIUBSS
n i e s s you
i u u xxnlH
w i i u d"/
rps t, u d e n 1.
t s in
ill r...
ree - 0o1n1 ,| bDUL
yuu were
» t n , there,
n m ^ , How
<w~
v vh
ny
y is
, - -y e a .r is spent
.
.
m
in -n—,„
R oOllie,
m e , onn
<WU
WHO.
r1)s T
o ri.pnvpcpnt,
e p r e s e n t the
'
i-tl — l
,:„,„.-,,.ln„l
a n i m a l s tew: e a c n ovne
l
V I I I Section B,,
cms
dg
l u s t of m a n k i n d e x u l t i n g in t n e n u r a w
tution
of o t h e r s ; it w a s t h e s m u g , self-satisfied h u m a n s f ) TO act^as telleri at s t u d e n t A S
f i g h t i n g p e r s o n a l fear of d e a t h b y g l o r y i n g in t h e
^ ^ / ^ ^ j S ^ o o n „„..„ ri^otVic r»f t h p i r fellow-men.
ow-nHnn
gory d e a t h s oi their lenow
stitutiom
Anrl it w a s t h u s t h a t t h e G r e e k s , d e f e a t e d as h ) ^ X i e s as a n advisory board
A n d »t w a s t n u s t n a i
,
a t all times as an^advisory
t h e y w e r e in p h y s i c a l c o m b a t , a c t m u y g
to t h e s t u d e n t u o u n c , L
y
McUonal(l
v i c t o r v over t h e i r c o n q u e r o r s . I t w a s b e c a u s e ot ^
'
E m J °
t h i s t h a t H o r a c e , in p r a i s e of G r e e c e , could sing
s h a ] 1 we choose M y s k a n i a by popt h e following w o r d s in a sincere a n d a l l - t r u t h f u l
ion
shall t h
c o n t i n u e
I p l i C - C a p f l v e G r e e c e ,ooY h e r r a d e c . p . o r c a p - * * * » * £
'» « - • —
» choosing new M y s k a n i a m e m b e r s a s M y s k a n teac a n
Believe u or not| tn
a r c o t h w
^
^
ty con_
eg
C o l ] e g e , . f e t h a t m i g h t b e given some
test w i t h half of t h e J u n i o r class o f t h o l a r g e a m o u n t of time allotted to M y s k a n i a
nominated.
"bull sessions"—such a s :
„ „ , , . ,
„ S p i r a l s t a i r c a s e " t h a t 1100 s t u d e n t s h a v e
I ( ., s ft k n o w n
fact
t n a t
a
s m a n
1} T h e
group operates more efficiently t h a n t o c i i m b a t a 45 degree angle to get into a l i b r a r y
s j
ventilated
Qne a n d M y s k a n i a a s t h e w h i c
w h e n
g e t thci.0| ls t 0 0 pooriy
^
.n ^
m a n y
contacts
M l l ^ l l i l.l,V n Ial u
l lsUe^oUuUs U s t„ u
^ dent
. .s. . piled
,
t h r e e deep on
s c h o o l i s the only group to m a k e t h e
2 ill) a „
ght y
b a c k - b r e a k i n g cots in a n ugly,
recovery
selection
, t , M K
'
" thin-walled
"
'""
room
t
h
a
t
once
you
try
to
sleep
in
it,
you
require
We don't need a n elected M y s a week's recovery to get back into the state you
g f ^ » % £ .
T J m Z ^ S
originally came in . . .
tive."
Myskania as formed by faculty in k a n i a ' s actual power is very small
3) overcrowded conditions in a too-small C o m m o n s
n cfnrv e n g r a v e d on t h e d u s t v p a g e s 1917 (later choosing their own T h e y ' r e not a bunch of cut t h r o a t s ! a t noontime
t n e (
y
h
I t ' s a n old s t o r y e i g r a v e d ° "
""
L -m m e m b e r s ! was responsible for f o r m Sincerely, _ _
_
,.
Etc.
Etc.
Etc.
of R o m a n a n d G r e e k t e x t - b o o k s , a n d toic in
v
any
pan
ot
ouiuenb
A.»UUHHUII.
Myskania
than
It
w o u l d
the
t u m
man
takea
o u t
M
"»^
—J—••
—
-•--
i-uwircoa . . - . . — »- ,
.
,, • y o u may speak of Democracy in Myskania in assembly last F r i d a y
M a n k i n d no l o n g e r feels t h e need to m a k e o t h e r s g t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t and yet if you
" I ' m gonna fake my marbles a n
suffer b e c a u s e m a n k i n d is no longer u n c e r t a i n a n d t . t l n p p l y l t T c , o l V t see how it go h o m e . "
iearfui-om
p h i l o s o p h e r s say t h a t t h e c o m m i s s i o n
of' t o r t u r e a n d c r u e l t y is a n a t u r a l result of
Isn't
it pleasant
that
we live
in a civilized
is
fear.
possible for Student Association
(Names withheld upon request)
Golleqe
age?
By CULL1NAN & H I L T
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established May 1916
By the Class of 1918
Vol. X X X
M a r c h 8, 1946
No. 1(1
Dlsiiiliiimr
MumUcr
CiiUi'«liiti' DlK«» '
id Collftfliil !'
New Vnrli Hun.
Tlio uuilergruiliniiB ,„..WH|iiipcr »f
<>t ilw «'i>l
Collide for TeiiHiorH ; publlriliml i-vurjD i l iKrliliiy
lliu NEWS Ilmiril !'
"' °S l'l"l i l 'i ' l l l A H
lnt?n .VI"' l
;I.',I,-,:IS:
tv.ir.
»-11)11;
linn. IMIOIIDH Ucrbrleh, '.' HI'JH : i I'N
•> SIS7U.
•
The News Board
JOAN D. BERBRICH
ELIZABETH S. O'NEIL
ISABEL FEAR
JOSEPHINE MAGGIO
MARGERY CRAMER
MARY SULLIVAN
KATHRYN HAGERTY
BERNARD M. SKOLSKY
MARY TESSIER
EDiTon-iN-cHiec
COEDITOH-IN-CHIEP
BUSINESS MANAGER
cincui-ATioN MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
. .
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASBOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
A Wing and a Prayer
Little did they think t h a t back
in t h e days when an airplane was
the dream of two brothers n a m e d
Wright, t h a t its world importance
would bring about flight lnstruction in college curriculums. Yet all
over the country colleges are beginning to prepare students for this
ever-Increasing era of aeronautics.
Oswego and Cortland S t a t e T e a c h ers' Colleges are making elaborate
plans to further this movement. T h e
a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of Cortland plans to
prepare trained teachers for this
field Ln a summer school session
conducted on a seminar basis. T h e
program consists of "teaching m e t h suitable
( ) d S B nd flight techniques
for the secondary school, including
noti-feclinical consideration of
a
UKI theory of flight, air-craft s t r u c turcs, engines, flight techniques,
navigation, weather, communiontlons a n d control, and allied subjocts, In addition eight hours of
flying instruction will be given at
the Cortland airport. T h o u g h not
rill earrv
yet certified, the course will
carryy
--. . ,u„
%T^'SLc«,.
Irene! in high schools is definitely
toward
the injection
of
flying
courses into their program, a n d t h e
need for trained instructors will be
acute.
Compromises
Speaking of Cortland we noticed
t h a t one of our former profs, Dr.
D. V. S m i t h , President of C o r t l a n d
College, is c h a i r m a n of a hospital
a r b i t r a t i o n committee which is a t t e m p t i n g to settle a problem arising from difficulties over general
hospital care a n d private nursing.
Last year S t a t e College sponsored
several events to make s t u d e n t s
more aware of arbitration methods,
W
lUll'UV
1IVU dissenting
u w n i r m m B groups
^ i w i , , . . , call
^....
whereby
two
on a disinterested third group to
settle their differences.
T h e s e events included:
Sending
delegates to an arbitration conference in New York, presenting guest
speakers to explain arbitration p r o cedures, and organizing discussion
groups on c a m p u s to popularize t h i s
practice.
Flush
H
H aa rr v
v aa rr d
d Unierslty
Unierslty hh aa ss decelerated
decelerated
then, accelerated program In e d u -
S t u d e n t Association w a n t a M y s k a n i a ?
swer is in the negative, carry out your
a n d do s o m e t h i n g about it; if it is in the
a n d you w a n t it, don't t r y to find fault at
sible occasion leave the minor problems
spend time on more vital questions.
If the a n convictions
affrmative,
every posalone and
AMERICAN-BRITISH-FRENCH
"DISCOVERY"—
SLIGHTLY LATE — IN MEMORIAM TO ONE
WHO HATED FASCISM
To (1. VI'., Loyalist, Died in Action in ,-iimin, 19,1(1.
only ten years
after you died fighting a g a i n s t
s o m e t h i n g you despised
we've "discovered" t h a t
franco's a fascist
it's officially
recognized!
*-* i .
LOllGQG
rI
I
Cd/GnClQT
"
v
FRIDAY, March X—
5:30 P.M.—Dr. Charles L. Andrews, Professor of
Physics in entertain SCA group at his
home at 21GB Quail Street.
H-.00 P.M.—Frosh-Junlor Party in the Commons.
Robert Baker, '•!!), and J a m e s Conley, '47,
Chairmen.
SUNDAY, March 10—
3:00 P M. First, of SCA Lenten lectures. Reverend
Arthur Adams, Pastor of t h e first. Presbyterian Church 111 Albany lo speak.
Hayles Hall.
5:00 I ' M Newman Holy Hour. Small Grotto,
I'HESDAY, March 12—
3:110 P.M. -I.G.C. S e m i n a r to discuss autobiographies contributed by s t u d e n t s . Alice Williams '4ft, Director Room 'i.
a r c h 14—
I HHW
»S
BD
«A
« »Y, M
tnw-vu
•»—
T
UR
8:30 P.M.—Varsity basketball team to plt.v Albany
c 0
aym
Mgg ffi.v«s A J S S M S „««- '"' " - "—'•
'
AH communications should lie addressed to ilm editor and
W i t h the facilities of t h e Albany c a n o n JU u m w u..»v , . „ . , , . . . . . . . . . .
roust be signed. -Names will tie withheld upon reuiiesi. Airport so close a t h a n d it would may receive t h e full a c c e n t u a t i o n of DAILY—
varsity
Christian
PallowsUlp
K F & M W M
a p p e a r reasonable for such a course t h e H a r v a r d accent instead of a
Mill-UtM-Inter.
Meeting. Room 151, Huested.
i i »ucl» e*press!ons do noi uecessarlly reflect he view.
to be inaugurated here at S t a t e . T h e t h r e e - y e a r accelerated one.
Prayer
Team To Play In Troy
In Preliminary Game
MARY LIZ SULLIVAN
T h e first t h i n g we would like to
do is give a terrific pat on the back
to our basketball t e a m for the game
they played against Siena last Tuesday night. I t was the best game of
t h e season a n d t h e boys certainly
did a wonderful job.
T h e crowds of S t a t e rooters t h a t
were there serve to show that State
supports its team n o t only at home
games bill also when the t r a m plays
away. In fact, s u i t e h a d almnsl as
m a n y Inns present as did Siena—
a n d those cheers in the last few
m i n u t e s of the fourth quarter were
really something lo hear.
Ten Flush
One of I he most interesting sights
01 the eveii.ng was waiclung one
bright boy who had bet leu dollars
on Die game with a four point niargm g n c n to Siena . . . w'• 11 the ten
dollar 1 wenl in and out ol lis pocket
that
in hi,
so man;, limes lha
there new is a worn spoll en his
trousers. Anyway he won his be'
as we were beat by onl\ o: ie point.
he had
so now the starvation dii I
have to
Ml ligured out won't, really
be followed.
Anyway here go our hopes again
for
t h e next S i e n a - S t a t e
game
which will be played next week at
t h e Troy Armory as a preliminary
game.
Next Hem
Second on Die list of things to discuss is w h a t has happened to the
so-called rivalry spirit, around here.
We can remember when the Sophfrosh rivalry basketball games were
s o m e t h i n g t h a t people i meaning
representatives from all the classes
with m a i n emphasis on members
from t h e two rivalry classes"! really
a t t e n d e d . This doesn't seem to be
t h e story this year. F r o m the a t t e n d a n c e a t the last Soph-frosh r i valry game we would say t h a t somet h i n g h a d definitely happened to
t h e rivalry spirit between the two
classes. Rivalry events this year
seem to be things t h a t are carried
off because they h a v e to be—not because rivalry is a tradition a t State
which u p until this year was somet h i n g t h a t everybody used to be ininterested in. W h a t ' s happening to
all of our traditions?
L a s t T u e s d a y night, in one of
tho h a r d e s t fought g a m e s of the
season, S t a t e d r o p p e d behind Siena
by a one point m a r g i n to lose the
game in the closing seconds of the
last q u a r t e r . T h i s g a m e w a s the
second between Siena a n d State,
Siena being the victor in both of
the e n c o u n t e r s .
Siena trailed 13 to 11 a t the end
of the first q u a r t e r and 21 to 20 at
the half. Rallying in the third and
d u r i n g the last half of the fourth
quarter, K c a m b u h l and L e C u y e r of
the Siena squad succeeded in pushing Siena out in front.
Combs Leads
Tossing in 17 points for State was
Hob Combs, again high scorer, toppin?: Siena's high m a n K r a m b u h l
by three points. Honors go to M a r s land who s t a r t e d fighting the second the g a m e opened a n d kept on
fighting t h r o u g h o u t , as well as to
Keciioy who played his usual steady
game, c h a l k i n g up 11 more points
for State.
C a m e Scheduled
Mext Wednesday, State is again
scheduled to meet Siena, this time
• ai :i neutral court. The game will
be the p r e l i m i n a r y play-off before
I lie Troy Celtics home g a m e .
The s u m m a r y :
F G FP TP
Siena
2
4
... 1
Rent/,, f
I
5
2
Speigle, f
0
0
... 0
Ryan, f
3
13
... 5
Kemp, c
4
10
... 3
LeCuyer, g
2
14
... 6
Krambhul, g
0
0
... 0
r.\wloi'
A Suggestion
And then loo. could we make the
suggestion thai a stretcher and
blanket be kept in ilu ;;\ in so ill case
of any mishap durii ig games, etc.,
the mnd dash to l he recovery room
won't be necessary. II n ally woiih
n'l t a k " up too much room would ii
Sophs Top Frosh
In Rivalry 7/
llll
he rivalry cor
'48 T i l e
m favor
11 Allen i he Da Hie.'lrv ba-kelball
•>l!
second game
H1 clay : 1'llTeiaiei till
) \ w I lime
T h i s; vic-
Ited the S o p h
l'Ci
! ill)i I e h i n e l l ' liowi
game
elll OUT Ilu If p
be
and
Pie-..- m.i
apb
on i s in - I l ! ' '
libSuliel i | iln.V • • •low. d
on
i
i
ie ill 11 .'. '.eldom
M
Midi
e II II ciiurl
1 I vlie d i s t i n g i i l bed i h e i n osb
forward: and e \ li.ii'l iculiu h
clevel
irk
N'i|ih ( i u a 1 lis
The
S o p h o i n o i i", • out oill I heil
Q u i n n . Tildeii, C o o p e r c o m b i n a t i o n .
'I ilileu a n d Q u i n n \ led for h l g h Ii
... 17
FG
.... 5
Totals
State
Feeney, f.
Qom'bs' f
Simmons,
Borlnick,
Marsland,
Evans, g.
Mullin, g.
Reed, g. ...
n i i i i i ••
....
....
....
....
....
....
0
3
1
2
0
0
18
Totals
46
TP
11
17
1
8
4
4
0
0
45
Wagner Ahead
In Fourth Round
The MAA Ping Pong t o u r n a m e n t
continued this week as the third
lound in the series neared completion while one game in the fourth
recorded.
was
Wagner, winner over S m i t h in
lasl weeks contest, defeated Weber
who moved into the second round
by defeating Favreatt two games out
ol Ihree. Welner moved into the
ibird round by topping Sullivan, a
round winner. As the first
ur icr of ihe fourth round. Wagner
ed into the semi-finals by InkMill'
inc. the better t h r e e of live games
lioin Welner.
Semi-1'inals Start
Before I lie remaining players of
ihe semi-finals c a n be determined,
i he contest between Mullin and
i v i r must be played off. T h e winner of this match will nice! Mallery,
who entered the third round by defeating Dickinson. T h e victor in
ibis play-off will lie matched ngiitnsi
I a: hlusky who moved into the third
round by overcoming Miner, a sccond round winner.
No play-offs
No l u r l h e r iiaincs in I he MAA
les have been played off.
Do.ihles sel
are urged lo complete
1'l.iM'l-s
> as soon as possible.
Ha ir e. line
si iinim honors oi 1 he gnme while
Conper
played
a
commendable
Tr< dor. ' The Soph guards had the
mid.-, in iheir favor b\ virtue ol
lliclr helghl and us n result made
some outstanding recoveries. Tronsor, Diehl and Dltlin have always
been dependable players.
Although It was 11 victory for '48,
It was the opinion of many observers t h a t the frosh would liave had
t h e edge h a d they not encountered
such unusually tall guards.
.... n
12
FP
1
3
1
2
2
0
0
0
Say/eS/Gam Kap
Lead Bowlers
ALBANY, N. Y.
PHONE 4 0 2 4 7
Pharmacists
137
IUOB
PHONE
CENTRAL AVE.
A L B A N Y , N. Y.
4 2030
FOOD
Ping-Pong Doubles
B e r t h a W a k i n , '47. captain of
WAA
P i n g - p o n g has a n n o u n c e d
1 ha I only siN couples have signed up
for t h e doubles t o u r n a m e n t . Since
il is necessary to have at least len
couples to start I he games, she has
asked thai all women who are Interested to sign up by Monday.
CENTRAL
Barber
PHOTOGRAPHS
Duplicate P r i n t s may be secured
a t all times
Discount prices in effect (ill May
Films
retained for
5 years
at
least
The Lloyd Studio
51 3rd S h e e t
Troy. N. Y.
jyafd&o
WESTERN
Phono
Troy 10(18
AT
QUAIL
'M0 C e n t r a l Avenue Albany, N. Y,
.MADISON SWEETSHOP
7H5 Madison Ave
Tasty and Delicious
Sandwiches
H. F. Honikel & Son
CBTAUl ISHKD
000D
GEORGE
a'Ge
I NlUAl. A V £
BZ Defeats Chi Sis;
By F R A N K W O O D W O R T H
Second Game Delayed
•Oh, my aching back!
Eastern All-Star Players
S u c h were t h e cries a n d m o a n s of
W e d n e s d a y
n i g h t s
basketball
ntramural
basketball^ ^ a s p i r a n t s g a m M m
^
^ * s l m ^
w h m
To Be Picked By Colleges iafter
t h e first n i g h t of "Informal" Chi Sig was forced to bow to t h e
T o d a y in assembly t h e S p o r t s
practice, I n f o r m a l practice—that's powerful B Z squad to t h e t u n e of
Staff of t h e N E W S will cona nice polite word for a n ugly con- T,„i r „^ 0 t „ i f Q j „ « ,„in, „ « „ I J
duct
a survey to find
out
glomeration of arms, legs, cute, * " ? ' , § & S s t a . r i ? d I o f £ , ^ l t h , a f i e d
who S t a t e t h i n k s are t h e ten
scratches, bruises, floor b u r n s a n d f » l * « BZ a n d Sy vestrl put one i n
best b a s k e t b a l l players of t h e
small bits of skin t h a t results w h e n $ 0 * 0 " « * . Chi Sig missed several
E a s t e r n League. T h e E a s t e r n
ten people w a n t the s a m e o b j e c t - l o u l shots while t h e BZers m a i n t e a m will m e e t t h e Western Alla spherical h u n k of leather. Fooled tained a steady pace. BZ's h e i g h t
s t a r t e a m in t h e E a s t - W e s t Allyou didn't we?
proved too m u c h for t h e Chi Sig's
S t a r B a s k e t b a l l G a m e at M a d i At any r a t e practice was a h u g e to battle despite their quick recovson S q u a r e G a r d e n on M a r c h
success. Someone threw in a ball cries of t h e ball on t h e p a r t of t h e
like a zoo keeper throwing a single guards. B a k e r was high scorer for
30.
h e r r i n g to a bunch of seals. I m - the victors, Dunlay for t h e losers.
T h e g a m e is being sponsored
mediately all the players, includT h e G a m m a K a p - P s i G a m game
by t h e New York Herald T r i b ing t h e referee—Sullivan, t h e r o b - proved to be t h e upset of t h e eveu n e for t h e benefit of t h e N. Y.
ber—stood on their h i n d legs a n d n i n g . I t was fast moving from t h e
Herald T r i b u n e Fresh Air F u n d
barked. This, figuratively a n d lit- beginning, a n d until the final w h l s for u n d e r - p r i v i l e d g e d children.
erally, s t a r t e d t h e ball rolling a n d t ] e blew it was anybody's ball game.
T h e F r e s h Air F u n d h a s s e n t
I lie h e a t was on. We hereby wish A t U l e o u t s e t o f t h e ( l r g t q u a r t e r
c h i l d r e n from New York City's
to publicly denounce one H a r r y Q u i n n o p e n e d u p b v R C o r l n g a f l e l d
t e n e m e n t sections for a total of
Baden as a disreputable w r c t c h over 700.000 fortnights.
goal for G a m m a K a p . Not to be o u t and a dirty player to boot.
The
We m a y n o m i n a t e only one
done. Sowa dropped one in for Psi
gnme
proceeded
in
a
gentlemanly
player from S t a t e , the r e m a i n m a n n e r which was pleasing to all. Gam. F r o m t h e n on both t e a m s
ing nine are to be chosen from
By gentlemanly m a n n e r we m e a n tightened up their defenses and t h e
ol h e r E a s t e r n colleges.
The
t h a t fouls were committed openly quarter ended in a tie 2-2.
j u d g e s will select ten contestin the face of the person a t t e m p t - Leng-yel S t a r s
a n t s from t h e suggestions of all
ing a shot. When all ten contestLengyel opened up the second
the colleges in this section.
a n t s had progressively crawled to quarter with a field goal a n d O s F i n a l selection by the T r i b u n e
1 he sidelines leaving- t h e "referee" borne followed suit for G a m a K a p
S p o r t s Staff will bc based on a
there we are misusing English vo- a n d ttdded a foul shot to it. Lengyel
player's record along with t h e
(iibularvi
holding t h e ball, it was followed t h r o u g h with two more
preferences of t h e campus fans,
quite unanimously decided t h a t t h e field goals and t h e second quarter
two teams (five players who a r e ended 8-5 in favor of Psi-Gam.
theoretically on t h e s a m e side m a k e
After
the half, G a m m a
Kap
tip a team) should substitute. Again buckled down and enthusiasm was
play resumed a n d t h i s time t h i n g s n i g h w h e n Osborne dropped in a n were different—one of the t e a m s other. However, Psi G a m h a d a n
scored a basket w h e n the referee e y e t 0 victory a n d Lengyel dropped
wasn't looking. T h e m a n s l a u g h t e r l n t w o m o r e to m a k e i t 1 2 . 7 ftj. t h e
More g a m e s a r e being rolled-off in continued until time for varsity e n d o f t h e t h l r d q u a r t e r
the WAA bowling league as t h e practice and t h e LIU. boys left t h e
,
, . .
T,
fc.
t
f
schedule a p p r o a c h e s the finals. Yer- floor with t h e glowing satisfaction ^
tea
" had S S l p T L d l f ™
don, '48, h a s high single of t h e sea- t h a t they could a t last h a v e a leg- g J ^ S b t e f S ^ e i t h e r t o s e o l
^ e
son with 184. Pedisich, '46, Is a close ltlmate excuse for t a k i n g a cut.
^
„nrt P d 12 7 i n w r Z f 0 ! i
*Editor
Note
This story is ! , a m e e n d e d 1 2 " 7 i n P s l G a m s f a v o r '
second with 182. Savles Hall a n d
'"Editor
Note
-— Thin
G a m m a K a p a r e ' t i e d " f o r first place slightly exaggerated.
exaggerated.
G a m e Postponed
since n e i t h e r of them h a s lost a More About I n t r a m u r a l s
T h e t h i r d game was between NewIrrespective of t h e report w r i t t e n m a n a n d Moreland, but it was poetgame so far.
K a p p a D e l t a a n d Sayles each won above, practice went along very poned a t t h e beginning of t h e seca g a m e a n d AEPhi a n d P h i Delt, well a n d a good n u m b e r of fellows ond q u a r t e r w h e n Tronsor was h u r t .
split t h e i r series. A third m a t c h will showed up. However, we do need N e w m a n h a d t h e lead, 16-0.
After
S a t u r d a y ' s games, e a c h
have to be rolled-off within t h e n e x t more players to form a league for
week. Sayles took the first game with the r e m a i n d e r of t h e season a n d we t e a m wil h a v e played a total of eight
618 to K D ' s 531. I n the second m a t c h appeal to you fellows to come out games. This will end t h e second
K D rolled 515 to edge out Sayles w h e t h e r or n o t you have h a d ex- elimination. Any t e a m loosing four
M e n s
bv two nins S k i n n e r h a d h i e h sine-le P e l ' i e l i c e '
'
Athletic Associa- s t r a i g h t games a g a i n will be elimintlon
is
toKDwlSi
137 while O r u m n b o w
your organization a n d we ated,
T h e r e m a i n i n g teams will
n c e d y0Ur
ed a H 2 for Savles
, a c " v e s u p p ° r > M £ A i s P la - V ° " t h e l e ( l ^ e a n d t h e t e a m
ca a I U roi bayies.
n o t ft c l u b o f a s e l e c t f e w
E v e r y s t a n d i n g w i n be pQsted Qn
W A A
second Match
m a n in school c a n become a m e m - bulletin board Monday
I n t h e P h i D e l t - A E P h i m a t c h , ber by simply expressing t h e desire
both g a m e s were won by small m a r - to do so. If you h a v e paid your '
— — — — _ _ _
gins. I n t h e first game P h i Delt's s t u d e n t tax or are enrolled u n d e r
total was 5G5 a n d AEPhi's 50G. I n the "G.I. Bill" t h e r e is no indivithe second game, Phi Dolt bowled dual expense involved. T h e a m o u n t
Meyers, '46, hit of your activity depends entirely
541 lo AEPhi, 548. Meyers,
game of 141 a n d 144. S h a p i r o , '48, upon you.
hit. 15G in t h e first game and Schwe- Smoking Kule
We have been asked to state in
dock, '49, 154 in the second game,
this column t h a t smoking is p r o Coming M a t c h e s
In ii Friendly,
hibited in the gym a t all times.
Next week four m a t c h e s are s c h e 'Phis is not. only a school ruling but
duled. On Tuesday, G a m m a K a p u city fire ordinance. Not only does
Comfortable
will t a k e on K a p p a Delta, a n d Sayles il constitute a fire h a z a r d but also
rolls a g a i n s t P h i Delia. On T u e s - h a r m s the floor and adds more
day, Chi Sig is scheduled with gray hairs to the j a n i t o r ' s head. '
Atmosphere
AEPhi a n d Stokes with Pierce.
it's I rue t h a t the new gym Is a n e a r
prospect but let's take care of tile
present, gym.
Central
\lt
Psi Gam Wins
Scoring Upset
Wood
D.
JEONEY.
DIAL 5-1913
PUOP
BOULEVARD
CAFETERIA
he most of the Best
for the Least
and Lunches
Dial 2-9733
1 9 8 - 2 0 0 CENTRAL AVENUE
A L B A N Y . N. Y.
*>
PACK 4
%
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, MARCH 8, 1946
Shamrocks, Blarney Predominate Freshmen, Juniors
As Harp's Riot Honors Erin
Co-Sponsor Party
'*>,.
ffi&ffia 'SASSS ml m '«• « -
°
War Veteran Will Give Faculty-Alumni
Anti-Discrimination Speech
T. Sgt. Ben Kuroki, JapaneseAmerican, who served in the
European and Pacific campaigns
will appear as guest of the
Capitol District Council for Social Studies in Page Hall on
March 19 at 7:30 P. M.
Will Conduct Program
On Teacher Education
The faculty-alumni meeting of the
Eastern States Association of Professional Schools for Teachers will
be held on Thursday, March 14, a t
the Commodore Hotel in New York.
The theme of this meeting will be
"Real Life Appraisal of TeacherEducation Programs," and will consist of two parts.
The speakers of the first part are
alumni of two teachers colleges, a
college of education, and a university. They will discuss the effectiveness of present teacher-education
programs presenting the points of
view of an elementary school teacher, a junior high school teacher, a
high school teacher and a rural
teacher. The following problems
will be included in the discussion:
1. The demands of the profession:
How much did the teacher-education program aid in working with
children, their parents, the community and with other teachers?
2. The socially-induced changes in
elementary and secondary education: To what extent did this program help the teacher deal with
such changes as increased emphasis
en inter-group education and on
problems of living?
3. The needs of a teacher as a
person: To what extent did the
program aid in developing the personal qualities necessary to a
teacher?
4. Leadership in social education:
To what extent did the teachereducation institution set an example for teachers by its own leadership in social education?
The two speakers in the second
part will comment upon cum it
trends in teacher education.
from page 1, Col. S)
Z.444
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY,
—s::-.
| D BETTER TASTING
^£^?—
Send a post card for
large portraits of Perry Como and
( 2 COOLER SMOKING £1
THE RIGHT COMBINATION
OF THE WORLD'S BEST TOBACCOS Si
C«f yclghl V)ki, Loom t M i n t Toiicto Co.
Jo Stafford. Address: Chesterfield
Studio, Box 21, New York 8, N. Y.
I
VOL. XXX NO. I t
Maloney, Weber
Starjfjn Musical
Noisy Roommates Would Bring
Students To Library At Night
reserve books in the library where
reference material was available.
brary Shutdown Daily at 6 P. M." Although the dorms are close to
The story goes on to explain that the Pine Hills Library, Miss Feethe long blackouts, lack of fuel, han said that this source was
and the danger presented by the not adequate for college level paglass enclosed library made it im- pers.
possible at that time to keep the Tho problem of studying in the
library open until 9:30 p. m. as group houses was mentioned by
usual.
Graham Duncan, '46, who said it
This week the STATU COLLEQH NEWS was impossible to work effectively
has made a survey of a representa- and that he would definitely use
tive portion of the student body to the library during the evening. Bill
determine whether or not a need Cornwall, '48, also advocated studyfor extending library hours into ing in the library because it is the
the evening again is felt. From ap- "only quiet place on the campus".
proximately thirty students con- Art Soderlind, '47, had to work out
sulted, twenty-six were definitely a schedule of sleeping after supper
of the opinion that such a move and getting up at 11 P. M. to study
until two or three in the morning
would be helpful.
The graduate students particu- to overcome this trouble. He adlarly favored evening hours be- ded, "Not only are the public licause of the great amount of re- braries inadequate but the State
search required of them. Richard Library is out because it closes at
Crane, stated emphatically, "An ex- six".
cellent idea. I have so much liLate labs three afternoons a week
brary work to do that it is ex- were the problem of science majors
tremely difficult to finish it dur- Erna Burns and Mary Jean Carving the day" and Therusa Gleason er, and social studies major Jodie
corroborated this opinion in prac- Mandell says, "I would like to have
tically the same words.
it open to do my outside history
From the Senior class a dissent- reading." Working after school ining vote came from Genevieve terferes with others' library scheSmithling who felt that not enough dules and Evelyn Boe|tcher, '48,
students would take advantage of says that because of it she is forced
the opportunity, and she was sup- to use the less convenient and less
ported in this by Dorothy Causae, complete public libraries. Nancy
'48. However, Ruth Herdman, '46, Hellman, '49, finds that extracursocial studies major, said, "It is ricular meetings produce a conflict
hard to get reserve books because with library work when 3:30 rolls
there are so many students using around and she would appreciate
the same ones, and evening hours the opportunity to work in the evemight alleviate this situation." ning.
Margaret Feehan, '46, also felt that
Some of the studonts like Eleait would be more convenient to use nore Schneider, '48, and Dick Hayford, '49, would not be affected by
the evening hours since they work
then, but thoy thought it was a
good idea. Hayford introduced a
sympathetic note when he said,
"Wouldn't it be hard on the poor
librarians?" Others like Helen
Wong, '48, who livos in a distant
All students who wish to play in part of tho city, also would not
the campus elimination contest of benefit directly, but thoir lot might
the Intel-college Bridge Tournament bo made easier if tho library faciliMarch 26 must sign up on the bulle- ties wore loss crowded In the daytin board in lower Draper before time.
Wednesday, March 20, according to
/Continued on pane ,'), Col. 2'
an announcement by the Captain,
Alice Prtndle, '48. The tournament
will decide the eight players who
will represent State College In a
regional contest among similar teams
In New York City.
Davis, Stokes To Direct
Curtain 8:30, Page
Four years ago in the STATB COLLEQR NEWS: "Blackout Causes Li-
Tills fourth Annual Inter-college
Bridge Tournament Is sponsored by
a commltee of alumni from leading
men's, women's and co-educational
colleges and universities. Because
of the war the annual tournament
has not been played for the past
lour years. This is the first to be
held since 1942.
/^ALWAYS MILDER
ews
MARCH 15, 1946
"Norwegian Nights," an operetta
by Harold M. Augustine and Arthur
E. Ward, will be presented by the
Operatic Society of Music Council
tonight and tomorrow night in Page
Auditorium at 8:30 P. M. Marianne
Davis, '46, Is student director,
Charles F. Stokes, musical director,
and Muriel Navy, '46, Is accompanist.
PEGGY CASEY
MARIANNE DAVIS
NEWS Editors
Plan To Attend
Press Convention
Two News Reporters Foiled
But Put Up A Good Fight
"Churchill arrives in Albany,"
screamed the headlines Tuesday night as two News reporters scrambled down to the Governor's Mansion for an interview.
Brimming over with confidence the two sauntered to the
front gate of the mansion to
bo met by two outstandingly
huge men.
Not to be outdone by mere
bodyguards, the reporters started for the rear of tho mansion.
Ah! No guards—a simple matter of climbing the fence. As
the climber stood with one leg
poised over the barrier, miraculously, out of nowhere, a
guard appeared. He looked—
she retreated.
A slight feeling of discouragement began to creep over
the reporters about this time,
but they nonchalantly strolled
to the other side of the house to
run smack dab into two armed
guards.
O well, who wanted to interview Churchill anyway.
Reporter's note: We did!
Theme: School Press
In Post W a r World
The three pairs who win the regional contost will compete in the
finals nt the Ritz-Oarlton Hotel in
New York City April 2(i and 27.
Thirteen pairs of players from other
regions will bo contesting against
them. The events will be played
Friday evening and Saturday afternoon to allow the contestants plenty
of leisure time in New York.
All players in the finals will be
provided with train fare,
hotel
rooms, meals and IUI allowance for
small incidental expenses. They will
remain in New York for tho week
end and awards and honors will be
presented to tho final winners.
Miss Prindle also stated that only
undergraduate students will be eligible for the contest. No graduate
students need upply.
In '48-'49 Clash For Rivalry Points
Willi the Sophs leading 8!ii to 4Vii, verdict.
tho rival classes will clash in today's
Each team member will be allotussembly to determine who can out- tt>ci three minutes to state his views.
argue who for the sum total of 2''j The frosh will start proceedings
points. The Sophs and the frosh with Miss Pay leading the talks,
shall pit their argumentlve powers Then Dunker will come to the fore
against each other with tho topic: t o introduce the Sophomore side of
Resolved: "That married veterans ( h ( , , i m , s t | o n .
c.riesco and
After
should wear wedding rings."
Roullci, h l m , e x n R l u t e d Ulelr ldons
Friday, February 1, Gloria Oil- lllK , ,,„,„. t h R l ( , m l n u t G S | ,, he t e t l m s
bort, President of tho Sophomore w l l l b e g l v o n ft two-mlnuto recess to
class, challenged the frosh to the l l l l ( | U l e i l . v o l c i , s l v n d p l n n ( h o n t _
debate, quoting the topic as she did t n c k i n l n e l l . abuttals. Both sides
so. Robertson Baker, frosh Pros - w l l l b e flowed two minutes for
dent, jumped up to accept the chal- n 1( ,| r rebuttals
lengo and the affirmative side, and A .student-faculty committee has
tlii! light was on.
been chosen to judge the debate.
John Pay, Marie Orieco and Ma- A n .students on tho committee are
ria Whelley will elaborate their seniors, Dr. Roland C. Burton,
views on publicizing the wedded stft-Professor of English, Miss Agnes E.
tus of the veteran students. Eloise FuMerer, Assistant Professor of
Worth, Barbara Dunker and Joseph English, and Miss Louiso Jowltt,
Rouller will uphold the Sophomore Instructor of English, will do tho
point of view by advocating tho Judging from the faculty point of
"no-ring" policy. Worth and Wholly view. Joan Mather and Marianne
will pick up the looso ends with Davis, Seniors, will act as student
their rebuttals. The Sophs say judges.
"No", the frosh say "Yes," and the At noon today the rivalry score
married vets sit with rings poised will stand 11 to 4',i or 8 Mi to 7.
above their fingers awaiting theOnly the debate will tell!
Cast
Justine Maloney, '48, and Harold
Weber, '47, play the leading roles as
Nina, the beloved of Grieg, and
Grieg, a Norwegian composer. They
wlll be supported by the following:
Joseph Palevsky, '46, as Bjornsen, a
Norwegian poet and composer;
Mervyn McClintock, '48, as Herman
Hagerup, Nina's father;
Agnes
Young, '46, Olga, the bride; William
Mallory, '47, Petter, the groom; Albert Read, '47, Otter, Grieg's agent;
Harold Mills, '49, Joslah Marmaduke, an opera singer; John Lawler,
'48, Mr. Covington; Mary Telian,
'47, Mrs. Covington, English tourists; Dorothea Silvernall, '47, Mary,
Sheila Watklns, '47, Jane, daughters
of the Covington's; Donald Dickinson, '49, Hans, Harold Story, '49,
Nils, characters in the dream; Agnes Young, '46, Solvejg, beloved of
Peer Gynt; Harold Weber, '47, Peer
Gynt, peasant adventurer; Mary
Telian, '47, Ase, mother of Peer
Gynt; William Mallory, '47, the
mountain king; Anita Delegge, '47,
his daughter; and Anitra, an oriental dancer, sung by Berdena Fuller, '49, and danced by Marianne
Davis, '46.
Joan Berbrich and Elizabeth
O'Neil, Co-Edltors-in-Chlef of the
State College News, and Kathryn
Hagerty and Mary Tessier, Associate Editors, will attend the 22nd
Convention of the Columbia Scholastic Press Association March 21-23
on the Columbia University Campus.
The annual convention was
cancelled last year because of hotel
Life of Grieg
and travel restrictions.
The story centers on the life of
Convention Theme
Edward Grieg, a struggling young
The theme will be "School Press musician,
Is devotedly In love
in the Post War World." General with Nina,who
an inspiration for much
meetings will be led by professional of his music.
His poverty moves
speakers from newspapers, magato seek a pension from the
zines, and publishing houses and him
and his agent, Otter, is
by advisors and student delegates. government
sent
to
negotiate
for it.
These meetings will deal with subjects of Interest to publication Herman Hagerup, Nina's father,.
staffs as a whole. There will also is opposed to the courtship of
be sectional meetings for individual Grieg and Nina and sponsors a n problems and clinics for criticism of other suitor for her hand, a certain
publications brought by the dele- English opera singer who is in Norgates. Representatives of manu- way studying, and who also is enfacturing concerns connected with deavoring, through Hagerup, to obthe newspaper profession will dem- tain a pension.
onstrate their work and advise
Herr Bjornsen, an old friend of
delegates on individual problems. Grieg, is visiting the composer.
Magazines and newspapers en- Grieg, long stirred by the beauty of
tered in contests during the con- the outlying mountains, speaks of
vention will be exhibited, and pro- his Intention of going out into them
fessional newspaper and commercial to formulate his dream into music.
In the course of his stroll, he grows
exhibits will also be on display.
tired and lies down In a cool glen
General Program
to rest. Sleep overtakes him, and
The program follows:
from his ensuing dreams, tho Peer
Thursday, March 21:
10:30 A.M.-Registration, McMillln Gynt music takes form. He returns
and tells of his experiences.
Theatre.
1:30-2:30 P.M.—OpeningMeeting, In the midst of n festival given in
honor of Grieg, Otter returns to reMcMillln Theatre.
2:30-3:30 P.M.—Sectional Meetings. port that the pension Is granted.
3:30-5:30 P.M.—N o w s p a p e r and Grieg is able to marry Nina, and
Magazine Clinics.
4:30-5:30 P.M.—Feature Lecture, Mc- (Continued on page .1, Column 1)
Millln Theatre.
Friday, March 22:
Myskania To Sponsor Tea
10:30 A.M.-General Meeting, McMillln Theatre.
A student-faculty tea will bo
11:30 A.M.—Convention Picture, Low sponsored by Myskanl i from 2 to 5
P. M„ Thursday, Mr.oh 28, in the
Library Steps.
Lounge. Members of Myskania and
12:00 Noon—Luncheons.
faculty members will pour.
1:30 P.M.—Advisors' Meeting.
The tea will bo tho second of tho
Student Round Tables.
2:30-4:30 P.M.—Sectional Meetixigs. two held each year by Myskania
4:30 P.M.—Feature Lecture, McMil- and will be financed by tho proceeds of tho Frosh-Myskania baslln Theatre.
li:00 P.M.—Dinner, Men's Faculty ketball game held for that purpose.
There will be faolllttes for bridge
Club.
playing, and refreshments will toe
Saturday, March 23:
9:15 A.M.—Feature Film, McMillln served. All students and members
of the faculty are invited to attend.
(Continued on page i', Col S)
Weddi ng Rings Will Be Di scussed
5 Wights a W<>ek... alll\lBCStations
'£
MUSIC COUNCIL WILL PRESENT OPERETTA,
NORWEGIAN NIGHTS, TONIGHT, TOMORROW
Students to Play
In Bridge Tourney
The Class of 104!): Jean Anderson,
Dorothy Arnold, Marilyn Avulear,
Mary
Baeher,
Marie
Bennett,
Blanche Borku, Dorothy Byrnes,
Stanley Chwalek, Elizabeth Cross,
Patricia Devlin, Sara Ethal, Corinne
Felgln, Alvln Feldman, Margaret
Franks, Lucille Gullo, Irene Galloway, Catherine Grant, Helen Habcrmaim, Rita Ratlin, Ruth Halstead,
Persis Hockrldge, Jean Hoffman,
Betty Hohensteln, Marie Hobs, Mary
(Continued on page h, Column if)
State College
Schedule Meeting
For First Semester
Molly Kramer, Ruth Lape, Justine
S. Lewis, Elizabeth McDowell, Olive
MacDowell, Gloria McManus, Elizabeth Margot, Caroline Michel,
Dorothy Monty, Dorothy Mordaunt,
Robert
Penrose, Eileen
Pierce,
Gloria Pirowski, Rosalie Pooler,
Norma Punchak, Doris Qulnn, Jean
Rector, Laura Reed, Ruth Reynolds,
Charlotte Roscoe, Patricia Russell,
Patricia Sheehan, Rosa Smith, Mary
Stieglltz, Mary Stolfe, Dorothy
Sturzenberger, Shirley Taylor, Mary
Tessier, Christine Truman, Virginia
Van Vranken, Arlene Vetter, Paul
Wagner, Herbert Weiner, Joanna
Wells, Shirley Whipple, Helen Zumbic, Calvin Zippln.
Sophomores
Class of 1948: Viola Abrams,
Ethel Angle, Margaret Ardito, Eugenia Baranowskl, Orletta Behrens,
Kathleen Bell, Jeanne Bigelow, Evelyn Boctcher, Betty Brebeck, Eleanor
Byrne, Catherine Byrum, Vera Chudiak, Marie Contos, Muriel Dando,
Mary E. Davis, Edith Dell, Genevieve
Dwyer, Peggy Eggert. Marjory Elmore, Henry Farley, Anne Gilles,
May Giovannlello, Joan Green,
Margaret Groesbeck, Elizabeth Gurka, Doris Halthwaite,
Mnrjorie
Harland, Eleanor Holbig, Gilbert
Holliday, Barbara Hyman, Jnrmlla
Janecek, Helen
Klslel, Dolores
Koenlg, Marian Kragh, Janet La
Rue, Arlene Lavender, Helen Lengyel, Annalee Levins, Jessie Ludlum,
Sheila Maglness, Theresa Mnhoney,
Evelyn Muttlson, Ann May, Paul
Meadows, Miriam Millmun, Elizabeth Meri'ltt, Beverly Moore, C. Roger Nielsen, Zium Olmsted, Mary Regan. Daniel Rider. Rita Roberts,
Myra Rosenberg, Lillian Snlani,
Eleanore Schneider, Prances Sowa,
Jean Stapleton, Marylin Thomson,
Paula Tlchy, Patricia Ttlden, Mary
Van Voast, Marionlee Watklns, Hay
Weiss, Doris Wester, Donald White,
Alice Williams, Shirley Williams,
Eleanor Winkler, Elaine Woods.
Freshmen
"
t%: ^ V
The Junior and Freshman classes
Shure, a n ' it's Harp's Riot that Is
are
hall of
Drum*
or
a
miaJrtpr
ata sister class party
causing all the congestion In the hall
of Draper, or a quarter at t o n l gsponsoring
h t f r o m 8 to 11 P. M. in the
Commons, and all State's children the door will do the trick.
Commons. The Class Presidents,
of Erin are turning out to whoop The wishing well opens for busiand Robertson
it up in honor of patron Saint •^c, „* ,i„w .„ n»„ ,.,„„(„ „„,.* James Conley, '47,chairmen
f the
Paddy!
Since his return to civilian
First stop is the Irish wishing
d
T h e
life, Kuroki has suffered much
Commons will be decorated
well at the entrance which works J S ' h S S S v Z ? • f f L S S E l ; hfv'p
the
^
class colors, green and red, discrimination because of his
on a reverse principle. Instead of ^ w S ^ S /U Sl l mS $ ^S p eM
clal
coloring. He recently starred
°
to keep in tone with the theme of
wishing on a coin tossed in, each ! , 3 l a ® °
in "Boy From Nebraski," a
»»„«!„ l o „„r,^„i1 ».,.), the party: "promoting class unity
newcomer is entitled to dip in for vnLi
transcribed
radio
broadcast
L M ?
, ^ ' and friendly relations." Coke and
a favor in the form of a n Irish rM^attoSfl
C00kleS WlU De SerTCd aS refreSh
which
won
the
Writer
award
limerick, or pipe perhaps.
S-^nnfifnH^S^^QSS" m e n t s a n d t h e
for 1946. Kuroki will give an
There will be dancing in the midst *§N! $d$?£S
»n* Mph f £
entertainment committee
anti-Discrimination
talk enhas arranged a pantomime
of the shamrocks and shillelaghs tm & f f i ^ S r t ^ K t e f f i
titled, "The War Isn't Over
and
the
a
ready
mentioned
Newman
"Cyrano
de Bergerac."
d
strewn about by Sally Dunn's deco- crews behind the scenes, State can ^ a h e cast of th nlav
Yet" before the Capitol District
is made un
P
rating committee, and when the brush off its ballads with battle J Tg . " } freshmen
John Tabne? Council for Social Studies.
Irish jigs'and reels have worn out cries and turn out for the party $ f e g ° f £ " " ; f Christian
the most exuberant Irish spirits, confident that it's glad they'll be onald Dickinso^ Will0 assume the
A discussion period will follow
D
there will be games and bridge. uiey came.
his speech led by Eugene J. Tayrole of C y r a n o wlth K a y G r a n t a s
Dorine Holland h a s a hand in the
lor of the Neio York Times. Mr.
Roraine and Jay Shelley. The parentertainment and is lining up a
Taylor has spoken to the Junior
ody
will
be
acted
out
in
pantomime
colleen or two to take part in Irish
Ed. 10 classes here at State for
with Jean Ineson, '49, reading the
dances and give out with "Mother Plan Inspection Tour
the past two years on education
dialogue.
Machree" and all the old songs of
and rehabilitation. He spoke to
The
party
is
intended
to
be
an
inKlllarney. When the soloists have O f Arnold House
the Junior Ed. 10 class last
formal get-together for the two
performed, all the lads and lassies
month on combat fatigue and
c a r d s w i l 1 SU
will join in the song fest.
An open house will be held by the ^ f - the ^ "c l a nfo i n„g
P"
its applications in teaching.
'
Singing plus bridge plus dancing men of Arnold at 564 State Street $*™^l
All State College students are
t
m
!
equals appetite, and what Irishman on Thursday from 7:30 to 11 P. M. ™ " ™ | s
urged to attend the program.
doesn't have a huge one? This is The purpose of the affair is to ac- t Committees for the party are: enAnn
Ethal, chairman, ,
where B, J. McGrath comes in quaint he college with facilities tertainment,
e
In on
Ha
£ y n Mi"s' rJ<*n
with the refreshments, which will and equipment of the Alumni As- l ™ „ ^ Tabner,
Frances
Flanagan,
fresh£abner,
fresh- n » a n « | i c f > - F r P « r i m p n
be in keeping with the color scheme sociatlon's newly acquired group men
< refreshments, Dolores Lawson,
of the evening. Everyone attend- hnnoo fnr m m
>47_ B e a t r i c e oaporale, '49, co-chairing is expected to wear his or her iw^e loi men.
(Continued from page !h Col. 1)
Refreshments will be served and m e l l | uichavd Smith, '47, Leslie Hergreenest outfit to match.
Horan,
Barbara Houck, Mary Iataa
tour
of
the
four
floors
of
the
,
McDonald,
vey P e a r l PlesS| J o a n n e
This annual party is being sponfreshmen;
decorations,
Rosalie uro, Helen Ivanyshyn, Robert Kaissored by Newman Club, but the house may be taken.
er, Virginia Keller, Dorothy Kern,
honorary title of Son of Erin is be- Edward Holstcin, graduate stu- Pooler, '47, and Jeanne Ashcraft, Robert Kittredge, Mary Krom, Elding extended to all State students dent and newly elected chairman co-chairmen, Beverly Coplon, Bev- riede Laemmerzahl. Marion LaFaro,
for the occasion. Ancestry is no of the house committee, will be in erly Stittig, Marion Hawkins and Joyce McCollum, Marie Markham,
obstacle to attendance, the only re- charge. He is to be assisted by Dorothy Sweger, freshmen; clean- Vivian Morter, June Olson, Thelma
quirement being $.25. Mary Straub Graham Duncan, '47, James Sul- up, Norma Swinyer, '49, chairman, Pangburn, Barbara Parry, June
has charge of the tickets which tan, '49, and Joseph Torrisi, '48. Eldrlede Laemmerzahl, '49, Dolores Peters, Ethel Rosenberg, Norma
will be available for purchase Wed- George H. Lewis, graduate student, Lawson and James Conley, Juniors; Schryver, Yvette Schwedock, Joyce
nesday and Thursday in the lower has been elected secretary and arrangements, Joan Alverson, '47, Simon, Helen Sins, Jeannette Skavtreasurer of Arnold.
chairman, Coletta Fltzmorris, Marie ina, Doris Smith, Marianne StandStudents and members of the Holz, and Margaret Seaman, fresh- ing, Audrey Steigerwald, Marvin
faculty have been invited to attend men; publicity, Barbara Houck and Wayne, and Elizabeth Winkler.
Honor Students Listed the open house.
Helen Califano, freshmen.
(Continued
m
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