advertisement
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER I t , 1941
*A«4
Statistics Reveal
Commerce Majors
Lead Placements
Girl$' Contest For Banner
C/osm With No Cawalt'ns
Dramatics Class
To Present Plays
Masculine Members of Faculty
May Answer Call to Arms
Men! Don't worry. Your dates
will be able to paint the town
With the declaration of war, per- Washington as a Consulting Ecored this weekend. Women's
Futterer Appoint! Players
haps the question uppermost in the nomist.
banner rivalry appears to be over
Also as part of this organization,
temporarily a t least and no
For Tragedy, Two Comedies minds of State College students is:
Dr. Henry L. Sisk, Instructor in Educasualties
have
been
reported.
How
will
the
war
affect
us?
Not
Mathematics and Scitnea
As a final examination in the only is it important to the students cation, has been doing research work
A few pioneering sophomores
at Albany Medical School for three
course, the Elementary Dramatics but to the faculty as well.
Most Popular Combination
discovered the 1945 banner in a
months on problems related to war
class will present three one-act
bass
drum
in
Page
Hall
audiThe faculty members who will be
l i i e demand lor commerce teachplays, two comedies and a tragedy, affected by the war are those whose neurosis.
torium.
Although
the
sophs
Dr. Charles Andrews, Instructor in
ers surpassed that for teachers cf
on January 13, 1942.
secretly tried to remove the banprofessional services may be needed, Physics, and Dr. Oscar Lanford,
any other subject last year, accordner, an observant member of '45
those who are reserve officers, and Professor of Chemistry, are reserve
The casts were selected last week
ing t o statistics revealed by t h e discovered the intended plot.
by Miss Agnes Futterer, Assistant those who are registered under the officers but do not know where they
Student Employment Bureau. Of
Meanwhile sophomores rushed
Professor of English, after the stu- Selective Service Act.
stand, when or if they shall be called.
831 different calls for teachers reto the rescue finding their rivals
dents in the class had made compeIn the World War I, Dr. Clarence
ceived during the past fiscal year,
Dr. Robert Rienow, Assistant Proready and willing for a fight.
titive try-outs for parts.
F. Hale, Professor of Physics, was fessor of Social Studies, Dr. Louis
nearly one-fourth of them were for
A Myskania member quickly
commercial teachers. Science, EngIn the tragedy, The Street Attends called from State College to do work C. Jones and Dr. Varley Lang, Insnatched the prize from grasping
structors in English, and Mr. Koolish, mathematics and social studies
a Funeral by William Kozlenko, are of liquid air and welding. Some of
hands and Wednesday's contest
were next in the order named.
cast Marjorie Breunig, Gertrude our faculty may be called in much man Boycheff, Instructor in Physical
ended in a stalemate.
Education in Milne, are of draft age
Gold, Lois Hampel, Shirley Mills, the same way.
Many schools needed students
Gretrude
Myers, and Robert White,
Early last Spring, the members of but have been deferred to Class 3
who were qualified t o teach two
sophomores.
technical societies registered in the because of dependents.
subjects. Mathematics and science
In relation to the war itself, Dr.
Included in the cast of Noel Cow- Roster for Scientific Personnel, a list
proved to be the most popular comard's high comedy, Hands Across of the trained men in the country Donnal V. Smith, Professor of Social
bination.
English teachers who
the Sea, are Trece Aney, Harold who could be called upon in an emer- Studies says, "I am merely a teacher
could also take over libraries or soAshworth, Paul Barselou, Roderick gency. Dr. Thomas Kinsella, Super- which is exactly what you students
cial studies classes were called for
Fraser, Joseph Higgens, Rhona Ry- visor of Commerce in Milne, is the are. And It is our duty in this time
by many schools.
French-Latin
an, Ruth Schmitt, Sophie Weiss- first to be called. He is now await- of greatest crisis to do our work as
teachers ranked low in preference
blum, sophomores, and Bryant Tay- ing orders which will take him to well as we can."
with a total of 17 calls.
"Personality and extra-curricular lor,
'43.
activities
run
neck
and
neck
with
Among less utilized combinations
Com Club Plans Get-Together
The cast of the second comedy,
high
averages,
as
far
as
teacher
of subjects, English-commerce, EngWhen You Are Twenty-One by Zilles, Clark to Present
lish-French - Latin, science - social placement is concerned", stated Miss Ludwig Thoma, consists of Dora
Commerce students are invited to
studies, Spanish-French teachers Irene Semanek, Director of the SEB, Aungst, James McFeeley, Betty Two Dramas Tuesday
attend a "Student-Faculty Get-Towere In general demand. The SEB at an interview on job qualifications Harper, Arthur Soderlind, Vera
gether" Monday from 7:30 P.M. to
did not receive many calls for this week. "That is why we have Willard, sophomores, and Shirley
Advanced Dramatics students, 10:30 P. M. in the Lounge. Sadye
instituted
sessions
with
the
junteachers who would take only
Luke Zilles and Barbara Clark, jun- Zilin, '42, chairman of the event,
Wurz, '43.
French, Spanish, history or phy- iors and sophomores. We want to
iors, will present two one act plays promises games, entertainment, and
Other
students
who
are
not
taksical education classes. There were make the entire school 'extra-curTuesday evening at 8:30 P.M. in the refreshments galore. The party is
ing
active
part
in
the
plays
will
be
no requests for German teachers ricular' conscious." Miss Semanek working behind the scenes. The Page Hall auditorium.
an opportunity to become better acunless they could also teach Eng- has held job placement sessions with
The play directed by Mr. Zilles quainted with the "profs."
following are the chairmen of the
juniors
and
sophomores
at
meetings
lish.
committees: Jeanne Bailey, Proper- is a fantasy with a small park in
Last spring State College put 260 during the past two weeks.
ties; Doris Lichtwart, Sets and London as its setting. Two rather
Previously the SEB worked only lights; Robert Loucks, Costumes; citified faunS, Betty Clough, '45, and
certified seniors on the educational
HEY,
"N
market. Of these, 46 had an Eng- with the senior and graduate classDelores DiRubbo, House; Eunice Dora Aungst, '44, are comparing
their present urban existence with
lish-social studies combination. Sec- es. However, realizing the ImportBaird, Publicity.
HEADING FOR HOME?
the idylic life they once knew in the
ond in line were those who could ance to the prospective teacher of
Start right and easy! Send your
woods. The sudden appearance of
teach either commerce or social a "well-rounded" personality, t h e
luggage round-trip by trusty, lowa man and a cockney flower girl
studies or both. French and Eng- directors of the bureau have started Hillel Society Organized
cost RAILWAY Exi'KO'S. and take
whom he has just defended in a
lish, mathematics a n d science, working on the "under-graduate"
London pub brings an unexpected
your train with peace of mind.We
To Succeed Menorah
English and commerce were three classes.
twist to the plot.
pick-up and deliver, remember,
other combinations chosen by the "In many smaller schools," stated
A newly-organized society, the
class of '41.
at no extra charge within our regMiss Clark's play Is a French
Miss Semanek, "teachers are chosen Hillel Councilorship, will succeed
melodrama concerning a governess
ular vehicle limirs in all cities and
not only for proficiency in French
the
Menorah
Society
at
State
Col(Claire Schwartz, '45) who has just
principal towns. You merely phone
or Latin, but also for their ability
to direct a play, or to coach a bas- lege. Selma Leis, '42, takes over been acquitted of strangling a child.
Three Subjects Added ketball
the presidential duties. Solomon Unconvinced of her innocence, a
RAILWA
game. That is one reaEXPRESS
AOBNCV " ^ F " INC.
son why we of the SEB urge active Greenberg, '43, is vice president and doctor (Ira Freedman, '43) sets
For Spring Semester
about
to
disprove
the
justice
of
the
NATION-WIDE RAIL-AIR SERVICE
membership in a t least one of the Beatrice Hirsch, '42, is secretary.
The group is sponsored by the court's decision.
Three courses have been added to school organizations for all those
the college catalog for the spring students of NY9CT who have a s - National Hillel Organization and
semester of 1942, according to a pirations toward a 'teachership'." will be guided by Dr. Bernard J.
GEORGE D. JEONEY. PROP.
DIAL 8-1013
statement from the office of Dr. "Active membership," explained Miss Bamberger, Rabbi of Albany's Temple Beth Emeth. Hillel will take
Milton G. Nelson, Dean of the Col- Semanek, "means rolling up your
sleeves and really accomplishing over the general program of Menlege.
Dr. William H. Hartley, Professor something for the organization."
orah and will work with SCA and
of Guidance, will teach Education
Newman Club to promote inter113, audio-visual aids in instruction, 2
faith work at State.
Dr.
Pound
Will
Speak
hours, second semester. Only Seniors and Graduate Students may
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
A Pi Gamma Mu discussion contake this course which will be held cerning
interesting
points
of
New
O T T O R. M E N D E
In room 250 on Mondays and Wed- York State by Dr. Arthur Pound,
nesdays at 1:35 P. M.
state
historian,
will
take
place
WedMiss Ruth Hutchins, Instructor
"The College Jeweler"
in Room 20, at 3:30 P.M. Dr.
of Art, will be in charge of Art 4, nesday
Pound
will
supplement
the
discusa beginners course in general art.
103 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY. N. Y.
with slides illustrating the hisThis group will meet Monday and sion
toric
scenes
of
this
section.
Wednesday, 1:35 to 3:35. Students
interested should consult with Miss
Hutchins before completing program cards for the spring semester.
Miss Grace Martin and Miss Ruth
Suhrie, Instructors in Art, will teach
Art 7, a class in Design and Crafts.
This is to be continued throughout
the college year.
SEB Institutes
Job Interviews
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
50c
Th<
AbkcUf
CENTRAL STUDIO
PORTRAIT
PHOTOGRAPHY
FLORIST
—•—
XMAS PORTRAITS $5 A DOZ. AND UP
AGENCY
You taste
its
quality
PICTURES
$ 2 A DOZEN
'•Say It
With Flowers"
•:• W V < " \
T , MlKKELSEN
181 CENTRAL A V E .
7-9 South Pearl Street
Phone 3-4255
py y v r y r r y | ' r T T , r t " » ' ^ '» r v i
r-rvv-wv
KIMMEY'S BREAD.
HOLSUM
(White Bread)
KLEEN • MAID WHEAT
HOLSUM CRACKED WHEAT
(Delicious Toasted)
J. I, KiMMEY BAKERY
Albany, N. V.
Experience prove* that nothing take* the place of quality.
You taste the quality of ice-cold Coca-Cola. Again and again
you enjoy the charm of its delicioui taste... and its) cool,
clean after-*en»e of complete refreshment. Thirst ask* nothing more.
(<™(w%
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OP THE COCA-COLA COMPANY SV
ALBANY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
226 No. Allen St,
Albany, N. Y.
You trust Hi quality
4J*_^
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
Z-443
TT intCr C o i l C C r t
i n
f%.
Saylei Extends Greetings
T° State College Students
DlfltCCl tO I rCSCnt
T o t h e
a
LJ
OrUS*
'
• «
HdrpiSt
•
Dr. Candlyn W i l l Conduct
Presentation in Albany High
*
*
State's 1942 musical activities begin January 8 when Music Council
presents the Choral Society's MidWinter Concert in Albany High
School. Dr. T. P. H. Candlyn, Assistant Professor of Music, will direct
.,
, ,
.
.., .
the evening's performance which is
scheduled to begin a t 8:30 P. M,
As guest artist, Music Council has
engaged Miss Betty Paret, harpist.
Miss Paret who will play two sets
has been acclaimed as the best
harpist in New York City.
Jeannette Ryerson, '42, President
of Music Council, advises "This will
probably be the last concert for quite
some time in which there will oe
any male voices. Everybody should
^mtosZIea
Besides the chorus renditions in
which over 60 voices will be heard,
several solos are planned.
The bass section is being supplemented by some of the members of
the choir at St. Paul's cathedral.
The program is as follows:
I
Bino We Noel
French
Sleep Holy Babe
Candlyn
(Solos by' Mary-Dorothy Alden '45)
Pat-a-pan
French
Hymn to the Virgin
14th century
,,
Cnwwh Romance
Russian
AnnkTthVmiefa
Daunhter
Annie, me Mtuei a vaugnter
^
ir™,/.,,.;.„ jurn„~»t,u>M
'
Kentucky Moon^er
(Solo bv Earl Snow ™44)
te
SoonTwillBeDmic
Soon-a Will Be Cone
iNefeio spiritual
student body of State
College, Dr. John M. Sayles,
President, extends a personal
greeting at the season tor customary good will and rejoicing.
S 8 f , m p l e t e message te as fo1"
,„" T h e c *} r },s J m a s message,
'Peace no Earth,' has a very different meaning to us with the
dark clouds of war surrounding
us. However, let us determine to
bring it about by assuming
cheerfully the burdens which are
T l ^ S n ™ f IM„Tt?"S
it by our present living, let us
^ a n e w world of,peace o n
earth good w mtoward men, _
g 0 0 d will which embodies tolera n c e ) g 0 0 d will which recognizes
the rights of others, good will
W hich makes possible the growth
0 f people as well as nations in
religious freedom."
John M. Sayles,
President.
.
Debaters, Forum
C*V3
Possibility of 5c Milk Remote—
Myskania Will Review Problem
The prospect of 5c milk seems remote today, as the problem has been
tossed by Dr. John M. Sayles, President of the College, squarely back
into the laps of the Myskania investigating committee. This committee
is to investigate the possibility of
the installation of a milk dispensing
machine as the solution to the problem of the rise in the price of milk
from 5c a half-pint to 7c.
The rise in the Annex prices was
the subject of the Student-Faculty
Discussion Group which met Tuesday. Miss Laura Thompson, Manager of the Cafeteria and Annex,
Myskania, honorary campus leadership society, and members of the
faculty and administration were
present to hear opinions viewed. Dr.
Sayles presided.
Miss Thompson spoke in defense
of the rise in prices by remarking
that the operating expenses and the
rise in the cost of food of both
cafeteria and annex required her to
make up her loss by raising the
price of milk.
The solution to the milk problem
as offered by the Myskania committee would be the installation of a
milk dispensing machine which
could provide milk for 5c.
Whether or not the machine could
dispense milk efficiently and whe-
k A
A »• • « •
fylCrQC A\CtlVltieS
w
Debate Council has cancelled all
intercollegiate debates for the present and is temporarily merging with Students Donate $ 3 3 0
Forum to discuss world problems.
In Campus Chest Drive
The scheduled debates were necessadly cancelled because the topic
Many Promise to Contribute
chosen by the National Association
Following Christmas Vacation
of Teachers of Speech, "Resolved,
Solomon Greenberg, '43, chairman
That the Federal Government of the Campus Chest Drive, declared
Should Regulate by Law All Labor in a statement to the STATE COLLBOB
Unions in the United States—Con- NKWH, that $380 has been collected
stitutionality Conceded," is antedat- in student contributions.
ed
"Although this has been an experi' Seminars have been discontinued
mental year for this new charitable
,
_
fffl l h e U m e b e m g ftnd b o t h f r e s n
organization, the results of the cammen and varsity debaters are at- paign thus far have been satisfactoy.
Forum * meetings instead. The present war may have its eft
Since the F o r u m a t the
fects on this program; they may be
>n'esent t l m e
m a k i n g a stUdy of t h e Ja anese
either advantageous or otherwise."
P
At the present time, the total sum
situation, and since Debate Councollected amounts to $330; many stu_
ci[ feelg t h a t t h e o n l y l o g i c a l queg
dents who have been unable to make
111
tlon to discuss at the present time any contributions to this charity
Habanera (Carmen)
Bizet l s t n e j a p a n e s e situation, they are
drive to date have promised to do so
after the Xmas vacation.
How Best Are They
Tchaikowsky
cooperating
Since the data which has been
Halleluiah unto God's Almighty Son
^ j ffl^ ^ p r e s l d e n t o f D e _
, „ , . . ,
„ „ « M ? ,7,7
bate Council, does not believe that handled is insufficient for determining deflnte figures in regard to the
(Solo by Audrey Benfield, 43)
^
^ ^
^ ^
w , „ b(J c n Q S _
percentage of the student body who
Ryerson Is Chairman
en for some time. "I do believe, have paid, a more completed reMiss Ryerson is general chairman however," said Hirsh, "that Inter- port will be given by the committee
ior the concert. She will be assistcollegiate discussions have two items after the Christmas vacation.
cd by the other members of Music
/Continued on page 3, column 2)
The students who have not been
Council. The committees are: pubapproached by the solicitors a r e
licity, Alberta Lee, '42, Mildred Matasked to make their donations at
tice and George Kunz, juriors; p L „ t n CrJiinr« Annniniorl
the table In the lower hall of Draper.
tickets and programs, Ira Hirsh, ™ o t o t d l , o r s ^ P P ° " " e d
'42, and Jean McAllster, '43; freshHubert G. Moore, '42, Photoman try-outs, Carmelina Losurdo, gmphy Editor of the Pedagogue,
•44, and Florence Halbrelch, '42; announces the appointment of two
y»frrp<
sale of tickets, Bernard Perlman Junior Photography Editors, Robert
and Maxon Reeves, seniors.
Wesselman and Carolyn Burrows.
Tickets for the performance may Either of the two new appointees is
be obtained by exchanging student eligible for the position of Senior
tax tickets during the week of Jan- Photography Editor or Edltor-lnuary 5 in the lower hall of Draper. Chief of next year's Pedagogue.
ther it could dispense both chocolate
and white milk a t the same time
were the questions discussed. Miss
Thompson said that there had been
much mechanical trouble with the
former dispensing machine. Also a
machine can hold only 100 bottles
of milk, while Miss Thompson sells
on the average of 300 bottles during
the noon hour. This would mean
refilling the machine three times in
the space of two hours.
Another solution to the problem
suggested would be the lowering of
milk back to its former 5c price and
raising the prices on luxuries. What
those other luxuries would be was
not decided a t the meeting but the
possibility was given to Myskania to
investigate.
Since the rise in milk prices, Miss
Thompson estimates that she sells
1/3 less milk now than formerly.
H o w e v e r , inasmuch as Miss
Thompson estimates that there is a
1 l / 2 c handling charge attached to
each bottle of milk, it seemed evident to some members of the discussion group that if a dispensing
machine could be kept in good mechanical order, Miss Thompson
would realize as much profit from
the sale of milk through the dispensing machine as she now obtains.
Dr. Nelson Buys Flashlight—
Sheds Light on Subject
When the sound of the blackout signal is heard, most people
will run to the nearest sofa and
twiddle their thumbs until the
all-clear signal blows. Confusion
will reign supreme among all as
they grope along by familiar
landmarks.
But Dean Nelson will know
just what he's doing. The other
day he purchased a red-colored
flashlight to use in case of
blackouts. "I've always had a
black-colored one and I never
could find it when I needed it.
So when I saw this red one in a
store window, I bought it," he
said, The Dean hopes this will
shed some light on the subject.
'**
tt.
VOL. XXVI, NO. 11
Training Courses
Will Be Offered
Second Semester
DeLaney Outlines Program
For Student War Service
State College began its War Service drive this week with the preliminary registration of students
and faculty for classes covering all
phases of defense work, There was
a great response to the request for
war service workers, although t h e
number registered has not been calculated as yet. Classes will be arranged to flt in with the second semester schedules of the students,
Miss Sara Tod Delaney, Dean of Women, explained. Class hours will be
posted outside Room 107, college war
center, as soon as decided.
Committee Set Up
A central committee has been set
up which will be in complete charge
of war and defense work on t h e
campus and will assign jobs to the
students. The committee includes
Miss DeLaney, Jean Sears and Bernard Perlman, seniors, in charge of
organization of the service program
and setting up of classes; Dr. Robert
Rienow, Assistant Professor of Social
Studies, and Edwin J. Holstein, '41,
Publicity; Mrs. Anna Barsam, instructor in Home Economics, and
Emily Blasiar, '43, knitting and sewing. In addition to the central committee, Alice Packer, '42, will work
on the knitting and sewing course,
and Miss Grace Martin, Miss Rutli
Suhrie and Miss Ruth Hutchins, of
the Art Department will handle poster work.
A new course has been added to
the ones already planned. As his
contribution to the program, Dr.
Howard A, DoBell, Professor of
Mathematics, will conduct a course
in Machine Shop Theory and Practice. His course will give the rudimentary procedures of shop work,
Many Courses Offered
Among the courses offered, the
Nutrition and Group Feeding course
ls open only to women and the Signal and Communications and AirRaid Warden Duty courses open to
men only. Open to both men and
women are the First Aid, Motor Mechanics and Home Nursing courses,
and office, knitting, sewing and publicity work. Men must be at least
Juniors Formulate Plans 21
years of age to take the Air-Raid
Warden course. Three courses in
For Annual Weekend Motor Mechanics will be given: a
Plans for the 1942 Junior Week- three week course, a twenty week
end, February 20-21, are already un- course and a ten week course,
derway. This year the prom ls to Students wishing to help in some
carry through a plantation theme. way but who lack particular skill
The class plans to engage a negro may be useful in making posters or
orchestra tofltin with the southern assisting in either the Red Cross
scene,
or the college office.
One event of the week-end proThe present program has been set
gram, the tea dance, is to be abol- up In the light of needs apparent
ished this year, due to lack of in- now. Miss DeLaney said that the
terest. Some of the money saved program would be kept flexible to
ls to be used to get a good name provide for possible emergencies and
band, Since the orchestra agency additional services required.
has not yet been appointed by student council, the class Itself will hire
the orchestra,
Finance Board Decides
Mildred Mattlce, Vice-president of
the class, is general chairman. The Tax Refund Standard
heads of the committees for the
prom are: Music, Howard Lynch;
Because of a n increased number
Decorations. Jean Buckman and of students who, upon leaving school
O w e n Bombard; Arrangements, tills year, requested the refunding
Gloria Commorata; Publicity, Mary of their school tux money, Finance
McOnnn; Programs, Lyn Burrows; Board deemed it necessary to set a
Chaperones, George Kunz; Bids and standard for the Judgment of fuInvitations, Lola Hafley, The lunch- ture individual cases. On Wedneseon committees are headed by: day noon, a by-law was passed and
Luncheon, Byron Benton; Speakers, added to the Finance Board ConstiMarlon Adams; Arrangements, Mor- tution, This provides that students
ris Oerber; Place cards, Shirley leaving college after the first month
Jennings,
of the first semester forfeit half
their tax. Students leaving during the first month of the second
Directories on Sale
semester may upon explication to
Nicholas Morsillo, '42, Edltor-in- Finance Board, be refunded half the
Chlof of the 1041-1042 Directory ad- tax, Any withdrawals after t h e
vises students who have not yet first month of the second semester
purchased their copies to do so be- will necessitate a forfeiture of the
fore they leave for the Christmas entire tax.
vacation. Only a small number of
Although such cases have arisen
Courtesy Knickerbocker New
directories remain, and a last min- every year, an Increased number of
MOST FREQUENTED ipol In collar tt the beginning of th« week was the Rotunda of Draper Hall, where itudanii
ute rush to obtain them ls antici- students have left college this
Hocked to ragiittr for War Service Work. Ed HoliUIn and Virginia Polhemus, seniors (background), enroll Mary Carpenter, pated, They are now on sale in the semester duetothe draft and availState College Co-op,
able positions in defense work.
*4S, and Edwin Steinberg, '41.
PAGE 9
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1941
—•{.tgrnr.—
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established Mty, 1916
by thi Gets of 1918
Vol. XXVI
Friday, December 10, 1041
No. 18
Member
Distributor
Associated Collegiate Press
Collegiate Digest
The undergraduate newspaper of the New York State College, for Teachers published every Friday of the college
year by the MOWS Board for the Student Association.
Phones: Office, 5-0373; Dorrance, 3-2843; Holsteln, 5-281i>;
Qrunwald, 3-0538,
Entered as second class matter Albany, N. Y., postoffioe.
MnmiNTIO
FOR NATIONAL ADVIKTIIINO I T
National Advertising Service, Inc.
Cotltf Publisher! ReprtunMivt
4 2 0 MADitoN A V E .
N I W YORK. N. Y.
CHICAOO • SOltOH • LOt A M I I . I I • SAS FMUCIICO
The N t w i Board
WILLIAM R. DORRANCE
EDWIN J . HOLSTEIN
A. HARRV P A M O W
MADELINE QRUNWALD
HARRIET DEFOREST
ALLEN SIMMONS
CARL MITCHELL
FLORA OASPARY
MURIEL SCOVELL
DAVID 8LAVIN
ANDREW TAKA8
COITOR-IN-CHIEP
CO-EDITOR-IN-CKIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
All communications should lio addressed to the editor and
must be signed. Names will be withheld upon request.
The STATE COLLEGE NEWS assumes no responsibility
for opinions expressed in Its columns or communications',
as such expressions do not necessarily reflect its view.
A Message From Whitman
"Listen America—what do you think endures ?
Do you thing a great city endures ?
Or a teeming manufacturing state ? or a prepared constitution ?
Or any chef-d'oeuvres of engineering, forts,
armaments ?
Away! These are not to be cherished for
themselves,
"Long, too long America,
Traveling roads all even and peaceful you
learned from joy and prosperity only.
But now, ah now, to learn from crisis of
anguish; advancing, grappling with direst fate and recoiling not;
And now to conceive and to show the world
what you children en-masse really are!
Long yet your road, fateful flag—long yet
and lined with bloody death,
For the prize I see at issue at last is the world.
"T swear I begin to see the meaning of things:
It is not the earth, it is not America that is
great,
It is I who am great or to be great, it is You,
Underneath all, individuals,
I swear nothing is good to me now that ignores individuals,
The only government is that which makes
minute of individuals,
The whole theory of the universe is directed
unerringly to one single individual —
namely, to You.
"I see flashing that this America is only you
and me,
Its power, weapons, testimony are you and
me,
Its crimes, lies, thefts, defections are you and
me,
Its Congress is you and me, the officers,
capitols, armies, ships are you and me,
Freedom, language, poems, employments,
are you and me,
Past, present, future are you and me.
Sorority Sister Speaks
CommunlcatlonTo the Editor:
Olen Walrath asked for a reply
to Mr. Takas' column on fraternities
and sororities from one of the girls
and the temptation to answer was
too strong to resist.
Mr. Takas is right, I believe, on
the religious question. When I Anally came to a decision, the question
of religious prejudice was one of the
deciding factors in my choice. I
think such restrictions are wrong,
but understandable. People will always tend to gather in groups with
the same back-ground and thoughts.
Whether there were sororities or
not in State, there would be factions
and cliques. In so large a student
body, it would be impossible to have
one large happy family. Sororities
are the answer to the average person's urge to associate with people
whom he likes or wants to know
better. Also they fill a most important part in the social life of State.
True, many students are never
bid. That is regrettable. Many, of
course, cannot join sororities because of financial reasons. But I
firmly believe that there is no girl
who could not join a sorority if she
really wished to do so. A few looks
at a book on personality development
or even on dressing correctly, though
that's not too important, and any
girl could work wonders. But it's
too easy just not to try, and then to
criticize the sorority system, I'm
being unfair, of course, because
many wonderful girls never have
had an opportunity to be rushed because they must work very hard.
And there's another important
consideration. Sororities cannot suc-
cessfully function, with too large a
membership. There should be more
sororities on campus, and then every
girl who wanted to Join one would
be taken care of. At least, that's my
opinion.
Of course, one usually votes for
a sorority sister at an election. I
joined my sorority, because I liked
the girls in it, and I like them enough
to vote for them. That wouldn't stop
me from voting for another girl I
felt to be more capable. Certainly
I've never been told, nor heard anyone told, to vote for one of the members. I think that the sorority spirit
is a wonderful thing. The last thing
I would criticize would be loyalty or
affection. I'm bound to my "sisters"
by genuine respect and liking, not
by iron chains.
As for prejudice against other
sororities, I can only speak for myself. My theory Is this—a girl joins
a certain group because she feels
most at home there. I respect her
decision, and expect her to respect
mine. I can think of only one girl
in school I honestly dislike and she
isn't in a sorority. Each sorority, as
a group, is pretty swell, I think. Each
brings companionship and happiness
to most of its members and thus
fulfills its purposes.
I don't think sororities are any
more undemocratic than a Women's
Club or the Elks. I've written this
answer because I think the sororities
have taken too much criticism, without enough attention being paid to
their virtues. I hope I've stated the
case clearly enough.
Rhona Ryan, '44
PnimfUtUf fyo* Pnaml
-Mary StudebakerTo get back to Casey und his
blonde—probably that wise gal knew
that not only must her make-up be
planned carefully, but also her entire costume, from formal to flowers. Tills same axiom holds true today for successful prom trotting,
Remember that the best evening
gowns are those of simple lines and
good material. In evening, as in
daytime wear, simplicity is the keynote. However, in the evening, this
simplicity can be as dramatic or
sophisticated as you wish. This effect cnn be accomplished by a different hairdo, unusual flower arrangements, exotic jewelry and accessories.
If you have the nerve and initiative, try to vary your coiffeur
for the ocacslon. If you have it done
professionally, beware that your hair
doesn't have that stiff, set; look that
screams beauty parlor, Be sure that
it's clean and shining. A harmless
vegetable rinse to high-light its natural color isn't a bad idea. For hair
glamour, try garnishing the curls
wlth tiny sparkling sequins applied
either by yourself or your hairdresser, or try garnishing the crowning
glory with fresh flowers.
Speaking of flowers, the December
issue of The Women has a good
article on flowers for formal wear,
The conventional shoulder corsage
is on the way out. Instead, girls
now favor wrist or waist corsages,
flower necklaces, or flowers In the
hair. All a decided Improvement
over the old use of the flora.
Jewelry is, as always, important
for evening wear. Avoid an overdose of uninteresting jewelry. Too
much glitter will merely confuse the
observer. Instead, spot light a few
good pieces of costume jewelry.
Jewelry usually goes hand in hand
with all white, all black, or one color
gowns. Prints are usually complimented best by flowers.
Try a few of these tips, and we
guarantee that when the band ends
up by playing Star Paul, you'll And
that your appearance has been as
perfect as the evening Itself.
Fauns and Psychology
'Bernadette Sullivan-
Onee upon a time there were two
little fauns. Now one faun was so
very, very disappointed because the
world was no longer young, and
green and romantic. But the other
faun made the most of affairs as
they were.
When the occasion warranted, she
showed the desolate faun how oven
a Cockney sailor could act like a
cavalier when he had a light of love.
•Silly? It may sound so, yet no
one who saw the fantasy which Luke
Sillies directed was aware of the Im"This is what I have learnt from America— probability of tile situation. The
accepted the fauns with
this is the amount, and I teach it again— audience
much less Incredulity than the sailWhile we rehease our immeasurable wealth, or and ills lady.
it is for Thee, dear Mother,
Betty Harden, who stepped into
It is for Thee, the soul of Thee, electric, tlio part Just one week ago, was a
typical English wench, John Lubey
spiritual!
was the seaman.
Our farms, inventions, crops, wo own in
The quili! delightful fauns were
Thee! cities and states in Thee!
played by Dody Aungst and Betty
Our freedom all in Thee! our very lives in Olough. Thell' horned coiffure and
pointed eyebrows did much to add to
Thee!
the Illusion of woodland creatures us
they prunced und cuvorted about
"Thou Union holding all, fusing, absorbing, the park bonch (donated by the
Class of 1030) which was the sot.
tolerating all,
is to bo complimented
With Victory on thy left, and at thy right forMr.illsZllles
realistic direction of two
hand Law;
young people's fulling In love. For
once a stage kiss wits a kiss, or
Thee, ever Thee, I sing!"
should we say kisses?
— Abridged and adapted from Walt Burbura Clark chose a French
melodrama as her offering. Like so
Whitman's "leaves oj Grass,"
many translated plays this one suffered front the stiffness of the dialogue.
All of the players were at ease in
their roles. Arthur Collins missed
not a line of the Judge's part. He did
a good job, but lie was hampered by
concentrating on his speeches thus
eliminating much expression.
Ira Freedman as u doctor interested in psychiatry gave by and all
lite best performance, Only iter
pantomime seemed natural to Claire
Schwartz. Wll.lt a few lessons in delivery and stage business, Miss
Schwartz might And her acting much
improved.
It has been our policy heretofore
to boost the entertainment which
Advanced Dramatics lias so thoughtfully provided to fill in that lagging
time wlille sets are being changed.
We appreciate the fact there are
few volunteers for the position of
unheralded Intermission singer or
dancer ns the enso may be,
We enjoy community singing. If
seems u fine way to build feeling
among the members of the audience.
But from now on we would rutlter
sit in styglan durkness und unearfltly silence titan to struln our vocul
cords following such incredibly bud
time us that hacked out lust Tuesduy night.
Our apologies to Ida Rosen, a
competent pianist and accompanist,
SakataUu:
Santa Claus Gate
A Chriitmai Letter
-A.*l.Dear Santa Claus,
It may seem a little foolish to you to have a college
student writing you a letter. People who go to college
are supposed to be old enough to have stopped believing that you exist. So it is—we know you to be
just a product of the imagination. We long ago
stopped believing in you. Still, we are writing you
a letter.
You must realize, Santa, that this is just a whimsy
on our part. We are serious so much of the time,
that every so often we feel like acting as if we were
still capable of believing in someone like you. And
when we really think about it, we must admit that
when we thought you were real, we were a lot happier
than we are now.
When we were children, Santa Claus, we knew that
you were a kind-hearted man who lived at the North
Pole, and no one could tell us differently. We knew
that once a year all good children could write you a
letter asking you for the things they wanted most.
Above all, we knew that they were never disappointed.
Whenever we asked you for something, we got it,
and if we didn't, we knew it was because we weren't
good enough to deserve it, You always came through.
Santa, and we got into the habit of deSanta
pending on you year after year. You lived
Never
up to the faith we had in you. You never
l e t u s do
Fails
wn.
Well, here we are, writing you one more
letter to ask you to give us a few more things. It's a
little different this time, though. We know that we
haven't been good at all, and that we don't deserve
anything; we know that you can't give us the things
for which we ask. Just the same, you've never failed
us before, and it makes us feel a little better to write
to someone on whom we know we can depend.
We suppose that it is right for us to ask for the most
Important things first. A little less than two weeks
ago, our country entered a world-wide war. We haven't
been in it very long, and we haven't suffered very
much yet. Still, we are at war, and we don't like the
feeling we get when we think of it. Santa, the best
thing that you could give us .s a quick peace. We
would prefer that no one had to die on either side,
but since we know that is Impossible, let whatever is
to happen be over with quickly. Peace—that is a gift
that you can give not only us, but the whole world.
Even though there is a war, we're still going to
classes, Santa. That brings up something else for
which we would like to ask—good marks. We are not
so silly as to think that you can give them to us without our doing anything for them, but we do wish
that you would give us some motivation. We nre told
that one must have it to do good work. If wo were
motivated, maybe we would do some studying. If we
studied, maybe we would get some good
marks. We need motivation. Won't you
Request
give us some—no one else will.
Future
Now we're going to get serious again and
Fate
ask you for something that seems very
important to us—a knowledge of the future. You can
see why we want it. Everything that we do here Is
so uncertain. We don't know whether we shall get
Jobs when we are graduated, or whether we shall
go into the army, or whether we shall get married, or
whether we shall Just sit waiting for something to
happen. It's rather difficult to keep on with your
studies when you have no idea as to why you're doing
It all, or what you will have when you are finished.
Especially so is this true in these troubled times.
Therefore, Santa, please give us an inkling of what
lies ahead,
We could go on asking for gifts from you. There
Is practically no limit to what we want. The less we
ask for, though, the more we might get. We'll stop
here,
il suppose you knew ull along, Santa Claus, that
we have been fooling no one but ourselves. Even
though we know that we will never get the things we
have asked of you, even though wo know you are just
a personage created for children, II makes us feel
belter to write down what we want the most, and to
ask you for If. For a minute or two we can fool ourselves into believing that It Is all true. For a minute,
we feel happy and hopeful. That is enough for us. It
Is a minute that we would not have had otherwise, i
A merry Christmas to you Santa Claus, anil thanks
n lot I
The Weekly Bulletin
I'TIOII
Tin'iv iirii J " I I H for I wenl,V in' I h l r l y 1,1,11 In iliillvot'
mull
il ii i' I I I U
I'III'IHIIIIIIN
I'IIHII. I I will iii'iilmlilj' pay
flli.v
n r n U l j ' runlH pur
liuiir,
Kni' I'tii'lliiir Infer
illation Imiuli'u ,n llui I'TIOII
IICHII In I In*
III'IIIH office.
IIIMII
ItlOdlHTK/YTION
Hi'
Hlu
QAUDS
All
i.| inli-iil .
Who llUVll
III,I
I 111' 111' 11 I III' 11'
HIM'Ollll
HCIIII'Nll'l' HOllUtllllll r l l l ' l l H , llll
HO Immediately.
I'Vps will
liii IMIIIIM'IIMI ilnnmiry j j ] , 'J'.1,
anil 211.
NiniHicH M ; I ; I ) I ; I >
Tim
Nlulo
NIII'HIIIK
I'IHIII-
i'il on National
l.iMiliif. a <'illl
1InftuiHii is
for liii.Oiin
I'il'l.
MI'llOolM
Ill
llllllir
Of
niir.'.lnr, In llin lloxl l'Vlirunry anil Nfjilniiiliur elumwH.
Vuiiiir. women Willi olio or
inoi'ii yuiii'H of colloifi! IIr«
llki'l)
I"
lie
KIVOII
iiri'i'iii'-
rlli'i'.
Knlllorltlo
I'm I lie,
Olnilriiiaii,
< iilillllllleii on IferliiltlllOlll of HI Illicit
Nlll'HOH.
M>< i,\i.
(\I,I;MIVH
lleeeinlier III L'lll'lulIIIIIH t'oIH1SS l n r His III I I A.M.
Jniitiurj'
nieellnt,-,
I'. M.
il
Mnili
II.Him
cinli
1(11, Villi)
January ^ i•••iiai>• Coinieii
in.'.-I in:'.. II.,inn 211, 11:1111
I', M.
.Iiiiiiiiii'.v H — Sl'A nietillntf,
U u « « u , 11:110 1'. M.
.1 iiiiuiif.v 8 I ' l i i i n i l Hiielnly'H
Mill • w i n t e r Oohaurt, A l bany I I I K ' I I Bofiuul, H;.')()
I?, M.
.lamiiii'y II Nlulci-lt. ]>. I,
I'iisl.rilisll
iriiiim, I'liiru
Hall (jyin, 8 1>, M.
Court Comic* - Looking mora like a trio of jitterbugs "cutting a rug," than college
basketball players, these three boy$, Floyd Volker (6) of Wyoming, Jack Kornlewici,
left, and Art Icthhead. both of St. Francis College, chase a loose ball, Wyoming ran
away with a 63 to 30 win. For more picture! on basketball funniti turn to page four.
inltrnational
Pondering Ixam Question* - Pretty Mariorie Kirkwood of Wichita,
Kansas, student at Cornell University, gets right dawn on the floor to da
her heavy thinking before examinations. It's none tog comfortable- bvt org.
duces results.
C e l l t f i # | i a t . ^ e ^ ^ tfejjyj
PAdii
V
PAGE 9
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1941
PAGE I
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
• - • - - - . . . .
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established M a y , 1916
by the Class of 1918
Vol. X X V I
tTrlftny, December 10, 11)41
No. 13
Member
Distributor
Associated Collegiate Press
Collegiate
Digest
Tlie unilergrmtiiiite newspaper nf tlie. Now York Stale College Cor T e a c h e r s published every F r i d a y of t h e college
year by the MOWS Hoard for the S t u d e n t A s s o c i a t i o n .
P h o n e s : Office, (i-0373; Dorrnnce, 8-2843; Hols'teln, 5-281li:
Orunwnld, 3-or»:!S.
Entered as second class matter Albany, N. Y.,
postofftce.
REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
4 2 0 MADISON AVE.
N E W YORK. N. Y.
CHICAGO • BOSTON * LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO
The News Board
WILLIAM R. DORRANCE
EDWIN J. HOLSTEIN
A. HARRY PASSOW
MADELINE GRUNWALD
HARRIET DEFOREST
ALLEN SIMMONS
CARL MITCHELL
FLORA GASPARY
MURIEL SCOVELL
DAVID SLAVIN
ANDREW TAKAS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
BUSINESS
MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
SPORTS F.DITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
All c o m m u n i c a t i o n s should be a d d r e s s e d to t h e e d i t o r a n d
must he signed.
Names will lie withhold upon request.
The S T A T E l.'OLI.KOK Nli'WS a s s u m e s no r e s p o n s i b i l i t y
for opinions e x p r e s s e d in its m i n i m i s or communications',
as such e x p r e s s i o n s do mil necessarily reflect ils view.
A Message From Whitman
"Listen America—what do you t h i n k endures?
Do you thing a great city endures?
Or a teeming manufacturing s t a t e ? or a prepared constitution ?
Or any chef-d'oeuvres of engineering, forts,
armaments?
Away! These are not to be cherished for
themselves.
"Long, too long America,
Traveling roads all even and peaceful you
learned from joy and prosperity only.
But now. ah now, to learn from crisis of
a n g u i s h ; advancing, grappling with direst fate and recoiling not;
And now to conceive and to show t h e world
what you children en-masse really a r e !
Long yet your road, fateful flag—long yet
and lined with bloody death,
For the prize I see at issue at last is the world.
"f swear 1 begin to see the meaning of things :
It is not the earth, it is not America t h a t is
great,
It is I who am great or to be great, it is You.
Underneath all, individuals.
I swear nothing is good to me now that ignores individuals,
The only government is that which makes
minute of individuals,
The whole theory of the universe is directed
unerringly to one single individual —
namely, to You.
"I see Hashing that this America is only you
and me,
Us power, weapons, testimony are you and
me,
Its crimes, lies, t hefts, defections are you and
me,
Its Congress is you and rue, the officers,
capitols, armies, ship.-, arc you and me,
Freedom, language, poems, employments,
are you and me,
I'asl, present, flit lire are you and me.
"This is what I have learnt from America—
this is the amount, and I lea eh it a gainWhile we rehease our immeasurable wealth,
it is for Thee, dear .Mot her,
It
is
for
Thee,
the
soul
of
Thee,
elect lie,
spiritual!
Our farms, inventions, crops, we own in
Thee ! cities and states in Thee !
Our freedom all in Thee! our very lives ill
Thee!
"Thou Union holding all, fusing, absorbing,
tolerating all,
With Victory on thy left, and a t thy right
hand L a w ;
Thee, ever Thee, I sing!"
• Abridged and adapted from Walt
Whitman's "Leaves of Grass."
Sorority Sister Speaks
-CommunicationTo the Editor:
G l e n W a l r a t h a s k e d for a reply
to Mr. T a k a s ' column on fraternities
a n d s o r o r i t i e s f r o m o n e of t h e g i r l s
a n d the temptation to answer was
too strong to resist.
M r . T a k a s is r i g h t , I b e l i e v e , o n
t h e religious q u e s t i o n . W h e n I finally c a m e to a decision, t h e question
of r e l i g i o u s p r e j u d i c e w a s o n e of t h e
deciding factors in my choice.
I
think such restrictions are wrong,
b u t u n d e r s t a n d a b l e . P e o p l e will a l ways t e n d to g a t h e r in groups with
the same back-ground and thoughts.
W h e t h e r t h e r e w e r e sororities or
n o t in State, t h e r e would be factions
a n d cliques. I n so l a r g e a s t u d e n t
b o d y , it w o u l d b e i m p o s s i b l e t o h a v e
one large happy family. Sororities
a r e t h e answer to t h e a v e r a g e person's urge to associate with people
w h o m h e likes or w a n t s to k n o w
b e t t e r . A l s o t h e y fill a m o s t i m p o r t a n t p a r t i n t h e s o c i a l l i f e of S t a t e .
True, m a n y students are never
b i d . T h a t is r e g r e t t a b l e . M a n y , of
course, c a n n o t join sororities bec a u s e of
financial
reasons. But I
firmly
b e l i e v e t h a t t h e r e is n o g i r l
w h o c o u l d n o t j o i n a s o r o r i t y if s h e
r e a l l y w i s h e d t o d o s o . A few l o o k s
a t a book on p e r s o n a l i t y d e v e l o p m e n t
or even on dressing correctly, t h o u g h
t h a t ' s not too i m p o r t a n t , a n d any
g i r l c o u l d w o r k w o n d e r s . B u t it's
too easy j u s t n o t to try, a n d t h e n to
criticize the sorority system.
I'm
b e i n g u n f a i r , of c o u r s e ,
because
m a n y wonderful girls never h a v e
h a d a n o p p o r t u n i t y t o be r u s h e d b e cause they must work very hard,
And
there's another
important
consideration. Sororities cannot suc-
cessfully f u n c t i o n w i t h too l a r g e a
m e m b e r s h i p . T h e r e s h o u l d be m o r e
sororities on c a m p u s , a n d t h e n every
girl w h o w a n t e d to join o n e would
b e t a k e n c a r e of. A t l e a s t , t h a t ' s m y
opinion.
Of c o u r s e , o n e usually votes for
a sorority sister at a n election.
I
joined m y sorority, because I liked
t h e g i r l s i n it, a n d I like t h e m e n o u g h
to vote for t h e m . T h a t w o u l d n ' t s t o p
m e f r o m v o t i n g for a n o t h e r girl I
felt to be m o r e c a p a b l e . C e r t a i n l y
I've n e v e r been told, nor h e a r d a n y o n e t o l d , t o v o t e f o r o n e of t h e m e m bers. I t h i n k t h a t the sorority spirit
is a w o n d e r f u l t h i n g . T h e l a s t t h i n g
I w o u l d c r i t i c i z e w o u l d be l o y a l t y o r
affection. I'm b o u n d to m y "sisters"
by g e n u i n e r e s p e c t a n d l i k i n g , n o t
by i r o n c h a i n s .
As f o r p r e j u d i c e a g a i n s t
other
sororities, I c a n only s p e a k for m y self. M y t h e o r y is t h i s — a g i r l j o i n s
a c e r t a i n g r o u p because s h e feels
most at home there. I respect her
d e c i s i o n , a n d e x p e c t hoi - t o r e s p e c t
m i n e . I c a n t h i n k of o n l y o n e g i r l
in school I h o n e s t l y dislike a n d s h e
isn't in a sorority. E a c h sorority, a s
a g r o u p , is p r e t t y swell, I t h i n k . E a c h
brings companionship and happiness
t o m o s t of i t s m e m b e r s a n d t h u s
fulfills i t s p u r p o s e s .
I don't think sororities are a n y
more undemocratic than a Women's
C l u b or t h e Elks. I've w r i t t e n t h i s
answer because I think the sororities
h a v e t a k e n too m u c h criticism, w i t h out enough attention being paid to
t h e i r v i r t u e s . I h o p e I've s t a t e d t h e
case clearly enough,
l i h o m i R y a n , '44
Pbitttp.Uuf rfak Pnxunl
-Mary Studebake r
T o get b a c k t o C a s e y a n d h i s
b l o n d e p r o b a b l y Unit w i s e g a l k n e w
t h a t not o n l y m u s t h e r m a k e - u p be
p l a n n e d c a r e f u l l y , but a l s o h e r e n t i r e c o s t u m e , f r o m f o r m a l to f l o w ers. T h i s s a m e a x i o m h o l d s t r u e t o d a y for s u c c e s s f u l p r o m t r o t t i n g .
R e m e m b e r that t h e best evening
g o w n s a r c t h o s e of .simple l i n e s a n d
good m a t e r i a l .
I n e v e n i n g , a s in
d a y t i m e w e a r , s i m p l i c i t y is t h e k e y n o t e . H o w e v e r , in t h e e v e n i n g , t h i s
s i m p l i c i t y c a n be a s d r a m a t i c or
s o p h i s t i c a t e d a s y o u w i s h . T h i s effect c a n be a c c o m p l i s h e d by a diff e r e n t h a i r d o , u n u s u a l flower a r r a n g e m e n t s , exotic jewelry and accessories.
If y o u h a v e t h e n e r v e a n d i n i t i a t i v e , try t o v a r y y o u r
coiffeur
for t h e o c a c s i o n . If y o u h a v e it d o n e
professionally, beware that your hair
d o e s n ' t h a v e t h a i stiff, set look t h a t
s c r e a m s b e a u t y parlor. Be sure t h a t
it's c l e a n a n d s h i n i n g . A h a r m l e s s
v e g e t a b l e r i n s e to h i g h - l i g h t its n a t u r a l c o l o r isn't a b u d i d e a . F o r h a i r
g l a m o u r , try g a r n i s h i n g t h e c u r l s
with tiny sparkling sequins applied
e i t h e r by y o u r s e l f or y o u r h a i r d r e s s er, or t r y g a r n i s h i n g t h e c r o w n i n g
g l o r y w i t h f r e s h Mowers.
S p e a k i n g of f l o w e r s , t h e D e c e m b e r
i s s u e of Tin
Wtiiiit II h a s a g o o d
a r t i c l e o n f l o w e r s for f o r m a l w e a r .
T h e c o n v e n t i o n a l .shoulder c o r s a g e
is o n t h e w a y o u t .
Instead, girls
n o w f a v o r wrist o r w a i s t c o r s a g e s ,
f l o w e r n e c k l a c e s , or f l o w e r s in t h e
hair.
All a d e c i d e d
improvement
o v e r tlie o l d u s e of t h e f l o r a .
J e w e l r y is. a s a l w a y s , i m p o r t a n t
for e v e n i n g w e a r .
Avoid a n o v e r d o s e of u n i n t e r e s t i n g j e w e l r y .
Too
m u c h g l i t t e r will m e r e l y c o n f u s e t h e
observer.
I n s t e a d , s p o t l i g h t a few
good
p i e c e s of c o s t u m e
jewelry.
J e w e l r y u s u a l l y g o e s h a n d in h a n d
w i t h all w h i t e , all black, or o n e color
gowns.
P r i n t s are usually complim e n t e d best by f l o w e r s .
T r y a few of t h e s e t i p s , a n d \vi
g u a r a n t e e that whet: the band ends
u p by p l a y i n g Slur Dust, y o u ' l l find
t h a t y o u r a p p e a r a n c e lias b e e n a s
p e r f e c t a s t h " e v e n i n g itself.
Fauns and Psychology
Bernadette Sullivan—
O n c e u p o n a l i m e t h e r e w e r e Iwo
lilt It* l a t i n s
Now oca' f a u n w a s so
very. \ e r . d i s a p p o m l e d b ' T a u s e Ihe
world was no longer young, and
green and romantic
Hut t h e o i l i e r
f a u n m a d e I h e most ol alfnil's as
I h e ) Were
Wl n i l I h e o c c a s i o n w ai'l'anl ed s!i"
s h o w e d I h e d e s o l a t e h u m IIO'A e v e n
a C o c k n e y s a i l o r c o u l d acl like a
c a \ idler w h e n h e h a d u lighl ol lu\ e.
S i l l ) .' ll m a )
mil id so, \ el no
o n e w h o saw I lie t a u l a s y w h i c h I .like
/ a l l e s d i r e c t e d w a s a w a r e of I h e i m probability
ol I h e s i t u a t i o n .
The
a u d i e n c e in c e p l e d i h e f a u n s w n Ii
l u n c h less I n c r e d u l i t y t h a n I h e iiiltnr .mil h i s l a d )
l i c i t ) H a r d e n , w h o s t e p p e d it it ci
I h e p a r i III .1 o n e w e e k alio, wa , a
typical Khglish v o u c h . J o h n Lube)
was ihe s e a m a n
T h e quite delightful fauns were
p l a y e d by H o d ) A u n g s l a n d l i c i t )
Clotlgll. T h e i r h o r n e d c o i f f u r e a n d
p o i n t e d e y e b r o w s d i d m u c h to a d d to
i h e i l l u s i o n ol w o o d l a n d c r e a t u r e s as
I hey p r a n c e d a n d c a v o r l e d a b o u t
t h e p a r k b e n c h ( d o n a t e d by t h e
C l a s s ol 1039) w h i c h w a s t h e set.
M r . Zilles is to be c o m p l i m e n t e d
for h i s r e a l i s t i c d i r e c t i o n of t w o
y o u n g p e o p l e ' s f a l l i n g i n love. F o r
o n c e a s t a g e k i s s w a s a k i s s , or
s h o u l d we s a y k i s s e s ?
Barbara Clark chose a French
m e l o d r a m a a s h e r offering. Like so
m a n y t r a n s l a t e d p l a y s t h i s o n e suff e r e d f r o m i h e si n i n e s i:| i h e d i a logue
All ol I h e p l a ) el's w e r e al e a s e m
their roles, A r t h u r Collins missed
nut a l i n e ol H e j u d g e ' s p a r i
He d i d
a good | u h bul h e w a s h a m p e r e d b \
e o l i c e i i l I'itl in;.' oil h i s s p e e c h e s t h u s
eliminating much expression
I in f r e e d n i a n a s a doe I or u n ci (".led in p s y c h i a t r y g a v e by a n d a l l
i h e besl
perl'orinauce
I >nl\
her
p a n t o m i m e s e e m e d mil u r a l to ( ' l a i r e
Schwarl/
W i l l i a lew l e s s o n s in d e livers
and
stage
business.
:\I iss
. S c h w a r l / in IKII i Unci h e r a c t inn m u c h
» .
—
T
Bahaialki:
i>«iW.i..>*...iW
%
••fm&
Santa Claus Gets
A Christmas Letter
rnthe
Iter
it."
arron
ore
the
• of
i to
air
atiess
eel.
lstto
-A.I.D e a r S a n t a Claus,
I t m a y s e e m a little foolish to you to h a v e a college
s t u d e n t writing you a letter. People w h o go to college
a r e s u p p o s e d t o be old e n o u g h t o h a v e s t o p p e d b e l i e v i n g t h a t y o u exist. S o it i s — w e k n o w y o u t o b e
j u s t a p r o d u c t of t h e i m a g i n a t i o n .
W e long ago
s t o p p e d believing in you. Still, we a r e w r i t i n g you
a letter.
Y o u m u s t r e a l i z e , S a n t a , t h a t t h i s is j u s t a w h i m s y
on our part.
W e a r e s e r i o u s s o m u c h of t h e t i m e ,
t h a t e v e r y so o f t e n we feel like a c t i n g a s if w e w e r e
s t i l l c a p a b l e of b e l i e v i n g i n s o m e o n e l i k e y o u .
And
w h e n w e r e a l l y t h i n k a b o u t it, w e m u s t a d m i t t h a t
w h e n w e t h o u g h t y o u w e r e r e a l , we w e r e a l o t h a p p i e r
t h a n we are now.
W h e n we w e r e c h i l d r e n . S a n t a C l a u s , w e k n e w t h a t
you w e r e a k i n d - h e a r t e d m a n w h o lived a t t h e N o r t h
P o l e , a n d n o o n e c o u l d tell u s d i f f e r e n t l y .
We knew
t h a t o n c e a y e a r all good c h i l d r e n c o u l d w r i t e y o u a
l e t t e r a s k i n g y o u for t h e t h i n g s t h e y w a n t e d m o s t .
Above all, we k n e w t h a t I hey were n e v e r d i s a p p o i n t e d .
W h e n e v e r w e a s k e d y o u for s o m e t h i n g , w e g o t it,
a n d if w e d i d n ' t , we k n e w it w a s b e c a u s e w e w e r e n ' t
g o o d e n o u g h t o d e s e r v e it. Y o u a l w a y s c a m e t h r o u g h .
S a n t a , a n d w e g o t i n t o t h e h a b i t of d e Santa
p e n d i n g on you y e a r a f t e r y e a r . Y o u lived
Never
u p t o t h e f a i t h we h a d in y o u . Y o u n e v e r
paj|s
let u s d o w n .
air
ove
at
aay
<er,
of
tose
opokImDne
ash
Well, here we a r e , writing you o n e m o r e
l e t t e r t o a s k y o u t o give u s a few m o r e t h i n g s . I t ' s a
little different this time, t h o u g h . We k n o w t h a t we
h a v e n ' t b e e n g o o d at all, a n d t h a t we d o n ' t d e s e r v e
a n y t h i n g ; w e k n o w t h a t y o u c a n ' i give u s t h e t h i n g s
for w h i c h w e a s k . J u s t t h e s a m e , y o u ' v e n e v e r f a i l e d
u s b e f o r e , a n d it m a k e s u s feel a l i t t l e b e l t e r t o w r i t e
t o s o m e o n e o n w h o m we k n o w w e c a n d e p e n d .
W e s u p p o s e t h a t it is r i g h t f o r u s t o a s k f o r t h e m o s t
i m p o r t a n t t h i n g s first. A l i t t l e less t h a n I w o w e e k s
ago. o u r c o u n t r y e n t e r e d a w o r l d - w i d e war. W e h a v e n ' t
b e e n in it very l o n g , a n d we h a v e n ' t s u f f e r e d v e r y
m u c h y e t . S t i l l , we a r e at w a r , a n d we d o n ' t l i k e I h e
f e e l i n g we get w h e n we t h i n k of it. S a n t a , t h e b e s t
t h i n g l h a t y o u c o u l d give u s is a q u i c k p e a c e .
We
w o u l d p r e f e r t h a i no o n e h a d t o die o n c i t h e r s i d e ,
bul s i n c e we k n o w t h a t is i m p o s s i b l e , lei w h a t e v e r is
Io h a p p e n be o v e r w i t h q u i c k l y . P e a c e t h a t is a gift
t h a t y o u c a n g i v e n o t o n l y u s . bul t h e w h o l e w o r l d .
E v e n t h o u g h t h e r e is a w a r . w e ' r e s t i l l g o i n g io
classes. S a n t a .
T h a i b r i n g s u p s o m e t h i n g e l s e for
w h i c h we w o u l d l i k e to a s k g o o d m a r k s . W e a r e n o t
s o silly a s l o t h i n k t h a i y o u c a n g i v e t h e m l o u s w i t h out o u r d o i n g a n y t h i n g for t h e m , but w e d o w i s h
t h a t y o u w o u l d g i v e us s o m e m o t i v a t i o n . W e a r e t o l d
t h a i o n e m u s t h a v e il to d o g o o d w o r k .
If w e w e r e
m o t i v a t e d , m a y b e we w o u l d d o s o m e s t u d y i n g . If we
si tidied, m a y b e we w o u l d get s o m e g o o d
Request
marks. We need motivation.
Won't you
Future
pate
give u s s o m e n o o n e else will.
Now w e ' r e g o i n g t o get s e r i o u s a g a i n a n d
a s k y m i for s o m e t h i n g t h a t s e e m s v e r y
i m p o r t a n t t o us a k n o w l e d g e of t h e f u t u r e . Y o u c a n
sec w h y w e w a n t it. E v e r y t h i n g t h a t w e d o h e r e is
so u n c e r t a i n .
W e don't k n o w w h e t h e r we s h a l l g e t
jobs w h e n we a r e g r a d u a t e d , or w h e t h e r w e s h a l l
go i n t o t h e a r m y , o r w h e t h e r we s h a l l gel m a r r i e d , or
w h e t h e r we s h a l l just sit w a i t i n g for s o m e t h i n g l o
happen.
I t ' s r a t h e r d i f f i c u l t to k e e p o n w i t h y o u r
si t i d i e s w h e n y o u h a v e no i d e a a s t o w h y y o u ' r e d o i n g
it all. o r w h a t y o u will h a v e w h e n you a r e f i n i s h e d .
E s p e c i a l l y so is t h i s I r u e in t h e s e t r o u b l e d t i m e s .
Warning to Hitler, Hirohito & Co. - Here's the kind of training American college boys are
receiving these days, preparatory to their entrance into the armed forces to fight for the American
way of life. This picture shows only a small contingent of Wisconsin's Reserve Officer Training Corps
cadets lined up at target practice. A special indoor range consisting of 30 targets has been set up
in the armory to accommodate 200 cadets an hour for practice shooting.
T h e r e f o r e , K a n l a , p l e a s e give u s a n i n k l i n g of what,
li' s a h e a d .
W e c o u l d no o n a s k i n g for g i f t s f r o m y o u . T h e r e
is p r a c t i c a l l y n o limit lo w h a t we w a n t , T i l e less we
a s k tor t h o u g h , t h e m o r e we m i g h i g e t . W '11 s l o p
here
'I s u p p o s e you k n e w all a l o n g , S a n t a C l a u s . t h a t
we h a v e b e e n fooling n o o n e bin o u r s e l v e s ,
Kven
l h o u g h we k n o w t h a i we will n e v e r get I h e t h i n g s we
h a v e ,i ked ol you, e v e n t h o u g h we k n o w y o u a r c ins 1
.i p e r s o n a g e c r e a t e d lor c h i l d r e n , ll m a k e : us feel
b e l l c r lo w r i t e d o w n whul we w a u l i h e m o I. a n d lo
a.-k \ o i i fur ll
t'oi a Ullliule or i w o we c a n lool o u r selvi -, i n t o b e l i e M i m Uiai u is all t r u e
For a minute,
we leel h a p p \ a n d Impel ill
I lull is i h o u g h l o r us. It
is a m i i u i l e llial we would nol h a v e h a d o t h e r w i s e . i
A n i e r p . c l ill' l u i . e lo y o u S i m l a C l a u s , a n d t h a n k s
a lot !
The Weekly Bulletin
in 11 JII J\ e d
II h a s b e e n o u r policy h e r e l o l o r e
io boost i h e e n l e r l a i n u i e n l
which
A d v a n c e d U r a n i a lies h a s s o t h o u g h I I ally p r o \ ided io nil in t h a t l a g g i n g
lime while sets are being c h a n g e d .
W e a p p r e c i a t e i h e lact l h e r e a r e
l e w v o l u n t e e r s l o r tlie p o s i t i o n ol
u n h e r a l d e d inlermission singer or
d a n c e r a s I h e c a s e i n n ) be.
We enjoy c o m m u n i t y singing
ll
s e e m s a l i n e w a y Io b u i l d f e e l i n g
a m o n g t i n m e m b e r s ol I h e a u d i e n c e .
B u l f r o m n o w o n we w o u l d r a t h e r
s i t in s t y g i a n d a r k n e s s a n d u n e a r t h ly s i l e n c e t h a n to s t r a i n o u r v o c a l
cords following such incredibly bad
l i m e a s t h a t h a c k e d out last T u e s day night.
O u r apologies to Ida Rosen, a
competent pianist and accompanist.
I' I I.It
I le r,
I I , | . . l i , I'm' i n . i
•I
' I
I Li I i U ' l
ii< •
'I u i• , M .d o ! - mi iI
I . W i l l p i ' . , I . i l . h I'.l *
I .1 i
i.l
-III)
, - lii
|n-iI
•
I'm
I u n lii i
inl'.ii'
ii, I I H I
inil-,I' I I I'.
ll, ,|, II, l l n
O r ,11 ,.| SIM
il' I I I l l l . i . l s , I II V T I t l v
(Mills
Mi
-I ml. is
"Ii '
h a'
uiii'il
' In ir
-• ''.unI
-I.-I' sell, .In.,
,il
il.i
si. i l i u m ' i l i i l e l j
I'I I', will
I.
ii,-.'I.,I ,I:IIIii.ir.\ J I . •_"_•
iinil '-'.'!.
\ l IfsKS
M;i:i)l;n
Tin' Si.II,
\ , i r - i n - i ,,oo
'•il "ii V I I I I I I M I l i e l ' i i i s e ^
issuing
a
i-.ih
r.ir .'iii.iiilii
fin Ii"
enter
!.<-liuiiln
ill'
lilli'allli! in lie ilex I I'YIil'il
n r y iinil S e p l e i n l i u r elnss.es,
V.uiiie. w i . u n II w l l l i II
ir
mure
yeiirii nf i;ollutfe l i r e
I I..
is
|.
Kill,, I
I .IV ,11,( liiilrniiiii,
I i i l l l l l l i l l r , . , n i l i r . r It il i l l , ' i l l i.l M m l . H I
\ iiisi-s.
MM I VI.
< l l . l - . N II AlC
I
.1 i I'.l C l i l l-.l III.In IV,-, - , I . , K H I S al II A M
I Hi.i.ir,
il
VI.,i|.
Chili
in, ii nit.-, ll
m i . 7 .;!()
C
u
.1.1 II n u n
7 | i , h.ii,.
Ciiiirii
in,,onII
JII
a :JU
r
\|
.liinii.-irj
s
Si A ineeliiijf,
l . u i w j j e :; Mil | ' M
.l.iiiiinn s i'lmr.il
Siifluly's
Mill W i i i i i - r
rimcrl
\|IIIIIIJ
High
School,
H:HU
1'. \ l .
Jiiinmry
11 S l n i e li
I'
|
liusl.ellinll
triune,
I'llBO
H u l l (fym, s | \ M.'
Court Comics - Looking more like a trio of jitterbugs "cutting a rug," than college
basketball players, these three boys, Floyd Volker (6) of Wyoming, Jack Korniewicz,
left, and Art Lbchhead, both of St. Francis College, chase a loose ball. Wyoming ran
away with a 63 to 38 win. For more pictures on basketball funnies turn to page four.
International
Pondering Exam Questions - Pretty Marjorie Kirkwood of Wichita,
Kansas, student at Cornell University, gets right down on the floor tp do
her heavy thinking before examinations. It's none too comfortable but produces results.
Colloid* Dia.tf rholo by Th„lfall
'«»«
™~P-—r«M»ei
"
•iif'TiH.«'.i. i , , . ,,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1941
PAGE 2
PAGE I
mm-m—
i *«»l5-a4nt.»SW*pM^V»*'J»*u4*iW a " 1I *' fii
Head Gal
There's
Vol.
Appeal
in This
Commander "Vic" Truster,
head of the military training
program at Emporia (Kansas)
State Teachers C o l l e g e ,
proudly displays the Honorary
Commander and her attendants who were guests of
honor at the annual Military
Ball. Left to right are Melva
Lee James, Bettyanne Atherton,
Frances Nunemacher,
Honorary Commander, and
Appeal
XXVI
Mcmbi
Associated Colle
Tlio undergrndim
lego fov Tenclicr]
year by the NEW
Phones: Office, 8
G ni nwn Id, 3-038Si
Entered as .tccoi
Natio
(
420 *
CHICAGO
WILLIAM R. DOI
EDWIN J. HOLS"
A. HARRY PASS
MADELINE GRU
HARRIET DEFOI
ALLEN SIMMOI*
CARL MITCHEL
FLORA GASPAR
MURIEL SCOVE
DAVID SLAVIN
ANDREW TAKAS
War Work With a Future
As much as she needs soldiers to man
her guns, pilots to fly her planes, workers to produce her tools and food, America needs nurses for the home front and
the battle front. With a definite shortage
now existing, at least 55,000 students
must begin their nursing education this
year, if graduate nurses are to be released for army duty without lowering
civilian health standards.
The usefulness of the nursing profession in a war-stricken world will not cease
after Victory is won. Post-war years will
bring enormous problems in feeding and
caring for sick and homeless war victims
— a full-time job for thousands of trained
nurses.
M r . Truster.
Leaders Meet
Star athlete Andy Kulakowich, who towers over six
feet, meets Serge JarofF, diminutive leader of the Don
Cossacks Chorus after their
performance at Alfred University recently. Andy has relatives in the same region of
the Don River from where the
Cossacks hail.
williami
Photos by Offict of War Information
All communk'iitli
must be signed.
The STATIC CO
[or opinions exj
as such expresl
A M essa
" L i s t e n Are
dures?
Do you thin;
O r a teemiii!
pared a
O r a n y chef
armamc
A w a y ! The:
themsel
This group of Skidmore College
nurses recently received their
caps, started their duties as student nurses.
Students of nursing are taught not only to give first aid in case of air rods
or other war or peace-time emergencies, but also how to deal with amateur
first aiders. Here a group of young nurses adjusts a traction splint on a fellow "victim."
II
LAYING THE EGOS" ^t°T*
the bombs
B R O W N E D O F F ' for bored
M
PIECE
O F C A K E " for an easy j o b
CAMEL" for the A r m y man's favorite
cigarette
FfRSTM THE SERV/CE
W i t h men in the Army, Navy, Marines,
and Coast Guard, the favorite cigarette
is Camel. (Based on actual sales records
in Post Exchanges and Canteens.)
Ii. J. lU'j'imltli Tubami Cuiiiinny. Win.mn Sul.ru. North i'troll
Calm and dependable in emergency operations, a student
nurse threads a suture in a needle, first step in preparation
for a thracheotomy.
Advanced students give the Schick and Dick tests for diphtheria
and scarlet fever to the probationers. By learning to protect their
own health, the nurse gets a vivid lesson in the disease prevention
measures she must teach her patients.
Mail from home brings a smile to
this student nurse's face. It's a highlight in a day of intensive training
- where cigarettes are
judged
The " T - Z O N E " - T a s t e and Throat—is the proving ground for cigarettes. Only your taste and
throat can decide which cigarette tastes best to
you .. . and how it affects your throat. For your
taste and throat are absolutely individual to you.
Based on the experience of millions of smokers, we believe Camels will suit your "T-ZONE"
to a " T . " Prove it for yourself!
" T h i s is wit h is is
W h i l e we r
it is felt is for T
spirit".
Our farms
Theef
Our
IN THE ARMY
BOMBER SQUADRONS
they say:
\%
" L o n g , too 1
Traveling r
learned
B u t now, a
anguish
e s t fate
A n d now to
what y
L o n g yet y
a n d lin<
F o r t h e prizi
"I s w e a r I bi
I t is not th(
great,
I t is I w h o i
Underneath
I s w e a r not
n o r e s ii
T h e only g
minute
T h e whole t
unerrin
namely
"1 see llashi
a n d me
I t s power,
me,
Its crimes, 1
me,
I t s Cougrei
cttpitoli
Freedom,
art' vol
Past, prese
freedo
Thee!
"Thou
Qui
tolerat
With Vict(
hand 1
Thee, $m
Cart of prematurely born babies it one of the most complicated procedures which mutt be learned by the student.
feeding and bathing mutt be carried on inside the incubator, in which temperature, humidity and oxygen must be
carefully regulated.
Photo by Crawford
Each student mutt spend hours in various
diet kitchens, learning the intricacies of food
therapy and methods of preparing meals in
accordance with their patients' prescribed
diets.
_
_ * ~ ?
• * •
—
•
Assisting at an appendectomy. This is part of the training with
which every student nurse must be thoroughly conversant before
she completes her course. With enough students to do this type
ot work, graduate nurses can be released for duty with the
armed forces.
GW&
lrnthe
slter
it."
earIron
fore
the
s of
n to
! air
atness
teel.
<istt to
air
oove
r at
may
•ker,
3 of
hose
lopookrlmOne
vash
PAGES
PAGE 3
~
m
Sfe.v-A".i...4\ m
Vol. XXVI
MenS
Associated Co!
Tile undci'irrndt
lege tor Tenehl
year l>y the NH
Phones: Office.
GrunwnUI, 3-05};
Entered as .i«|
WILLIAM R. D
EDWIN J . HOL
A. HARRY PAS
MADELINE GR
HARRIET DEF(
ALLEN SIMMC
CARL MITCHG
FLORA GASPA
MURIEL SCOV
DAVID SLAVIh
ANDREW TAK>
'
All <-o in in u II iiu»
must 1 e
Hlgnoj
The S' 'AT 10 i;
for opl n i. J U S ':
as sue i expru
A M ess*
"Listen Ai
dures?
Do you thii
Or a teemii
pared (
Or any che
armam
Away! Th<
them.st
"Long, too
Traveling 3
learnei
But now, §
anguis
est fat
And now tc
what j
Long yet i
and linf
For the pri2
"I swear I I)
It is not th
great,
It is I who .
Underneath
I swear nol'
nores i]
The only )>,
minute!
The whole ':
iinorriii
namel,v|
"J see llash|
and m<|
its power, I
me,
Its crimes, |
me,
Its Coiigrof
<-:i| j i t o l f
Freedom,
arc yol
Past, p r e s a
I
"This is wli
this is
While we r
it is f(J
It is for I
spiritul
Our farms!
Thee I
Our i'reedc
"Mustn't touch," Bob Mullens of Fordhom seems to be saying to John Buescher of Kansas, as the la)
ter playi "patticake" with the ball, This fast action was frozen stiff by the speed camera.
Gail Bishop (10) of Washington gives N. Y. U's Ray lumpp the recipe
for a black eye as they lunge for the ball.
"Ride 'em Cowbov " cries Ed Golub of St John's as he sits astride Joe lauren of
CCMV
I
' mu
„*A
wt»,n
CCMY, TU.u
Thit pile-up
occurred
when hoth
both missed
missed the
the ball as it bounced off the board.
AI Grenert, N. Y. U„ hangs onto the ball and assumes an Atlas pose while Herschel
Baltimore of Penn State hovers over him like an angel.
CelUwK &•«»• Www \m Am
.
i
mwi.m.tqfftriv-' ••
#
7
PAGE 2
,
h;:,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEK
PAGE 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
mumnmmmmamm
*ws»-s;'~»'*i*'«i-***
Vol, XXV!
Me:
Assoclntcd C
Tlio undefgnil
icgi> for Tenc)
ycnr by tin- x
I'IIUIU-M:
offli!
Entered
as m
•e warn(not the
shelter
ind it."
he nearor iron
s before
e in the
steps of
•jturn to
the air
the at^oginess
lg steel,
i exist#ork to
Grunwnltl, 3-D;
Na
42
CHIC
\M R. [ |
W1LLIAN
EDWIN J. HO!
A. HARRY PA
MADELINE Gl
HARRIET DEF
ALLEN SIMM
CARL MITCH!
FLORA GASP,
MURIEL SCO'
DAVID SLAVI'
ANDREW TAK
for air
ir above
X or at
, it may
darker,
aces of
f those
,t shop;, cooklilgrlmd. One
'11 wash
All cmiiniiinlcfi
IIIIIHt
llC
BiglH
The STATE (
Cor opinions e
as tuii'ti o x p n
A M ess
''Listen A
dures?
Do you thi:
Or a teemh
pared
Or any cht
arm a IT
Away! Thi
themsi
& * :
flu t«fci1HFL**>.
.J ;
IMVCIIOIII,
I;
v'., \ •. i . i ' . - . i '
• .*'« '
'•.«.*»«
Stuffed Animals are all a part of Fenn College's war work.
In eddition to knitting sweaters and making hospital supplies, the co-eds make stuffed animals for children of men
in the service. Mary Butler is surrounded by ducks and multicolored elephants made at a recent Lambda Sigma Chi
pajama party.
•
Dapper Flappers — The bi-annual Varsity Club initiation at
Springfield College (Mass.) brought out a bevy of beauties from
the ranks of the school's all male enrollment. The three "gals"
pictured here are noted for football, pole vaulting and crosscountry running. Dick Foster with the kitten portrays "Beauty and
the Beast."
Salvaging Cuts — Staff members on the Madison College
yearbook are shown as they scrapped copper and zinc cuts
as part of the Harrisonburg, Va., salvage drive for these two
vital metals. The girls unmounted all old engravings and
turned the precious metal over to the armed forces.
Dribbling D o w n t h e Court Gene Rock of the University of Southern
California eludes Saul Cohen on a fast break that was typical of the
West Coast school's play. The Californians defeated the Long Island UniAcml!
versity quint, 48 to 40.
Collegiate Digest Photo by Llneberger
r
kW4
st
» and ant>
»'
Wcse
a gesand
Watch forth*
18
,
»nd cost, 1
materia
m
°
••V.-.--
'... . 1 .
...
•
,.••".'
• • • • • . , , : , „ , , >;jtfi,i
Auociated Collegiate Pre$s-
"This is w i l l
this i s j l
While wi! i'(i
it is |'() !
It. is for | |
spirit.iu
Our farms,
Theelc
Our I'reedoi
Thee i
National Collegiate
Bond Queen
••^SSBrrSS',
\ ^ e e d e v e obVa>^d
Get your shutters clicking and send the
Au>vt*B»
I'
t lhl;Se
. . . can make some easy spending money for
yourself and at the same time see that your
college is represented in Collegiate Digest by
sending in pictures of events on your campus.
We pay the regular professional rates for all
photos accepted. Pictures should be at least
3 x 5 glossies and adequate caption material
must accompany all shots. Remember candid
or action pictures are preferred to posed
photos.
W* }
S T R E T C H
~&**«i„'*Wii*WM*>r'
that A l l o w a n c e —Buy Bonds a n d Stamps
:.Jftt^^'fM<|Wifl<<
*.' f **««*' ! * ) . , ; * . .
„ . . . • . ; - . . ; » ; , — ..,-.-, •
Section
Publication! Office; 317 fawkei
•uildlng, Minneapolis, Minnewlu
.i-.j-
.
prints to Editor
Regardless of M a i * Skepticism coeds at Antioch College are taking over. The six women pictured above hold
all of the major campus positions - most of them being in
women's hands for the first time in the history of the college.
ColkuSkileDittet
IWSBSW''*
*•
Collegiate Digest Photo by Simmons
are youl
I'ast, prcieifi
"Thou Unic
tolorftt)
With VietO)
hund, h
Thee, ever '
1
An Educational Foundation of a different nature
is being acquired by these
students of Florida Southern
College as they mix cement
to be used in construction
of a new library. A shortage
of labor made it necessary
to call on men and women
students to do the work.
"Long, too
Traveling
learne<
But now, j
unguis'
est fat
And now t<
what \
Long yet j
and lin
For the priz 1
"I swear I I)
Jt is not t h
great,
It is I who i
Underneath
I swear not
nores i
The only g
minute f
The whole 1
unerrir
namely
"I see flash:
and nit
Its power,
me,
Its critni's, 1.
me,
Its Congre.'.
eapilul.-
•% 4>'..
•
I
•
Adttiliiim Aep'eienlelive ;
NATIONAL AOVtmiSING
StNVict INC.
4ft) M.di.on Avenue, N«w Vwfc ,
400 N«. MichliM A H M * . CU«*t», : :
jlo,i8e S w f i w i w
Le.Aesetu
Collegiate Digest
317 Fawkei Building, Minneapolis, Minn,
ie Drexel School of Engineering,
Th*
• « » »First
•» • ! Lady
» H H | to
I U be
U O accepted
U * . * . « f i * . M by
** 1 t' h .
'
' student
Philadelphia,
is
Dorothy
Jane
Hampton.
Philadelphia, is Dorothy Jane Hampton. Miss
Miss Hampton
Hampton is
is a
a specia
sp.
in organic and quantitative chemistry. For
For the first time in the school s hen
his
tory
•«,w women
^ — » were accepted
._ J for
i regular
. - . . i „ , degree courses in engineering w
0 new polky was adopted in January
^
PAGE 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBERJ% 1941
From
Vol. I
Fox Trot to Feed
. . . , ~ . - , v . . , , - .
: ^ , . .
• •-•
mmmmmmm^
Potter Club, SLS
Prove Fraternity
Houses Informal
Bag
It's Fun on the Farm
attest.
Christmas Carols Lack Bass
Can State women get along
without men? Sorority women
had the opportunity to display
their somewhat dubious independence last night at their annual Christmas parties.
At midnight last night the sorority cinderellas bid adleux to
their dates under clusters of
mistletoe, some of the less subtle
wearing them in their hair.
Hereupon they clenched their
fists preparing to face the supreme test—the "hen party."
First they exchanged such inexpensive gifts as lipsticks —
things with which only women
are bothered. Christmas carols
were then sung without the accompaniment of resounding bass
voices.
At the completion of
festivities, sororities cared little
that State lacks men.
Their
theme song is / f7r/
Along
Without
Vim Vera Well, but
thev added the sequel Once In
A While.
Fellows Drink Much Milk
Life goes on in a slightly different
way in State's four fraternity houses.
The idiosyncracles of living at Kappa
Delta Rho and Kappa Beta were discussed in a previous issue; now
angles of life at Potter Club and
S L S will be df-seeted.
Six dollars and fifteen cents per
week is the price charged by Potter
Club to each of the sixteen fellows
living at 495 State Street. Every
person in the house has a job to
perform. The boys do their own
cooking, which is limited to one
meal a day. Breakfast and lunch
are eaten elsewhere. Edward Burke,
'42, is house manager, and Bob Selfert, '42, house president. Burke receives his board and room in return
for the services he renders.
Collegiate Digest Photos by Griffin
A typical meal at Potter Club is
very satisfying. Tomato and lettuce
salad, lamb chops, mashed potatoes,
spinach ( A l i h . milk and fruit jello
is a good example of a Potter Club
supper menu. Six loaves of bread
are bought each day to suit one
George Miller's appetite
AN
"List(
d
Do yd
Or a t
R!
Or an,
ai
Away
t
Bull sessions and storytelling took place around the stove. This was a favorite spot
as the weather was crisp. Host Matt Byrne, Jr., listens at left.
Guests reached the loft
by climbing this ladder.
Here Jean Carr, Alpha
Phi, makes her appearance.
•
"Long
Travel
lei
But ni
ar<
es
And ni
wfi
Long I
an
For the
"I swoa)
It is no
grl
It is I v
Underri
I swear
not]
The onlj
mil!
The wh.
ime
nan
"I see II
and
Its pow'i
me,
Its crimf
me,
Its
('oiij
eapi
Freedong tire
Past. |)i'( 2
*f> o'clock h.>ch. o p ? ^-^L^a^»
Students had a lot of
fun riding in the farm's
own milk wagon. Acting as horses are Jayne
Caulfield, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Jean Sterling, K a p p a A l p h a
Theta, and Mary Gere,
Gamma Phi Beta.
I'dttcr ( l u b Musical
Potter Club is definitely musical.
Six men play I lie piano, and Haiiey
D i n g m a n . '43, can play nearly every
instrument made. Impromptu sings
are high spots of lite al Potter. T h e
vie operates continuously and Glenn
Miller lime is always observed.
Thi' EEP boys have abandoned the
practice of playing basketball in the
kitchen witli the .soup bowl, resorting in football, basketball and baseball games in Washington Park according to the seasons.
PLASH! Everyone at Potter Club
gets up five minutes alter his first
class!
Board and room al Sigma Lambda
Sigma is eight dollars per week
T h i r t e e n dollars per w t k is paid
out lo boys working at the house
House m a n a g e r T h o r p e De-Void '42.
gives out jobs oil I '-If ha -is DI need
lake other m a n a g e r s . DcVoid receives board and room lor his work
"Excellent
food"
says
Etlgi ne
Guurino. '43, and proceeded in list
a typical meal s e r . e d at 203 ( Inlario
SI reel, An entree usually precedes
such items as pear salad, pork chops,
sweel potatoes, corn, applesauce, and
pudding. A quart of milk pier day is
allotted to each man and the fifteen
fellows living at SLS manage to
t a k e care 0 r ii, ( , u:i\i.-t situation a d e quately.
S I / \ Knjuys Bridge
T h e dormitory system is used al
SLS. T h e studi"s on second Moor
a r e largely doubles, with the exception ol the large ironl room which
houses three people, and one slud\
which is a single. T h e house manager's si ud\ is on Ihe lii'f I floor.
T h e ( i n t a r i o si reel buys are bridge
fiends and l a n e latch taken up
Russian Bank. A dart board is part
of ihe recreational equipment
A
favorite pracl iee al SLS is a (i A \l
j a m session, feat ui'lllg sinuing, piano
and vielrnla
Willi such musician'
as Kim/. K'ee\es. Snow and Mar
.shall, the p o p u l a n u ol -.limine, i:
under: laudable
T h e lelloW: en |n\ h. n nor., in I he
" I imer S a n c t u m " in' i"i'\ program
I h |||.lie
111: 1. II,"
(pill I h o u r
i M.'-.l bill
Hi' e
I: n \ I I
I In", \\ 111 linW
hi'
o n i o n ei|
And
I h.il ' .
Imw
I he
III.I clllllie
( ',1'eeks ' til-Ill 1 I 11*"II I line aW ,'',
the ivied v.,ill nl N Y S C ]
llolll
Pi Omega Pi Chooses
Six A d d i t i o n a l Members
Pi ( Mm en l'i Nat lonal (*tJIiiiin 11 is 1
I loiltJI' Hoclel j . elect I'd sis new llielil
Pel's al its lil'sl ineeini" las week
The\
are.
Madeline
(ii unuald,
Margaret
llolalllii
Ii
Inglls
Virginia Lay, Mai \ Viliauo and
Marion Whcadon, seniors, Membership in tin- I r a l c r n i l j has mm
reached If) In ihe sprint 1 a number
of juniors a r e to be elected lo the
orgaul/al inn.
Inslallal inn ceremonies Will lake
place after the holidays. Mr. Edward
L. Cooper, faculty advisor, has made
tentative plans to have Dr. Tonne
from N. V. U. as guesl .speaker al
some fill are meeting.
"Thou U
With Vice
Hm
Thee, $yi
Steve Garahan and
Barbara
Glenn
pause b e t w e e n
dances to enjoy cider and doughnuts
in the stable.
ypBMW
i»UIWW*^M*'««' , »"»*' '"• •"*""
Heller Fills Post
In Library School
Women Prove Martyrs
As Glenn Miller Rates Al
Syracuse University's three Byrne brothers, Charles, Matthew and William, all
members of different fraternities, decided to have a barn party for their fraternities
and girl friends. When noses were counted it was not surprising to find some 300
Syracuse students had flocked to the barn. They came dressed in dungarees, hunting clothes, sweaters and sneakers, danced old fashioned square dances, the Virginia Reel and all the others, along with today's Conga and jive. Of course they
had cider and doughnuts, and of course they had a good time — as these pictures
PAGE1
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
Police Offer Students Advice
To Prevent Undertaking Boom
Miss Frieda M. Heller is being employed permanently in the library
school as Assistant Professor of Library Science, her appointment to
be effective February 1, 1942. Miss
Heller received her A.B. degree at
the University of Kentucky, and the
degree of Bachelor of Science and
Library Science and later of Master
of Science at Columbia University
She will replace Miss Mae P.
Webb, who has been employed temporarily in the library school since
February, 1941, and who has resigned from her position, Dr. John
M. Sayles, President of the College,
disclosed recently.
Miss Heller comes to State from
the position of librarian and Associate Professor in the Department of
University Schools at Ohio State
University. She has written many
articles for the American Library
Association, the Ohio State University Press and the University of
Chicago Press. She Is a member of
the Committee To Study Teaching
Materials in Library Instruction of
the American Library Association,
and of the Committee on Book Content of American School Libraries
of the National Council of Teachers
of English.
Departmental Clubs
Use Xmas Themes
by Betty Gravellc
es. Just remember that they're warning you of a coming storm (not the
damp type!); and take shelter
"wheresoever you may find it."
Don't hesitate to crawl into the nearest man-hole, cellar window, or iron
mine, After all. "pride comes before
a fall (of a bombi." If you're in the
process of descending the steps of
Draper, you are advised to return to
the realms of Minerva, until the air
is cleared. After all, even the atmosphere of cut and dried stooginess
Is better than that of cutting steel.
If you value your continued existence, find some more (?) work to
do in the library.
The raid's the thing, nowadays
at SCT—or at least the Albany Police Department is afraid it will be.
So. Police Chief William J. Fitzpatrick announced a list of do's and
don'ts last week to be followed by
State wayfarers at the sound of the
vacillating "air raid" sirens. Maid or
man who refuses to heed directions
may causo a boom in the undertaking business.
As soon as the "furrln divlls" wing
into sight, their number Is taken by
the Army Filter Station which Immediately passes on the word to the
Police Department which, in turn,
keeps up the chain by relaying the
news to the Fire Department. Then,
every cruising patrol car will abandon its role of pick-up for that of a
blaring Mercury; and fire trucks,
owlishly inclined heretofore, will add
their car-splitting activity to the
general confusion.
And dormitory rules hold for air
raids, too—no man is to appear above
the first floor of a building or at
Ihe windows. But, strange as it may
seem, basement rooms—the darker,
the better—are urged as places of
safety for all.
And if you're not one of those
on a pilgrimage to the nearest shopping center, but are at home, cooking the results of the last pilgrimage, leave your door unlocked. One
never knows what the raid will wash
in!
Tl's a repeated long and short blast
that means "Duck or disintegrate!"
So. when several noisy fire engines
or police cars go whizzing by, each
headed for different destinations,
don't complain about the uncoopcrativeness of the city's protective forc-
Slides, Faculty Discussions
Given A t Various Meetings
Christmas themes provided material for meetings of the various
departmental clubs last week. The
Math Club bus m a d e plans for its
next meeting which will be heid
after vacation.
Kllen Holly a n d M a r g a r e t
Hollin-
ger will present Iwo topics at the
next meeting of the m a t h e m a t i c s
club lo be held J a n u a r y (i. at 7:30
o'clock, o n e nf these will be "Making Pi Digestible." It is expected
that 111" meeting will be held in room
1111
At ihe lasl meeting of the Classical Club no December twelfth. Ihe
members - inn Christ inns songs In
I jit I in and engaged m a discussion
nl Sat urnalia and its relal inn in our
Christmas.
T h e French and Pan Amiens organizations held a joint session 1-isl
Wcdnesdav in ihe lounge
Al Mils
lime l)r Wall Stewart deUvercd a
speech mi South America, lie emphasized Christmas m thai country
and |iinii-l Haled his talk wil I; va'-iou.slid"s taken while in South America
I)i Stewart, who has spent a Christmas in l a m a , Peru, offered bis firsth a n d knowledge in an appreciative
audience.
A lecture was sponsored by Pi
G a m m a Mu on Wednesday fcalurinii
Dr Arthur Pound, State historian,
and Director of the division nl Archives and History
\
\.J%
1 |
'>
t-\:
Sr.
1..J
•fm \\
•"%<>-;
i w/« m \ • I :
Debate
f '"ill
in in it
tnim
juiii'
I.
riihtiiin
'
. I I i . m in inn lor I la- p i e ,enl . Ihe type
nl peace I h i ' U n i t e d S t a l e s want:
. 11 I T I he « ar ,inii w hat coHece : ' i i l l e n l s call (lo In help ( l e l c l u l l l i e l l
count I T
Hir.il i also s i i i l e d I h a t
another
pn • ible topic lor d e b a le w o u l d lie
i n del e r m i n e w ha I colic e : \ lldellls
iiiu.sI d o In Ills! d \ I h e i r renin n n n g
in cnllei'.e niii'ln:' I h e n a t i o n a l crl i
,ii si lin' lie r a i l e d : l a c k e r s
I )eba l e t 'iiiuiell : p n l i s n r e d a r o u n d
t a b l e .Ii . a . m o Willi H I' 1 la I
W
• il.i\
W h -I Cnllei'.e S l l l d e l i l :
( '.in 11.. n I l e l p in I h e I 're: elil
('i isi
w a I lie 111 j p -<-1 ill ider di
ell inn a n d \'ei na S i n del' a n d SI iir|e.\ Win / iiiniors, d e b . m i l l o r SI a l e
Colli " e
( in . I, iima I \ 13 S l i d e v. ill l a k e
p a r i in .i i nlll id I a b l e ill: e l l . ' Inn w. II h
Ihillllllnll C o l l e g e
Muriel Snivel!
and
I).a..lie, I h r . e k
piiilor
will
di h a l e o n
W h a t S h o u l d He I h e
11.1 I III I h e New Will 111 ( )| (Id'
f
HEY,
~\
HEADING FOR HOME?
si.HI
1,,
;.
.si, .
Ill
eel
. .i a '
i,,i
|
,ii,l
K All « \ ,
I \l'l.I
,,,ui
II.UII vsiili | . . . . .
| . l , I, u p
.111.1
I
...in
|..w
'•
-I
.Ii I I U I
il m i e x l l . i i l u l l i'.
lll.il v e i n . Il I n .
S. l i d
la
in '
n
l.il-i
A a l i i i. . • i
I lain,
n, l.i i m i n u t e ,u.il i m u n . i u
.i n \ 1 l l l n e
In W i a C
Nnl
aiilid.i\ l e . l i w i l " liu s u c h a n llllbi lle\ alilv
lipi-rb ; n w i . . Willi I lull all nl u pi 11 I lea I ed
Im
III
III.I n v
si . I, s
In
Winn
.nil
a:
r.lll
I in
In
nil\
plep.lleil
I caul
Inl' II. i
' o r , |ni.< al S l w r s ,
.Snnph
.III i |,ln II \ I i a, I I lie si.114 line en
a iii I , , , ! . , '
I- .ISIIIUS'
SM,<>\
it
hli
. H i . s .111,1
KAiiAVA^Ixriuss
I I A I l AIK
a,
lie
| .il I. i\\ IIS *l . MI III. I . Il p l l w l l l
NAIIONWIDt
I inn I w all iini il
I V\ i
' . III. I l i l ' i I
nl
For Your Christmas Formals
itKVICt
j/akn
Q. MyeAA Ga.
15
Ut;.:>
PAGE*
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY. DECEMBER 10, 1 0 *
nHULUll .1 * l i — » l l l •lliliHi"!
«W
•I«II«, ii
;.-.V;'
g '•
I—WTV,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
«.,•.»,< »».,«!•• m •nilM.n;jgii;iii.i' •«• «;i " • a : ^ ' " ? ' * ' , * f r T ^ ~ ^
» » : ^ i »»
Vol.
Potter Club, SLS
Prove Fraternity
Houses Informal
»
F-vci Ban
Farm
Women Prove
Christmas Carols Lack Bass
Can State women get along
without men? Sorority women
had the opportunity to display
their somewhat dubious independence last night at their annual Christmas parties.
At midnight last night the sorority clnderellas bid adleux to
their dates under clusters of
mistletoe, some of the less subtle
wearing them in their hair.
Hereupon they clenched their
fists preparing to face the supreme test—the "hen party."
First they exchanged such inexpensive gifts as lipsticks —
things with which only women
are bothered. Christmas carols
were then sung without the accompaniment of resounding bass
voices. At the completion of
festivities, sororities cared little
that State lacks men. Their
theme song is / Get Along
Without You Very Well, but
they added the sequel Once In
A While.
Fellows Drink Much Milk
As Glenn Miller Rates Al
Syracutt University's three Syrnt brother*, Charles, Matthew and William, all
members of different fraternities, decided •»•» have a barn parly for their fraternities
and girl friends. When noses were counted it was not surprising to find some 300
Syracuse students had flocked to the bam. They came dressed In dungarees, hunting clothes, sweaters and sneakers, danee>J old fashioned square dances, the Virginia Reel and all the others, along with today's Congo and jive. Of course they
had cider and doughnuts, and of course they had a good time — as these pictures
CoMtfltat* D l f H l MMta* by Orffln
All co
must
The S i
for op
as sum
y
Or ar
Awaj
Bull sessions and storytelling took place around the stove, this was a favorite spot
as the weather was crisp. Host Matt Byrne, Jr., listens at left.
Guests reached the loft
by climbing this ladder.
Here Jean Carr, Alpha
Phi, makes her appearance.
"I swea
It is n<J
M
It is I j
Underr|
I sweaf
no|
The on]
mift
The whi
unfl
na "
"I see fi
Its pow|
mej
Its crimi
me
Its Conjj
cap|
Freedorll
a ret
Past, pr|
"This isl
thi(|
While v |
it i i
It is fol
HpiM
Our i'ai
Th|
Our inm
Thi
"Thou J |
toj
With
hi
Thee,;
Life goes on in a slightly different
way In State's four fraternity houses.
The ldiosyncracies of living at Kappa
Delta Rho and Kappa Beta were discussed in a previous issue; now
angles of life at Potter Club and
SLS will be di-sected.
Six dollars and fifteen cents per
week is the price charged by Potter
Club to each of the sixteen fellows
living at 495 State Street. Every
person in the house has a job to
perform. The boys do their own
cooking, which is limited to one
meal a day. Breakfast and lunch
are eaten elsewhere. Edward Burke,
'42, is house manager, and Bob Selfert, '42, house president. Burke receives his board and room in return
for the services he renders.
A typical meal at Potter Club is
very satisfying. Tomato and lettuce
salad, lamb chops, mashed potatoes,
spinach (Ah!), milk and fruit Jello
is a good example of a Potter Club
supper menu. Six loaves of bread
are bought each day to suit one
George Miller's appetite.
Potter Club Musical
Potter Club is definitely musical.
Six men play the piano, and Harley
Dingman, '43, can play nearly every
instrument made. Impromptu sings
are high spots of life at Potter. The
vie operates continuously and Glenn
Miller time is always observed.
The EEP boys have abandoned the
practice of playing basketball in the
kitchen with the soup bowl, resorting to football, basketball and baseball games in Washington Park according to the seasons.
PLASH! Everyone at Potter Club
gets up five minutes after his first
class!
Board and room at Sigma Lambda
Sigma is eight dollars per week.
Thirteen dollars per week is paid
out to boys working at the house.
House manager Thorpe DeVoid, '42,
gives out jobs on the basis of need.
Like other managers, DeVoid receives board and room for his work.
"Excellent food" says Eugene
Guarino, '43, and proceeded to list
a typical meal served at 203 Ontario
Street. An entree usually precedes
such items as pear salad, pork chops,
sweet potatoes, corn, applesauce, and
pudding. A quart of milk per day is
allotted to each man, and the fifteen
fellows living at SLS manage to
take care of the milk situation adequately.
SLS Enjoys Bridge
The dormitory system is used at
SLS. The studies on second floor
are largely doubles, with the exception of the largo front room which
houses three people, and one study
which Is a single. The house manager's study is on the first floor.
The Ontario Street boys are bridge
fiends and have lately taken up
Russian Dank. A dart board is part
of the recreational equipment, A
favorite practice at SLS is a (i A. M.
Jam session, featuring singing, piano
and victrola. With such musicians
as Kunz, Reeves, Snow and Marshall, the popularity of singing is
understandable,
The fellows enjoy listening to the
"Inner Sanctum" mystery program.
Definite quiet hours exist, but since
rushing is over, thoy will now be
enforced.
And that's how the masculine
Greeks spend their time away from
the ivied walls of NYSOT.
^^mm
Pi Omesa Pi Chooses
Six Additional Members
Pi Omega Pi, National Commercial
Honor Society, elected six new members at its first meeting last week,
They are: Madeline Gruuwald,
Margaret Hotalliu;, Irtna Inglls,
Virginia Lay, Mary Vlllano, and
Marlon Whcadon, seniors. Membership In the fraternity has now
reached 15. In the spring a number
of Juniors are to be elected to the
organization.
Installation ceremonies will take
place after the holidays. Mr. Edward
L. Cooper, faculty advisor, has made
tentative plans to have Dr. Tonne
from N, Y. u . as guest speaker at
some future meeting.
Steve Garahan and
Barbara
Glenn
pause b e t w e e n
dances to enjoy cider and doughnuts
in the stable.
impjMtwwwi.iii"""*-'
~-*—jMdfc&waMfl
Martyrs—
Departmental Clubs
Use Xmas Themes
Heller Fills Post
In Library School
Miss Frieda M. Heller is being employed permanently in the library
school as Assistant Professor of Library Science, her appointment to
be effective February 1, 1942. Miss
Heller received her A.B. degree at
the University of Kentucky, and the
degree of Bachelor of Science and
Library Science and later of Master
of Science at Columbia University
She will replace Miss Mae P.
Webb, who has been employed temporarily in the library school since
February, 1941, and who has resigned from her position, Dr. John
M. Sayles, President of the College,
disclosed recently.
Miss Heller comes to State from
the position of librarian and Associate Professor in the Department of
University Schools at Ohio State
University. She has written many
articles for the American Library
Association, the Ohio State University Press and the University of
Chicago Press. She is a member of
the Committee To Study Teaching
Materials in Library Instruction of
the American Library Association,
and of the Committee on Book Content of American School Libraries
of the National Council of Teachers
of English.
PAGE I
Police Offer Students Advice
To Prevent Undertaking Boom
by Betty Gravelle
The raid's the thing, nowadays
at SCT—or at least the Albany Police Department is afraid it will be.
So, Police Chief William J. Fltzpatrlck announced a list of do's and
don'ts last week to be followed by
State wayfarers at the sound of the
vacillating "air raid" sirens. Maid or
man who refuses to heed directions
may causs a boom in the undertaking business.
As soon as the "furrln divils" wing
into sight, their number is taken by
the Army Filter Station which immediately passes on the word to the
Police Department which, in turn,
keeps up the chain by relaying the
news to the Fire Department. Then,
every cruising patrol car will abandon its role of pick-up for that of a
blaring Mercury; and fire trucks,
owllshly inclined heretofore, will add
their ear-splitting activity to the
general confusion.
It's a repeated long and short blast
that means "Duck or disintegrate!"
So, when several noisy fire engines
or police cars go whizzing by, each
headed for different destinations,
don't complain about the uncooperativeness of the city's protective forc-
es. Just remember that they're warning you of a coming storm (not the
damp type I); and take shelter
"wheresoever you may find It."
Don't hesitate to crawl into the nearest man-hole, cellar window, or iron
mine. After all, "pride comes before
a fall (of a bomb)." If you're in the
process of descending the steps of
Draper, you are advised to return to
the realms of Minerva, until the air
is cleared. After all, even the atmosphere of cut and dried stooginess
is better than that of cutting steel.
If you value your continued existence, And some more (?) work to
do in the library,
And dormitory rules hold for air
raids, too—no man is to appear above
the first floor of a building or at
the windows. But, strange as it may
seem, basement rooms—the darker,
the better—are urged as places of
safety for all.
And if you're not one of those
on a pilgrimage to the nearest shopping center, but are at home, cooking the results of the last pilgrimage, leave your door unlocked. One
never knows what the raid will wash
in!
Slides, Faculty Discussions
Given A t Various Meetings
Christmas themes provided material for meetings of the various
departmental clubs last week. The
Math Club has made plans for its
next meeting which will be held
after vacation.
Ellen Holly and Margaret Hollinger will present two topics at the
next meeting of the mathematics
club to be held January 6, at 7:30
o'clock. One of these will be "Making Pi Digestible." It is expected
that the meeting will be held in room
101.
At the last meeting of the Classical Club on December twelfth, the
members sang Christmas songs in
Latin and engaged in a discussion
of Saturnalia and its relation to our
Christmas.
The French and Pan Amigos organizations held a joint session last
Wednesday in the lounge. At this
time Dr. Watt Stewart delivered a
speech on South America. He emphasized Christmas in that country
and punctuated his talk with various
slides taken while in South America.
Dr. Stewart, who has spent a Christmas In Lima, Peru, offered his firsthand knowledge to an appreciative
audience,
A lecture was sponsored by Pi
Gamma Mu on Wednesday featuring
Dr. Arthur Pound, State historian,
and Director of the division of Archives and History.
Debate
(Continued from page I, column 2)
in common for the present: the type
of peace the United States wants
after the war, and what college students can do to help defend their
country."
Hlrsh also stated that another
possible topic for debate would bo
to determine what college students
must do to justify their remaining
In college during the national crisis
and not be called slackers.
Debate Council sponsored a round
table discussion with R.P.I, last
Wednesday. "What College Students
Can Do lo Help in the Present
Crisis" was the subject under discussion, and Verna Snyder and Shirley Wura, juniors, debated for State
College.
On January 13, State will take
part in a round table discussion with
Hamilton College. Muriel Scovell
and Dorothy Iluyck, juniors, will
debate on: "What Should Be the
Basis of the New World Order,"
f
HBY,
HEADING FOR HOME?
Stun tight and eusy! Send youi
luggage round-nip by trusty, lowcost RAILWAY lixi'KHss, iuul take
your train with peace oi mind.Wt
pick-up and deliver, remember,
m no exoii iluirgc wiiliiu our regular viliu |e lnniib HI all i tties and
principal towns. You merely phone
AUHNCY ^ p r |ISC.
NATION-WIDE
MAIL
AIH
SSKVICfc
For Your Christmas Formats . .
Don't wait until the last minute and then have to say . . "I'm sorry . . I can't
SO, I haven't anything to wearl" Not when you can be prepared for the
holiday festivities for such an unbelievably tiny price at Myers. Simply
superb gowns with that air of sophisticated simplicity thai the stag line go
for . . . In many stylus and colors,
FASHION SALON • • Second Floor
00
15
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19,1941
PAGE 4
State Overpowers St. Lawrence
During Final Minutes Of Play
Potter Club's 33-18 win over SLS
last night gave them undisputed
possession of first place in the intramural league. The teams looked
evenly matched for the first half,
Potter leading, 17-10. At the opening of the second half SLS gained
four quick tallies then Potter took
over and was never in danger for
the rest of the contest. Ed. Reed
led the scoring with 12 points.
The KDR - College House game
was a dull affair with neither team
showing much form. At one time
College House led 10-0, but at the
loss of Ruback they slowed up and
eked out a mere 14-9 win.
Potter Club recorded its second
victory of the week when it decisively defeated a Kappa Beta aggrega-
Eagle Quintet Loses
Hard Fought Contest
To Clarkson Cagers
State's Eagles were flying high
when they won a 49-46 victory over
a highly-touted St. Lawrence squad
Wednesday evening on the Page
court. St. Lawrence started the
game with an undefeated record
which listed powerful Colgate among
Its victims.
The Statesmen came from behind
in the thrilling final minutes of
play to win their first game of the
season when Bye Benton sank a foul
shot and followed up with a victory' assuring basket. This win avenged
the previous loss at the hands of
the Larries.
Both teams played a steady brand
of ball during the first half with the
scoring evenly divided. State held
the lead twice but the Larries spurted toward the close of the half to
lead, 22-15, at the intermission.
Eagles Take Lead
St. Lawrence slowly drew ahead
and at one time led by thirteen
points; then State found itself midway through the final quarter and
swiftly closed the gap with Moose
Gerber and Bill Marsland finding
the hoop for important points. With
only minutes to go Bye Benton tied
the count at 46-46 on a foul shot to
the great glee of a hysterical State
crowd. Then Bill Dickson sank a
foul shot to put State in the lead.
Benton tapped in a basket to sew up
the game which ended a few seconds
later with the State students on their
feet shouting themselves hoarse.
Hank Brauner led the team in scoring, as he has done in every game
so far, with eleven points. Dickson
was next with ten points.
Eagles Nosedive
The State College Eagles took a
nosedive last night when they lost
a hard fought game on the Page
court to Clarkson Tech by a 51 to
28 score.
Bill Marsland started the scoring
with two baskets to give State a
shortlived 4-0 lead. The Engineers
then went on a scoring spree to run
up a 20-9 advantage at half time.
Hard playing featured the second
half which found the State quintet
swiftly falling farther and farther
behind the onrushing Engineers.
The outcome was never in doubt as
Finnegan scored fourteen points and
J, Smith twelve to lead Clarkson to
its 51 to 28 victory.
Marsland led State's scoring with
nine points and played his usunl
good defensive game. Brauner tallied seven.
"Join Us at Johnson's"
DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIALS
P U R I T A N ROOM A V A I L A B L E FOR
S O R O R I T Y , S O C I A L OR B U S I N E S S
MEETINGS
HOWARD JOHNSON'S
739
CENTRAL AVE.
ALBANY
Standings to Date
— Photo by Burrows
BILL DICKSON is shown here ready (o lots the ball downcourt and into the
waiting hands of one of his teammates in the State-St. Lawrence contest last
Wednesday evening on the Page court. The local quintet emerged victorious in
a hectic battle, 49-46.
Sports Department Issues Call
For Victory Song Contributions
by Hickey and Soule
"We need a victory song" say the
students in the hall, the men on the
team, and most loudly of all the
sports department. In a poll taken
by this department, the Publications
Office voted unanimously for a victory song.
Of course, a genius whom we shall
call the Nameless One, had to say
"Why do we need a victory song,
we won't use it often enough."
Last Wednesday night, St. Lawrence University came to play an
underdog State College team. When
the final whistle blew, a hysterical
mob jumped up and down yelling its
head off. There was no other way
l-M Bowling League
Leaders Tied For First
Potter Club and SLS are tied for
first place again in the lntra-mural
bowling league, since SLS bowed to
the Ramblers in the last game last
Monday. Both teams now have a
record of eight wins and one loss.
Potter Club won three games from
Sayles Hall on the same day, and
KDR won three from the Ramblers
on Tuesday.
KDR is in second place with four
wins and five losses, the Ramblers
are third with one win and Ave losses, and KB and Sayles Hall are tied
for the cellar position with no wins.
Potter Club still has the high
team average, 718.8 pins. KDR has
second high average, 669 pins,
BRING T H E GANG TO . . . .
DRINK
PETER'S
Sandwich & Ice Cream Bar
HOME-MADE ICE CREAM
SANDWICH LUNCHES
137 C'entrul Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
BHaraiaaajBrinn^^
Morris Diner
Herb Monette, Prop.
40c and 45c Dinners
in which they could express their
feelings. The students longed to
march down the hall singing—but,
no victory song.
The team feels the lack of a song.
Bill Dickson, co-captain, is so enthusiastic that he even offered to
write the lyrics. He tells us that
the team sings constantly on their
way to and from games, and all that
they need is a good victory song to
complete their repertoire.
Every Moving-Up Day, each class
writes four or five songs, but no one
has written a victory song for Mie
college. Because these songs are
of such high calibre, Ira Hlrsh is
positive that State College possesses
plenty of talent to compose a song
that would be worthy of our team.
Hlrsh and Perlman have both offered to write music to any lyrics
given to them. All that is needed
for a song are words and music.
The cheerleaders are ready and
willing to boost the song by all the
means possible. They promised that
the students will be made well aware
of the songs as soon as entries start
coming.
Ed Reed summed up the whole situation when he said "We have the
team; we lack the song."
Freshmen Beat Delhi;
Bow To Y M C A Team
The Prosh chalked up their first
win of the season Wednesday night,
turning back the Delhi Aggies,
31-19,
The boys put up a game but losing struggle against the strong YM
CA varsity last night, losing by a
44-18 count. Buck Hipplck accounted
for twelve of the Prosh's points.
The Prosh displayed an effective
defense in notching their first victory at the expense of the Delhi
Aggies last Wednesday, Trailing IBIS at the half, they penetrated the
Delhi zone for 18 points while holding the visitors to one Held and two
foul baskets the second half, Art
Olivet was high man with nine
points, but the win was distinctly
a cooperative enterprise, Warren
Kullnuin sustained a compound nose
fracture but will be ready for action
after the holidays.
In a wild contest that saw 107
points, and 4G fouls committed in 32
minutes of playing time, the powerful Albany Law quintet outscored
the Prosh 57-50 last Friday.
Eat at John's Lunch
PLATES 2 0 c AND UP
PLENTY OF
PARKING »PACE
EEP Beats SLS;
Takes Top Spot
In Intramural
234 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
WE
NEVER
CLOSE
Won
P o t t e r (Hull
(I
Sltfiiin l.iimllllll S I K I I I U . . . 4
<<>Ml'(JC( llOUHO
I
Kappa Iletu
It
RiimlilcrH
2
KiilMiu I M t u Klio
1
lAtnt
0
1
I
ii
4
i
Sayles Hull
o
4
TIIOIIIIIH Mori'
0
4
tion, 33-7. Potter outplayed Its opponents throughout the contest and
won handily, compiling a 16-2 lead
at half-time.
After having played the upper
half of the league, the Ramblers
invaded the second division and
emerged victorious in two contests.
With Dan Bucci piling up 16 points,
the commuter squad scored its first
win of the season by outscorlng
Thomas More 33-20. The Ramblers
next encountered the Sayles Hall
boys and again were victorious.
This contest was a see-saw battle
throughout, they however, took the
lead in the final minutes and were
still one point ahead at the final
whistle to win 25-24. Kiley was the
big gun for the winners with 18
points while Woodworth scored 12
for the losers.
Ping Pong Tournament
Nearing Final Games
The ping pong tournament is running like a well-oiled machine, according to Art Flax who is guiding
it through to the finals. The tournament is nearly over, the first three
rounds having already been played
leaving only the semi-finals yet to
be decided. Art Flax hopes that it
can be completed entirely before the
Christmas vacation.
So far three of the four semifinalists have been chosen. Hank
Brauner toppled Carr, and Stiller
beat Bittman to reach that "clutch"
position. Dickson upset Doc Cooke
to reach the half mark.
A Fight Song
Sports fans have come up to us
and asked, Why does State stand
out as a college which lacks one of
the most important elements of ;i
complete sports program — a fight
song?
Today we take up the challenge
and ask the remainder of those
wishing to see our college advance
on the athletic front—why don't we
have a fight song?
A fight song is one written for
the purpose of stimulating action—
to add color to the sports program—
and to add prestige to the institution.
Each year the cheerleaders make
a sincere but ineffectual attempt to
boost the morale of the team by
holding pep rallies which are attended by the curious (and compulsion at chapel) to make everyone
conscious of the fact that we do
have athletes who are giving up
hours and hours of their valuable
time In an effort to notch a place
in the log of sports for their Alma
Mater.
But for constructive purposes,
there is no reason under the sun
(and we DON'T mean the Rising
Sun!) why we can not have a fight
song written—by some of the students. State has the talent. Why
let it go to waste?
We are not asking you to write a
better song—just a song!
Look at Notre Dame, Ohio State,
or Cornell—their songs are sung and
played from coast to coast. Even
State fans must resort to the hairraising Stein Song of the University
of Maine when the spirit so moves.
Therefore, we urge you—in the interests of your college and athletic
teams, to please get together this
Christmas vacation and collaborate,
elaborate, or resort to plagiarism, if
necessary—but someone please bring
back some kind of a musical score—
and we promise you—the State College Band will play it completely
and so loudly that the referees will
have to fire a pistol to be heard!
EMILJ. NAGENGAST
YOUR COLLEGE FLORIST
Corner Ontario at Benson St.
DIAL 5 - 1 9 1 3
G E O R G E D. JEONEY, PROP.
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
50c
ALBANY. N. Y.
198-2QO C E N T R A L A V E N U E
C. P. L O W R Y
JEWELER
WATCH
REPAIRING
GRUEN - HAMILTON - ELGIN
LONGINES WATCHES
Gifts
Wembly
.".39 C E N T R A L A V E . A L B A N Y , N . Y .
MADISON
SWEET SHOP
For Discriminating
Gentlemen
Nor'East
Neckwear
I lick ok Accessories
Snappy Men's Shop
Hatters —:— Haberdashers
Home Made lee Cream
and Lunelle*
ADAM and STETSON HATS
186 Madison Avenue
221 Central Avenue
DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
HOME MADE ICE CREAM
7 i 3 0 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M.
.CARL.
J-OTJS
117 So. Pearl Street
We Dellvw
OPPOSITE THE HIGH SCHOOL
i • • H — . . — M I ii
• • « i m i l ii.n mi m»i ii .i
i in
m
'""
• 111——w
in....!
ww—nw
Download
Related flashcards

Historical eras

16 cards

History of Iran

12 cards

History

17 cards

History of Israel

21 cards

Calendars

21 cards

Create Flashcards