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iTATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26,1941
Mitchellairs
Giavelli Assists I-M Council
In Promoting Frosh Tennis
Plan of MAA
Strict Economy
by Gene Guarlno
•CARLThe class of '44 made quite a mer she came in first in a contest
-GINNYCouncil Promises Cooperation
name for itself last year as a bunch staged at Washington Park.
We emerge from the midst of a
Harry
Kensky,
No.
1
man
on
W i t h Intramural Activities;
Heaven be praised! Not only has
of "tradition breakers," but they
flurry of excited frosh, over-packed
tennis team, has watched WAA acquired a president in t h e
have nothing on Nora Giavelli of State's
mailboxes, a n d fraternity propaVice-Presidency Vacant
Nora play, He thinks she is a good person of Kay Peterson, but it has
the class of '45. This budding bit of player and will give a good acganda in all forms, and risk a glance
from the now quiet Publications OfEnsuing a plan of "strictest econo- femininity is going out for varsity counting of herself in the tourna- also acquired an artiste! Have you
fice doorway.
my," the Men's Athletic Association tennis, believe it or not!
ment. When asked what he thought noticed (who could help but notice
We withdraw the ole bean in council will attempt to provide the
It seems that someone tentatively of having a girl on the tennis team, it) the dressed up bulletin board?
haste for bearing down on us from maximum activity for the student identified as Francis Mullin signed,he admitted, "It would be very nice It seemed that Kay and Armedethe direction of the men's locker body at a minimum of expense.
her name for the freshman tennis —wouldn't it???
Black are responsible. They certainly
room in a sturdy blond lad over six
which
Intramural Art Flax, who is in charge of the made katchy, kute and klever inviThe council considers itself re- tournament
feet in altitude. A nervous interview sponsible for more student activity Council is sponsoring to check on contest, has already posted the sche- tations to the world of sports.
reveals that he is one Dave "Doc" in the various sports of the college. varsity tennis potentialities in thedule
the fifteen freshmen who
Camp Johnston . . . Way out
Cooke, a graduate of the New York Therefore, in an effort to do thefrosh class. She admits she was a signedforup
(including Nora, of thai- in Chatham . . . won't know
State Teacher's College of Buffalo. most good for the greatest num- little flabbergasted to hear of it, course) but now
expects a last min- itself in a little while. The longWe timidly ask if this proud pos- ber, considerable attention is be-but she regained her usual com- ute rush.
sessor of a B.S. in Education ever ing focused on the Intramural posure and came back like a real Nora's first round opponent, Gor- promised curtains are destined t o
went out for sports and the answer
sport, deciding to leave her name on don Baskin, nearly fell over when appear in the near future to make
weekends in the great outdoors
staggers us. "Doc" received fourteen Council.
Along with the three mainstays of the list. "Anyway, I think girls he found out whom he was to play. more home-like. As if this shock
letters in basketball, soccer, tennis,
really
should
go
out
for
more
sports
His
only
comment
was,
"She's
too
wasn't enough, there is also promise
and golf—everyone a major sport! the non-varsity calibre, MAA is here at State. I t might arouse more good for me. She's an ace."
A further glance into the ranks planning to add a number of other interest for one thing." She is not Kay Peterson has already found of rejuvenating the outer walls by
of the graduate school reveals that sports to the intramural program. a girl who cares to brag about her- out that Nora is also an excellent a creosote treatment.
the former chauffeur of this p i l l a r - At present, soccer, bowling, volley self (or needs to for that matter) bowler and envisions a men and woTo the uninitiated, let me say that
then known as "Maloney's Baloney," ball, and golf are under considera- but we found out that she toon a men's
Camp Johnston is the headquarters
bowling
league.
Not
a
bad
tion.
is also back in search of higher
tennis tourney in Panama where idea. You've started something of the Lotta Bunkers, a hiking
education. Jim Is specializing inj Closer affiliation is also in line. she originally lived. And last sum- Nora!
group, and all those who like to "get
American History. The title of his Both council presidents are workaway from it all" for a weekend.
column has gained everlasting fame ing hand in hand in planning
It has triple decker bunks, a pump,
ward to more varied activities. Ac- candlelight illumination, and a great
future programs, and in widening
for the fella.
cording to Regis Hammond, presi- expanse of rolling lawn extending
the undergraduate spurt activities.
Going back and looking over the No longer will the representative.!
dent of Intramural Council, "Each in four directions.
available frosh men we find a n - of the various competitive teams
year the Council has been thwarted
other outstanding sports potential- arrange their own schedules and
in its efforts to expand its program. Betty Lou Court is in charge of
ity. This tall lad is Fran Mullin of then apply to MAA council for apWith a little co-operation we hope the camp this year and will schedule
Schenectady. Fran attended Mount proval. Instead, the Association's
this year to buy a new ping-pong camp weekends throughout the difPleasant High School and held posi- council will take a more active inMen's Intramural Council is start- table for the Commons, introduce a ferent seasons. However, any group
tions on the basketball, bowling, terest In providing State students ing the year off in a business-like bowling league, possibly golf and of six or more girls may secure perand Softball aggregations. In ten- with a varied and attractive intra- fashion. The tennis tournament for six-man soccer." I n evidence of itsmission to journey cut to the camp
nis, he led the flock as the No. 1mural program for the coming year. freshmen is already underway and good intentions Intramural Council on weekends nt scheduled.
Man!
already delegated members to The first issue of the WAA HandSince Frank Hansen, '43, vice- the starting date for football has has
investigate these different fields of book will be out in a couple of
Last Wednesday we sneaked over president-elect of MAA council did been tentatively set for Monday.
weeks. Senior Anita Holm is editor.
to the Washington Park courts and not return this year and may not This starting date depends upon expansion.
found Mullin and Nora Giavelli enter school until February, the two factors: (1) how soon Council
putting on a n impressive perform- council Is awaiting the results of will know what fields it may use
ance. Although the young lady the junior class elections before a p - and (2) if Dr. Dorwaldt can give all
DIAL 5-1913
GEORGE D. JEONEY. PROP.
came out on the short end of the pointing a new council vice-presi- the men their necessary physical
examinations in time. Nearly one
final scoring, the tallies were near dent.
hundred men have signed up for
enough to indicate a terrific battle.
intramural sports and Dr. Dorwaldt
Mullin was very confident that Miss
examined most of them Wednesday
Giavelli would make the finals in
Peterson Clarifies
evening.
the current Tournament.
The four fraternities on the camCoach G. Elliot Hatfield, one of
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
Girls' A w a r d Rules pus, College House, Ramblers, and
State's original proponents of a
two teams from Sayles Hall will
more extensive golf program among
the undergraduates, recently carded Freshmen women who plan to make up the eight-team league.
If everything noes as expected two
a 73 in a local country club tourna- earn their class numerals for partiment . . . and that's going some!
cipation in sports should heed the games will be played Monday afterThis summer Coach spent a requirement rule released by Kaynoon. Potter Club will play Sayles
Hall's second team and Sigma
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY. N. Y.
couple of weeks at Manhattan Beach Peterson, '42, president of WAA.
Lambda Sigma will engage Kappa
where he took up golf and physical
Numerals will be given to all Beta. Notice of the games will be
education.
Frosh who earn credit in four sports
The fate of State's cross-country by the end of the year. These sports posted on the MAA bulletin board
hopes are still hinging upon the re- may be chosen during any two or in front of the men's locker room.
Council does not plan to be consponse of the men of the college. If more of the four seasons.
tent with the usual intramural proyour interested—Keep 'em Flying!
Upperclassmen will be awarded gram this year and is looking forWAA keys after obtaining credit for
four sports in each of three years.
W A A Fall Sportogram The years do not have to be conse- i
OTTO R. MENDE
cutive, but the keys will be awarded
Features Tennis, Riding to juniors and seniors only.
"The College
Jeweler"
To obtain credit In any one sport,
The WAA Fall Sportogram got un- a girl must have ten hours of partider way this week with a few minor cipation on record. Archery, riding, 103 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
changes made concerning time and swimming, tennis and badminton
places. Exact data may be found on will be offered again as Spring
the WAA bulletin.
sports, and hockey will be replacBig plans have been formulated ed by softball. However, a girl may
to carry on a tennis tournament. All not repeat a sport in the spring
Eat at John's Lunch
those who would like to enter the which she has taken in the fall,
PLATES 2 0 c AND UP
contest should sign up on the bulle- and receive credit for it twice,
DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
tin board and contact Lois Hafley, In order to vote In any WAA
HOME MADE ICE CREAM
'43 who will arrange the play-offs. election, a member must have credit
7 : 3 0 A. M. TO I I : 0O P. M.
These can be played at times con- for a t least one sport taken within
OPPOSITE THE HIGH SCHOOL
venient to the contestants. Those
desiring Fall tennis credit should one year previous to the election.
play ten hours, four of which must
T T T T T T T V T T T " V *
be supervised. Captains Lois Hafley
and Mary Domann will be a t the
Washington Park Courts on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 P. M.
to 4:30 P. M. for .supervision and to
give instructions to any beginners
Who wish It.
Riding is to be conducted differently this season. June Clark, '44
captain, will take groups out Saturdays, but experienced riders may go
at any time providing they secure
Courtesy of Dartmouth "Jack-o-Lunturn"
slips from the riding master to attest to their having been there. WAA
(Delicious Toasted)
refunds half of the cost to those
A better m e t h o d is t o send it h o m e regularly by R A I L j . i. KIMMEY BAKERY
Albany, N. Y,
who complete the required number
of ten hours.
W A Y EXPRESS—-and h a v e it returned t h e same way.
Z-443
Five W i l l Seek
Role of Queen
For Campus Day
Monday Elections W i l l Decide
Wearer of Royal Crown,Seniors V i e For Honor
YOUR LAUNDRY THIS YEAR?...
(White Bread)
KLEEN - MAID WHEAT
HOLSUM CRACKED WHEAT
LUNCHEONETTE SERVICE
CAMERA SUPPLIES & FINISHING
SPEEDY DELIVERY
• A.M. - I I P.M.
PHONE 4 - 2 0 3 6
P L E N T Y OF
P A R K I N G SPACE
234 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
rates include pick-up a n d delivery at n o extra charge
w i t h i n o u r regular vehicle limits in all cities and prin-
WE NEVER
CLOSE
cipal t o w n s . Y o u r choice of prepaid o r collect charges.
J u s t as c o n v e n i e n t t o o , for ' m o s t any s h i p m e n t ;
Baggage, gifts, cake o r a p e t e l e p h a n t .
RAILWAlgfeEXPRESS
AGENCY
MATION-WIDI
RAIL-AIR
years
of service to the college:
Silver Jubilee Banquet Planned
Mu Will Hold
O u r service is fast, sure—and convenient. Economical
Fresh Pastries livery Six Hours
Hot Turkey
H a m b u r g Special
Spaghetti
Sandwich
F . F . P o t a t o e s & Cold S l a w
40c
20c
25c
COMPLETE DINNERS DAILY FROM 40o to 65o
NEWS in its twenty-five
Turns
Twenty-Five Year Milestone
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Will Attend
KIMMEY'S BREAD
187 CENTRAL AVENUE
From the inner sanctum on
the first floor of Draper, where
President John M. Sayles guides
the destiny of State College,
comes this bugle note of encouragement and commendation on the achievements of the
VOL, XXVI, NO. 3
Activity Budget
Faces Decrease
WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH
H. Monette, Prop.
'/ Predict A Bright Future'—
President Sayles Pronounces
1941
A s Anniversary Commemoration
50c
Morris Diner
A L B A N ^ I w YORK, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
"To the STATE COLUSOE NBWS;
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
Honikel's Pharmacy
ews
The successor of Queen Bea (trice
The COLLEGE NEWS IS to be
Dower i, is one step nearer being
congratulated on its long and
chosen today as the result of last
outstanding history. It has
Friday's Student Association voting.
shaped collage policy and conFive nonimees have been selected,
structively enhanced the life of
one less than last year, when a traMoving-Up Day Charade Provided Inspiration for Establishment
dition breaking sextet vied for the this institution. I predict a
bright future for it because its
regal honors.
O f Committee by Brubacher to Issue College Newspaper,leadership, by tradition, is
The girls who were nominated for! [rained through a wise apDedicke Became First Editor-in-Chief of Publication
Campus Queen as disclosed officialprenticeship.
ly by Myskaria today are as follows:
The STATE COLLEGE N E W S tomorrow marks the twenty-fifth year of
My felicitations and congratMarion Duffy, Gamma Kappa Phi; j ulations."
its
founding.
Kay Peterson, Kappa Delta; JeanOn October 4. 1916, the Class of 1918, represented by a "Committee
nette Ryerson. Chi Sigma Theta;
Mildred Swain. Chi Sigma Theta;
lo Publish a Weekly College Newspaper," Allied K. Dedicke, chairand Kay Wilson. Kappa Delta.
man, breathed life into six pages of inanimate paper and type and
Myskaria has also announced that |
ink and gave birth lo the STATE COLLEGE N E W S .
final balloting for Compus Queen •
To commemorate its Silver Jubilee, the 1941-1942 NEWS Hoard has
will take place Tuesday in the Commons from 9 Io 4 P. M. However,
asked all former board members to join in a Imnquet celebration at
the identity of the new Queen will
Jack's Restaurant tomorrow at 6 !'. M. Dr. Edwin R. Van Kleeck, '27,
DR. EDWIN R. V A N KLEECK '27,
not be disclosed until the coronation :j This week administrative authoriceremonies on Campus Day which ties will take measures regarding former Editor of STATE COLLEGE NEWS, former editor of the STATE, COLLEGE N E W S and now an Assistant Commissioner of Education in the State Department, will deliver the main
this year falls on October 18.
the deficit in the present Student who will be main speaker at the NEWS
address. Dr. Harry W. Hastings, Professor of English, will act as
True to history the voting last association budget. A budget cut Jubilee Banquet.
toastmaster. Edwin J. Holslcin, and A. Harry Passow, seniors, are
Friday was unusually light It is will ensue unless additional funds
probably, however that the increas-! can be obtained.
~
-•general chairmen of the Annivered interest that comes from a narsary Committees.
A total of 85 students have derowing of the field will greatly swell faulted in their payments of which 2 0 2 Women Enroll
The idea of a newspaper for State
College Faculty Plans
the number of students exercising there are 6 freshmen, 24 sophoCollege came from a skit presenttheir right of franchise on Tuesday. mores, 17 juniors, and 38 seniors.
In Freshmen Class
Conference—No
School ed in May, 191G by the Class of
Sororities, after looking over the sit- When the defaulters eventually
1918. Later the class received peruation will undoubtedly make an ef- make payment, the deficit will be
mission from the late President AbDr. John M. Sayles, President
fort to eliminate the splits in votes decreased to $1,043.
World Conditions Correlated
ram Royer Brubacher to publish a
of the College, has announced
that are obvious from the choice of
Last year's budget amounted to
paper the following fall. Alfred E.
that college classes will be canW i t h College Registrations
nominees listed. If this happens, $12,910 as compared with this year's
Dedicke as president of the sophocelled for Monday and Tuesday,
the new Campus Queen will be budget of $14,827. The sale of tax
October 13 and 14. This is due more class appointed himself chairchosen Tuesday and will await her tickets last year, however, totaled
The figures on registration which
man of the inaugural committee
the fact that members of the
crowning by reigning Queen Bea 1,010, whereas only 856 tickets have have just been released by Miss! to
and later became the first editor of
faculty plan to attend meetings
Elizabeth Van Denburgh, Registrar,
who will journey here from New been sold this year
the paper. October 4, 1916, was
of the Association of Teachers
York City to take part in the cereAnother possible source of income show that a total of 203 freshmen
the first publication date, when a
Colleges and Normal School
monies.
may lie in thegenerosity of the enrolled this fall. The ratio of wo- Faculties of the State of New- four column newspaper appeared.
The freshman class will be in graduate class. Although it is not men to men, which has always been
York. The meeting will be held
The financing of the NEWS was
formed of the rules governing the mandatory that they purchase stu- a problem to the women of State, is
at Buffalo, New York.
carried on throughout the first
even
higher
than
it
has
been
in
the
rivalry cup competition at Sopho- dent tax tickets, such purchases
year by the sale of subscriptions.
Dr. Sayles also made the anmore Reception on October 10. At j would aid considerably. Only four past, for this year there are 202 wo- nouncement
When the student budget plan was
that
Milne
High
that time members of Myskania will j graduates have secured tickets thus men, but only 01 men. In other
adopted in 1917, the NEWS was inSchool
will
be
in
session.
Milne
read said rules from the freshman i far, and a campaign for soliciting words, there are more than three
cluded under the blanket tax, thus
will
be
taught
as
usual
by
the
women to each man.
handbook.
I the graduates is being considered.
relieving many of the financial
staff of campus teachers.
worries.
An interesting sidelight, disclosed
This will be the tenth conby a study of the figures on total
Progress throughout the twentyference of the Association. Their
enrollment is the comparison which
five years of the NEWS is notable.
purpose is to discuss the probcan be made between the figures for
Change of type from the heavily
lems facing the faculties of
this year and those for the years
headed print of the 1916 paper to
teachers' colleges.
1917-18. This comparison is brought
the clear type of the 1941 editions
about as a result of the similarity
was a major improvement. Edwin
In the world situation of the present
Van Kleeck, editor in 1926-1927,
time and the year 1917.
Frat M e n , Freshmen
made the pages five columns wide
and lengthened the sheets proporIn 1917 the number of freshmen
Smoker tionately. John A. Murray, last
who registered was 346. In 1918 the
year's editor, made the latest renumber who returned a.s Sophomores was 190, or only 519f of the Fraternity men of State College vision of the style, when he modernclass. In other words, 49'/, left for will be hosts to the men of the class ized the headline type, substituting
army service or jobs.
of 1945 tonight at the annual Inter- the simple-faced sans serif for the
This year 217 Sophomores, or fraternity Smoker in the Commons old-style face hitherto used.
82'/^ of the class, returned. IL isof Hawley Hall. The affair is schedThe first home of the NEWH was
believed that the present national uled for 8 P. M.
Room X, which it shared with the
defense program Is responsible for
The Activities Committee has Pedagogue and the Alumni Quarthis decrease, for many of those limited mid-week functions to a terly. Its next move was to the
who would otherwise return now minimum for the coming year. In present location of the cafeteria
have well-paying jobs in defense line with this policy, rush parties annex and thence to the present
work. The inference that is to beby the fraternities are being plan- office. Recent enlargement of the
made from this comparison is that ned only for week-ends. Interfra- Publications Office has provided the
the world situation has a decided ternlty Council has also decided to present NEWS with much more room
effect on college registration. This limit the formal rush parties of each in which to work. The NEWS staff
belief is supported by examination fraternity to two, because of thehas also increased from the original
of the enrollment of other colleges. scarcity of available open dates on twelve members comprising both
editorial and business staffs, to the
Friday and Saturday nights.
larger staffs of later years.
The committees for tonight's afriuamma
It is believed by the present edifair include: General Chairman,
Alfred Stiller, '42; Arrangements, tors that Edwin Van Kleeck was by
Annual Picnic Tuesday Glen Walrath, '42; Entertainment, far the best editor in the history of
George Kun/., '43; Clean-up, Owen iContinued on page 5, column Hi
Miss June Haushalter, '42, presi- Bombard, '43; Refreshments, Hal
dent of the Delta Chapter of Pi Singer, '43.
Numerical Election Results
Gamma Mu, the National Honorary
Society of Social Studies Students,
( liiho or lli-ia—W\A MMiiiiKIT
has announced that the annual Pi
Assembly Canceled Today
Vote
Gamma Mu picnic will be held at
Irviiia, Murv
-'2
Indian Ladder on Tuesday.
There will be no assembly today
* William*, June
24
All members of the social studies since all seniors are required to ( luhh iir im:i—MAA iti-iir ntitllvu
department, and all those of thetake tests In the auditorium all day
• I loin JI;I l-ij. Ilivi-ll
28
Il.iillrnoiiil. III-KIH
88
student body interested in social with a break in the middle of the
CtiUk of lUI'l—Ui-ii. In I'IIIIIIIIII llimril
studies are invited to attend. Trans- day for lunch and rest period.
l< till/., (ji-urn'2(1
portation will be provided. The buses
These tests are given as a "follOilwanl
80
will leave the college at 4:30 P. M. low-up" from those given when the Cliihn• BIHMI,
iif 11)11—i'ri-imIIrur
Refreshments and entertainment seniors were sophomores. Tho r e ( ' n u l l s , l.iii-llli18
will afford the faculty and the stu- sults will be standardized for use in
* Tiirlio, Allan
24
dents a chance to get acquainted. other colleges and universities and China or inn— w.V.v Mttimtfer
The cost will be 35 cents per person, for the selection of teachers.
Courtesy Central Studio
I i.'inn. I.uis
12
the money to be used to pay for the
Dean Nelson stated that all col• LaSallc, Lfija
20
W H O W I L L H O L D the Royal Sceptre as five leek Campui Queen honor? buses and the refreshments. Tickets lege and employment appointments
Itiivolt'H—Tuimiliiy
O n floor, Jeanette Ryerson,- seated, left to right, Mildred Swain, Marion Duffy, will be on sale in the lower hall of must be canceled so that every sen- H U M . uf I IMS— IV AA Hi'iinmeiitutlvo
(iri-uiiiiiiii. ,liuiu
Draper from now until Monday.
•Catherine Petenon/ (tending, Kathryn Wilson.
ior will be able to attend.
Ti-fft, Sylvia
Touch Football
Starts Monday
HOLSUM
1916
State Co
Th«
"Giin //
Mill
SERVICE
• oluctoil.
mm
msmmm^
tmimi limn
SfATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
PAGE 1
3
!
JlrV
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established May, 1916
by the Class of 1918
SakaiaUu:
Females and Fraternities—
•
The Learned Daughter
''ll,l:'f'V/;:„,-
-A. T,
Krlilpy Oetdtier :t, HRl
No. I!
Member
Distributor
Associated Collegiate Press
Collegiate Digest
The iinilcrprnilunte newspnpur of the New York State ColIcpc fur Teachers published every Friday of the college
year by the XKWS Board for the Snulcnt Association.
1'IIIIIIOM: (iffleb. 0-0:173; Dorraneo, .'l-28-l.'l; HolsteM, 4-0378;
llniiiwnlil, :i-0uR8
Entered as second olass matter Albany, N. Y., postoffice.
Vol. XXVI
OF A MA.JOFi
CO-LDUCATIOMAL
UNIVERSITY'S
DAILY
,
NEWSPAPER/
SHE HANDLES
TrIE N£W3 END
OF THE DAILY
CALIFORNIAN.
ntPMSENTID FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers
420
MADISON AVE.
CHICAGO
• BOSTON
Representative
NEW YORK. N . Y.
• LOS A H Q I L C S
' SAN M A N C I S C O
The News B oard
WILLIAM R. DORRANCE
EDWIN J. HOLSTEIN
A. HARRY PASSOW
MADELINE GRUNWALD
HARRIET DEFOREST
ALLEN SIMMONS
CARL MITCHELL
MURIEL SCOVELL
DAVID SLAVIN
ANDREW TAKAS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGER
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
All communications should be addressed to the editor and
must lie signed. Names will be withheld upon request.
The STATU COM,BOB NEWS assumes no responsibility
for opinions expressed In Its columns or communications,
ns such expressions do not necessarily reflect Its view.
Looking To The Future
October 4, 1916 found a war-torn Europe
entering a third year of struggle with a militant Germany triumphant on all fighting
fronts attempting to strike a final blow which
would end the conflagration victoriously. That
date found a nervous, uneasy United States
preparing to select a president, maneuvering
to keep itself out of armed conflict, attempting to enlarge its armed forces, and slowly
converting its peacetime industry into wartime readiness.
On October 4, 1916 appeared Volume 1,
Number 1 of the NEWS. The newspaper
came to a student body whose membership
was decreasing as its members dropped out
to enter industry and the armed forces. It
came to a student population whose interests
fluctuated between classwork and war news.
The paper was read by a State College student body which looked to the future with
uncertainty.
Under such conditions was the NEWS born
and under such conditions does the NEWS
celebrate its silver anniversary tomorrow—
exactly twenty-five years after the appearance of the first issue. Once again we find a
student body war conscious, decreasing in
enrollment, and distressed by a war-torn
Europe.
Surprisingly enough, the comparison between the student body of twenty-five years
ago and today does not stop with the prevalent frame of mind. During those war years
of struggle and uncertainty, State College
history shows that students made the greatest gains and progress in the evolution of
student organizations. The student association developed into one of the most liberal
organizations of its type, Myskania was organized, the NEWS became one of the few
college newspapers granted freedom from
faculty censorship of material published, and
numerous other organizations were founded
to fulfill needs of a leading teachers' college.
The growth of the NEWS itself is indicative of the trend through those years. It
weathered the storm of depression years,
expanded during boom times, tided over criticisms from numerous sources and raised
itself to the position of leader in student
activity, molder of student opinion, pacer of
student progress, champion for student causes, historian of State College. It has been instrumental in creating a better impression
of the college amongst the general public.
State College's student body stands again
in the midst of uncertainty and opportunity.
It must distinguish between privileges and
rights and must accept the responsibilities of
each. Like the NEWS, the student body is
celebrating another birthday but has not as
yet attained its full maturity. A Student
Union, a College Quadrangle, a college athletic field, education for the care of present
facilities, reorganization of present activities
and procedures,—the future possibilities are
limitless. Much is yet to be done!
A. H. P.
PAGE t
f
tir*
fEND-ERSQN
ALABAMA POLV
VALPARAISO
CONVERSE
INDIANA
ROLLINS
CLEAASON
GOUCriERL
LENOIR RHYME
LAWRENCE
DU7.E-SNE
DARTMOUTH
WAYritSBURQ
"3s
rnoo-
THAT FRATERNITY GROWTH IT
r,nr
SLOW I DOWN IS vTEEN FROM THt: FACT
THAT ).,u?X THAN $20,000,000 IS BEING
SPENT ANNUALLY ON NEW FRATERNITY HOL'SFS'J
GolusnticUAitUfl
Facultyfotoj
Checkmalc
-Rhona RyanWhat do you know about the faculty? Yes, yes, they're the people
who stand behind the big desks In
the front of the class-rooms, but
it's a safe bet you don't really know
much about them. This column will
try and remedy that situation, as
far as it is able. For this week, we'll
concentrate on Professor Lang, new
member of the English Department.
Professor Varley Lang has come
to us after serving three years as
instructor at John Hopkins. He became a professor through the process of elimination, since he first
started as an engineer.
"I don't approve of hobbies," he
says a bit defiantly, though he admits to a fondness for writing poetry and short stories. He likes Albany very much, as well as State.
"I'm not used to so many skirts—
that's nice," he confesses shyly, and
mentions that his bad habit of addressing classes as "Gentlemen"
will soon be overcome.
However, Professor Lang seems to
feel that his great-grandfather
makes better copy than himself,
and it must be admitted that StepLoe Demerit Hut is worthy of any
writer's attention. Steptoe Demerit
Hut, yes, that Is his name, was a
Virginian, suh, and a hard-drlnkin'
man. He also owned a very notable
horse. When Mr. Hut had finished
an evening of tippling, he climbed
on his horse, and thought no more.
The horse then proceeded directly
to the ancestral plantation, up tho
front stops of the house, into tho
parlor, and stopped In front of
the sofa, at which point Mr. Hut
climbed off and wont to sleep, and
the horse returned to the stable.
Would that thero wore more of Unit
mighty breed I Mr. Hut had another
claim to fame In that he never
worked a day In his life, even after
tho Civil War left him only a truckload of Confederate bank-notes.
Professor Lang is justly proud of
his great-grandfather, but It should
be mentioned that for so young a
man the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is something to be proud of.
However, the Professor makes light
of this accomplishment, and merely
starts talking about Steptoe Demerit
Hut again . . .
we can predict
confidently that State College won't
take Professor Lang and his accomplishments as lightly.
— R o y SommersLife at State is shifting rapidly
into second gear. By Thanksgiving
things ought to be fairly under motion. By Christmas students will be
getting down to brass tacks. By New
Year's they'll be turning over new
leaves, and during the last few
weeks of January we may even see
a bit of stooging.
Meanwhile—the
State
College
Cavalcade trundles on! Tomorrow
is Activities Day. Once again our
fete-fettered Prosh will find themselves crushed to our collective bosom as the splendors of our extracurricular program are unrolled before their enraptured gaze. An organization for every need—an activity for every talent—a club for
every interest—State College has
Lhem all. Step right up, folks, and
enrich your personalities! It costs
you nothing— you'll get oodles of
mail—before you know it you'll be
heading a refreshment committee.
The
NBWH, tho Statemnan,
the
Pe-
IUKJOIJUC, French Club, Math Club,
Commerce Club, Chess Club, the
Symphony Orchestra—these are but
a random handful of State's multitudinous activities.
Do sports take your fancy? Do
you yearn to got out and fight for
tho old alma mater? Then join tho
State College Chess Team today I
Enjoy the thrills of a player In all
the comfort of a spectator. State
boasts no football team, but we do
have chess.
I recall a .stirring little poem on
this .subject. It's an ancient little
ditty handed down through generations of State College chessmen,
Wo called it the "Alma Check-Mater," and as near us I remember It
ran something like this:
Oh let's cheer for the Chessmen —
They're giving their all
In this nerve-wracking, brain-taxing,
Sedent'ry brawl.
Every eye to a board
Is transfixed in u stare;
Not a player but sits
On the edge of his chair.
There's a spectator murmuring,
"This game's too slow."
It's a lie I I Someone moved
Just ton minutes ago.
Now we view with alarm
An impending disaster;
The white king has termites;
They'll have to play faster,
Oh let's cheer for the Chessmen.
An oxcollent c h o r d Let us cheer for the Chessmen,
But please—not too loud I
In the second term of Franklin, the king of the land,
a father sent one of his daughters in search of the
Higher Education.
And he took her to his bosom and he spake thus unto
her; My daughter, thou hast reached the time when
thou must leave the home of thy fathers.
Thou leavest that thou might enrich thy mind; go
thou, and sit at the feet of thy teachers to hear their
words; nor waste thy time in frivolous pursuits.
And so it came to pass that she left the house of her
father and the side of her mother; and she traveled
far and long; and she came unto the Institution of
Higher Knowledge.
She spake unto the students that had been there
before her, and she said: I am come to sit at the feet
of those who teach; lead me among them for I am
eager to start.
And they said: Come with us; we shall lead you.
And she went among them; but they took her not
unto the feet of the teachers and the dispensers of
wisdom, but they brought her first to learn of the
Social Life; and she was dismayed.
Thou shalt not divert me from my true purpose, she
spake unto them; and she left the livers of the Social
Life.
Now it was the custom in those days for the neophytes of learning to attach themselves unto one of
the many tribes of Hellenes who made their homes
there; and so that each might attach himself to the
right group, the members of the tribes made mighty
and unceasing efforts.
And this newly-arrived daughter was possessed of
both beauty and a capacity for knowledge; and the
daughters of the Hellenes gathered around her in
mighty numbers, and each of them spake unto her,
saying:
Entreat me not to leave thee, for whither thou goest,
I shall go; and thy friends shall be my friends; and
my tribe shall be thy tribe; and no rival tribe shall
part us, even unto death.
But the daughter listened not unto them, but she
rose saying: I look for the dispensers of wisdom; entreat me not to stay with thee, nor follow after me;
And so saying, she left to seek the feet of the dispensers of wisdom.
Now it came to pass that the young men of the
land heard of her plenteous beauty; and they came
in numbers as multitudinous as the creatures of the
air and the land and the sea; and they spake unto
her, saying; thy wish shall be our command, and thy
desire our task; give us but thy presence and thy smile.
But she frowned upon them and she said: Begone,
for I seek the teachers that I may listen to them; I
see that there is no wisdom to be found here; for
here there is nought but pleasure.
And the young men went away in droves; and they
wrote her down in their books as a drip.
And, unhindered, she went down unto the dispensers
of wisdom, and she sat at their feet.
And four springs followed each other; and at the
end of that time, the gowned graybeards came to her
and spake, saying: Upon receipt of five talents, we
will deliver unto you a parchment testifying that you
have assimilated all the knowledge which hath been
afforded you.
And she paid the five talents; and she took the
parchment; and bearing it in her hand, she traveled
the road to the home of her fathers' fathers.
And her father spake unto her, saying:
Tell me, my daughter, what hast thou learned?
And the daughter began lengthily and accurately to
recount the many things which had entered into her
mind; but they fell upon the ears of her father and
filled thorn with boredom.
And the father listened long; and then his patience
overcame him; and he spake unto her, saying:
My daughter, these things are to be found in any
book; what hast thou learned that is not on the
printed page?
And the daughter was silent.
And a great grief fell on the old man; and walling,
he beat his head upon the walls, crying:
Oh unfortunate man, thou hast erred; thou hast
made thy daughter a parrot; yea, know thee that now
she is not a woman, for she has neither the grace nor
the charm nor the talents nor the wiles of a woman;
she hath but tho words of a book.
And he wailed disconsolately; but his daughter saw
him not, for she was busying herself reciting the things
she had learned that they might be fresh in her mind,
and not fade away from disuse.
Moral: More Is learned out of books than from them,
F l f i t N i f h t e n — Some of the members of Oberlin College's freshman class look
for their belongings after their first ordeal by the sophomores. Shoes and pajamas first
cast away on the athletic field were laterreturned well knotted for freshman scrutiny
in the M e n s Building lobby.
C o n „ W e D i s t l t Photo by Pfincehorn
, .-*
W a l l , She A f k c c I For It — Freshman Fern Hendricks, Texas State College for
Women, survived the strain of her first college registration but quails at the sight of
the stack of books which is her only reward for going through the matriculation lines.
For more pictures of registration see pages four and five.
Collate DiS«« Photo by Ber9in
Ickes Special
With the defense program
increasing the demand for
used cars, Ray Kirkpatrick
of Williams College has
recommissioned his 1903
Stanley Steamer, and is
seen with William Brewer
(behind mustache) rolling
across the campus. Water,
kerosene, gasoline and oil
propel it along at the terrifying speed of 35 mph.
The W e e k l y Bulletin
NV.Y
.Mill'
WVtlnoHtliiy,
Oclolier I, Kvelyn M. Hinll.li w i l l
lii'
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•t'rliliiy, (lutuliiir .'I, nl noon
ill llouin I'D.
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Pros 8
lliiri'iin
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Mi't'ilnu HI I'ri'KH Ituivmi tor
ir.viiiitri
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liooiii
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Vli'nlnlit rollitoniiN,
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•
SI ATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
PAGE 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941
PAGE 2
h
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Sakcdcdkl:
Females and Fraternities-
Established May, 1916
by the Class of 1918
Vol, X X V !
Fritlny, Octiilicr •".. 1041
X", il
Member
Distributor
Angnrfnieil Colleglnte Press
Collegiate
Digest
The unilcl'Dcrniluale nevvspflpur nf Hie New York Sunt' College fur 'lVndiprs published every F r i d a y of tin
liege
year by the N'KWS Ilonrtl Cor Hie Stiuleiii . W o c b u i n n .
P h i m c s : nrrice. ."1-0:17.1; l>orrani.i.. :i'_'si::; llnlsleln. 4-H373:
[Jriiiivviild. .'1-OoHS
Entered as second class matter Albany, N. Y.,
postoffice.
REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING DY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
4 2 0 MADISON A V E .
CHICAGO
'
BOSTON
N E W YORK. N. Y.
• LOS AMQELES
• SAM FRANCISCO
The News Board
W I L L I A M I?. D O R R A N C E
EDWIN J. HOLSTEIN
A. HARRY PASSOW
MADELINE GRUNWALD
HARRIET DEFOREST
ALLEN SIMMONS
CARL MITCHELL
MURIEL SCOVELL
DAVID SLAVIN
ANDREW TAKAS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGER
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
«ftS«l 2
All riiinintinlriilinns should be nddrossed in ihe eilltur unil
must be signed. N'linii'S will be withheld upon reiitiest.
The STATU ('III,I,ICOfi MOWS HSSiiines nn responsili 1 i11y
for opinions expressed In lis columns nr cniiimunientloriR.
lis such e.tprpssinns do mil iieci'isnrll.v relict'! iis view.
Looking To The Future
The Learned Daughter
-A. T.
MISS HENDE.-:a0H [,£
I n t he second term of Franklin, the king of the land,
IS THE ONLY t£
a father sent one of his daughters in search of the
W0.VAN EDITOR. p
I Higher Education.
Of- A MA.JOR.
fe
A n c i h e took her to his bosom and he spake thus unto
C0-LLXJCATIOMAL %. i her: My daughter, thou hast readied the lime when
UNIVERSITY'S §'• ' thou must leave I he home of thy fathers.
DAILY
Thou leavrst that thou might enrich thy mind: go
NEWSPAPER/ W
thou, and sit at the feet of thy teachers to hear their
M j r iHANDLES
i A k i r v i-..b words: nor waste thy time in frivolous pursuits.
SHE
IS
And so it came to pass that she left the house Of her
THE NEWS
END 1
iVSEND
father and the side of her mother; and she traveled
OP
DAILY K
OP THE
THE-DAILY
far and long; and she came unto the Institution of
CALIFORNIAN.
Higher Knowledge.
She spake unto the students thai had been there
; before her. and she said: I am come to sit at the feet
[ of those who leach; lead me among them for r am
eager to start.
And they said: Come with us; we shall lead you.
And site went among them; but I hey look her not
unto the feet of the teachers and the dispensers of
ALABAMA POLY
wisdom, but they brought her first to learn of the
VALPARAISO
Social Life: and she was dismayed.
Thou shall not divert me from my true purpose, site
CONVERSE
spake unto them: and she left the livers of the Social
INDIANA
•^o, ooo ,ooo
j Life.
ROLLINS
Now it was the custom in those days for the neophytes of learning to attach themselves unto one of
5
CLEAASON
the many tribes of Hellenes who made I heir homes
GOUiVc C
(SGLUfi! I
j there; and so that each might attach himself lo the
LI NOIR RUYNE
j right group, the members of the tribes made mighty
!
fjat on fmi JUS | 1
. A.WRENCE
Si / . . .
and unceasing efforts.
DL' J SSNE
I
And this newly-arrived daughter was possessed of
both beauty and a capacity for knowledge; and the
I \STM0irm
I j daughters of the Hellenes gathered around her in
ProWAYIY.SBURS
mighty numbers, and each of them spake unto her,
SI '.
saying:
THAT , Tl I AT FRA1 cRNI I y GROWTH I5 I ,OT
IVrlVN
IS
SBBH
FROM
THE
fA'.'i
j
Entreat me not to leave thee, for whither thou goest.
SPENT ANf.UAl.ty ON NEW FRATERNITY HX«;b'
cHAN 9 2 0 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 0 IS Ut-'NG ~J
I shall go; and thy friends shall be my friends; and
my tribe shall be thy tribe; and no rival tribe shall
part us, even unto death.
But the daughter listened nol unto them, but she
rose saying: I look for the dispensers of wisdom: entreat me not lo stay with thee, nor follow after me;
And so saying, she left lo seek I lie feet of the dispensers of wisdom.
Facultyfotos
Checkmate
Now it came to pass that the young men of the
land heard of her plenteous beauty; and they came
Rhona Ryan
-Roy Sommersin numbers as multitudinous as the creatures of the
air and the land and the sea; and they spake unto
her. saying; thy wish shall be our command, and thy
What do you know about the faLife al State is shifting rapidly desire our task; give us but thy presence and thy smile.
culty? Yes yes they're the people into second gear. By Thanksgiving. ,. B l l 'S"L' ''owned upon them and she said: Begone
LUILJ . i t s , yes, t n i y i t me peopie
b
J
e
B f o r T s( , ( , k n u , teachers that I may listen to them; I
fW
who stand behind the big desks in ^ ^ ^ ^ u l L n ^ i U ^
^
T
^
* , n ,°, " . T l° * M
^
the front ol the class-rooms, but U ing'down to brass tacks. Bv New h e ™ \hv>'v »" , M ) U « n l l n " Pleasure.
Alul
it's a safe bet you don't, really know Year's they'll be turning over new
" " ' • vim "^ " " ' " went away in droves; and they
much about them. This column will leaves, and during the last few, end
wroteof her
their
books gray
as abeards
drip. came to her
thatdown
time,inthe
gowned
trundlesweon!
try and of
remedy
that situation,
u Cavalcade
weeks of January
mayTomorrow
even see' andAnd.
unhindered,
she
wcnlreceipt
clown of
untolive
thetalents,
dispensers
spake,
saying:
Upon
we
member
the English
Department.
lls
., ,.
,, ,
,
,
Activities
Day. Once again our will
deliver and
untoshe
you
parchment
., I,:,
ol wisdom,
sala at
their teet.testifying that you
r ...,,„,,;,,,,
1
valley
has come
Prnsh will find them- i ,,,
,
. each
. , other;
, . and
, . al the
J""
farProfessor
a.s it is able.
ForLang
this week,
we'll aI'pte-retlererl
»" ol .stooging.
A m | f o t.
m , :, , , , , . followed
icLL-ttiuitti
i i u s n win
unti College
wit.m have assimilated all the knowledge which hath been
concentrate
on
Professor
Lang,
new.
Meanwhile—the
Stale
to u.s alter serving three years as selves crushed to our collective bo- afforded Von
instructor at John Hopkins. He be- s o m a s the splendors of our extraA n t | s | u . | l a j d l l u . nve talents: and she took the
came a professor through the pro- ''nrrieiilar program are unrolled be- parehmi.nl: and bearing it in her hand, she traveled
,.
,
,.. , o r e their enraptured gaze. An or- .i,,, rn.lri ,,, H,,, n,,,,,,. ,.,• i,,„, i.,n,,,,.,.. r.,n,,,,.,.
cess ol elimination, since he first ,,„„,.,.,,,„„ Ir „. „,.„,.,, „ np ,i „„ „,. " ' " , a c l " ' " " " " n " 0 | " " l a | h e o , lalheis.
started as in eiminecr
gam/.alion loi oveij need -an ac-, And her falher spake unto her, saying:
suited as an engineer
: , V U v )0] . l>V(,,.y U l k , n t
a club tor
T ( , n 111(, m v ( | a U K l l l ( ,,, w h u t ,,.,,, u U) ,i learned"
"I don't approve of hobbies," he iwery interest, s t a t e College has
A l ) c | ,,„, daughter began lengthily and accurately to
says a bit defiantly, though he ad- "icm all. Step right up. lolk.s, and ,.,,,.()llnl l | l ( , 1 | l a n v n l i n g s w h i ( . h h a c l ( , nlt ,red into'her
mits to a fondness for writing poe- rnncli
your you
personalities!
It costsj
l | 1 (lHlJ , j ( , n u
n l | ) ( , t , a| . s n | |uil , f a t h ( , r . m d
mail before
know it you'll
be m i n c l ; bthe
I her listened
long; and then his patience
bany
veryshort
much,
a.s well
try and
stories.
He a.s
likesState
Al- >"".
nothing• you'll getcommittee
oodles ol j m l (And
, ( | ,,„,,„ fa
w ] ,' h b o r t . c l o m .
heading
a refreshment
"I'm not used to so many skirts— The NKWS, the Shiti .•miiui, the Pv- overcame him: and he spake unto her, saying:
My daughter, these things are to be found in anv
that's nice," he confesses shyly, and
HENDERSON
iK
October 4, 1916 found a war-torn Europe
entering a third year of struggle with a milit a n t Germany t r i u m p h a n t on all fighting
fronts a t t e m p t i n g to strike a final blow which
would end the conflagration victoriously. T h a t
date found a nervous, uneasy United S t a t e s
preparing to select a president, maneuvering
to keep itself out of armed conflict, a t t e m p t ing to enlarge its armed forces, and slowly
converting its peacetime industry into wartime readiness.
On October 4, 1916 appeared Volume 1,
Number 1 of the N E W S . The newspaper
came to a student body whose membership
was decreasing as its members dropped out
to enter industry and the armed forces. It
came to a student population whose interests
fluctuated between classwork and war news.
The paper was read by a State College student body which looked to the future with
uncertainty.
Under such conditions was the N E W S born
and under such conditions does the N E W S
celebrate its silver anniversary tomorrow—
exactly twenty-five years after the appearance of the first issue. Once again we find a
student body war conscious, decreasing in
enrollment, and distressed by a war-torn
Europe.
Surprisingly enough, the comparison between the student body of twenty-five y e a r s I
ago and today does not stop with the prevalent frame of mind. During those war years |
of struggle and uncertainty, S t a t e College!
titlifiHllit , ' r e l i c h ( u i . M a t h L l l l b , i,,,,,i.
„,i,,,i i.,,.., n , , ,, i, ,,
i ,
,
,,'
history shows that students made the great- mentions that his bad habit of ad- ( , ; m l l l „ m , club, Chess Club, the! J ! J , * , ^ ,','' ,, 1,,lM " " " l l l , u n , ' d t l , H l Ls " 0 | ° " l 1 "'
est gains and progress in the evolution of dressing classes as "Gentlemen" Symphony Orchestra these are but
A l u i the daughter was silent
„ random handliil ol Slates mull.AM( , (| ,,,,,,„ „,,,,, ,,.„ „„ | | ) ( 1 ( | W | n i m ; m ( | v „ i | l u i ^
student organizations. The student associa- Will soon be overcome.
However, Professor hang seems to l l u l l l U ) l is aclmties
, | r j ) r ; l | h j s hl ,. 1(| U ] ) u n | | u , w u ] | ^ t . r y |, l t ,.
tion developed into one of the most liberal
feel
that
his
great-grandfather
"
"
sports
lake
your
fancy?
Do
oh union unate man. thou hasl erred; thou hast
organizations of its tvpe, Mvskania was orlo gel out and tight for made lh,\ daughter a parrot: yea, know thee thai now
gani'/.ed, the N E W S became one of the few ' makes heller copy than himself, viiu yearn
l(l l l I m
" '"'.ilcrV Then join ihe she is nol a woman, lor she has neither the grace nor
college newspapers granted freedom from , and it must be admitted that Step- " " ' "
,.
. ,, .
,,
t
State College Chess 'I'eam today! ihe charm nor Ihe Inlenis nor the wil,,. ,a >, ,,,,,,,••,,
faculty censorship of material published, and
I,,,. Dement Hul IS worthy ol anv ,,
,, ,7 ,,,
,
i
,,
' " luuius not uu wins oi a wnm,,n.
numerous other organizations were founded j w i l i e r ' , i n t e n t i o n S l e n l o , . ' Demeri'l '''" J "' V " " ' " " " ' " " ' J ' | , l l l y ' ' ' ' " " " ^ H ' h a l l l b l l l 11." Words ol a b o o k .
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A n d h e w a d e d d i s c o n s o l a t e l y ; but h i s d a u g h t e r s a w
In fulfill needs nf a leading teachers' college. H ,
>lS
t l u l
s
' • V f . ' IXMWIS n o f o o t b a l l t e a m , bill we d o h i m n o l , f o r s h e w a s b u s y i n g h e r s e l t r e c i t i n g I h e m i n u s
The growth of the NEWS itself is indica- V i' "r g' .i n i a n' , slih, '"a n t " a "h 'a "r t" -i
r i n k u i i,,,,.,, c h e s s
i i
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r ,
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tive of the trend through those y e a r s . It
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s h e h a d leai n e d l h a l I h e y m i g h l b e I r e s h in hci iiiind
, ,.,,,..,„ ,, M i | . n , 1 ; l l m k , ,„„,,,, , „ , , l l l ( l , „ , , | i l ( i l , a W ; h f n a n d i s u s e
weathered the storm nf depression years, m a n l i e a l s o o w n e d a very n o t a b l e
h o r s e W h e n M r Hill h a d lini.shed l h l , M l h | e c l
I t ' s a n a n c i e n t 111 11.
M o r a l M o r e is l e a r n e d o u l of b o o k s I h a u I r o m I h e m
expanded during boom times, tided over cri- a n e v e n i n g ol l i p p l i n g , h e c l i m b e d ( |itl.\ h a n d e d d o w n t h r o u g h g e n - .
ticisms from numerous sources and raised oil h i s h o r s e , a n d I h o i l g h l n o m o r e , e r a l i o n s ol S U i i e C o l l e g e c h e s s m e n .
T h e h o r s e i h e l l p r o c e e d e d d i r e c t l y W e c a l l e d II t h e " A l m a C h e e k - M a - T U p W p ^ L L
Riill«>fin
itself In the position of leader in s t u d e n t lo I h e a n c e s t r a l p l a l i l a l i o n . u p t h e t e r . " a n d a s h e a r a.s 1 i r m e m b c r II
..I I ' r ,
11
"M lC. I ™
CKK
Iy
UUIieilH
\\'.-.In,
ila
M..II.I n
activity, rnolder of .student opinion, pacer of frold s t e p s ol i h e h o u s e , inli) I h e r a n s o m e l h i n » l i k e t h i s
I., i I I <• .11 \ l S i , H I
,,
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student progress, champion for student caus- p a r l o r a n d slo|i|ied III l i m i t ul , . , , ,, ,
> IItun.i
I'IIIIK-IIIIIH,
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O h lei s c h e e r i n r t h e C h e s s m e n
,| I l
Itll-.'l l l l l '
es, historian of Slate College. It has been in- t h e s o l a , al w h i c h p o i n t M r Hul T h l , y111:;
mil
I :II i
, , „ , , , . llU
n . t,l,m,,
W o u l d l h a l I here were more ol l h a l S e d e i n ' n b r a w l
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I'll)Al.lll.l I
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w .• 11
i n , -..hit
l i m b e d o i l a n d Weill Iti s l e e p , a n d , , , | h l s n e r v e - w r a c k i n . ' , . b r a i n - l a x strumental in creating a better impression cline,
hi \ breed ! M r H i l l h a d a l i o l h e r
Hi.I l l nl M
In.In i.e. ,
en n n ,
I,.
I h e h o r s e r e t u r n e d lo t h e s l a b l e livery e\e h
of the college amongst the general public.
I l.-l.t II M . S n i l l l l ,
ih. r. an'.i. in .n, I,, in,
h ml
claim lo lame In that he never
s
i
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l
.
n
l
D
l
r
i
s
11- n a, in, i
n ii,
Slate College's student body stands again winked a day in his life, ewn after Is I r a l i s l i x e d in
dare;
MIII.N
by u |
iliihiil nn
(11(1 I I I s f K \
Nol a p l a y e r bill s i t s
si.n
l| mi ih, n u n
" i , Ii. ' i i I.
..,
vi
in the midsl nf uncertainty and opportunity. Ihe ('u il War left him only a iruck- i )u i h e e d g e ol h i s c h a i r
m i l , i i n I n , I I , i ,,, | i,M|,i .,»• !• in It
•M.'ii.l.'u
It must, distinguish between privileges and | load ol Confederate bank-noles
s o l I VI, ( \ | . K M ) \ It
nnI
I H, a n
i OIL: • :; .'.I
" l u r e ' s aa spectator
. s p e c t a t o r in
s
Prolessor Lang is justly proud ol 'Acre's
mui'liltirilii
I ' M
U i ,
hn
7 in 1'
»
opei
rights and must accept the responsibilities of
T h i s g a m e ' s too slow
M
t nil
i
n,
I inn .
l l . n i •••• 11 • i l i e .liiin n
tl
e a c h , h i k e t h e N E W S , t h e s t u d e n t body is h i s g r c a t - r r a n d l n l l i c r . hul it s h o u l d 11 s ,i l i e ! ! S o m e o n e m o v e d
.Ii, ,ii
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In i ., .
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be m e n t i o n e d t h a i l o r so y o u n g a J l | M | ( , n n i l m i l i .
„,,
in I «
Iw i n I ,
i 'l iril
•'•
Iiiiii i iiii mil v
celebrating another birthday but has not. as m a n t h e d e g r e e ol D o c t o r of P h i l o s o 11, r i i . i i . l
I',.i I n i . i n ,
Stii.il
( imililrliir.
M
yet attained its full maturity, A Student p h y is s o m e l h l n g to be p r o u d of Now we view w i t h a l a r m
On t
soriio.MOiucs
mi i i a\i i \n UirUnion, a College Quadrangle, a college a t h - H o w e v e r , I h e P r o f e s s o r m a k e s l i g h t A n i m p e n d i n g d i s a s t e r ;
u
S"|.I."liiin,
i ..,-.. n
ilnn
i nn
1 111
I,mil
nici'lliiif
letic field, education for the care of present of this accomplishment, and merely ,' ' ' white king has termites; I 'I'nt i t . I Ii I i , I , I T II nl n,mil I ICr lI
r.t c i u i i ,1,1,1 \ m
I'll! l-irlit ( a r r u l ,
'ii'.in
Oh,nil,-nl
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facilities, reorganisation of present activities starts talking about. Sfcploe Demerit Tncy'll have lo play faster.
u c c a n p r e0 d1 i c t n l ,
„ „,,
,.,„. ,,,,, „ ,
|
o.in
li
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and procedures,—the future possibilities are H i d a g a i n
' • ' " I " ' ' " ; ; O h I d ' s c h e e r for t h e C h e s s m e n , !
I-.I . ; ' s " n r TlUv
i a Kl'A nnii'i-iil niiHilc o i i l n l c n l l y l h a l S t a l e t o l l e g e w o n t A n e.xcellenl c h o r d
Mo-.m wli.i did imi nil
.iiii l.'iiinui', ;i .".ii I' \l
limitless. Much is yet to be done!
l,lll
1
1
A. H. P.
t a k e P r o f e s s o r U m g a n d Ills twjcomp l l s h m c n t s as lightly.
Let us c h e e r for t h e C h e s s m e n
Hul
. , „ a luo„o, i,.,,ai
'
B
u t pn l e a so«
e -not
loud!
'"" " ' ' " "
' c ' " '"n''
"''
'•' xcwnmii Club Ii
" 1 " " ' l | l ' T o p il nut,. Ilili, I_•• |
mnnillliin
I'b'MBU, New
hi'.
lllll'.'.nl
IlllllaiX
in II.ill
In I' M
Icltes Special
With the defense program
increasing the demand for
used cars, Ray Kirkpatrick
of Will iams College has
recommissioned his 1903
Stanley Steamer, and is
seen with William Brewer
(behind mustache) rolling
across the campus. Water,
Kerosene, gasoline and oii
propel it along at the terrifying speed of 35 mph.
Collcgldle Digtil Photo by PI«Cf
i
""^c,
• % / - _ # ffl
'-'
*
Acme
SFATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
2
«BHB»WM1>'«WW»«1
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941
3
—••
.;•.•!", •
'"'•' I " , " - " — "
•*!•••'«
^^
Probing
]
.... .
IU...J..
n
Ai/sfrMfi
of
Str.inge
J)
Offers
io Team
Entertain
iSchool
Buds
/
X
College Expedition Invades Mexico j
* ^ * ; i .''• ' V .
Grw* £•*•*»•<
^
UJL-sJL * A 4
ji,ni ipi •!••»•. . i i .. _i n i ini m i i n i i j - r a r n ^ r * V i'*r~ir""t—— • - - ' - — — — - — — • — " " ^ ^ " ™
7
i'-t'c
c . . / . . . — - - . i - . rh~*>**-
PAGE 3
To study, collect, band, and observe the habits of strange southern birds, members of
the Cornell University — Carleton College Ornithological Expedition invaded the
heart of the Mexican mountain country, a bird paradise south of the Tropic of Lancer.
For three months Dr. George M . Sutton of Cornell, Dr. O . S. Pettingill, Jr., Carleton
College, and students Robert Lea and Dwain Warner conducted their survey, cut o»
from the world except for weekly trips to the little town of El Monte for food and mail.
Each member of the expedition helped in the general collection and preparation of bird AWWCM Cunuow
specimens, and in addition, pursued a project of his own.
T h e y ' r e S o u n d tp M a k e a n Impression — These pretty Washington State College Kappa Delts believe that one way to interest
Cledges is to have a spic-and-span house. Betty Pierce, Janet Oswalt,
ois Zimmerman, and Maedeane Kelly shine up the stair rail
Bad f t Coach Confers W H h T o a m W o t * — Under the Harry Stuhldreher modification of
the Notre Dame system, the quarterback is boss of the team, so the former pilot of the famous
Four Horsemen gets in a huddle with his signal calling squad. H e is determined that Wisconsin
will play smart football this yea.-.
Acme
ined in exA table will
• girls' locker
E ' S THE THING!
Thumbing your way in Mexico isn't so easy according to student*
member Robert Lea who used this method to get to Monterrey
where he joined other members of the party.
Association
Jragiotti, in) pianists, in
lbany High
October 15.
eleven years
irpose of inof music
two pianos.
ssical trainconservatory,
•1 for swinghat, popular
lation of the
tomorrow.
first mu.siito the connkee Doodle
take-off on
ters.
ill consist of
anging from
3orge Gersh-
CHECK, PARDNER, CAMELS
ARE MILDER-EXTRA MILD!
The smoke of slower-burning Camels contains
LESS
NICOTINE
than the average of the 4 other largest-selling
brands tested — less than any of them — according
to independent scientific tests of the smoke itself
Headquarters for the expedition was this crude rancho. To move
into it the men had to dig out a huge termite nest and kill counties scorpions which lived in the cracks of the logs. They did their
own cooking, each person taking his turn as chef.
Lovely
CAM^ Ate
IT'S GRAND CHAMPION COWBOY PAUL CARNEY. A t C h e y e n n e ,
Tucson, Pendleton—on sun-fishin' saddlers . . . barbarous bareback broncs
—this lean, leathered Arizona tophand outperformed 'em all. He tells you
this about cigarettes: "Less nicotine in the smoke means just that much
more mildness to me. I'm glad I switched to Camels."
\ e s , by actual comparison (sec right, above) less nicotine in the smoke
than any of the 4 other largest-selling brands tested. Less nicotine in the
smoke—freedom from the irritating qualities of excess heat—extra mildness. Switch t o the slower-burning cigarette of costlier tobaccos now!
CO0LG&
'
I
co-eds
i»-'1
5 EXTRA
SMOKES
PER PACK!
jo^vv1
j t u M * n ° w j dT e a nuoted
Bird** "*, . garner a" , h
in this
The ornithologists used this method of transportation in their
search for rare birds. This stop was made in the market square of
tiny Gomez Farias.
„,ann«« at n.tf»'
^
^mmmmmmmm^mmimmmm^mmm^^m——
Perched atop a 20-foot tower, Dr. Pettingill photographs
a Cotinga nest. He devoted much of his time to obtaining
a natural color motion picture record of rare birds which
have never been filmed.
Coii-smc Di»c»t Phoioi by Robcn u>
For even greater economy and
convenience, get Camels by'the
carton at attractive carton prices.
strict. and
; side.
Ii' »•
j5»sw«ai8g!
• BY BURNING 25% SLOWER
than the average of the 4 other
largest-selling brands tested —
s l o w e r than any of them —
Camels also give you a smoking
plus equal, on the average, to
f alone
TOO rrA
W
"That E X T R A SMOKING PER PACK
makes slower-burning Camels a mighty
T H R I F T Y smoke."
Dr. Sutton, a distinguished bird artist, painted a bird each day
and worked on his semi-popular book on Mexican birds. This
was his fifth expedition into Mexico.
r bull
dnight
retir-
I0J
IF YOU'RE SMOKING MORE than yoti once did,
you'll appreciate Camel's slower burning all the more.
Not only less nicotine in the smoke but also more
coolness and an extra flavor that livens up even a
tired taste. Camels always rasre good.
patristars
backwaist
m s of
Sizes
,! VU,
Camel
THE CIGARETTE OF
COSTLIER TOBACCOS
)( J .Uoiulil.TutianuCijiHixlu-.WIIMIMI
S»l«u, N m l M m u l l m
I
SfATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
PAGE 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIQAy, OCTOB|», », 1941
~. ..... ..
.
. •
:
. «»»*-*• .f— . . - - r * ? - - — . * * — . ^ — — • - « - - — - • »
I
—
CM>IM«.«.. 1 . /-!._.
PAGE 3
i. 4 i
i i
*•»..
Offers
no Team
Frosh
Co-ed's
First
Week Is
I Entertain
gh School
One Big Whirl
c Association
BraglotM, inuo pianists, in
Albany High
October 15.
d eleven years
purpose of ini of music
)f two pianos,
asslcal trainConservatory,
;ct for swingthat popular
idation of the
if tomorrow,
e first musilnto the coninkee Doodle
. take-off on
sters.
Indiana Slat* Teachers College at Terre Haute chose
Lorajean Doup as "typical freshman", then photographed her through the many steps connected with her
first campus enrollment this fall. Lorajean learned that
getting into college is not so easy, let alone getting
through to graduation in an average of four years. Follow her through the maze of freshman week routine and
activity in this unusual series of candid pictures.
will consist of
ranging from
ieorge Gershained in cx:. A table will
e girls' locker
Lorajean called at the Registrar's office in good season
to make out her class program, but she learned that there
had been many ahead, of her. Lots of the favorite professors already had full classes.
Harvard A c e a " N u r s e m a i d " — Despite his 250 pounds and six odd in height, V e m M i l l
has no qualms of how he shall earn funds to support his education at Harvard University. Vern a
his schooling fund by caring for 17 months old Georgie Dwyerof Brighton and is here shown feed
ing the boy. Vern takes a good ribbing from his mates on the Harvard varsity grid squad but is
Internationa
"sissy" for he has been a letter man for two years.
If Pete's Not D o w n . H i t Pants A r c Forfeit — Speedy Pete Kmetovic Stanford halfback,
is caught in the unyielding clutches of a Webfoot. This thrilling game saw Stanford, defending
Pacific Coast champions, eke out a 19-15 win over the University of Oregon gridders.
Acme
During a psychology examination Lorajean tries to
brush from her mind all the confusion of what seems the
biggest and most exciting day of her life long enough
to solve brain teasing problems.
Lovely
>v bull
dnight
; retirf alone
After a complete physical examination she gets a "passport photograph" and a number to go on the activities
card which will admit her to campus events throughout
the term
Z&fitejs*^
Pajama-clad Freshmen at Arizona State Teachers College at Flagstaff dance around the
huge bonfire, traditionally lighted on the eve of homecoming. The ceremony climaxes the
initiation begun on registration day and the frosh then discard their "beanies" and are almost
indistinguishable from the upper-classmen.
%ik
co-eds
Coll,
«t/«e
^AMO
, .vv,
f
*
,
;
#
Their Wigs W e r e Mops — PiKa's created a sensation during rush week at the University of Arkansas by
disguising as new pledges and dashing up to the Delta Delta Delta house in a taxi amidst screams of the
expectant initiates.
R«orbick Photo
**Bnt*•«*»'
'..
:
patristars
backwaist
ms of
Sizes
. ' •
II
'
1
Floor
i
Midway in orientation week the whirl of sorority rush
activities began. Lorajean had "rushes" from three of
the eight sororities at the outset, by week's end was on
virtually all the lists.
Blind dates are part and parcel of the first week on
campus. Here she says goodnight at the door of the
Women's Residence Hall which will be her home
for some time.
Lora/ean decided that she would like to be pledged to the
oldest sorority on the campus, Alpha. When she found she
had been accepted she made merry in the favorite campus
hangout with her future sisters.
There still remained the formality of getting into college. After signing her,
name to nearly a score of blanks and filling out repetitious data for nearly an
hour, Lorajean stands in line with others of the 500 new students.
She's cleared all the first hurdles of
college life in addition to making
the sorority of her choice so LoraThe "typical freshman" will be a science student for she wants
jean is pretty happy as she sets out
to become a laboratory technician. Dr. G . David Koch of the for her first class. From now on it's
Science department checks her enrollment
study.
> "~"*««*i«WW»«
m n
strict. and
; side.
iiiiin
- ^ • a *
IM>m«MM|ii»w-»«*«»
S1ATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
PAGE 2
3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941
•iiMil- i l » n i n j i n • •j>iu n • ! « • » •
.SritfWra«< fa Chnnco
. ' • - .
D~~t~~i
kA
n
PAGE 3
lit
Offers
ano Team
'Sweat, Blood, Toil and Tears'
ill Entertain
igh School
Workin* Behind the Curtain
A l l the world's a stage, and collegians are actors and actresses at heart. These scenes, taken
during final rehearsal time for the premiere of George Washington Slept Here, at Syracuse
University's Civic Theater, show typical activity which will be found in dramatic circles on
every campus this fall — for fall is truly show time.
•>ic Association
1 Braglottl, indun pianists, in
Albany High
V, October 15.
ed eleven years
purpose of injs of music
of two pianos.
;lassical trainConservatory,
)ect for swingthat popular
nclation of the
of tomorrow.
•lo first mu.siinto the conrankee Doodle
a take-off on
asters.
will consist of
i ranging from
George Gershtaineci in exx. A table will
he girls' locker
Pessimists!
K^'~ ;
Three locks shatter this
almost perfect picture
of U t o p i a , taken at
the University of Minnesota post office.
Lovely
or bull
itlnight
c retiri.l' alone
SSSSSrfe sS&SS
* # * * &
adu»ir»9Pf*c"uUocUtn9P«0
s*l«W
Cfe!tf««**
co-otia
strict. and
t Hide.
•I^BJ^BOMOJUPI
A Mm*
patristai'H
backwaist.
Eocfc n o * * ColUfbW DffoM wilirt«tiK«Mtpktiir«tlictK>cciMoffb«li«v«
to bo otifeUndlfif fooi * • tuiwJpoiiit of pltotoffaphy, comp<Mit.oft, wojoct
•tttor, MMI * o Hory Utoib. Tib photo will bo toloctod « A t PICTURE of
A t MONTH. WiA ft will go • tWdolUr cot* «w«d plot the r.gula, throodoltw payment which tbfc wcHofi poytforall itoota pictures. Submit your
pktuftt for tiiio now "boooT contort nowl
IUH O f
Sizes
RULES
•%i
Fh
,e*eifcfiefea**<
. . Xe^fSS^eW ^ • ' • • • I ^ ^ F ™ ' ' * /
^ ^^ ^^W w 0^P^^R^OPr^O
•J^^Sf^S^PFSWli|^W*
^ ^ ^ ^ » ^ w •sssssssssssssssssssss^p*
*^^^*^^^^^^
>> fMeewsfwtanwMfteafW ejeeeaj e > ^ ieie4we)mDie«44n)ea'*aeeMrtatef 0>wdeMaKi
that
mml
CPMO r j . .
i.1HHj^^M>«lii^Ae10e»^
vnnu«iMLj.-T - i f O " .. .1,.
,,
Woman, thy characteristic is vanity. Jane Cutting, ingenue of the shoVr.
makes up between scenes. This training in makeup technique should
prove invaluable in later life.
Q f | | J f | X • »«r»
Win
" .l5.0QPHi
'Cb**i&Digest . S S S - .
V^i
• W ^ f - H ^ y r ^ . » ^ t < t f r a w ^ i | , l i | M l l i naiiO-W.1 .ii'flh.i 1 |^WWW>#^WBfl t»ML' • . i B H » W ' « ^ a ^ # q W a i » . w
. JflBF"*
Traffic it quiteaproblem on rehearsal days. Crossings and recrossings have to be figured out so that
bumpt and direct hits are not made by the actors. A t this point in the play droves of expected and unexpected weekend guests are arriving so the timing of entries must be perfect. It s all hard work but
every actor loves it.
coii<ni<uPi«<>ii>haioibyConMm
, , . - . , . • ;
SI ATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941
RAfifc8W8^.^_U
.STATE COLLEGE NF.WS. FRIDAY. OCTOBER 3. 1941
Forum Discusses
NY A Reduction
"Aye, There
Is the Rub"
Shortage of water at M t .
H o l y o k e C o l l e g e has
forced the girls to forego
even the Saturday night
bath, showers are out, and
feminine unmentionables,
usually laundered daily,
must be washed when the
time can be found at Uper Lake on the campus.
/ashing dainty underthings is just one of the
ways the girls get around
the water shortage. Lined
up left to right are Mary
Sniverick, Audrey Prior,
Ruth Harper, Eunice Wardell, Eleanor Folsom, and
Jane Goodrich. The "bathless girls" standing in the
rear are Ellen Deming and
Doris Biesterfield.
Acme
«
Sculptress to Choose
Model
From
Students
Anyone interested in t h e t o p ography of his own c r a n i u m
may have a chanca to s e e it
closeup.
On November 17, under t h e
auspices of Dramatics a n d Arts
Association.
Suzanne
silvercruys. noted woman sculptress
from Belgium, will lecture a n d
exhibit h e r skill a s s h e talks.
After choosing a likely-looking
person from III.' audience s h e
will pi'ocei d to transfer hts
beauty l'i clay. When s h e h a s
Iini lied, the audience may a p i I'O.a h t lie static and "KUC s
who.'' So. II you've ever h a d a
- ei'el desire lo see yourself on
l he ' lag", be con.' picuou:
PAGE 3
Music Group Offers
Perfect M anners, Peace, Quiet
Hold Forth in New Dormitory
Famous Piano Team
By Ilhona Ryan
*
Fray, Bragiotti W i l l Entertain
No doubt t h e student-bodv won- I ° f Tchaikovsky's B Minor P i a n o I
SCT at Albany High School
Outside Part-time Jobs Cause
ders about t h e new experiment in Concerto far into the night, a n d one
democratic
living
a
t
Savles
Hall,
freshman
could
open
a
successful.
Decrease in Appropriation,W h a t h a p p e n s when more t h a n fifty grocery store with t h e delicacies h e S t a t e College Music Association
Dean Begins Interviews
boys get together after school? What i s storing away in his closet.
will present Pray a n d Bragiotti. i n clo they think about t h e new elormiT h e interior decorators have been ternatlonally famous duo pianists, In
T h e $500 cut in tlir NYA approlory?
at work. O n e junior is Justly famous Hie auditorium of Albany High
priation for S t a t e College will be
The first reports indicate an omi- for purchasing an Impractical but School on Wednesday. October 15.
partly alleviated by allotments d i nous calm t h e well-known
lull aesthetic bright yellow rug. All. of
T h e team was formed eleven years
verted from oilier colleges where
before t h e storm. There are only course, have collected various odds a g 0 j n paris with t h e purpose of inNYA funds ;ii':' less necessary. T h i s
aboul ten upper-classmen to give a n d e n d s to m a k e their r o o m s ' s p e a k [prpreting
all types
ol music
fuel was bruuuht otil lie i Tuesday
bad
examples.
So
far
the
freshof
their
personality."
Too
bad
a
lot
,
medium
of
two
pianos,
l
h
r
o
l
l
f
h
U
l
P
by Claude Chuuneey, district NYA
men have been models of propriety ol il is unprintable,
repp'senta! Ive. i.i a I 'iiniin pain I
!
Ul0
and good m a n n e r s . They are quiet,
As a
n side-line
o,.,..!„
,, ..,.,
" - I " " ' . " ', , -» ' , classical
trainAs
on
the e, n t e...<„..,
rtain, „
discus am invesl IjralillK t h e etil in
Ihoughtlul. a n d keep i heir rooms „ „ , „ : i I u .|,.. perhaps it should be " u : ' " th<> P r e n c n C o n * e n ' a t o r y NYA funds. Mr--. Sura T 1 icLuncy,
clean.
! mentioned thai there has been some , l l , v h l l V c a d e e ' 3 ' ' f ' s P e c ' r ° ' ' »WingDean ol Women. A. Harry
issow,
Ot course all is not p e r l " , !
Life " h a / i n g . " A few freshmen, it seems, , m u " l c a n d » o l n l o u t ( h i " Popular
and Evi lyn sir.i: h. ,ci ior.s pin l iei
in Savles Hull h a s its little problems, were enticed into a night football music may be t h e foundation of t h e
piited.
For instance, t h e r e is a serious lack jganic, a n d instead, paraded down ''.rial
symphonies
of tomorrow.
'riic Youth Administralion's poi
ol us]) irays, o n e of the boys com- i Central Avenue, with an e m b a r r a s - They were among t h e first musiof view was explained by Chauncey.
^J""D I
.
plained mournfully. "First you have | sing lack of Irotisers, T h e r e were clans to bring h u m o r into t h e con"The
a\ crane
approprial Ion lor
^ £ f c j I n t e r V i e W S " ' ^'imV Mil t h e ' c i g a r e t t e on t h e m u r m u r s of revolt on t h e second cert hall by their Yankee Doodle
each school," he • aid. "i - determined
floor. Ih"n pick n up. rub the ashes floor, bill an upper- class man reports Variations which is a take-off on
by l lir enrollui: nl in I lie colle.ie "
into the wood with vour .shoe, and'•that in a few minutes the situation n,„ slvles of "real masters
I'm! Time Jobs Increase
' " " ' balanci ul Studeiii Kmploy- | | ) (
, , , „ , . l u l ) | ] ] I ( 1 , , „ , W uste- I was "well-in-hand."
.',., ' '
l ; r l
|,n
y e a r ! ) ! ' , i.l Slu
|„,| ( | ,„.regislration
., w
,tiidonls
. , i"v"j•!»| |„.
' Btimiu
basket." T h e food could stand
Now Savles Hall is an oush of
V
" ' n , m w l "m m M o l
X | W( ,. k T l l . i„ierview>
1,
Were urunted NYA money; [his
year uill
;.,. .., be
„,,„„,„
| ) r | , i nweek
ludenls
hold nevi
, ,,,, , ,„ .,!„, „,„i „,-,.,-.,i ,.f , i„,
i
, ,
, . r " onu mal l ranscriplions ranging from
w n l Th.-si
| ,, Q won.-.,.
n|. ,
Hi allotment fund has been leduc- W i l | h,. mioiTl v , r i l M l l l ( . | V . s linprou'Uienl also, and se\ el a] ol llie peace amid I he Ijiisl le ol si udenl life ,, ,
, ,,,
. ,.
;,
u i lo 7.5'J ol Hie enrollmelll T h e Tuesdav; T s ami /. s Wednesday m e , are surpri inch annoyed about But ihen,
Brubacher
.Memorial H i l ( ' l ' »'KI W a g n e r to George Gershn
reason lor such a reduction is Hie s t u d i nis who cannot appea o n ihi lh" lack ol mirrors in liieir rooms
|,,,.,,
,.. , „ , | V( ,| finished. iU1 d when
l a d thill parl-tlllli' lolls outside the M 'heduled d i n s mas come 1MI.II'
Knlei'iainmenl is varied according I il is. a n d when the feminine element
Tickets may be obtained in ex[ii lasle
(Hi" l.'oy sits with n pair enters daintily
bill t h e college, change lor student lax. A table will
college h i r e becoiiK' more nuiii'rous, ,„• Hiuurdin
"' " r l < 1 "I,,SM'S li"'
" " ' u , i , rls ' a l a s ' m u s l W 1 , i l f " r " 1 l '»' s l l " this be MU up in front of the girls'locker
thus e l u n i n a l n m . in many cases,
•, •„,. ,., „,, ,,...,,, ,,„ ,„
,. , , , , , . d o r m , t o n mint her play s a recording lutlire interesting dev-lopnieui
room for that purpose.
the need ol NYA aid Since the :11>i,. »\ i h c lime ol llie inteiview
NYA allolmenl ha: been decreaesd a n d innj be paid al any time bclorc
Miss Del,alley h a s lliallgllriiled a Monday, November 1M HegL-t ration
M ' l r m ol personal interviews ill o r . does not lake ellecl until Ihe lee
tier lo ilil ill nil l • Which ol llie NYA ha , been paid. Polders a r e d u e as
I iiniin Drafts
('(institution
applicants
really
iced jobs
lollows: A-K. Monday, October - 0 :
T h e remainder ol llie Forum [•'-I„ Friday, October 24: M-H Monday . O nber - 7 ; S-Z, Friday. O c t o .
lll'le
due, a nal
d itais
.
her !il .'lore
I a'\'Ihe
will dale
be accepted
n\
meet in ' was devoted to c.xplainln ; nn io' lam thai they come in as
soon
as
possible
since
I
her"
is
so
llie clianges m a d e in llie oivuni/.anllon,
new These
constitution
e payment
include and
ill •t h
drali
ing ol M l ,.,, ,.,,,,.„.,, W()J>k .,,, ; „ . 1 | r ( | | ( ]
1,1
5L ;
' ' " " * ' " , ,"'' l, 'f " ' ««'«l"«"»l nn eonlidential malerial
' " ' w •-tueli-iu-i Willi Ihc I'oruin, a
,„ , „ , , ,,
A | | , , , „ , , , „ , .,,,, , , , , , , ,
I''"'" 1 ;':" 1 :; " " " . / " m s ! l | ) '' l ' v l ; s | 1 ''" " . . h e d u l e card which will include
W»ll Muller, -U. will be published ,,„.„. ( , 1 | l s s ( , s , u u | ulM .,.,. I l l r , , . , „ , , ,
Studelils. Wishing lo purchase Ihe | ( ) |)( . ( | | | n i ] ( , ,,.,,,. ( . | 1 ( H | .
" K e u d e r s 1 i c e . t'" iua\ do so l hruiigh
placement Bureau
ol the ;ulolllie Forum al lillei'n'cenl.s per copy
Hument iheFmploymeni
liolllie
siaie
College
Students:
Member... ol Ihe Foi'illll Will make | | j U , j n ,
;l
l 1
,s l
l n s l!X
"/'P ' " •''"' , "' ' r » ' "
'", " ' 1
" Donald
p,
ii. '41, Sioc.kbridgo,
l 1 1
" " "! " " ' '''•'•edoni ol the Press. M i ,,,.,„.,,„,,., I s . i.; n ,, U . sh;
Margaret
„ Next Week Ends
fmrJ
5-1401 ^{/
41 NORTH PKATOL
••'[ ""' ;s
'., ''''lucation Building
T„k(„.,
:w Mmm
Nl , w Yl) , k
C(JII1 .
t h e exhibil will open October L a n d „ „ , , , , . . ,,,,„„,.,, P f , | T V ..(!1 ,„,,,,,,,_
' " ' °(,|lll»'l' »
laer Falls, New York, seventh a n d
eighth grades; Mary Hurdle. 40
l-orlo Rico, lillli tirade; Kdith Ca.sl T
C
I
Mivanl, '41, House: Point, New York
l l M
M
aynard l o opeak
2.98
Newman's Program
will
hold
its first
Pnm|)cr the D01111 Crowd
i nghh
At SCA Meeting
•SCA
Pretty Pajamas
general
l\
(
ni
'
inceiiiig
oi the year
ai WillAn beIInformation
nIhe
r o rfeature
m a t i oPlease
n P lprogram
ease
ol Hie various
S C A Tiiiirsday,
commissions
of Ihe second
The
highlight
ol t h eT hmeeting
will
;i,:i()
in
Ihe
,
. .IiOlinge.
,.
,..,e r e...will
. . be Newman Club meeling ol I h e \ car.
May briel deseripl ions ol the aclivilii
be a .speech by Uev^ .Spud
M a y - w ) | ] H | w | | | ||(, , U |
N l , w | ] m n •„,,„
„ard rector ot h i P e t e r s Episcopal T ) i u r s d v
„, ,
T1]|. ,,,,,.,,,
Church, who Is c h a i r m a n ol S( A.s | J ( | ) m
,.,,,„,,,,„. ( | |
A
MuJui
mlvlM,l v bl,l,nl
'
F r e n c h ; Rev. William Cahill, P r o A meeling ol the llilercolleglalc lessor ol philosophy al t h e ColCouncil oi SCA in New York S l a t e I,,,,,, „ | HI, Rose; l.alirella Servalius,
will be held al Cornell University .v.'.. a n d also a visiting guest
tills weekend. Don V'anas, council
,,,,,,,,
!
...
,,
Oue.sl inn.s on church hlsloiv, r e l
1
"••"''•'"•'
',',''• i !'"',
, "''"•'" ' ^ i o . l . currenl evenis, a
ipologe|" IV1 ' S "i/, , W i l ' ,"'-" , | U l : , ; : ««'<«'K»«'« lies should be placed in the NcWrom Stale, t h i s miu.fil plans in- ,„.,„ ( , | u | )
u|,
ten olleglah' al lairs lor the Sludenl
Clirlsl tan inoveineiil
Tile
Social
Act lull
Hie SCA, under
SWEET SHOP
is getting under way lor llie year,
'the aim of this colllllllllee is lo
give si udenls an opporl unity lo d e velop leadership ahililie.s
II W l 1 1I I
emu
Hume Made lee Cream
anil Lunches
P. LOWRY
WATCH
7sr> Mmillion Avenue
!)7.'!.'l
AVI
A I I I A N Y . N
We Deliver
Y.
KEMMEY'S BREAD
HOLSUM
*
>,»^..,VM.V.|l^i|,.W,|^iiil|ULjJ1^.IJll_,_>,),>1|^CT|Wy
II. .Miss Swank goes patriotic in red and blur stars
and stripes mi a white back\
ground.
Adjustable waist
>S^ band on full cut but loins of
' colli rast in),
color.
Sizes
:i2~lo.
(White Bread)
KLEEN - MAID WHEAT
HOLSUM CRACKED WHEAT
War Helps H t m — Benefits to be derived from notional defense are not confined to
business as freshman Hugh Brooks found out when he registered at Santa Ana Junior
College this foil. Due to the draft and defense industries there is a decided shortage of
males among returning collegians, and Hugh finds it difficult to decide which of the
co-eds is the greatest asset — or hindrance.
Coii««nu i-nsm CMO W Suihv.n
A. The pajamas all co-eds
H'o for in a big way
strict l,v tailored . , . strictly coinfortable
. . and
strictly on the budget side.
Sizes
'XI-1(1.
RtPAIUING
N
HAMILTON
ILLS I N
1 (II'U.INI: S WA 1 L H t S
2 I'J c.L i n i A i
sketched
MADISON
( ' i i m o o l t e e of
Ihe co-chairinau-
.'.hip nl S h i r l e y O i l a n d P a u l S k e r i l l ,
c
or sk'epiiitf in class . . . .
unci wakiiiK in style1!
Lovely
t'lioiitfh In liiiinu'o in for hull
sessions, liiirm'iin; I tic midnight
nil, ni' thtil shark before; retiring . . .Or \ mi can loaf alone
anil like il, too.
(Delicious Tousled)
.(. I.. KIMMKY HAKKUY
Allmny, N. Y.
\l.llhl,
i l
rin
t'llll
SfATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
BAfii.9.
...STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY. OCTOBER 3.1941
ttiwiiii^iii»wi>i«iiriwiJjiiw»9we<i»«g««
##
Aye# There
Is the Rub#/
I
Shortage of water at M t .
H o l y o k e C o l l e g e has
forced the girls to forego
even the Saturday night
bath, showers are out, and
feminine unmentionables,
usually laundered daily,
must be washed when the
time can be found at Uper Lake on the campus,
/ashing dainty underthings is just one of the
ways the girls get around
the water shortage. Lined
up left to right are Mary
Shiverick, Audrey Prior,
Ruth Harper, Eunice Wardell, Eleanor Folsom, and
Jane Goodrich. The "bathless girls" standing in the
rear are Ellen Deming and
Doris Biesterfield.
Acme
«
Forum Discusses
N Y A Reduction
PAGE 3
Perfect Manners, Peace, Quiet
Hold Forth in New Dormitory
Music Group Offers
By Rhona Ryan
No doubt the student-body won- of Tchaikovsky's B Minor Piano
Outside Part-time Jobs Cause
ders about the new experiment in Concerto far into the night, and one
democratic living a t Sayles Hall. freshman could open a successful
Decrease in Appropriation,
What happens when more than fifty grocery store with the delicacies he
Dean Begins Interviews
boys get together after school? What is storing away in his closet.
do they think about the new dormiThe interior decorators have been
tory?
The $500 cut in the NYA approat work. One junior is justly famous
priation for State College will be
The first reports indicate an omi for purchasing an impractical but
partly alleviated by allotments dinous calm—the well-known lull | aesthetic bright yellow rug. All, of
verted from other colleges where
before the storm. There are only course, have collected various odds
NYA funds are less necessary. This
about ten upper-classmen to give and ends to make their rooms "speak
fact was brought out last Tuesday
bad examples. So far the fresh- of their personality." Too bad a lot
by Claude Chauncey, district NYA
men have been models of propriety of it is unprintable.
representative, in a Forum panel j
and good manners. They are quiet,
As a side-line on the entertaindiscussion investigating the cut in l
thoughtful, and keep their rooms ment angle, perhaps it should be
NYA funds. Miss Sara T. DeLaney,
clean.
mentioned that there has been some
Dean of Women, A. Harry Passow,
Of course all is not perfect. Life "hazing." A few freshmen, it seems,
and Evelyn Smith, seniors partici-1
in Sayles Hall has its little problems. were enticed into a night football
pated.
For instance, there is a serious lack game, and instead, paraded down
The Youth Administration's point
of ash trays. One of the boys com- Central Avenue, with an embarrasof view was explained by Chauncey. j
plained mournfully, "First you have sing lack of trousers. There were
"The average appropriation for |
to stamp out the cigarette on the murmurs of revolt on the second
each school," he said, "is determined j
floor, then pick it up, rub the ashes floor, but an upper-classman reports
by the enrollment in the college."
into the wood with your shoe, and that in a few minutes the situation
The balance of Student Employ- then put the stub into the waste- was "well-in-hand."
Part-Time Jobs Increase
ment Bureau registration interviews paper basket." The food could stand
Now Sayles Hall is an oasis of
Last year 9.1';^ of State's students j will be held next week. These whose improvement also, and several of the
were granted NYA money; this year last names begin with P, Q, or R men are surprisingly annoyed about peace amid the bustle of student life.
But then, Brubacher Memorial
the allotment fund has been reduc I will be interviewed Monday; S's the lack of mirrors in their rooms.
Lounge is not yet finished, and when
ed to 7.5 of the enrollment. The Tuesday; T's and Z's Wednesday,
Entertainment is varied according it is, and when the feminine element
reason for such a reduction is the students who cannot appear on the
fact that part-time jobs outside the scheduled days may come Friday to taste. One boy sits with a pair enters daintily . . . but the college,
of field glasses facing the girls' alas, must wait for news on this
college have become more numerous, or Saturday.
thus eliminating, in many cases, j The $5.00 registration fee is pay- dormitory, another plays a recording future interesting development.
the need of NYA aid. Since the • a ble at the time of the interview
NYA allotment has been decreaesd.; a n d may be paid at any time before
Miss DeLaney has inaugurated a Monday, November 24. Registration
system of personal interviews in or- does not take effect until the fee
der to determim which of the NYA has been paid. Folders are due as
applicants really need jobs.
follows: A-E, Monday, October 20;
F-L, Friday, October 24; M-R, MonForum Drafts Constitution
day, October 27; S-Z. Friday, OctoThe remainder of the Forum ber 31. They will be accepted at any
meeting was devoted to explaining time before the date clue, and it is
the changes made in the organiza- important that they come in as
tion. These include the drafting of soon as possible since there is so
a new constitution and the payment much clerical work attached to
of $.25 dues. In order to acquaint the confidential material.
new students with the Forum, a j All students are asked to file a
S t 0 ; u n * r th,l s " ™ ° " ° , f ! schedule card which will include
.„„„„
Will Muller, 43, will be published. t h e i r c l a s s e s a n d w h e r e t h e y e x n e c t
Students, wishing to purchase the; t o b e d u r i
, ^ '
free
"Reader s Digest may do so through j CStudent
' .. Bureau
^.... anJ ,,, J „„ i ,»_._,
Employment
the Forum at fifteen cents per copy
nounces the placement of the folMembers of the Forum will make lowing State College Students:
a trip to see the Times Union's ex- Donald Patten, '41, Stockbridge,
hibit of the Freedom of the Press, Massachusetts, English; Margaret
at the State Education Building. Tokoes, '38, Akron, New York, ComThe exhibit will open October 1, and merce; Eunice Perry, '38, Rensseclose October 8.
laer Falls, New York, seventh and
eighth grades; Mary Hardie. '40,
Porto Rico, fifth grade; Edith Cassavant, '41, Rouses Point, New York,
English.
Maynard To Speak
Fray, Bragiotti W i l l Entertain
SCT at Albany High School
Sculptress to Choose
Model From Students
Anyone interested in the topography of his own cranium
may have a chance to see it
closeup.
On November 17, under the
auspices of Dramatics and Arts
Association, Suzanne Silvercruys, noted woman sculptress
from Belgium, will lecture and
exhibit her skill as she talks.
After choosing a likely-looking
person from the audience she
will proceed to transfer his
beauty to clay. When she has
finished, the audience may approach the stage and "guess
who." So, if you've ever had a
secret desire to see yourself on
the stage, be conspicuous.
Next Week Ends
SEB Interviews
5-1401
Famous Piano Team
State College Music Association
will present Fray and Bragiotti, internationally famous duo pianists, in
the auditorium of Albany High
School on Wednesday, October 15.
The team was formed eleven years
ago in Paris with the purpose of interpreting all types of music
through the medium of two pianos.
In spite of their classical training in the French Conservatory,
they have a deep respect for swingmusic and point out that popular
music may be the foundation of the
great symphonies of tomorrow.
They were among the first musicians to bring humor into the concert hall by their Yankee Doodle
Variations which is a take-off on
the styles of great masters.
The entire program will consist of
original transcriptions ranging from
Bach and Wagner to George Gershwin.
Tickets may be obtained in exchange for student tax. A table will
be set up in front of the girls' locker
room for that purpose.
[MerJ
41 NORTH P1AHL
Pretty Pajamas
Pamper the Dorm Crowd
A t S C A Meeting
Newman's Program
r t a u M n f l through the air is
Ed Smyke, Springfield College diving ace. Form like this won for him
the New England A . A . U . diving
championship.
SCA will hold its first general
meeting of the year Thursday, at
Information Please
3:30 in the Lounge. There will be
brief descriptions of the activities j An Information Please program
of the various SCA commissions.
be the feature of the second
The highlight of the meeting will will
Club meeting of the year,
be a speech by Rev. "Spud" May- Newman
will be held at Newman Hall,
nard, rector of St. Peter's Episcopal :j which
T^nirsdav
experts will be:
Church, who is chairman of SCA's John yA. The
Mahar, Professor of
advisory board.
French; Rev. William Cahill, ProA meeting of the Intercollegiate fessor of philosophy at the ColCouncil of SCA in New York State lege of St. Rose; Lauretta Servatius,
will be held at Cornell University '42; and also a visiting guest.
this weekend. Don Vanas, council
on church history, rerepresentative, and Helen Curtis, Questions
current events, and apologeadvisor, will attend as delegates ligion,
should be placed in the Newfrom State. This council plans in- tics
tercollegiate affairs for the Student man Club mailbox.
Christian movement.
The Social Action Committee of
the SCA, under the co-chairmanMADISON
ship of Shirley Ott and Paul Skeritt,
is getting under way for the year.
SWEET SHOP
The aim of this committee is to
give students an opportunity to develop leadership abilities.
Home Made Ice Cream
and Lunches
C. P. LOWRY
JEWELER
WATCH
Sketched
A. The pajamas all co-eds
go for in a big way . . .
strictly tailored . . . strictly comfortable . . . and
strictly on the budget side.
Sizes 32-40,
785 Madison Avenue
2-9733
2 3 9 CENTRAL AVE. ALBANY, N. Y.
T T T T T '
We Deliver
T T - y T v v -v T"*
- r ' V > v >-•*
KflMMEY'S BREAD
HOLSUM
B. Miss Swank goes patriotic in red and blue stars
and stripes on a white background, Adjustable waist
band on full cut bottoms of
contrasting color.
Sizes
32-40.
(White Bread)
KLEEN - MAID WHEAT
HOLSUM CRACKED WHEAT
W a r HcljM H i m — Benefits to be derived from national defense are not confined to
For sleeping in class . . . .
and waking in style!
Lovely
enough to lounge in for bull
sessions, burning the midnight
oil, or that snack before retiring . . .Or you can loaf alone
and like it, too.
REPAIRING
GRUEN • HAMILTON • ELGIN
LONGINES WATCHES
business u freshman Hugh Brooks found out when he regis tared at Santa A n a Junior
College this fall. Due to the draft and defense industries there is a decided shortage of
males among returning collegians, and Hugh finds it difficult to decide which of the
co-eds i» the greatest asset ~ or hindrance,
Coii*»i«t« (*»«». photo & SW<IIVMI
2.98
(Delicious Toasted)
J. L, KIMMEY BAKERY
Albany, N. Y.
jLlnyerie
Third Floor
PAGE 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
Behind
The
Eight-Ball
Men's Athletics History
Exceeds Quarter Century
Founder—
College Football
Has Short Reign
Win Or Lose, Legree
Dates Dodger Femmes
"Oowanlllbetchathreetoonc!"
Hearing these loudly spoken
words, we dashed up to a group
gathered around a strange sight
—and there was the Simon
Legree of the sports page (editor
to you), with his back to the
wall weakly defending the New
York Yankees before three
stormy feminine supporters of
the Dodgers.
Before the end of the argument he had made bets with
Shirley Wurz, "Sunny" Sundstrom, and Gertrude Jacobson—
being the recipient of 3 to 1
odds!
The bets? Three luncheon
'ates received if the Yanks win
in the first five games!
Come on you Brooklyn Bums!
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3 ,1941
Thi
Gin
Mill
•GINNY• CARI, •
Dear
Nora
and
Everybody,
Purpose: "To publicize the athleIt more than surprised me to hear
tics and athletes of the New York
that a young female had entered
Conscientious Undergraduates
State College for Teachers."
the men's intramural tennis tournaWith the penning of these exaltOrganize Present M A A ;
ment. It hurt my pride mostly, I
ed words, Bill Ryan, '39, standing
guess; it would seem that the woG. A m y o t First Head
before a small group of men meetman's tennis tournament hadn't
ing in Room 100 Draper formed the
been given enough publicity. Then
A football schedule, com
' • nnd
Men's Athletic Association Press
again it would seem, Nora, that you
waiting for the play-oflt bi, >
Bureau. I t was indeed a muchthought the women's tournament
football squad to fulfill the oblik
needed organization, for many nawould be too much of a snap for
tion!
tive Albanians have confessed that
you and you wanted stronger compSuch was the situation in spoi t,
in past years they were not even
etition.
at State way back around October
aware of the existence of State.
1916. Fortunately, as the ancient
But, Nora, your action brings up
Organizations of this kind are
article said, "Manager Hohaus is a
a question. Last week your unpreceto be found in all the major colgood diplomat, for none but a diplodented step was the subject of comleges of the country. In contrast
mat could have secured games from
ment in the men's sports column
with the altruistic services of our
colleges without having a team to
and in a feature article writcn by
back him!"
athletic press bureau, those publicone of the men sports writers—both
of which were unprecedented also.
izing sports in other colleges are
Men's sports at that time were
Does this foreshadow a consolidaunder the jurisdiction of an unoffiwell-rewarded financially for their
Reading through the old News tion of MAA and WAA? Does it
cial "Men's A. A.", whose memberefforts.
Paul G. Pulfpr. '36. who was a
files one cannot help but be im- mean a co-ed athletic program?
Since that afternoon in the fall leader of tJV orieinal n^rnm of un- ship included every man of the pressed by the quasi reluctance of
college.
of '38, MAA Press Bureau has paid
the student body to change the old If it does, it wouldn't be the first
rich dividends for the small amount dergraduates who established the First Football Game
order of things. Slow but sure, that's time. During a talk with Miss Minpresent
Men's
Athletic
Association.
allotted to it by the student associaThe first football in the history of State College, and that was the nie Scotland of the Biology departHe was also President of the Stution.
the college took place this same year case with MAA Intramural Council. ment and an alumna of State, I
It contacts home-town newspapers dent Association in '35-36.
between the upperclassmen and the Impromptu athletic contests were learned a little about the time when
At present he is a member of the frosh, the former romped over the the style until Al Jadick, '35, started the men and women played handof the men participating in sports
and endeavors to get beneficial faculty, serving as Vice-principal of latter, 20-0. However, this should an inter-class basketball league in in-hand.
write-ups for those who will soon the Milne School. At the same time not be confused with intercollegiate March of 1935. Under Jadick's leadHowever, despite the fact that
be seeking teaching positions. It he is serving as the faculty advis- football a t State. That came later. ership an inter-class track meet men were outnumbered more than
takes care of placing posters in ad- or of MAA.
In October of the year when the was held in the spring—the first ten to one, their activities ate a
vantageous spots so that all in the
bigger how in the Association'^
United States entered the First such meet in ten years.
college may not miss games; it
World War, the governing body of
Tom Barrington, '37, was chosen budget. (They had budget trouble
sends to different colleges for in- President—
athletic activity for the men of the manager of intramural sports for even in those days.)
formation about athletes who will
Well, in the Fall of 1911 the wocollege was composed of three up- 1935-36. Student Association passed
compete with State, thus providing
per class representatives and five a budget which raised the appro- men decided to become independent
a valuable source of information for
faculty advisors.
priation for intramural sports from and form their own organization.
the NEWS sports department; it
$75 to $250 proving that the under- In this way they hoped to be able
The
sentiment
towards
football
contacts capitol district newspapers
was hopefully expressed six years graduates were finally waking up to get a little more money for
and garners every available inch of
previous by these prophetic words, to sports in State. Activities includ- themselves. Thus started Girls' Aththeir sports pages for State publici"Football will have to first creep, ed inter-class football, basketball, letic Association or Women's Athty; and lastly, it gathers informathen stand, then walk, and some and baseball. Swimming, bowling, letic Association, as it is now
tion about State paricipants and
day
it may run." However football volley ball, and tennis filled out the known. Miss Scotland, who was
sends it to all the colleges on the
program. A second inter-class track captain of basketball, was one of
was
destined for a short "run."
various sports schedules.
the founder and held "some major
The football squad lasted for only meet was held in the spring of '36. office."
Further investigation reSnowball-like, intramural sports
Those who attended the first
three years. During this interim
meeting were: Gadlin Bodner, '41;
State put on an impressive but los- gained momentum. Ed Hulihan, '37, vealed she was president.
The girls had to pay a fee of
ing display against the Union Frosh took over the helm and introduced
Joe Schwartz, '41; Jim Maloney, '41;
featured by an 85-yard run for the innovations, including soccer. The twenty-five cents to gain memberLouis Greenspan, '41; Phil Kauflocals. In 1924 State trounced the spring softball league was really two ship, instead of becoming members
man, '42; Carl Mitchell, '42; and
"USS Destroyer Breck," their only leagues, the usual inter-class affair automatically upon payment of a
Howard Anderson, '42.
victory in sixteen starts. Topping and a new schedule in which KDR, student tax as we do today. They
The Directors during the past few
off the schedule in big-time football College House, and Potter Club par- wore small round silver pins with
years have been, Bill Ryan, Jim
were tilts with the Colgate and ticipated. Incidentally the student "AA" on it to designate their memMaloney, Joe Schwartz, and the
body voted $400 for school sports for bership. Those also were the days
Manhattan frosh.
present sports editor.
when the unappealing black cotton
that year.
The Dark Ages
Bill Ryan is now head of the ComMAA finally came into existence stockings, voluminous bloomers, and
merce Department at Sag Harbor,
After this period of energetic and with it an Intramural Council middy blouses constituted the gym
L. I.
planning, the sports train seems to in 1937 of which Pat Miranda, '38, costumes.
have passed through a long, dark was appointed chairman. The basWe have come a long way from
MAA is very much interested in
tunnel. Nothing of major impor- ketball league that winter consist- the times and activities of yesterincluding a golf team in the sports
tance occurred for many years and ed of ten teams representing' group year. With the freedom of the mocurriculum of the college. In order
it seemed as If men's sports fell houses and commuters—a vital step dern gym outfit has come greater
to make such an add'tion, it is necGerald Amyot, '36, who served in
in intramural sports. A bowling freedom in choice and number of
essary that an immediate survey be the capacity of first president of into a very insignificant position.
However, in 1934 the resurrection league was started with seventy- sports. But, Nora, even thirty years
made cf all available material.
the Men's Athletic Association in occurred in the sports field. In this five men taking part. In the spring ago, tennis was one of the big feaAll students interested should '35-36.
year a group of clean-minded, un- two softball leagues were organized tures of the women's program.
contact Dave Bittman at once.
Love,
He was also captain of baseball biased undergraduates got their —inter-class and group house. As a
There must be an Immediate reheads together and planned a new result 707' of the men at State enGinny
sponse while an opportunity to play in 1936. At the present time he is experiment. These men, all prom- gaged in sports that year. Finally
h e a d c o a c h o f C o h o s s Hi
h SchooL
I*.
S.
News
of
your
first victory
is's'ti'll open" DonT'letTack'' of"clubs i H c n a s
%
inent alumni today were: Al J a - in 1938-39 intramural sports came lias come, Nora, I hope you lick the
deter you—above all, show that y o u '
consistently played with the dick, '36; Tom Harrington, '37; John around to the state in which we living
daylights out of those guys!!
are Interested! Thirty.
| Alumni outfit in their yearly tilt.
O'Bryan, '38; John Ryan, '36; Jerry find them today.
I'll be rootin' for ya Sunday.
+
*
*
Amyot, '36; and Paul Bulger, '36.
This group took their plan to
Kay Peterson has let out the InFirst Play-offs Completed
Dr. Donnal V. Smith, who gave his
formation that If there are enough
instant approval, and took the regirls Interested in learning how to
First
round
play-offs
in
the
Wosponsibility of faculty advisor.
men's Athletic Association tennis fence, a class will be formed. There
The plan called for the forma- tournament were completed last will be no charge for the lessons,
Marie Souie
f c h e m room. We wonder 11 Husted tion
of an organization which would night, With twenty-two entrants, it AND—don't rush,
girls—but a
Way back in 1917, the girls were sm elled then like it docs now.
over men's sports and bring would facilitate matters if the girls MAN from RPI is going to do the
members of the Girls' Athletic As- A b o u t 1 9 3 0 GAA wont dramatic, preside
them within reach of every man of played their games on .schedule. teaching.
sociatlon. Twenty-live cent dues T h e y p u t o n a vaudeville show con- the
Formerly, a group Lois Hafley, captain, requests that
were collected from each member j s l s t m g o f a o n e a c t piUy and all knowncollege.
as
the
State
College Trouba- all second round games be played
who received a little GAA pin t o ; t n e trimmings. In 1933 GAA, indors, unofficially took
charge of the by five o'clock Tuesday.
show she belonged. The early GAA collaboration with the Troubadors sports and social life of
the college.
Intramural Council
had lots of spirit-all through 1817, presented the operetta "Patience," Most of the organizers of
new
18, and 19, we read about numerous j w h l c h wafi_ according to the March plan were members of the the
TroubaStarts Fall Sports
gym frolics, gym exhibitions (with 120 issue, a tremendous success,
lennis Tou rnament
dors.
dumb bells) and buses leaving as we
In 1932, Camp Johnston was built
do today from the back door of with money raised by GAA activi- Experiment First
Rugged but spirited play has
Nearing Semi-Finals marked
Draper for Indian Ladder hikes. ties. Since then the camp has been
the opening of Intramural
The first year the new organizaThese girls played tennis, basket- the .scene of many week-end trips tion was called "The Intramural
Council's touch football .schedule.
With the first round of the freshball—hot lnterolass games—swam, and several playdavs
Council." This was In 1934-35, with men tennis tournament completed Potter Club, led by "Tornado"
and hiked extensively.
Feeney, was leading the pack WedAl
Jadick
heading
It
as
Manager,
October, 1937, was a red letter
the earlier part of this week, Art
In March 1921, the GAA constitu- month for GAA. They celebrated
In 1935-36 the new constitution Flax, director of the tourney, ex- nesday as the result of Its two wins
tion was revised and article one their twenty-fifth anniversary with was presented to the student asso- pects to reach the semLflnals to- —the first over the newly-organized
Ha.yles Hall II team by a 20-0 score
changed the name to WAA. How- a big banquet. That same month ciation by Paul Bulger and wasday If at all possible.
and the second over a sadly-depletever, this never became effective, GAA grew up and began calling it- approved,
In this year, Gerald
"The absence of an Indian sum- ed personnel representing KDR,
and the organization continued as self WAA. They also took over part Amyot, now head coach at Cohoes
mer this year," says Flax, "forces 12-0,
GAA.
of Miss Johnston's office for head- High School, was elected the first us to hasten proceedings. We would
Sayles Hall II with three freshFebruary 1923, saw the advent of quarters and began having regular president of the Men's Athletic As- hate to see the finalists frost-bitgirls' intercollegiate basketball. Our meetings and keeping files.
sociation of State College. The con- ten while deckling the champion- men, Joe Taasoni, Stan Gipp and
Dick Beach showing the way broke
girls traveled to Russell Sage and
Since 1938, WAA has Inaugurated stitution which these men drew up ship."
into the win column Wednesday by
beat them 45-32. The next year, we many new sports, especially winter has had little material change since
The comely feminine contestant Slapping down a woefully weak Colwon again from Russell Sage by ones and has set up a program its inception,
of State's Red Raiders came through
House squad, 20-8. College
one point—29-28. In 1926, the score, to include the whole college. Now
The only original members of the witli flying colors in her first match, lege
House had been routed in Its first
after a very good game, was 42-39— playdays with nearby colleges have group who founded MAA, and now
defeating Gordon Baskin by a score
that time in Russell Sage's favor.
replaced Intercollegiate basketball on State faculty are Paul Bulger of fl-0, 6-2. Her next match will be game by a heavy, hard-playing
In 1924, OAA inaugerated a sys- games, and an annual barn dance and Dr. Donnal V. Smith, Smith's with Norman Finer, John Dooley is Kappa Beta team, 43-0.
tem of awards and gave to the girls with MAA has been established. We Interest in sports is still evident in paired with Fran Mullln and Joe Walt Gryzwacz's passing paced
letters for three years of hard-work, don't wear long black stockings, but his attendance at basketball games. Tossonl witli Lou Rablneau. The 8L8 to its 6-0 win over the Ramblers
The Awards Banquet that year was we do have the same spirit that the Bulger was a prominent member of remaining pair of contestants are KDR enjoyed temporary success
Monday when they feated Sayles
served by the freshmen in the girls had then.
all Alumni sports events,
Richard Beach and Stan Gipp,
Hall I, 20-6.
Student Rivalry
Evolves Council
News Morgue Reveals Evolution
Of Women's Sports Regime
Lieut-Colonel
Former Editors
Find Placements
In W i d e Fields
And It Still Goes
—The First Editorial from the First
Majority Fix Upon Pedagogy,Van Kleeck Obtains Position
In Education Department
Since the organization of the
Nrcws In 1916, eleven women and
nineteen men have served in the
capacity of editor-in-cl.ief. There
were co-editors of the NEWS four
times. All of the editors have been
seniors with the exception of the
first editor, Alfred Dedicke, 18,
who was a junior.
The former editors are now engaged in a \ariety of professions.
Eighteen are teaching, one is an
officer in the Education Department, one Ls a lawyer, five are
housewives, and three are doing
other kinds of work.
The
job of piloting
PAGES
the NKWS
ALFRED E. DEDICKE, '18 First Editor
through its first year was given to
Alfred E. Dedicke, '18. Dedicke is i of the STATE COLLEGE NEWS shown here
now a Lieutenant-Colonel in the In- in W o r l d W a r uniform.
fantry stationed with the Civilian
Conservation Corps, Fresno, California.
NEWS JubileeList of Former Editors
The following is a chronological (Continued from page 1, column 5)
list of the other editors and a little ths NKWS, Under his guidance, the
as to what they are doing now: News earned its only All-America
Kathryn Cole, '18, is now Mrs. Allen rating. Van Kleeck was a trailGillett and lives at Longmeadow, blazer; where Dedicke was the!
Massachusetts. Donald M. Tower, George Washington of the NKWS, j
'19, has become the Acting-Presi- Van Kleeck was its Thomas Jef-1
dent of the State Normal School at fer.on. He made use of a highly-1
Oswego. Kenneth P. Holben, '20, isorganized advertising staff, and'
teaching at the Gilman School in through its efforts, the paper's in- j
Baltimore, Maryland. F. Reginald come was almost doubled. Van
Bruce, '21, is a lawyer in New York Kleeck used six-page Issues, pic-1
City. Louise D. Persons, '22, Ls nowtures, cuts, and mats extensively :
Mrs. Arthur Main of Slingerlands. and also intrcduced the idea of ro- •
Robert MacFarlane, '23, has a posi- togravure sections. No editor since
tion at the State Normal School at has approached his ambitious and j
Pittsburgh.
record-breaking achievements. In
Dorothy V. Bennit, '24, is an art his editorship, th3 NKWS received its;
teacher in Albany. Kathleen E. Fur- largest appropriation from the Stu- ,
man, '25, teaches at Fairport, and dent Association, nearly $2700.
j
Harry 8, Godfrey, '26 Is principal
William
Dorrance
and
Edwin
of the school at Youngstown. Dr.
Edwin R. Van Kleeck, '27, is the As- Holstein, present editors, contem-!
sistant Commissioner for Instruc- plate no radical changes in this j
tional Supervision for the New York year's paper. They would like to
State Education Department. Vir- enlarge the paper from its customginia Higgins, '27, is Mrs. James ary four pages to six pages. This
Cullen of Newburgh, housewife. Dr. week's issue, if not the first eightWilliam M. French, '29, is the Dean page paper in the history of the;
of Muskingum College at New Con- NKW.H is at least one of the very
few ever published.
cord, Ohio.
Wolner Now Principal
STATE COLLEGE N E W S —
The committee on publishing a weekly newspaper respectfully
submits to you this, the first issue of the STATE COLLEGE NEWS, opening thus, we believe, a new chapter in the history of State College.
To the many who have been entirely unaware of the coming of this
journal and to those who do not clearly understand its mission we
direct this message.
This great United States of ours was once a small nation. With
a steadily increasing population the boundaries of civilization were
gradually extended, until at last the Republic reached from ocean
to ocean. But the growth of the nation presented a possible danger,
a danger that was threatening the very life of our contry—the
danger of a crumbling nationalism, the danger of a growing sectionalism,the clanger, therefore, of a country divided, of a nation falling
apart.
Then, almost at the crisis, in the march of progress came influences that revolutionized the whole political and economic status
of the Republic. The rails of the railroads and the wires of the
telegraph and telephone were stretched across the fields, the hills,
and the rivers of the land, from the East to the West, from the
North to the South. These bands of metal bound together the
extremes of the country, one with the other, making the hetrogeneity, into which the nation had grown, a solid unit. These
modern agencies of communication brought the millions of our
country into direct touch with one another—made the whole nation
a single political and industrial family.
This great State College of ours was once a small College. With
a steadily increasing number of students, courses and activities were
gradually extended, until today the boundaries of the student-life
inclose stretches from the Chemistry Club to the Promethean
Literary society, from the athletic field to the auditorium, from the
library to the gymnasium, from the senior to the freshman and so
on, from one extreme to the other, touching upon scores of independent groups, each with a different interest and none visibly connected with another. The close observer must discover now the
presence of that same threatening danger in our student-life which
history shows to have once existed in the United States—a decided
trend toward sectionalism and away from centralization. We have
by no means reached a crisis, but there is a great need for some
means by which there can be brought to bear upon our student body
a similar influence to that which is being exerted upon the nation
by the railroads, the telegraph and the telephone. There has
arisen a need for a means of bringing each extreme of our student
life into direct touch with the other, of making this hetrogeneity
into which we have grown a solid unit, a single collegiate family.
What better means than a newspaper, such as the STATE COLLEGE
NKWS to achieve the desired results?
In it will be pictured with insistent regularity and in installments
quickly following one another, the history of each unit of our college
life. In its columns you will feel the pulse beat of the student body.
It will be as a mirror standing at an angle into which a body peering
will not see his own, but rather the image of another.
Thus do we launch this journal on its course, with every confidence
that it fills a long felt want and that its policy:
To make each faction of our student organization know and appreciate all others, to uphold the maintenance of fraternal regard
and friendly rivalry among all, to work for cooperation between
all sections and for the solidification of the now separately wasted
energies in the promotion of a real, distinct, and enthusiastic spirit
of loyalty to State College, will in time do much toward placing the
record of our achievements outside of the classroom on a plane in
keeping with our standing as America's leading teachers college.
(Signed) The Committee of the Class of 1918, on Publishing a
W e e k l y College Newspaper, Alfred E. Dedicke, Chairman
Charter Staff
Member Tells
Story of NEWS
"The present members of the staff
of the STATE COLLEGE NEWS have it
pretty easy compared to the way the
members of the first staff had It."
These were the words spoken at an
interview with Mrs. Amos Prescott,
175 Whitehall Road, Albany. Mrs.
Prescott is the former Lillian Magilton, '18, staff member of the first
NEWS.
The idea of a State College newspaper was born on Moving-Up Day,
May 4, 1916. At this time, in their
class stunt, the class of 1918 presented an allegorical charade called
"A Student's Dream." Written by
Alfred Dedicke, '18, the play expressed the idea that the perfect venture would be the creation of a college newspaper. Dr. Abram Brubacher, then President of the college, was very much impressed with
the skit and called Dedicke the next
day. Dr. Brubacher said that he had
also considered the creation of a
newspaper and that he was willing
to help Dedicke undertake it.
At that time there was no student
tax, and the main problem facing
the students was a financial one.
Dedicke, together with Miss Magilton, found that the cost of one issue would be approximately $38.
At a class meeting on June 2,
which Dr. Brubacher attended, a
committee was appointed with Dedicke as chairman for the purpose
of issuing a newspaper.
The
name
STATE
COLLEGE
NEWS
was chosen principally because of its
briefness, and the first issue a p peared on Friday, October 4, 1916.
The venture was financed with
the sale of subscriptions which sold
for $1.50 a year. Advertisements
were not solicited for the first few
issues. Dr. Harry W. Hastings was
of great assistance from the start
as an advLsor; and instead of the
large, spacious office which the
NEWS now occupies, the small room
beneath the steps in Draper (now
used as a mimeograph room) was
used.
Mrs. Prescott visited the new offices of the NEWS recently and was
favorably impressed by what she
saw: the enlarged offices, the organization, and issues of the NEWS.
Louis J. Wolner, '30, is the prinNEWS Banquet to Reunite Members
cipal of the Homer Academy and
employs only graduates of State
College. Netta Miller, '31, has beO f Former Boards For Silver Jubilee
N E W Y O H K STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
come Mrs. Donald Brown of Grand A W E E K L Y J O U R N A L
Gorge. Dr. George P. Rice, '32, has V O L . I N o . 1
PRICK KIVU CENTS
A L B A N Y , N. Y., OCTOBER I. m o
obtained his doctorate and is a
The Silver Jubilee Banquet will iences on the NIOWH, and his life afmember of the English Department D E A T H 0 1 ' DR. L E O N A R D
Urges! freshnuii Class in
SEVEN
NEW
MEMBERS
ON
commemorate
to the day, the twenty, ter leaving college.
A. HLUE.
at Pennsylvania State College. AlHistory ol Ibe College
The main address of the evening
FACULTY
fifth anniversary of the Inauguravina R. Lewis, '33, is teaching at Wan Prominent Educator and
Crowded College Means That tion
0,1 .in.l ll,.,. ,
of llie STATU COI.MJUK NIOWS. will be given by Dr. Edwin R. Van
New Head ol Cominetcial
Ossining. Marion C, Howard, '31, Authority on I'edarioKy,
Scholaislil|. Test May he
lie ,li,.,,. I,,. I'l
Kleeck, Editor-in-chief of the STATU
Derailment.
Since 191 j Dean ol
Tomorrow former board members CDI.I.ECIIS
Given lu all Candidate.
is now Mrs. Ralph Rclnliar,. of Red
As is c m ,d> Ihr case tins
NKWS in 1926-1927. Dr. Van
Slate College,
lot
Entrance in
new ...llcuc ,,..,, hting, „ , l l ,
Hook.
and the present staff will attend a Kleeck is now the Assistant CommisFuture.
l l is OKI sad dill) to re,,u,l 11 several urn Lues annul]! the
banquet at Jack's Restaurant.
Dan Van Leuvan and Ruth Wil- in this, 1,111 oral, issue llie [acuity Tin- im|ireccilcnted ,|ll..lllie.l I., nil l l . ,
sioner of Education for Industrial
The I'lieiiiinioual (jrnwlll ol
,.[ Ilr Leonard A llluc, fin.will ..I Ihr 1..Ilc,;r dnriiii; ,,,,.,, ,|,.,| huu
Male i iillrgr has received no
liams, '35, are teaching at the Cen- death
Invitations have been sent to all Supervision for the New York State
since Iota the dean <>l Stale llic I.i,l >,... .,.,,1 the . , , - , , , , , ,
. l i c k this .,.,
I In tlir .,,11
tral School In Al'lon and in Mincola I ..ll.'iji' Hi llluc iltcil .11 11 ..I .... .1 's made .111
Department,
1'iolessor Oeoiy.e M Yolk, i i . i i ) . 11 seems .is il 11 hasmembers of the NKWS Board since Education
lie mormon o l
, , , „ . ! .,.1,1.,I Hliurlut, Tins
respectively. Karl D. Ebers, '30, i.'.l...k
1.1
•I
u.,1 I.n
New Head ol Commercial
s i l e n t 1X1I1 ,.t Ins I le m
inauguration of the NEWS In
The
ceremony
of the cutting of
teal's rule,,,.,; il.iss l,.„ mil the
I)c|iiiitineul
loaches at Callicoon. Harry T. Mils my. l i t I1.1.I lieen ill I.11I
•',,,.,.,'.I .,,,, ..I I
I'1.,less,.1
,.,:,• M Viuk
1916'. Many have answered that the birthday cake will be underGumaer, '37. is at Glenfleld. Jean .1 Iris weeks, apiiatcitlly Irum
I"
II.11.1 .
I'l. H
win.
is
1..
Iiusc
i!iali;i'
,1
the
.1 tuMiilcli litcakiliiwu caused
they can not attend because of bus- taken by Dr. Hastings, Dr. Van
1 . in...... ...I Hi-!...
r n l , is .1
Wallace, '38, is now working in Al- '•>
« •"> •'!
o
• I"
Kleeck, William R. Dorrance, Edwin
iness or geographic reasons.
bany. Edgar B. O'Hora and Jean In. .1 - .in.l .lii.ly
was icu.ir.lcl a,
.,
,
„
„
,,
_
,.
J.
Ho stein, and A. Harry Passow.
Strong, '39, leach al Red Hook and 11.' •MIII litelllucleadinc.
rained
I,,
\
ll
rdtl.alutiol
3
Huntington. Leonard E. Kayle, '40, Hi.- .I.n He li.nl iccctvcd a
Dr. Harry w. Hastings, professor
,
I... , . , , ! , . , , , . I . 11 llic I. I..I
IIC||I..IC I. I,.,- uicnil.i'i, leel .11 I1..I1I1 I n n
Is employed at the Remington Arms lll"l ••UH
I I I I - I I I , . , 1 . ll.-,:, I. I.,! ,1,
of English, will serve as Toaslmas-1 Q u e s ^ at the banquet will be Mis.s
was looked ii|
as an an ami like 1 lull llr.ltfi'il mrinlir
.111,1 I.,,,
Company in Utlca. Otto J. Howe, 'I * " " I'l'l-MI"!,')' Mc was .,1.,1,1 l.inuly
I'"
for for the evening. Dr. Hastings^' 1 1 1 " E ' £ e r c o ' P o , ' n ^ ' ' ° e r a » o f
» , , , k ,,l N e w V . u k I
Icl.niii.il.l,. worker, .1
'40, is teaching at Richburg, John .1
Ilr I..,. ., n , l i .mil ,
I 1.11,1
1c.1l.u1s in.Lin ., 1,1
1 ,„„.
,
,„
,
, ,, . „ , , ' Women, Miss Sara T. DeLaney,
Mis. Maty li C0I1I1 New
A. Murray, '41, teaches al Liberty,
I..1111.I I. .11
,• and e»i|.| 11.il
Libra) Ian
I-.
,: I
I,,, M i , I . I.„ il„was also I oastmaster at the 10th, .-,,,„.. o f W o m o l l i M r S i E d w i n V a n
.il.ilu, ... 41 In l i n n .ml in
I'MII'.IM
.\
'
'In
I
Mlll.ll
It.lll
'I lie
i,l, ...II •
In
• m i . i " lie i s . , - I,
.ml .1.1.1
u.i, I ... .ui.l , .,1, m m I
Anniversary banquet.
; K l G e c k , M r s . H arry w . Hastings, and
mvrt .1 new Luc ,,i Ihc 1,1,1,111
.1. .Lull
l i e „ . , , .,,1
,,.
I,,., s e n ,
U I ... I'. I c .
\l,-> M i n I 1 ,1,1- will I.
Ir.id.l HI 1I11 I n n , 1 , M I
Self-introductions will feature the Mr. Marshall Davis, representing
V...I,
I....I. ii|. .. , i l - lir
clim.
id S111ul.it s,l..„.I III.I ilic.c 1I.11I, t., I „,V ill,-, l l „ ,
NEWS Cub Classes
Mir.I .1 | i . . , l i 1, ., I,, i.l , I ll,,.
I 1 1,1,,.,i,
next pari of llie program, Eaehjihe Record Printing and Publishing
l'r-i.l.'
I ll..- l l
Ilil.lr nrr.1 .in.l
I "• MMll.l. i.l D M
I Ihr
,1
I
I'llhli, ML... I. I \\ i l n l „i
member of the former boards will Company, printers of the STATU COLHe.,,, Ll,,, „ , - ., „.„„c ..I
'.' Y I l r i n n 1 „• I there l.u
Are Held Each Week
rlse, give his name, class, exper- I.KOK NEWS.
1,.,. tears isl.ro !„• „ „ , allrd slate 1111.I .
State College News
MM
Cub classes have been started for
NKWS freshmen. The next class
will bo held on Tuesday al 12:00
p. m. In Room 111. Anyone who
wishes to join cub classes should
sign up on Activities Day.
The people who have already signed up lis cubs are as follows: Dominie Mulo, Edna M. Marsh, Hiinna
Cooper, Donald Regan, Robert L.
Peters, Dorothy Meyers, Ruth Blake,
Marlon Mac Galium, Ruth Hines,
Dorothy Gregory, Alice Raynor, Lois
Rablneau, Jane Heath, Lucille Kenny, Kathryn
P. Ryan,
Betty
Sweeney, Hilda Dego, Elsie Whipple,
Lois Drury, Joan Hylind, Mary Sanderson, Florence Oarfull,
Anne
Fritz, Marguertod Bostulck, Mary
Ourran, John Susslna, Jean Berger,
Margaret Pujak, Marie De Ohene,
Caroline Hasbrouek, Catherine M.
Bitterman, Jane Rootli, Barbara
Putnam.
I ll 111 1, III. It ,,,1,1,11
ulnulnl .,, ., I'll It
ml .is I'll M in | »
I. . . . . , •
1
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In I'm.••.•Hi .,1 I In,.,
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lth.ua l u H i m 1 . . . . . he .1.
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I'l.iiu- N V w V i r h r In.,.
Ihr d u e l
I llu 1,11.„i,..,
i,r in Ihr li,,.|i , . l , ..I
l'i.nil While I'l
I"
I,, M i l e l"..|lr,'r , ,,
lluii.kltn I'nl.l,. I ilii.ii, i . , | ,
Hi she I..,in,, had I,,, , .,,
the 1.1.1 nam,,I |,lj,c , I llu
'.,1,1,,,,'. . 1...... a...... j in.l , I
I l l A l t l n i i I! link to Assist
I'm I .- . 1.111.1,. .Hid ,, .,!,..•
III I'a.nlei
lui.it'. "
. ' H i ' llu
Mmlriil
will Le inleleslel
II.,. I I , . .
111.I L-1.nl I . I
I, ,1 llie ,'...
.{,,
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1,1c
Di J V De I'.ule New In 1.11
1.1'.' '',..n. I i n Iowa; I'l..
tisi Ii . l i . s e s w i l l l.c
alrtlttoi id M . I I I K I I I in,-,
..imewhat e e l 1.1 the .111
L
1 in l.i.u.hei toiler,,'
<•'"••» I'l
.',,' | „ l , . „
The Matlirinaii,,
,,,,,,
ilmr
I I n sMiluii l<
ll'il.Vui, l l n i . e i . i i t . I I
,
ol I'...Irs.
nicnl
Ills lies I.I I 1.1 Ill-it, .1, A
,l.v I'ellu*, tT.ik Unnclsily
I N . i nnue unlim
11- lank. I n I V lie I',., 1, It, I'alntei
ami mire H)li Ucau id ,,111 l u r i n g hern c.,,..:,.l , „ , „
1,, , 1,1-s rails 1,1 is.iid the rn-h
mm Stair f'ullr S e I.n Te.111,
•1111.1... Hi 11. I'.ule earned MI l l u . iteiijttiiiriil -ins c, iv I
tn
I),
H i , I te.eiie.l his e.nlv
lilt A II .Irrree al Hie I'.u.ri
At the lime ol h i , dean, illy o| llkl.il,,,,,,, i „ , „ , , ||,. H.iiiilll-- at liiu.iiHI «..a,lrii.,
tlran Hlue wat 47 yean old
Iowa I'lailiialink' f r.jni that
1.11 h
I,'...tut
- - . %/ j e a n uiu 1 came east
east l-.r
hii,- liu.li'iadualc
llie (initial trrvit'C* liiuk platre i,,uk enteiittii lirsl I'liucrlnu tchuiil in I>i4. Ilt4 enleiinv'
('••nlmmri ass, P#(ta ]
Cmlintiio*
Pufi I
I where he tecetvel h i . A M In
M.,,„,„,,,„| |,,|
ll.rl -l.lt, ,
, ,1
MM.I.MI.I
1,1 Mi. [,,,:.,„
11.1.
id
. Ill
I
I.l
srl ted I . I il i .
i . i l u j l , In Hum
i ,1 sctiiiiis
,,,!.!,,,, u h u l i I.i ,,-|-r Willi
ihr authorities have thiail)
made |,l.ins
I l n l is Ihc
Well! " I
ni.-ililinc .
.iildnilli.-di I l n l I. List .ml
mowing us lucent ouallcn
The liusicc- id the college are
Imiiing lu ail I more liind to the
college gftvgnds and to cnlaige.
in lli.t way linllbling facilities
lu the uicinliine however. Pi
l l . i i h . i h n is introducing. In en
rcuiuikcJ en I'igi 5
Front Page Facsimile; Vol. I, No. 1
Compliments
of
MUSIC COUNCIL
PI CAMMA MU
I) & A COUNCIL
NEWMAN CLUB
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASS'N.
MEN'S ATHLETIC ASS'N.
"•jWWLjs.
I
in i iiiBiwniwwiMiwi'fH
PAGE 6
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
State Campus Expands to Accompany Continuous Enrollment Growth
Original Buildings Include
Draper, Hutted, Hawley;
Others Additions Since '27
In 1916 they had a State College,
but they didn't have Page or Richardson or Milne, SCT then consisted only of Draper which housed the
administration offices, the library,
and classrooms; Husted, the science
building; and Hawley, the auditorium and gymnasium. The college
enrollment grew and by 1916, the
auditorium was crammed every
week—there was no library for
"studying"—a schedule of empty
classrooms was published and students spent their free periods in
one of these.
Extensive Planning: in 1919
In 1919 the planning of three new
buildings began. They stood completed in 1927, A faculty committee
suggested naming the new science
and home economics hall, Richardson, the practice school, Milne,
and the auditorium with gymnasium
beneath Page. In 1929, the first class
day program was held in Page Hall.
Hawley, transformed beyond recognition, became the library to which
Draper's books were moved in 1933.
In the meantime, with unrelatA V I E W of the State Normal School at Lodge and Howard Streets, 1 8 4 9 . This
ed group houses springing up, agitation for centralized housing units until a new building was erected in 1 885 on W i l l e t t Street, opposite Washington Park
arose. In 1934, the actual construction of Pierce Hall began. Called
the Alumni Residence Hall or just Fraternity and Sorority Rules Undergo
the "dorm," it was completed September, 1935, although the Ingle
Extensive Change A f t e r Councils A p p e a r
Room was not finished until later.
On the event of the twentyfifth anniversary of the NEWS,
Sara Tod DeLaney, Dean of
Women, extended congratulations to the paper for its service in the past and in anticipation of its service in years to
come. Her complete letter reads:
"The completion of an individual's twenty-fifth year with
an
organization
frequently
marks his approaching retirement, so that it is fitting to
look to the past and to congratulate him upon work well
clone. On the contrary, the
Twenty-fifth Anniversary of
the
WyVrtftW ">>>>VbOl)i.W>W»V
Sayles Hall Completed
Sorority Rushing System
A year ago last spring, the alumni KDR, Potter Originate
property between Ontario and ParInter-fraternity in 1936
Reorganized by Council
tridge Streets again became the
scene of activity—this time in be- Picture State College where, at
"Everybody was so nice to me at
half of State's manhood. Now, Say- the beginning of the year, a popules Hall, the first men's dormitory, lar freshman strolling by a group of first, but oil mamma, I wanna;
and almost the replica of the wo-fraternity men causes no excite- come home now," the freshman girl i
men's dormitory, is a finished pro- ment. A few casual greetings are sobbed after a hectic six weeks at
State. That was back in the years
ject, accommodating 134 men.
made, no more.
before Intersority Council.
Mrs. Farrell's bequest of her That was twenty-five years ago
Freshman
Mobbed
$100,000 mansion across from the when only one fraternity. Kappa
college campus is the latest addition Delta Rho, was in existence. There A Freshman was mobbed from all
to Alumni Association property. The was no rival fraternity to compete sides if she had any talent or beauty.
possibilities of using the mansion for the Prosh and consequently, lit- She had no private life until the
for a Student Union are now being tle or no rushing was done.
final clay of reckoning came when
investigated.
she made her decision under highSecond Fraternity Founded
pressure. After that clay, her
Things changed in 1930 when Ed- "friends" disappeared one by one
ward Eldred Potter Club was and only her sorority sisters were
First M y s k a n i a
founded. Rushing was taken more left to console her.
and the in-coming students
Dean Anna E. Pierce was among
O f H u m b l e Birth seriously
found themselves drafted into one tire first to understand the plight
fraternity or the other. Thus, in of the Prosh. Intersorority CounIt was just another student as- 1936, it became necessary for the cil
established. The following
sembly. A few people were listening two fraternities to meet and form yearwas
published its first rushing
to Dr. Brubacher, but for the most an Interfraternity Council which rules. itNo
rushing of any type
part it was a disinterested audience. would keep all rushing clean.
could be carried on until second
Students were whispering, doing In the spring of 1938, Kappa Beta semester
with the exception of the
homework, thinking about the com- was admitted as the third member first ten clays
of school.
ing week-end. Then Professor Walk- of the council and in the fall of that
er rose and walked solemnly across year, Sigma Lambda Sigma was ac- Eligibility List
The second rule was not quite as
the platform. There was a momen- cepted as the fourth.
tary hush as he slowly called out Interfraternity Council consists drastic, but It managed to cause
the names: Kolln Hager, Mildred of representatives, two seniors and quite a commotion at State. One D
Lawerence, Edith Wallace, etc. . . . one junior from each fraternity. was enough to keep any girl off the j
Thus was the first Myskania an- The four offices of the Council ro- list of eligibles that wa,s submitted
nounced.
tate among the four fraternities. by the faculty.
Intersorority Tea was later inFrom Small Beginnings
Rushing
Rules
Changed
stituted.
In November the girls met,
Who would think now that the
tea, ate cookies and parted
dignified and majestic Myskania Only a few changes have been drank
headaches and sore feet. Alhad such humble beginnings? Today made in the original rushing rules. with
not much was accomplished,
the tapping of Myskania Is the most The tired freshman can no longer itthough
was an annual event until reimportant part of the Moving-Up sleep In a fraternity bed for a placed
by Open House two years
night, it was decided. Between two
Day program.
and seven In the morning, the fresh- ago.
There was no pomp or ceremony men are not allowed in the frawhen the first Myskania was an-ternity houses. The Council also
nounced. There was no excitement supervises the time when bids are
or eager expectation on the part to be given and returned.
of the student body on that day in
April, 1017. Ml.ss Wallace, who The fostering of social and athleteaches In State College today, was tic activities in order to promote
a member of the first Myskania, good feeling among the fraternities
and she wasn't even there when the has also been a major purpose of
names were announced. No one the council.
realized what a memorable clay It
was. No one foresaw what an im- NEWS May Hear Harp
portant part Myskania was to play
At Future Celebrations
in the future life of State College.
Courtesy Knicla rhaoker Ncwn
building Housed the N ormal School
near Madison Avenue.
STATU COLLECIE NEWS
is
Congratulates the NEWS on 25 Years of Service
to the College
D. J E O N E Y ,
PROP.
BOULEVARD
DIAL
5-1913
CAFETERIA
AVENUE
ALBANY.
N . Y.
WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH
YOUR LAUNDRY THIS
STATU COI.I.KIIM NKWH. This
oc-
curred when the NBWH was a
mere Infant of ten.
Nothing
Else So Good
la So Good
For You
Numerous Administrators Reign
The twinkle in Dean Milton
G. Nelson's blue eyes is clearly
apparent in his letter compli-
Since Establishment of NEWS
menting the STATE COLLEGE NEWS
house for men. Miss Pierce
During the twenty-five years of group
herself ran a group house for wothe NEWS' existence there have been men.
many changes in the administration
STATE COLLECIE NEWS on the
of State College. In 1916, the first Succeeding Miss Pierce at the
occasion of its being twenty-five year of the publication of the NEWS, post of Dean of Women was Miss
Though the STATU COU.HOK NEWS
The Pedagogue proceeded the
years young.
has retained the name it was given NEWS by 10 years ,but its progress
Dr. Abram R. Brubacher was presi- Helen Hall Moreland, who also deat its founding, the Statesman is has been less continuous, because
"For twenty-five years the dent, Dr. Harlan Horner, Dean, and voted herself unselfishly to the betterment of housing conditions for
the result of an evolutionary pro- after the first book in 1900, publicaSTATU COLLECIE NEWS has made
cess. The title and character of the tion was discontinued for several student opinion vocal, and has Miss Anna E. Pierce, Dean of Wo- students. She continued and improved the co-operative houses
magazine have changed considerably years. It wasn't until 1912 that the
played its part in directing the men.
since 1892.
college
student body toward
One of the most loved of all fig- started by Miss Pierce. She was
name Pedagogue was applied.
group accomplishment through
ures that have been in the college interested in all student affairs, and
The Statesman evolved from n
The Pedagogue's predecessor, the
deeds and not through words was Dr. Brubacher. Always work- spent a large part of her time with
combination literary magazine and Neon, was published in 1900 with
alone; in truth, the STATE COLcollege newspaper founded in 1892William Ranney, '00, as editor-ining for the good of State College students in their own homes. A
LBQE
NEWS
is
not
so
much
a
colcalled the Normal College Echo.
and
its students, perhaps his big- tall, statuesque person, always perchief. Dedicated to Dr. William
fectly groomed, it was her personal
gest contribution was getting State appearance
From
this magazine grew the James Milne, then president of the lege newspaper as it is the Colalways impressed
lege itself. May the next twenSTATE COLLUDE NEWS, the Echo, the college, the Neon was an enterpristransformed from a normal to a lib- a student onthat
first
meeting her.
ty-five
years
be
ever
younger
Pedagogue, and the Lion.
eral arts college. Without him,
ing little book including pictures of
in
spirit
and
even
more
successWhen the NEWS came into exis- the faculty, seniors, classes, and frathere would never have been a Dr. Metzler was the successor to
tence in 1916, the news department ternities, a literary section, and an ful in leading the student body Men's Athletic Association. Under Dr. Horner as Dean. Fundamentally
to
high
accomplishments."
was abandoned and the Echo spe- activities section.
him, the Richardson, Page, and a scholar, he did a great deal in
cialized more in stories, essays,
Milne buildings were added to the raising the scholastic standing of
plays, and poems. Although renamed Failure of 'Neon'
State.
college.
the College Quarterly in 1918, the But the Neon failed financially, Futterer Inaugurates
Until the time when he left to The present administrative staff
old title was resumed in 1929.
and no other class attempted a
become
Associate Commissioner of is headed by Dr. John M. Sayles,
yearbook
until
1911
when
Our
Bonk
In 1926, another magazine, the
Education.
Dr. Horner acted as acting president, noted for his longO
f
D
&
A
Society
Lion appeared at Christmas time. was published under the leadership
Dean.
He
was
more than well lik- range building program. Miss Sara
Both of these magazines flourished of Helen Bennett. It was mostly
ed
by
the
students,
who were in- T. DeLaney, Dean of Women, is the
until May, 1939, when the student written material with few pictures. The opportunity for State College stantly put at ease by
winning motivating force behind the reform
body voted to combine the two toSince then the book has been pub- students to see the best in enter- personality and ready hissense
of in the college social program. Dr.
form one magazine, the Statesman. lished regularly.
tainment did not always exist, for of humor. With Dr. Brubacher, he Milton G. Nelson, perhaps the closThe boards of both magazines, conThe newly-named Pedagogue of twenty years ago, outside of occas- served
on the board of directors est friend of all the students, is
solidated into one unit, announced 1912 was a photographic issue. The ional plays presented by various that added
Dean of Students.
the new buildings.
that the Statesman would feature 1918 book contained an honor r o l l - dramatic groups, there was no speMiss
Pierce
probably
did
more
tocommentaries, editorials, stories, happily discontinued since then! cial organization designed for sponarticles, poems, and humor.
One year later the annual was dedi- soring this form of creative ability. ward the improvement of student
The first issue of the Statesman cated to Theodore Roosevelt. 1922
A newcomer to the State Faculty housing conditions than anyone
with Harriet Sprague and Marcia found the Ped campaigning for a in 1920, Miss Agnes Futterer con- connected with State. She was the
FROM
of the housing inspection
Brown as co-editors, appeared dur- State College dormitory.
ceived the idea for a dramatic and instigator
Her favorite belief was coing Thanksgiving week, 1931. Mil- Student Tax Included 'Ped'
arts society, formed from a collabor- plan.
BILL
MATHEWS,
'42
housing. She and Mr.
dred Kirschenblum, 1940 editor,
ation of dramatic groups and artoperative
Up
until
1939,
the
Pedagogue
was
Hidley,
of
the
social
studies
deYOU
CAN
GET
IT
ANYTHING
ON WAX
campaigned for improved covers. For
students, the former to perform in
this year, the Statesman has Mary procured by individual orders plac- the plays, the latter to aid in stage- partment, started College House, a
ed in the fall. That year the student craft.
Klein as its editor.
tax was increased to $12 per stuThe first plays presented were
including $1 assessment for
Alumni Praise NEWS Record dent
amazingly successful and from the
the Ped.
The 1940 yearbook bade farewell second play a profit of $300 was re"The alumni are always with
to formality with an innovation in ceived.
us." Yes, it's true; even with
the line of informal pictures. Last
the passing of a quarter of a
year's Pedagogue, staff produced a
century by the NEWS, the gradbook "as sophisticated as possiuates remember. Their conble." Senior write-ups, reduced to
gratulations are expressed by
bare essentials, produced quite a
Mrs. Bertha E. Brimmer, Excontrast to those of 1914. The Peda- Successor to the Lion and Echo
ecutive Secretary of the Alumni
gogue has improved not only in
Association:
COLLEGE QUARTERLY
size and volume, but in skill, in
"Many alumni associations
workmanship and appeal.
have publicity departments.
'Lion' and 'Echo' Joined
'Pedagogue' Predecessor
To Produce 'Statesman'
Of NEWS by 16 Years
on its twenty-fifth birthday:
"I am happy to have this opportunity to congratulate the
Buy your Records
from the
YEAR?...
STATU
COIXIMIG
NEWS
Greeks
Kappa Delta
has
filled that need for our alumni
association. For its splendid
cooperation both for news items
and educational items we are
very appreciative. We wish
for the NEWS another twentyfive years of growth and prosperity."
Congratulations
TO THE N E W S
. . .
Affirmative Congratulations
for a
Debatable Career
FROM THE
Psi Gamma
Debate Council
Hollywood Barber Shop
Chi Sigma Theta
COMPLIMENTS
THE
FORUM
Waterville Laundry
Congratulates the NEWS
Inc.
Congratulations
Twenty-five
Happy Birthday
From . . .
ONE
It) the
State College News
Gamma Kappa Phi
Yearn of
College Paper
SIDE OF THE OFFICE
.
Beta /eta
. .
TO THE O T H E R
Phi Delta
CONG RATI' LATIONS
FROM THE
ON 25 YEARS OF" GOOD
S. G. A.
Alpha Epsilon Phi
Publishing a Successful
NEWS
from
State College Co-op.
THE PED
Kappa Delta Kbo
ANNEX
CREAM
Result of Evolutionary Process
The
At the
"Dear Editor:
Again let me offer my congratulations to the State College News, this time on its silver
anniversary. I can do no better
than repeat what I said on an
earlier occasion, namely, that if
I am not able to help you cole
brato your golden and diamond
Jubilees, I hope to furnish an
obllgato accompaniment on the
harp,
Truly yours,
Harry W. Hastings."
Once before, Dr. Harry W.
Hastings, Professor of English,
has had occasion to extend a
congratulatory message to the
'25 Years Young'—Nelson
®Itr §tatpama«
50c
You'll find
Second Tapping Cruel
Shades of Captain Klcld I The tapping of the second Myskania was almost cruel. While a pianist played
vigorous music, the entire Junior
class marched across the stage, and
as they passed by, the out-going
Myskania pulled out of line those
chosen to be on the in-coming Myskania. (Imagine the feelings of the
Juniors who hud expected to be
tapped as they marched back to
their seats.) That was adding InJury to Insult. The next year the
present method was inaugurated.,
The early Myskania were chosen
by the faculty and out-going Myskania, Since 1020, however, the faculty has had no voice in choosing
members. The student body elects
three members, the rest being chosen by the out-going; oounoll,
Present College Publications
PAGE 7
GREETINGS
TRY OCR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
198-200 CENTRAL
a
twenty-fifth birthday, an occasion on which it is fitting to
congratulate the staff not so
much upon its past achievements but upon the opportunities it will have in the future
for even greater service to the
College. Reliable reporting, unbiased presentation of facts, intelligent and dependable expression of student opinion, service
to the best interest of the College—for these we shall look to
the NBWH as it begins its second
quarter-century.
Myskania
GEORGE
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941
Future Service Destiny
Of the NEWS—DeLaney
Conrtuy of Dartmouth "Jack-o-LanUrn"
A better method is to send it home regularly by RAILWAY EXPRESS—and have it returned the same way.
Our service is fast, sure—and convenient. Economical
rates include pick-up and delivery at no extra charge
within our regular vehicle limits in all cities and principal towns. Your choice of prepaid or collect charges.
Just as convenient too, for 'most any shipment:
Baggage, gifts, cake or a pet elephant.
RAI LWAlgikEXPR ESS
NATION-WIDE
RAIl-AIR
SERVICE
COMPLIMENTS C)F . . . .
Congratulations . .
Edward Eldred Potter Club
BILL GRATTAN
—ana- •
HIS ORCHESTRA
on 25 yours of
kappa
Beta
interesting' and informative
Kl'l'VilT
¥
STATE G0LLECE
CAFETERIA
Sigma Lamba Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS . . . .
to the STATE COLLEGE NEWS
•
SAYLES HALL
NEWMAN HALL
PIERCE HALL
THOMAS MORE HOUSE
COLLEGE HOUSE
:
• : • • ' i ' ^ j j=a..-'
•.;.•:'*'•.:
Jr
c
*tf*
PAGE!
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1941
Farrell Mansion Hicks Lauds Choice of Regents;
Former Student u , e d Boo'< Exchange
Has Successful Year
May Open A s
Escapes Injury The figures on the Student AssocEarned Degree Under Stoddard
by Janet Baxter
Reports have been received by iation's Used Book Exchange, just
"Undoubtedly the most stimulating |
Students'Union teacher
Robert
G. Rich, Menands, confirm- released by Chairman Rita Hickey,
I have ever worked under,"
was the comment of Dr. J. Allan
Hicks, Professor of Guidance, when
questioned about the personality of
Dr. George D. Stoddard, recently
appointed Commissioner of Education of New York State. Dr. Hicks
If the financial problem can be wrote his doctor's thesis under the
solved this fall, the Farrell Man- direction of Dr. Stoddard at the
sion will be opened in January as University of Iowa.
Dr. Hicks went on to describe
State College's official student union, President John M. Sayles stat- Stoddard as a brilliant and original
ed this week. The possibility of person, with the ability to talk and
creating such a union has been write interestingly. "The students
made more feasible by the recent all liked him. He was straightgift of Mrs. Margaret Brady Farrell forward, human and thoroughly
of the Western Avenue mansion lo-1 democratic." Dr. Stoddard is no
cated directly opposite the college. traditionalist, but neither is he a
radical, Dr. Hicks explained. He
Finance is the principal stumb- ,
n as i d e a s a i l d w a s t e s n o t l m e
ling block opposing efforts to take ,
Putti"8
immediate action on the plan. t h e m t o w o r k - Anyone who has
"Eight thousand dollars," Dr. Sayles j worked on any committees with him
explained, "would be necessary b e - ' w i n testify to his administrative
fore it could be used." Maintenance ability and the direct way he goes
of the union would necessitate a t o t h e P ° i n t o f a Problem.
$4,000 income. The many expenses
The Board of Regents has done a
incurred in maintaining such an es- commendable piece of work in the
tablishment include heating, light-1 selection of Dr. Stoddard, Hicks being, insurance costs, and payment j lieves. Besides a wide scientific
of a caretaker and a resident dean, background, Stoddard is an accomA logical solution to the financial I Pasted statistician and well-ground,
problem is student taxation of $5 e d l n t h e n d d o f f i n e a r t s - T n i s
per student each year. "Since j enables him to appreciate fully the
Courtesy Knickerbocker News
the students are the ones who will J f i n e a r t s aspects of the teacherNew Commissioner Stoddaid
benefit by the union, they should | training program.
be among those who will bear the His life illustrates his ability. Born
burden of expense." Dr. Sayles said, in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, on
As an alternative, activities a n . October 8, 1897, he received his A.B
appropriation could be pared down degree from Pennsylvania Stale
to save $5,000 as student leaders College and studied at the Univershave repeatedly stated that the as- ity of Paris. The University of
sociation budget is sufficiently pad- Ioofw a conferred upon him the degree
ded. So far, there have been no i doctor, and later made him a staff
The twelfth annual Activities Day
definite steps taken toward an ac- member. He was made dean of the program
will begin tomorrow with
tual program of procedure, but Dr. graduate school in 193G.
the registration for extra-class activSayles said that there would be a
In addition to his prowess in the
by the class of 1945 from 9 to
faculty committee appointed to in- field of education, Dr. Stoddard has ities
12 A. M. in the Commons.
vestigate all angles.
made a name for himself as a writer
Last Monday at the orientation
of psychology and education books.
When Stoddard came to State Col- class, the freshmen were informally
by representatives of each
EMILJ. NAGENGAST lege several years ago as a member addressed
of a committee from the American activity of the college extra-class
Association of Colleges and Univer- program. The Committee feels that
YOUR COLLEGE FLORIST
through the use of this system, the
sities, he visited Dr. Hicks.
freshmen will sign up for only those
(ED.
NOTB:
The
State
Commissioner
Corner Ontario at Benson St.
they feel they can handle.
of Education has full administrative activities
will eliminate many of the overpower over all state-owned colleges.i This
burdened extra-class programs of
past years.
The program for the afternoon
will feature dancing in the Commons from 2 to 5 P. M.
Herb Monette, Prop.
At night, the traditional bonfire
and sing will be held followed by
dancing in the Ingle Room of Pa rce
Hall from 9 to 12 P. M. The bonfire will take place in the field between the two dormitories.
The committee handling all phases
of the Activities Day program inPLENTY OF
234 Central Ave.
cludes Henry Brauner, '42, general
W E NEVER
chairman; Mary Susan Wing, '42.
PARKING SPACE
Albany, N. Y.
CLOSE
arrangements; Howard Lynch. '43
music; and George Kmr/, '43, singing.
Sayles States House to Open
If Student Finances A l l o w ;
Tax Probably Necessary
Frosh to Make
Activity Choice
Morris Diner
40c and 45c Dinners
ing newspaper dispatches that his '43, reveal that another successful
son, Robert G. Rich, Jr., a former year of service to the student body
State College student, escaped in- has been completed. The report is
jury when he and 12 others bailed comparable to that of last year,
out from a falling Navy bombing when five dollars profit was turned
plane into the Carribean Sea. Three over to the treasurer of Student
Association.
W'»re drowned.
Those who served on the exchange
Rich who is a civilian employe of
the Navy was returning to Antiqua with Hickey were: Alma Jewell, '43,
Graham Duncan, Art Cornwell,
air-base after a brief vacation with Adele Bucci, sophomores; and Lu_
his parents in Menands. Exactly cille Gerg, Zollie Privett, and Prank
what happened is not known, but
something went wrong with the en- I Woodruth, freshmen.
gine of the plane as it neared the I T h i s exchange is a comparatively
Dutch West Indies island of San \ recent innovation, having been starter, three
'38. v s a l ' s a 6 ° by Dorothy Lash
Eurtatious, about 100 miles southeast ecl
of San Juan, Puerto Rico.
There were 14 persons in the
Debate Announces Tryouts
plane, four of whom were civilians
Freshman tryouts for Debate were
including Rich. Thirteen bailed out
and all but three were rescued. The announced to take place next Thurspilot of the bomber managed to day at 3:30 P. M. in Room 20. All
make a safe landing, after he had freshmen who try out are required
to prepare a five minute speech on
lost his human cargo.
Rich lived in Albany for 12 years. the subject; "Resolved: that defense
coming here with his parents from industries .should be financed by
New York where he was born. He taxation rather than borrowing."
was educated in Albany schools and
attended State College for one year
HOLLYHOCK HOLLOW
is a member of the class of '43. At
MILK-FED SPRING CHICKENS
State College he became interested
4 to fi Lb. Average
in the study of Spanish. Last NoEXCEPTIONALLY CHOICE. .. MEATY
vember he went to Puerto Rico where
AND TENDER
he was employed by the Navy. He
Individual orders 32c lb. Dressed
worked there for a while and was
later transferred to Antiqua, Rich
and Delivered- -Special low prices
Is a brother of Marilyn Rich, '43.
for quantity orders by group
houses
Commerce Club Meets October 8
ROBERT
The first regular meeting of the
Commerce Club will be held in
••oom 208, Draper, at 3:30 P. M on
Wednesday. October 8. according to
Helen Krizka, president of the club.
The program includes a speech
of welcome to the new members and
the presentation of plans for the
coming year.
Honikel's
Pharmacy
157 CENTRAL AVENUE
LUNCHEONETTE
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&
FINISHING
PLATES 2 0 c AND UP
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DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
HOME MADE ICE CREAM
7 : 3 0 A. M. TO 1 1 : 0 0 P. M.
9 A.M. - 11 P.M.
PHONE 4 - 2 0 3 6
OPPOSITE THE HIGH SCHOOL
THE ALBAN ICE(REAM & DONUTSHOITE
2 0 3 CENTRAL AVENUE
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M A Y W E S E E You S O M E T I M E I N T H E N E A R
FUTURE
H. H O R T O N , Inc
B R I N G T H E GANG TO . . . .
BOWL
The Playdium
Ontario - Park Ave.
Where All State Students Meet for
GOOD FOOD
Special Bowling Rates for Students Afternoons
PHONE FOB RESERVATIONS
We Cater to Parties and Banquets
8-9021
Sandwich & Ice Cream Bar
HOME-MADE ICE CREAM
SANDWICH
AT
GOOD BOWLING
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410 BROADWAY
ALBANY, N. Y.
LUNCHES
137 Central Ave,
Albany, N. Y.
The complete kitchen equipment,
TRADE AT
YOUR
COLLEGE
HABERDASHER
CSNAPPY
MEN'S
SHOP
china, .silver, glassware, utensils,
etc., for the new Men's Dormitory
furnished and installed by us.
"Kveything At One Place'
MANHATTAN SHIRTS
A D A M HATS
F A L L STYLES
117 8 PEARL
221 CENTRAL AVE.
RlENOW
Phone: 8-1281 or 8-1282
Z-443
Myskania Helps
In Constructing
Discussion Plan
Students, Faculty to Cooperate
For Considering Questions
About Student Affairs
esc
ews
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10,1941
Possible Expulsion May
Confront Tax Defaulters
Nimble-Fingered Piano Duo-
"The situation arising f r o m
the low sale of student tax
tickets remains the same," Edward L. Cooper, faculty advisor
to the Student Board of Finance,
stated this week. There will be
a further waiting period during
which students who have not
purchased their tickets may do
so before any cut or other such
move will be made.
A list of non-payees has been
turned over to the Dean of Women's office. A possibility that
these students may bo dropped
from college is being considered.
1916
1941
VOL. XXVI, NO. 4
State|To Hear
Famed Pianists
In Duo Concert
Fray, Braggiotti W i l l Render
Novel Type of Concert;
Duo Pianist Pioneers
Music Council will present t h e
Unprecedented action was taken
world-famed piano duo, Jaques Fray
by Myskania, senior leadership soand Mario Braggiotti in the counciety, in a meeting with Dr. John M.
cil's initial concert on Wednesday
Sayles, President of the College,
at 8:30 P.M. in the auditorium of
last Tuesday, when the body and
Albany High School. They bring
the administration pledged "all-out"
to State College students a new
cooperation in settlement of probtype of program, ranging from the
lems of student affairs, and took
classics of Bach to the more modsteps toward setting up a mechaniern melodies of George Gershwin.
cal means for such cooperation.
FRAY AND BRAGGIOTTI, renowned European artists, who will give concert Fray and Braggiotti have perThe new program provides for a
formed before crowned heads in
discussion committee composed of
here Wednesday in Albany High School Auditorium,
Europe, winning international fame
twenty-one student leaders and
by their nimble lingers. The duo
from six to ten faculty and adminwas formed in Paris eleven years ago
istration members. This group inFerris Initiates Plan to Allow
at the French Conservatory, where
College
Classes
Cancelled
cludes the President of the College
the two artists merged their talent
Easier Voting by Students,and the Dean of Women. Dr. Sayand pioneered in the field of duoCollege classes will not meet
Must A p p l y in Draper
les has offered to chairman the dispianism.
on Monday and Tuesday. The
cussions if the committee feels that
Ability Widely Acclaimed
recess
has
been
granted
behis services will be required.
The Forum of Politics is sponsor,
cause of a meeting of the AsTheir debut at the Salle Plevel in
Source of Information
lng a system whereby students elisociation of Teachers of ColAccording to Myskania, the pur- gible to vote but residing away from
As a result of a recommendation Paris in 1928 showed the many poslege and Normal School faby Myskania, Student Council will sibilities open to twenty talented
pose of the move is to create an I i l o m e m a y procure absentee ballots
culties of the State of New
introduce in today's assembly a fingers working in unison. They ininformation source upon which to a t l h e c0Uege for the state elections
York
at
Buffalo
which
the
resolution for an appropriation to troduced humor to the concert stage
rely for constructive actions tend- Tuesday, November 4
members of the faculty of
pay for the services of an auditor in 1930 when they rocked the auing toward a better student-faculty
Due to the inability of most stuState College will attend.
who will periodically examine the dience a t Carnegie Hall in New
relationship.
dents to go home November 4, Fredbooks of all Student Association or- York City with take-offs on famous
The committee will have no pow- erick Ferris, '42, speaker of the
ganizations. This resoluton was pre- composers using Yankee Doodle as
er of action, merely that of recom- Forum, consulted with the Albany
ceded by a suggestion from My- the principal theme.
mendation.
County Board of Elections in order
skania that Student Board of FinNewspaper critics are unanimous
This singular step has not been to institute a more convenient sysance determine the possibilities of in their praise of the two. Jeanette
made with the idea of increasing tem of absentee voting for college
setting up a uniform system of Ryerson, '42, President of Music
the participation of the faculty in students. The procedure to be tried
bookkeeping for all organizations. Council, said: "I think we're pretty
matters of student government. It this year is the result.
is an action initiated by the stuA Myskania spokesman explained lucky, having a chance to hear two
Students residing in towns with a
Debate
Council
at
its
last
meetdents, for the students, for the bet- population less than 5,000 are not
that
the proposed plan to stand- such good performers. Their proterment of their college life, and required to register personally at ing released lhe names of its new ardize the bookkeeping system has gram-Jias lote of appeal for everythe welfare of State as a whole, their local boards. However, they memb.rs. They are: Lois HaTnpel, for its purpose the elimination of body—from lovers of the classics to
Joseph Higgins, Bernard Skolsky,
Myskania declared.
must secure an affidavit of absen- Marian Sovik, Harry Wurtz, and budget padding. The system will al- jitterbugs and swing fans. Why,
Members of Committee
so stop the "prevalent practice of even Joe Levin—athletic, mascutee voting and apply for a ballot Shirley Wurz.
keeping records on scraps of paper line Joe—says he can't wait for the
The committee in the proposed before October 18 at the table which
The names of the members of frosh
fifteenth to roll 'round—(he heard
program will be composed of the will be in the lower corridor of squad are Sinna Cooper, Miriam or of not keeping records at all." them last year here in Albany) and
editors of all publications, Lhe presi- Draper. These applications must Quinlan, Samuel Scolt, and Basilio This lack of competence has pre- Perlman will give you the opinion
vented Finance Board from accurdents of the four classes, the vice- then be mailed to the students' lo- Triscari.
ately tabulating expenditures and of the other group. Anyway, see
presidents of the freshman and cal boards of elections.
Ira Hirsh, '42, President of Debate
Joe and Bernie for incentive, then
sophomore classes, and the heads of
Those students who live in towns Council has stated that every other losses. A standard system will keep come yourself and see why they're
all other major organizations. In with populations above 5,000 or in week intramural debates will be a check on the finances of every so enthusiastic!"
addition to Dr. Sayles and Dean cities other than New York City held, one of which will be schedul- organization; in addition the audit
DeLaney, six to ten faculty mem- must register in person at their ed for assembly. "However," Mr. will provide a basis for the determ- Tax Holders Admitted Free
bers invited by Myskania will com- local boards of elections, October Hirsh said, "Debate Council has re- ing of all future budgets.
Holders of student tax tickets
prise the discussion committee.
10, 11, 17, or 18. They must also ceived no challenges! I should like
Another resolution will be intro- may see the concert free of charge.
Aside from the fact that the pro- have obtained an affidavit of ab- to see such challenges as Cooper duced in today's assembly by Mil- General admission to others is sevposed program is unprecedented in sentee voting and filled out an ap- House vs. College House, Pierce dred Mattice, '43, Secretary of Mu- enty-five cents, with reserved seats
the history of the college, this also plication for a ballot at the table Hall vs. Sayles Hall, a sorority vs. sic Council. The resolution is: Re- selling for $1.10.
marks the first time that Myskania j in Draper by October 18. The table a fraternity or another sorority, solved: That a committee of three General chairman of the concert
has disclosed any action taken in will be up from 9 A.M. to 3:30 one publication vs. another publi- members, one from the Sophomore, Is Jeanette Ryerson, and assisting
its private meetings.
I P. M. every day until October 18. cation."
Junior and Senior classes, acting her are: George Kunz, '43, Max
Seminars will begin Thursday, at until they graduate, be appointed by Reeves, Bernard Perlman and Alwhich topics for research will be Student Council to set up an or- berta Lee, seniors, publicity; Ira
chosen. Forum will meet Debate chestra agency whose duties shall Hirsch, '42, and Jean MacAllister,
Council on a topic to be announced be lo: ill get the orchestras for all 43, printing; Mildred Mattice, '43
class dances and (2) to act in an and Carmelina Losurdo, '44, freshat, a. later date.
advisory capacity for all other man tryouts; and Florence HalThis
year
the
varsity
squad
will
/
breich, '42, finances.
have Mr. Louis Jones as coach, with school organizations.
By Janet Baxter
and Bill Grattan and their bands Hirsh as assistant. Miss Vivian
Maybe it's not the first time in furnishing the "mosta of the besta" Hopkins will coach the freshman
the history of State College that an in swing rhythm. Couples may squad assisted by Glen Walrath,
All-Slate dance has been held, but "commute" between the two dorms '42. At a conference of debate coachthe idea is new enough for Paul throughout the evening. Nine o'clock es al Syracuse lasl week, which Mr.
Merrltt, '42, General Chairman of starts the jive jumping, with one Jones attended, topics on the most
the event, to dub it "the
o'clock set as the witch- Important political and international problems were decided upon for
biggest and best thing
ing hour of parting.
By Andrew Takas
<
that ever hit State ColWith members of all debate squads.
Recipients of disturbed letters will be necessary to have a stateThe Council has planned Inter- from their parenUs at home, Slate ment from you covering lliat partilege." For the last three
four classes putting forth
years, the big fall social
tin ir best efforts to make collegiate debates which include a College women this week found the cular absence."
Misinterpreting the letter as a
event has been Senior
Hie dance a memorable western trip on which the squad will reason In a misunderstanding of a
Hop, but the decision to
occasion, a big evening debate at Cornell, Hobart, Wells, form letter sent lo the homes of all personal warning of the misbehavseems ID be ahead. Presi- Keuka, and William Smith; and a the women of the college by the ior of their daughter, many parents
make the dunce a fourdent of the Senior Class, southern trip which include; de- Dean of Women, Sara Tod DeLaney. immediately sent letters to Albany
class affair may prove
Merrltt, holds the com- bates at Queens College, Fordham, On September 29, Dean DeLaney inquiring as to the meaning of the
better yet. It should at
Dean's message.
mittee reins, with the anil Hofstra.
least bring out a better
released a letter explaining thai
Vice-Presidents of lhe
crowd, since It Is every
written permission from home was One freshman received a note from
other
classes
lending
student's dance.
required every lime that a college her mother saying,
mental, moral and physi- Pedagogue Plans
"I have always trusted you durFour years ago, the
woman desired lo spend a night or
cal support. Marge GayClass of !i)41 held an
a weekend away from her official ing your high school years, and now
lord,
'42,
has
charge
of
you are on your own. Can't you take
All - State dance, thus
Paul Merrltt
Photos, Cub Classes residence.
programs; Millie Multicc.
care of yourself, Are you going
planting the seed of an
In
part,
the
Dean's
letter
read:
idea which takes root again today. '43, Is handling the publicity angle,
The Pvdayoynv photographer will
"Women students who do not live astray?"
With the present committees gun- while 44's Rich Young will take cure take individual pictures in the room With their parents or other members The personal interpretation apning for a crowd of at least 200 cou- of lhe music makers.
oil the Annex through the week of their family must secure permis- plied by many parents lo the form
ples, this year's dance may well
In addition lo the appealing fea- tiding October 24. There is a sche- sion from their Head Resident or letter is clearly brought out by this
surpass its predecessor.
tures of price, semi-formal dress, dule of appointments on the main House Mother for all overnight ab- letter from the father of a senior:
The fact that All-State dance is i wo clever bands and four-class bullet in board,
sences , . . It is necessary that
"Sara T. DeLaney, Dean of Wosemi-formal will register with many participation, lhe All-State dance
Shirley Kyle urges all seniors to these persons know that the absence men, senl us a letter referring to
students. The price factor must not i marks the first time that an evening have their pictures taken as soon meets with the approval of the overnight absence at college. Why
be overlooked either; tickets are dance sponsored by Stale's classes as possible so that they may have student's parents and such approval is the Dean writing to us about your
to be sold for one dollar plus ten ' bus been held in the dorm.
Ihem for the SEB applications. The should be sent in writing directly to staying overnight? We don't know
the pictures are taken, lhe the person in charge of the house why she had any reason to call our
cents lax, tints putting them withThe administration of State Col- sooner
where your daughter is living. . . . attention to this matter. We and
in the reach (or pocketbook) of I lege has professed itself as being sooner the proofs will be ready.
A
short
meeting
of
all
sophomores
" . . . For all overnight visits to you know that you aren't supposed
every Stale man.
very enthusiastic about lhe dance.
Pierce and Sayles Halls will be With the official seal of approval on and freshmen who signed up to men's colleges or to the homes of lo stay out late or to stay overnight
the scene of the dance when Octo- the undertaking, nothing seems to work on the Pedat/Quue will bo held men students, or for trips on which at any time or place.
at noon today in Room 28.
the student will stay in a hotel, It
ber 31st rolls around, with Bob Beid be lacking lor a perfect evening.
"Please let us know at once."
Forum to Direct
Absentee Voting
Finance Revision
Assembly Topic
Council Releases
Names of Squad
Dorms to Cradle State Dance;
Reid Grattan Orchestras Billed
De Lane/ Form Letter Causes
Error in Parent Understanding
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