advertisement
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19,1941
PAGE 6
SEB Placet 129 of 1941 GradsDraft Reason for Job Increase
According to the latest list of the Student Employment Bureau, 129
of the graduates of 1041 were placed in teaching positions. This figure
represents approximately 58% of the class, and is an increase of almost
25% on the placements of last year, when only 78, or 33% of the class,
were placed.
The draft is considered to be the main factor contributing to this
increase since many of those already in the field were forced to leave
their positions for the army. Other vacancies were created by those
who left the teaching profession for better-paying jobs in defense work.
Following is a list of the '41 grad-f
uates who were placed, the subjects
they are teaching, and where they
are teaching:
Herman Kleine, Clark
University,
Worcester, Mass., Fellowship; Matthew
Uiulatnln, Grand Gorge, Commerce; Anne Norbergr, Germiintown, Math., Social
Studies';
Shirley
Vnn
Valkenburg,
.tobnstown, English; Frances Blanl,
Homer, Commerce; Helen Lasher, Ludlowvllle. Math;
Frances
Hoffmann,
Math, Commerce; Betty Prltchard, McOraw, History; Gerald
Saddlemlre,
Miirgaretvllle, Math, Commerce; Hetty
Prltchard, McGraw, History;
Gerald
Saddlemlre, Margnretville, S. S.; Isabel Burgln, Satigerties, Grade; Catherine Shafcr, Sclo, Latin, English; Ivn
Hiietwyler, Galevllle, Elem. Grades.
Iris' Harnett, Adams, Latin, French;
Iicrnlee Gates, Utlcn, Public Library;
Ethel Williams, Otogo, Com. School
Off.; Clarence Olsen. Ooslleh, French,
English; Dorothy .Mix, Fells Mills,
English, French. Latin; Belle Lasher,
Felts Mills, Commerce, S. S.; Loulso
Hno.ll. Oneonta, S. S.; Stanley Smith,
Buffalo, Dlst. Teacher; Alice Wilbur,
.Schenectady, Math, French;
Harriet
Davis, Sherrlll, Com: flenevlovo SttWyer. Georgetown, French, English, Lil)rary.
Tiolet Cngnnek, Koscoe. Commoree,
English: Harris Gardner, I.eKoy, S. S..
Math, English; Louis firuner, Lloyd
Upper Grades; Eva Firm. North Hose,
Commerce; Walter Daniels, Narrowburg, Science; Roy McCreary, Coeyinans, Science; Rose Joffnlohp, Turin,
Commerce; Irene 1'oger, Norwood, S. S..
English, Library; Luella Metcuif. Oppenhelm, Commerce; Vincent Stanger,
Montlcello, Gen. Sci., English, Music;
Lucy King, Kings Park, Math.
Arnold Ellerin, Montlcello, Commerce;
Lloyd Clum, Silver Creek, Science; William Sewell, Dannemorn, Science, Math;
Evclvn Olivet, Luzerne, Math; Rose
Llsoh, Hurleyville, Commerce;
Margaret Bennett, North Rose, 7th Grade;
Alice Abclove. Akron, Commerce; Laura
FroBt, Constablevllle, Commerce; Carol
Kniffen, Constablevllle, English, Library; Theresa MncPherson, Port Leyden, Commerce; Mary Casson, Coeyninns, French, Latin; Virginia Dooley,
Athens,
French,
Library;
Barbara
Ferce, Redwood, English, French,
Victoria
White. Walewortli,
Commerce; Marlon Cahill, Mildred Elloy
Sell., Bookkeeping; .lohn Gnrdephe, S.
Glens Falls, Commerce, English; John
Murray, Liberty, S. S.; Francos Wood,
Verona, Science; Hnttle Conklln, Arlington, English; Barbara Scott, S.
Onondaga Latin. French; Alida Chimm,
Round Lake. History, Science; William
Brophy,
Nnrrowsburg,
Commerce;
Florence Pros'ser. Ripley, Library; Virginia McDermott, Stratford,
English;
French.
Charlotte Ritchie, Liberty, English;
Grace Moon, Athens, S. S.. English;
Mlchelene Draper, M. Elley Sell., Commerce;
Shirley
'looker,
Forestport,
English, Latin, Library; Marilyn Groff,
Penn Yan, English, S. S.; Hetty Bagle,
Rlchmondvillo, Latin, French; George
Noonnn, Allenlown, S. S.; .Teanetto
Evans, White River .Tnet., Vt„ English;
Kobort Jones, Elmira Heights, English,
S. S.; Ruth Pellette. Hyde Park, Sci.,
Math;
Ray Carroll,
Scliagbtlcoko,
Science;
Alfred Moody,
Nivorvllle,
Grades.
Glenn Doull, Berne, Grades; Helen
Leary, Millbrook, English,
Library;
Hetty Parrott, East Rnekaway, Commerce, Bnglisn; Vincent Glllon, Center Morlelies,
Secretarial;
Kathleen
Muck. Manlius, Otll Grndo; Neva Benson, E. Springfield. Commerce; Bflrnioe
Martyn, E. Springfield, Science; Elolsc
Ilnrtinann, Cobleskill, English; Lois
Mannheimer, Phelps, Social Studies:
Mildred Foley, Old Forgo, Science;
Catherine O'Hryan, Kdmeslon, Soe. St..
English, Library.
Anne Rattray, Clyde, English; Ruth
LaiBon, Klnderhook. Commerce; Alberta Friekneclit, Klnderhook,
English,
Library;
Marion
McCnusland,
Coeymnns, Commerce; Janol Bus'acker,
Andes, English, Library; Elmer Mathaws, South Schenectady, 8th Grade;
Isnhelle Webb, McGraw. Latin, French:
Alma Knowles, Greenwich, Mathematics; Charles (julnn, Tannersvlllo, Social Studios; Robert Ague, Itcnsselner
Falls, Commerce.
James Snovor, Cambridge, Mathematics; .Twin Schaeffer. Kdiiieston, Fr.,
Latin, Social Similes; Dorothy Peak,
Sclinjchtlcoko, Library, English, Social
Studies; Madalyn Ileers, Valley Falls,
French, History. Latin; Sieve Kusnck,
Cannndlngun,
Mathematics;
Dorothy
Johnson, Uli'liiiionihille, Social Studies;
John Allien, Itlchmniiilvillc.
Science;
Mary Mahar, Randolph,
Commorco;
Helen Miller, Muiinsvllle, French, Span
Isb, Gen. Science; Miiry ShnrpluM, Winihrop, Commerce; Helen Pitman, Ger
mautown, Commerce.
George Clark, Hlchhurg, Commerce;
Eleanor Sterling, Eldred, Pa., English;
Helen McGrlovey, Scolia, Grades; Sylvia Greene, Hems'eu, Commerce; Fdnn
Austin, I'umpey, French, Latin; Glenn
Clark, Confer, French, English, History, G. Sci.; Alone Crnmle, Forestville, French, Lalln; John
Hoose,
Willshoro,
Science;
Helty
Boynlon,
lta<|lictte Lake, Math; Helh Donahue,
Liverpool, English, Library;
Dennis
Harran, Glenfield, English;
Douglas
Dillciibi-ck, Marlaville, English, MathomaUc*; Doris Mauersberger,
Cairo,
English, Gorman.
Isabelle Robinson, Scotia,
French,
English; T, Rue Stem, Calllcoon, Com-
Contractor Marriea
Library As»i»tant
Diminutive Miss Marion W.
Nelson, one of State's librarians
and alumnae, appears to be
Dan Cupid's latest victim. The
bride, now Mrs. Lee W. Waters,
was a member of the class of '34.
After two years of teaching high
school in Spring Valley, New
York, she returned to State to
take a position in the library.
Mr. Waters, a graduate of
Albany Academy for Boys, attended B. P. I. and Kenyon University. At present he is employed as a general contractor.
The newly weds' home Is. on
Madison Avenue in Albany.
City Club Invites State
To Enter Photo Contest
III
Courtesy Knickerbocker News
The City Club of Albany has
invited all State College students
interested in photography to
participate in the "Photograph
Albany" contest which it is
sponsoring to stimulate better
planning of the city of Albany.
Since considerable talent was
displayed in the work of those
amateur photographers whose
work was exhibited in Draper
Hall last year, it is expected
that State will be well represented in this contest.
Subject matter must have direct application to city planning,
and all entries must be delivered
at the City Club of Albany, 257
State Street, before September
29, 1941. Further rules may be
found on the bulletin board outside the Co-op.
ALFRED TREHANON, '38, who
was killed at Maxwell Field, Alabama,
when his parachute failed to open.
State Graduate
Killed on Flight
Flying Cadet Alfred Joseph Trehanon* State, '38, was killed September 4, when his parachute failed to
open near Maxwell Training Field
in Alabama. Army men believe that
Trehanon jumped at too low an
altitude for his 'chute to function
properly.
As a student at State College
"Alf" was active in Choral Society,
Advanced Dramatics, and Science
Club besides writing for the Alumni
Quarterly as Undergraduate Editor.
He also won the Wheelock Scholarship. Many students met Trehanon
at work in the college cafeteria, in
Dean Nelson's office, or at Star Lake
Inn in the summer. Trehanon graduated from State in 1938.
His death was a blow to members
of the faculty, alumni, and student
body.
"Al Trehanon was a man of great
industry and tremendous energy,"
declared Dr. John M. Sayles, President of State College. "It is a pity
the accident happened."
Miss Anne Rattray, the Cadet's
sister, graduated from State this
past June. She is now teaching
English and Dramatics at Clyde,
New York.
Cub Classes for Freshmen
Cub classes will be held Tuesday,
at twelve noon in room 109, Draper
Hall for all Freshmen interested in
newspaper work. The classes will
be under the direction of David
Slavin and Muriel Scovell, juniors.
Instructions will be given as to
newspaper policy and procedure.
Golden Horde Declares Season
Now Open On All Freshmen
In the fall a sophomore's fancy
lightly turns to thoughts of rivalry.
With guerrilla warfare already raging on the campus, the keenest competition In years seems a certainty.
Employing fifth column tactics,
'44 scored the first blow. Under the
impression that they were being
"rushed," six trusting freshmen were
de-trousered.
The concentration of the Frosh
men in Sayles Hall gives the verdant
ones a unique opportunity for organization. This may prove a boomerang, however, since any marauding Sophs will always know where
to lay their ham-like hands on a
few freshmen.
Rivalry was as scarce in Frosh
Camp as swizzle-sticks at a WCTU
meeting. The fact that there were
three Sophs and forty-nine frosh
may have caused the usually daunt-
GEORGE D. J E O N E Y ,
less Sophs to be a trifle cautious.
Everything was sweetness and light
at the Burden Lake bivouac, also.
Gordon Baskin of Albany announces that he is a life-guard and
anyone seeing any freshmen going
down for the third time In Washington Park Lake, will please phone
him immediately. Should It be a
Soph who is doing the floundering,
let nature take its course.
Though participating chiefly in
official events, the gentler sex plays
a major role in the traditional melee.
The '45 females will have to be good
to overwhelm Carroll, Latimer &
Co.
There is at present a standing invitation to the "Golden Horde" to
drop in at the Dorm. Tea and
crumpets will not be served, but a
warm reception is guaranteed. The
blessing of the college is on you
both, boys, go to it.
PROP.
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
50c
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AVENUE
PLUMBING, HEATING, VENTILATING
CONTRACTORS
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9 A.M. - 11 P.M.
Phone 5-1214
PHONE 4 - 3 0 3 6
College for Teachers' New Dormitory
Student Group
Works to Keep
Buildings Clean
Tibbetts Requests Cooperation,Campus Commission Makes
New College Regulations
Creation of a new Campus Com
mission was made public this week
by Student Council with the announcement of a nine-member
group headed by Patricia Latimer,
•44.
Almost immediately alter its appointment, the Commission met, and
drew up the following student-activity regulations:
1. Smoking shall be permitted
only in the Commons and the Publications Office.
2. Cigaretts butts and ashes shall
be placed only in
provided receptacles.
3. All waste materials shall be
placed in refuse
containers.
4. All eating
shall be limited to
the Annex and
Cafeteria Areas.
5. All notes in
student mailboxes
that are not at
least 2" by 4" in
size and dated on
the outside, will B a I h x l b b e t t s
be removed.
6. All posters not approved by
the Campus Commission before being posted will be removed.
"These measures necessitate 100%
student cooperation," said Ralph
Tibbetts, president of Student Association, "since penalties have no
place in an Intelligent student organization."
Campus Commission is designed
to provide major impetus in the
drive to keep the College buildings
clean, and the appointment of a
member of Student Council as the
head of this commission is an attempt to centralize control and enforce the rules.
Members of the Commission working with Miss Latimer are: Owen
Bombard, George Kunz, Verna
Snyder, and Una Underwood, juniors; and Harold Ashworth, Gertrude Bove, Katherine Herdman,
and Betram Kiley, sophomores.
Dr. John M. Sayles, President of
the college, and Dr. Milton G. Nelson, Dean of the college, left, Albany
Sunday to participate in educational
conferences at Lake Placid, New
York. Dr. Sayles attended the Pall
Conference of Presidents and Principals of State College and Normal
Schools, held September 23 and 24.
Dr. Nelson conferred at a Council
of Superintendents, September 21
and 22.
ALBANY, NEW YORK, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 86,1941
Regents Name Stoddard
As University President
The New York State Board of
Regents has announced the selection of Dr. George D. Stoddard, Dean of the Graduate
School of the University of
Iowa and a leading authority in
the field of child development
as the successor to Dr. Ernest E.
Cole as State Commissioner of
Education and President of the
University of the State of New
York. Dr. Cole has been asked
to remain as Commissioner until July 1, although he will reach
the statutory age limit of seventy on November 18. The commissioner-elect, Dr. Stoddard,
is forty-four years old and is
well-known as the author of
several books and articles on
education and psychology.
Annex Prices Up
With Food Rise
'45 Orientation
Begins Monday
IOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COIA COMPANY IY
ALBANY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO,
226 No. Allen St.
Albany, N. Y.
One of State's daughters, a
Campus Queen bicycle-rider,
Bea Dower, '41, rather hopelessly submitted an entry to a contest sponsored by Mademoiselle
Magazine, last June. One part
of the contest required contestants to "air" their ideas on
how to better business In department stores. Bea's un-Scottish nature prompted her to reply, "Free coke bars for all patrons." Maybe the judges of the
contest were Irish, too. Anyway,
after she had completely given
up hope, Bea received a request
to appear at Lord and Taylor's
for an interview. There, being
viewed and interviewed with
satisfaction, she was given a
position in the store. At present
she is employed in the dress department, but she expects to be
transferred to the advertising
staff soon.
The class of 1945 will have its
first insight into the extra-curricular life of State College at an
orientation meeting Monday afternoon at 3:30 in Room 20. Speakers
representing every phase of the
varied activity program of the college will be present to describe
briefly what their activity has to
offer.
The program comes as an introduction to Activities Day, which is
scheduled for Saturday, October 4.
Formerly freshmen have chosen
their program solely on personal
judgment. The new two-fold plan
will afford each freshman a more
definite basis on which to make his
selection and will help to prevent
freshmen from going out for too
many activities.
Representatives to Speak
John Ralph Tibbetts, President of
Student Association, will preside at
the meeting. Representatives from
Dramatics and Arts Council, the
NEWS. Debate Council, Pedagogue,
Music Council, the Statesman, Student Christian Association, Men's
and Women's Athletic Associations,
Newman Club, Menorah and ths departmental clubs will speak briefly
on their activity. Thus the freshmen
will know the definite organization
of each, and can sign up for the
activity in which they are really
interested.
Registration For Activities
On Activities Day, the class of 1945
will go to the Commons in the
morning to register for extra-class
work. Mary Susan Wing, '42, has
charge of signing up the freshmen
at the various tables.
In the afternoon, there will be
dancing in the Commons from 2 to
5 P. M. to music furnished by the
vie system. The traditional bonfire
will be held in the evening in the
field between Sayles and Pierce
Halls, and will feature class and other college songs. Following this, an
open house will be held from 9 P. M.
to 12 M. at Pierce Hall.
The vastly increased cost of food
and miscellaneous materials was
given by Miss Laura Thompson of
the Cafeteria as the cause of the
higher prices prevailing in the Cafeteria and Annex.
The effect of the increase has
been chiefly felt in the Annex
where sandwiches and milk, both of
which sold last year for five cents
are now seven cents. With the exception of a few side dishes, prices
in the Cafeteria are the same as
last year.
"Not only has the actual food
risen in price, but incidentals, such
as straws, wax paper and napkins,
have soared to what in some cases,
is double their former cost," explained Miss Thompson. She added
that the present seven cent sandwich is larger than last year's nickel
one.
Miss Thompson believes that it is
too early in the semester to gauge
accurately the effect of the new
price scale on sales in the Annex,
but that a slight decrease in volume seems evident. If there is no
further increase in the wholesale
price of milk, a reduction from the
present cost of seven cents may be
possible.
Pi Gamma M u Plans
Miss Thompson has shown herself amenable to the suggestion that
Indian Ladder Picnic
a larger bottle of milk be offered.
She is willing to substitute a onethird bottle of milk for ten cents in
At its Monday meeting Pi Gamma
place of the present seven cent half- Mu, National Honorary S o c i a l
pint. If sufficient demand for both Science Society, discussed plans for
sizes exists the two would be put its fall picnic, to be held Tuesday,
on sale. In terms of quarts, the October 7, at Indian Ladder. The
arger bottle would represent a picnic is open to students of all
slight increase over the current classes and especially to those peoprice, selling at thirty cents per ple majoring or minoring in social
quart instead of the present twenty- studies. Faculty guests will include
eight cents.
all professors of the social studies
The NBWH will shortly conduct a department.
poll at Student Assembly to solicit Buses are scheduled to leave the
opinion on this question.
college at 4:20 P. M. for Thatcher
Park. The picnic committee plans
refreshments and entertainment. A
table will be set in lower Draper
Monday for the purchase of tickets.
The price is 35 cents.
June Haushalter, '42, President,
announced committees consisting
of the following seniors: publicity,
Bea Hirsch, chairman, Fred Ferris,
Vincent Miller, and Shirley Kyle;
refreshments, Virginia Lay, transportation, Frank Evans; entertainment, Marjorle Gaylord and Edwin
Holstein.
Dean Nelson Speaks Today
BEATRICE A. DOWER
^ F
The main feature of today's assembly will be a speech by Dr. Milton G. Nelson, Dean of the College.
Ralph Tibbetts, President of Student
Association, will announce the class
marshalls for the coming year.
Tibbetts stated that a series of
interesting assemblies which will include speakers, debates, and entertainments have been planned for
the future.
i*n>
VOL. XXVI, NO. 8
Warns of Cut-
Low Tax Sales
Cited as Cause
Of Budget Cut
Representatives of Organizations
W i l l Explain Activities
To Freshmen Class
Dower Answers Big City's Coll
QUAIL.
FROM 9 : 0 0 A . M. TO 6 : 0 0 p, M .
Z-443
Sayles, Nelson at Meetings
RICE
ALLEYS
15c BOWLING
N. Y.
466 Madison Avenue
Albany, N. Y.
FOR S T A T E C O L L E G E B O W L E R S
AND
ALBANY,
M. KRAMER & SONS, INC.
merce; Dorothy Tompkins, Freeville,
English, French; Steve Paris, Ellenburg, Science, Math; Frtiada Diamond,
Clinton. Commei
; Lurry lining, Arlington, Science: Dan Ciillliss, Local,
Grade: Josephine Antoiiiiecl, Savannah,
French, Latin: Marion Keables, ,lefI'ersiinville, Math Science; David Km
lei-, Caiskill, Muth; .lull" Tunuell, S.
Fallsburg,
Latin,
English;
Miriam
N'ewell, CuhnoH, Jr. High; Hertlm I'd
II, V'uii lloriiesvllle, Lalln, French.
WESTERN
DIAL 5-1913
State College News
Full Check of A l l Class Lists
Planned by Finance Board;
Grads Among Defaulters
W A R N I N G of a budget cut was issued
by Edward L. Cooper, Treasurer of Student Board of Finance.
Junior Reception
To Honor Frosh
The Class of 1943 will extend its
first official welcome to the freshman class tonight a t H P. M. in the
auditorium. In complete charge of
all arrangements for this annual
reception is Thomas Feeney, president of the Junior class.
After the formal welcome to State
College, which will be extended by
Feeney, there will
be an original skit,
written, directed,
and produced by
the Juniors, under
the
chairmanship of Marion
Adams. The exact
plot of this skit is
to remain a mystery until tonight.
Following
the
skit, the two clasThmniie Feeney
ses Will a d j o u r n
to
Edward L. Cooper, Treasurer of
the Student Board of Finance, has
stated that a cut in the college
budget may be inevitable, due
to the fact that the decreased registration will not permit the collection of the $14,287 prescribed by
the Student Association in its
budget meeting last spring. Even a
100% return will create a shortage.
Thus far a total of only $11,704 has
been realized from the sale of 836
tickets, making the returns fall
"1,5 i short of the required amount.
Mr. Cooper said that a check of all
class lists will be made in an endeavor to find out why a more gratifying response has not been forthcoming. Those found at fault will be
contacted at once and corrections
made.
Tax Not Enforced
Last year's decree by Dr. John M.
Sayles to the effect that payment
of student tax would be mandatory
before any student could enter classes has evidently not been enforced.
This may be due to Dr. Nelson's
wish that no system be set up to
prevent students from entering
classes. As a result, students were
not asked to present tax tickets as
well as class cards upon reporting
for instructions.
The decrease in the registration is
also a major factor contributing to
the shortage. Such a marked fall
in enrollment was not taken into
full consideration when the Student
Association voted on its budget last
spring.
Grads Won't Buy Tax
Mr. Cooper stated that with two
requests for refunds on tickets from
grads, no member of the graduate
class has a tax in his possession.
Great difficulty has been encountered in trying to convince the graduates of the advantage of the student activity program. "If the graduates could be sold on the wisdom
of a tax purchase," Mr. Cooper explained, "it would be a long step
in the right direction."
If the quota has not been reached
after a thorough check-up, all activities will suffer a cut in their
allotment, in spite of the fact that
the main reason for Dr. Sayles'
afore-mentioned decree was to prevent any such budget cuts in the
future.
the Commons to dance until 12.
Hal Singer, chairman of
the
music committee, has made arrangements to have Bill Grattan's orchestra, following the tradition
started by the Class in having an
orchestra rather than a victrola
furnish the music. The use of the
Commons rather than the gymnasium for dancing is an innovation necessitated by the fact that
the gym floor has been refinished Newman Club Slates
this summer and it is feared that
Tea, Smoker Sunday
dancing on it might cause some
damage. Refreshments will be served by a committee headed by Eliza- Upperclassmen Welcome Frosh
beth Barden.
A t Varied Social Functions
Annual Open House
Date Set by Sororities
Arrangements have been made by
the seven State sororities for the
entertainment of the freshmen, who
may visit the houses from 7 P. M.
to 9:15 P. M. on Thursday and
from 7 P. M. to 10 P. M. on Friday
at intervals of forty-five minutes
each.
Non-rush period will begin at the
end of sorority open houses for the
freshmen women.
Alpha Epsilon Phi, Kappa Delta,
and Phi Delta will conduct open
houses on Thursday; Beta Zeta,
Gamma Kappa Phi, Chi Sigma
Theta and Psi Gamma on Friday.
After Friday's assembly, freshin 'i.'1 women will be asked to attend
a special meeting at which instructions will be given regarding the
functions.
Newman Club's social program for
the coming year will continue in
full swing on Sunday, September
28, with a tea for the women in the
afternoon and a smoker for the men
in the evening.
Helen Krizka, '42, is chairman of
the tea, which Is slated to begin at
three o'clock and will be held at
Newman Hall. The upperclassmen
will be hostesses to the class of 1945.
The smoker will be at the Thomas
More House at 8:00 P. M. Paul
O'Leary, '44, is the chairman of
this affair, which will also include
entertainment.
The faculty and the officers of
other State religious groups will be
guests of the Newmanites at both
of the get-to-gethers.
Members of Newman Club gathered last night at Newman Hall to
take part in a bull session led by
Father Cahill, Kay Martin, Marl/>
Reilly, and Cormac Cappon. The
subject for the evening was "The
Catholic Student at State College."
Dancing and refreshments followed.
-.a,w-3as«i||ai|jBHgigSs'-«3K!»£K^^
tSS&g&SSSS&mmi
-
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
SakcialU:
Man With Sharp Appetite
The Retention of Ration
Established May, 1916
by tht Cltu of 1918
-A. T.
No.
Vol. XXVI
Friday, Spptember 20, 11)41
Member
Distributor
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Collegiate Digest
The undergraduate newspaper of the New York State College fur Teachers published every Friday of the college
year by the NEWS Board for the Student Association.
Phones: Office, 5-0373; Dorrancc, 3-2843; Holsteln, 4-0373;
Uriinwiild, 3-0538
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. _.
Entered as second class matter Albany, N. V„ postoffiee.
The editorial page of the STATE COLLEGE NEWS last
week carried two communications. One of them, t h e
second, is worthy of comment.
Signed "A Woman," it consisted of an exhortation
to State men to form on the campus an ROTC unit.
In part it read as follows:
"Most colleges have already 'gone over the top'
in preparing their male population to meet that inevitable dragon, war. The establishment of an ROTC
here at State would not be a difficult procedure—in
fact the government is very willing to help things
along . . . Certainly State men have an obligation to the United States to aid as much as possible
in national defense and preparedness. And it's time
to start shootin' now;"
By itself, this letter is unimportant. The thing that
makes it of consequence is that It is a part of a growing fever for war—a war hysteria.
• I r H S I N T I D roil NATIONAL A0VMTI8INO BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
4 2 0 MADISON AVB.
NIW YORK, N. Y.
CHiuao • Bonos • Let A M I L I I • s»» FHAKCISCO
The Ncwi Board
WILLIAM R. DORRANCE
EDWIN J . HOLSTEIN
A. HARRY PASSOW
MADELINE GRUNWALD
HARRIET DEFOREST
ALLEN SIMMONS
CARL MITCHELL
MURIEL SCOVELL
DAVID SLAVIN
ANDREW TAKAS
PAGE t
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 16,1941
STATE COLLEGE N E W S , FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941
PAGES
'.' iftaS'.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGER
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
This Is not the first time that the STATE COLLEGE
NEWS has been included in a mounting feeling for war.
"A movement was launched at a meeting attended
by all the men of State College last Friday morning,
which promises to bring there a permanent and recognized military company, on the plan of these organized at various other American
World War colleges . . .
Company
"Dr. Brubacher said that he was
Favored
strongly in favor of a military company at State College, so that if the
need should arise, State College might take her place
among the number of institutions ready to fight for
the flag . , ."
All c o m m u n i c a t i o n s s h o u l d h e a d d r e s s e d to t h e e d i t o r anil
m u s t be signed. N a m e s will be withheld upon request.
T h e S T A T E C O M J E G E N E W S a s s u m e s no responsibility
for opinions e x p r e s s e d in Its columns o r c o m m u n i c a t i o n s ,
us such e x p r e s s i o n s d o n o t necessarily rolled Us view.
Wake Up, Frats
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, March Hi, 1917
Unless fraternities postpone bidding of
"The men of State College are proud of the part
freshmen until Christmas, or spring, or even
they are taking in this movement. They are grateful for the chance that has been promised them,
until next fall, State College will soon witness
which will enable them to do their bit if the need
the most vicious, cut-throated, unorganized
arise.';. They hope for peace, but if it is to be war,
rushing in its history.
they will go in a body and fight as did the men who
left this institution a half century ago for southern
Whereas in the past each fraternity has
battlefields."
ania and Posters
had six or seven social affairs at which to
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, March ///, 19a
meet and make friends with freshmen, this
-Student Forum"Yet that there are men . . . (who are not
year each fraternity has but two. Last year
willing to assume the responsibility of defending the
Freshly painted walls make an#~
all four fraternities kept about twenty-five excellent backdrop for posters. Un- their egocentric personalities by nation's flag and the nation's honor) . . . among
dates with freshmen; this year all four com- fortunately, the "crummy" ones furnishing an excuse to consider us the committee can all too truly vouch for . . .
up just that much better. I themselves better than the rest of This means that we have among us the genuine unabined have only eight—approximately what show
refer especially to the class rivalry the student body. I do not consid- dulterated grape juice pacifist, the man who does not
one had last year. Such a cut has resulted posters. Most of them are of the er that appointments to Myskania believe in war, who refuses to take the chance of befrom the re-organization of the college social "add-a-line" variety with little of are made as a reward for special ing killed by a cannon, and who is not even sure that
merit, but that they are the result if a foreign foe were marching up the Hudson valley
calendar by Miss DeLaney. This has elimin- the limit concept thrown in.
is plenty of artistic talent of the vicious system of politics he would take rifle in hand and go out, in defense
ated all non-weekend affairs. Even weekend in There
of his home and loved ones, to meet
the sophomore and fresh- prevalent in State. However, with
dates are at a premium, because they have manbothclasses.
the invader. Yes, we have in the upWhy not put the human nature what it is, I suppose Editorial
proposition up to some retiring soul that there is nothing to be done CoiHlcmnation per Hudson valley a few such men.
been filled with college functions.
and give him a chance to do his bit
while below us at Vassar the students
the system by which Mys- Voiced
Two affairs do not afford sufficient oppor- for State in the form of the about
have, without a dissenting vote, pledgkania is appointed. Therefore, any
tunity for fraternity men to become the "oomphy" poster.
revisions must come from within ed themselves to do their part in upholding the naH. S.
the body itself. The revision for tion's honor and integrity. Vassar women and State
friends of freshmen.
which I ask for is this: that Mys- College men! The former bravely facing that which
•' Already fraternity men are talking of
kania use for the benefit of the by nature they are expected to shrink from, and the
mass fraternity invasions of the men's dorm- To the Editor:
Student Association the power latter cringing with fear lest they be called upon to
which it wields over the student perform that which, from the birth of the race, has
itory and raucous drinking parties as a subThere exists at State an executive body and the administration by been their sacred obligation and duty to do."
stitute for the organized rushing which has group which is in bad need of re- virtue of its position. What use has
STATU COLLEGE NEWS, May ir>, I9IH
been denied to them.
organization. This group is Mys-Myskania ever made of its position
kania.
now disguises fair nature. Peace Days change
If this is to be prevented (and it may have I realize that I am treading on other than to act as official ref- to "Rage
War Days. Harry Lauder's wife rejoices that her
for rivalry, chaperones at
to be if fraternities want to survive as or- treacherous ground in saying that erees
parties, election inspectors, or as- child was a boy and that she could give him for her
country. There are a hundred ways to die; one is
ganized campus groups), Interfraternity this exalted body needs a repair sembly decorations?
sweet—for one's country. Better that a thousand
Council must prolong the organized rushing job. But not being content with I say that Myskania, if they were should
die nobly than that one should die pitiably.
own views on the subject, I
period. Weekend affairs over a longer period my
have asked several other students what they should be, would be the "This is not time for so-called open-mindedness.
of time will have to take the place of former what they thought of Myskania and real leaders of the Student body. "We are right, Germany is wrong. The day has
Myskania take advannon-weekend affairs. This will integrate well the general consensus is that Mys- Itageaskofthat
its pre-eminent position to passed when we could see one iota of right in Gerkania
is
ridiculous.
with the Orientation Program and will also
many.
My own personal opinion is that fulfill its obvious purpose—to lead
give the freshmen more time in which to Myskania
"It is All-Democracy against All-Depotism."
is, at present, merely a i State College.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, May IS, liilH /from a upvcchJ
make up their minds.
chance for a select few to satisfy I
C. O.
In all justice, it must be remembered that when
Think it over, frats. Your survival may dethese words were written, the United States was a
pend upon it.
country at war. Even so, It must bs admitted that
Mysk
The Weekly Bulletin
It Can Be Done
Last week, the NEWS mentioned a Student Union in the Farrell Mansion as the
gerious consideration of the Alumni and Administration if students could prove their
ability to keep their own property clean.
The first sign of student determination to
cooperate has come already, the Publications
Office seems to have been finally cleaned up.
The number of smokers lounging in the office the past week has been almost negligible.
The office has become at last a place for business only.
If students can cooperate In this, they
should be able to cooperate in keeping the
rest of lower Draper clean. Campus Commission has set up a number of suggestions for
students to observe. The Commission has
omitted all penalties from their list of regulations. These have no part in an intelligent
student body.
This is a year of trial. Not only Student
Union but free use of the Commons is at
stake. If students are to hold on to what they
have, they must cooperate.
•
i.
S T l ' U K X T I.OANK
•$•N o m i n a t i o n s for t r e a s u r e r of NewAll s t u d e n t s who lire p l a n n i n g to
apply for n college hum lire In see Miss man Club should lie siguoil ami given
Wallace mi or before October 1 In lo Council m e m b e r s or left in I lie club
mailbox.
Itmini ii. Uleliiirdsiin.
Frederick Ferris,
HOA
I'resldeiil.
I'rusli Chorus iileels F r i d a y ill 3:30
I'KII.KiliCtt-;
P. S|, In | he I,limine
Cpporchissinun
are nlan Invited in Join t h i s SCA
All s o p h o m o r e s Interested in work
Chorus.
lllg oil I In- Pllllllgoglic a r e reijllesleil In
sign up mi the poster.
I'iurle Snow, D i r e c t o r .
I'TKII
c o o r K i t . v n v i i VACANCY
All sluilenlH who a n - In Immediate
A vacancy Is available in onu of lllo
need
of
work
should
keep in persnuul
eiioperiil Ive liuilses anil liny slnilenl
who Is Inleresleil should a p p l y In I he touch wlih I lie lliiriuiu ill this lime.
H u r r y I'ussuw will be in [he office
lieiin HI' Women [in
Ilnlely.
from a .-:!?i mull l a m i \ M . Friday
Huriili T. Ilel.lllley,
ill'leriinnil
a m i from II :.'l(l until I ::in p ,
I*I-IIII i.i W o m e n .
M. Hal u n l a y m o r n i n g for the purpose
.SCA
All - m i n u s wlin luivu a l r e a d y put ni' interviewing needy s t u d e n t s . Stu111 laic ; li|illcill Inns I'll!' NVA 11 II- tills dents wlin (•annul sec liim at ilial time
year should rcpiil'l hi llie n f f l
if the should call al I In- desk mi M lily
ami consult I In- schedule I here Homo
b e n n ill' Worn 'ii liniiiedlillely.
Jobs a r c available which IIIIIHI bu fill.
Small T, Uelallley,
Heilli lit Woinell.
I'd i i i i i n i i l i i i i i ' l y .
(iV'.M CI.ANHKH
A. H u r r y I'ussuw, IHruulnr.
Sophomore women uro asked to conSOCIAL CAM'JNDAH
sult. Willi Miss J o h n s o n In Iter office,
PflBfl Hull Gym, sign lip for lookers, Wuploinbur 211- SCA Chorus, I.minim
!l:3(l I'. M.
and
complete
preliminary
urrtingoSc|iieinlicr ail J u n i o r
reception forIII on la for b e g i n n i n g (.'.mi clauses.
freshmen,
A u d i t o r i u m a n d ComM (I, NCIHIIII,
mons, 8:00 P . M,
Dunn ni' Hie College.
Huplutllbor '11 lOiislorn Zone New Vork
I ((ItCM
Slale T e a c h e r s ' Association Public
Will Miiiinr, 'i:i, ims liuun a p p o i n t e d
llelailiin.; I n s t i t u t e meeting, Piii'c
to ilia F o r u m Board ns D i r e c t o r of
Hall, 10:00 A. M.
Publicity.
Miss Shirley rllegul, '111,
will rci.iio h e r posit loo on Ilio h o a r d . S e p t e m b e r 28 N e w m a n Club leu for
Wnmcii, Newman Hull. :i :(lt) p . J[.
Crollorlclf
Ferris,
September 'M Newman Club smoker
Bnoultcr,
for men. T h o m a s ' More House, 8:0(1
N H U M A N (JMill
P. M.
C'ormiie Ciippon, 'PI, Ims been elected
&• S o r o r i t y Open llousu for
to Newman Club Cniinoll, n« C'hiilraiin October
freshmen, H o u s e s , 7:30 P . M.
of (he 1'iduenllon Committee.
•§••••
—, •• ' -mmmnaw
they are not words which show rational thought.
Rather, they show the Influence of years of a mounting wave of propaganda and chauvinism.
It took a year for patriotism to turn to Jingoistic
hysteria, but the Inescapable fact Is that eventually
it did turn.
Today, State College finds itself watching the
United Stales approach entry into another World
War, Once more the propaganda mills are grinding
°ut their opinion-swaying tracts. Once
Hysteria
more speeches and newspaper reports
Growing
inflame an already aroused public a
Rapidly
public that soon will be maddened beyond reason. The nation as a whole is
slowly approaching the same hysterical state of mind
that It attained In the first war.
We as college students have been educated to see
through deliberate -attempts to influence our thinking. We are the ones who should keep the coolest
heads. We are the ones who should act as governors
—as safety valves for the less perspicacious.
In past years no need existed ut State College for
a training course. Perhaps the male registration lias
been too small to support one, perhaps the men have
not been able to support it financially, perhaps II
could not have been included In the college curriculum.
The situation at State has not changed, What we
could not support before, wo cannot support now.
liven if we were to establish tin officers' training unit
on the campus, n liS cloubLful if it would be of any use
in the present crisis, for such a training program '
a mutter of years.
Let us bo rational. Let us not long for the sight of a
uniform, Let us not yearn for a gun I
_
•
J
P l e b e s T o u g h e n U p - Where once a tackling dummy might have
hung on the p l a y i n g fields a t West Point, another type of dummy now
hangs, devoted to the d e a d l y seriousness of bayonet practice. Twelve
hundred plebes, the largest class ever to enter the United States Military Acpdemy, are taking an intensive course that would keep the
famous commandos " s t e p p i n g . "
Acme
i - — — — • • -
e$
A
s.';.•.:iU^V>l•^^ir;•^>^',,r'^i|iai•i l Sl ^^(<w ^ww*^
m Mary*
unsafe
°" "'mo,. <nWs/b/ 'nving"
a cour,e /„
in
(
m#m
'"•""''oat/on f , „
Ot Pe
motor.
HI in Li——«ft«Mi»
"" Sf0,eqc>^''Wo,bt,f?W * * .
PAGE 2
.
-A. T.—
Vol. XXVI
Friday, September I'll, Hill
No. 2
Member
Distributor
Assocliiii'U Collegiate Press
Collegiate Digest
The undergraduate newspaper of the New York State College for Twieliers published every Friday of the college
yeiir by the MOWS Hoard for the Student Assiicliulim.
Phouua! Office, 0-0873; Dorrnnco, 8-2813; Ifolsteln, 4-ii.'t".'t;
(iriiiiH-nld, 3-0538
. ..
Entered as second class matter Albany, N. V., postoffice.
WILLIAM SLAUGHTER!
EATS RAZOR BLADES AND
LIGHT BULBS TO HELP PAY
HIS EXPENSES AT NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE
TEACHERS COLLEGE/
REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISINS BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
NONE FOR ME, THANKS.
Representative
NEW YOHK. N . Y .
CHICAGO * Boston * LOS AHOELIS • SAN FRANCISCO
Une INTERCOLLEGIATE
COMMUTING CHAMPIONSHIP IS CLAIMED
BY WILLIAM HALUSEy,
CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL
COLLEGE STUDENT,
WHO "THUMBS' HIS WAV
10 MILES A DAV TO
SCHOOL/
The News Board
W I L L I A M R. D O R R A N C E
EDWIN J. HOLSTEIN
A. H A R R Y P A S S O W
MADELINE GRUNWALD
HARRIET DEFOREST
ALLEN SIMMONS
CARL M I T C H E L L
MURIELSCOVELL
DAVID SLAVIN
ANDREW TAKAS
!.l\.L.x- r
I
The Retention of Ration
Established M a y , 1916
by the Class of 1918
College Publishers
4 2 0 MADISON AVB.
P*
SaJzaicllu:
Man With Sharp Appetite
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
PAGE 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26,1941
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
CO-EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
MANAGING EDITOR
BUSINESS MANAGER
ADVERTISING MANAGER
CIRCULATION MANAGER
SPORTS EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
*
All communications should be addressed io ihe editor and
iiiiisi bo signed. Names will be withheld upon request.
The STA'J'K ('(11,1,10(110 MOWS ussi
H tin rosponslhtliiv
for opinions expressed In lis columns or communications
us such ex press Ions do not nccoMirii.t l'"i!o>'i lis view.
W a k e U p , Frats
T h e editorial page of the STATE Cohume N E W S last
week carried two communications. O n e of t h e m , t h e
second, i.s worthy of comment.
Signed "A Woman," it consisted of a n e x h o r t a t i o n
to S t a t e men to form on the campus a n R O T C unit.
In part it read as follows:
"Most colleges have already 'gone over t h e t o p '
In preparing their male population to m e e t t h a t i n evitable dragon, war. T h e establishment of a n R O T C
here a t State would not be a difficult procedure—in
fact the government is very willing to h e l p things
along . . . Certainly State m e n have a n obligation to the United States to aid as m u c h a s possible
in national defense and preparedness. And it's time
to start shootin' n o w ; "
By itself, this letter is unimportant. T h e t h i n g t h a t
makes it of consequence i.s t h a t it is a p a r t of a growing fever for war—a war hysteria.
This is not the first time t h a t t h e STATE COI.I.KIIE
NEWS h a s been included in a mounting feeling for war.
"A movement was launched a t a meeting a t t e n d e d
by all the men of State College last F r i d a y morning,
which promises to bring there a p e r m a n e n t a n d recognized military company, on t h e plan of these o r ganized at various other American
World W a r colleges . . .
Company
"Dr. Brubacher said t h a t he wa.s
Favored
strongly in favor of a military company al State College, so t h a t if the
need should arise. Stale College might take h e r place
among the number of institutions ready to fight for
the flag . . ."
STATE OH.I.BIB NEWS. March
11,,
inn
1
Unless fraternities postpone bidding- of
FRATERNITY AND SORORITY
"The men of Slate College are proud of t h e part,
freshmen until Christmas, or spring*, or even
HOUSES ANNUALLY SPEND
they are faking in this movement. They a r e g r a t e ful for llie chance that h a s been promised Ihem,
£37,560,000 FOR. FOOD/
until next fall, State College will soon witness
which will enable ihem to do their bit if t h e need
the most vicious, cut-throated, unorganized
arises. They hope for peace, but if it i.s to be war.
rushing in its history.
they will go in a bod', and fight as did t h e m e n who
left tins institution a hall century ago for s o u t h e r n
Whereas in the past each fraternity has
bal Hi fields."
had six or seven social affairs at which to
S i t ' i : C U.I.KI;': NEWS, Muriii llf, inn
meet and make friends with freshmen, this
-Student Forum"Yei thai there are men . . . (Who a r e not
year each fraternity has but two. Last year
willing to asMim. the responsibility of defending the
Freshly painted walls make a n *
all four fraternities kept about twenty-five excellent backdrop for posters. Un- I their egocentric personalities by nation's Hag and the nation's honor) . , . among
dates with freshmen; this year all four com- fortunately, the " c r u m m y " ones furnishing a n excuse to consider us the committee can all too truly vouch for .
.show up ju.sl t h a t much better. I
This means thai we have among us the genuine unabined have only eight—approximately what refer especially to the class rivalry themselves better than the rest of dulterated grape juice pacifist, the m a n who docs nol
the student body. 1 do n i l considone had last year. Such a cut has resulted posters. Most of i h e m a r c of t h e er that a p p o i n t m e n t s to Myskania believe in War. who refuses to lake the c h a n c e ol bevariety with little ol
from the re-organization of the college social "atkl-a-line"
are m a d e as a reward for special ing killed by a cannon, and who is nol even sure thai
the limit concepl thrown in.
merit, but thai they a r e the result il a foreign foe were marching up the Hudson valley
calendar by Miss DeLaney. This has eliminT h e r e is plenty Of artistic talent of the vicious system of politics he would lake rifle in hand and go out, in defense
ated all non-weekend affairs. Kven weekend in both t h e sophomore and fresh- prevalent in S t a t e . However, with
of his home and loved ones, to meet
the invader. Yes, we have in llie u p dates are at a premium, because they have man classes. Why not put the h u m a n n a t u r e whai it is, I suppose Editorial
proposition up to some retiring soul t h a t there is nothing to be done
been filled with college functions.
and give him a chance to do hts bit jabout t h e system by which Mys- ('oiiilcni.natiiiii per Hudson valley a lew such men,
while below us at Vassar t h e s t u d e n t s
Two affairs do not afford sufficient oppor- for S t a t e in t h e form of t h e ! kania is appointed. Therefore, any Voiced
h a w . without a dissenting vote, pledgtunity for fraternity men to become the "oomphv" poster.
revision:; must come from within
II. S.
the body itself. T h e revision for ed themselve. io do their pari in upholding t h e n a friends of freshmen.
which I ask for i.s this: that Mys- , lion's honor and integrity. Vassar women a n d S t a t e
Already fraternity men a r e talking of
kania use for t h e benefit of the , College m e n ! The former bravely lacing t h a t which
mass fraternity invasions of t h e men's dorm- To t h e Editor:
Student
Association
the power by nature they are expected to shrink from, a n d the
which it wields over the student latter cringing with fear lest lhey be called upon to
itory and raucous drinking parties a s a subT h e r e exists al S l a t e an executive body a n d t h e administration by ; perform thai, which, from the birth of t h e race, h a s
stitute for t h e organized rushing which has group which is in bad need of r e - virtue
of its position. W h a t use h a s been iheir sacred obligation and duty to d o . "
organization. This group is Mys- Myskania ever m a d e of its position
been denied to them.
STATE CUI.I.EIIE NEWS, Mm/ /.",, I'.IIK
kania.
"Rage now disguises fair nature. Peace Days c h a n g e
other t h a n to ael as official refIf this is to be prevented (and it may have
1 realize that I am treading on
for rivalry, chaperones at to W a r Days. Harry Lauder's wile rejoices that her
to be if fraternities want to survive its or- treacherous ground in saying that erees
pai'tie.s. election inspectors, or a s - child was a boy and that she could give h i m for her
ganized campus groups),
Interfraternity this exalted body needs a repair sembly decorations?
country. There are a hundred ways to d i e ; one is
sweet- lor o n e s country. Belter that a t h o u s a n d
Council must prolong the organized rushing job. But not being content with
I say thai Myskania, if they were should die nobly Ulan that one should die pitiably.
own views on the subject, 1
period. Weekend affairs over a longer period my
have asked several other students what they should be, would be the
"This is nol Utile lor so-called o p e n - m i n d e d u e s s
of time will have to take the place of former what I hey thought Ol Myskania a n d real leaders of t h e Student body.
"We are right. Germany is wrong. T h e day hie.
1
ask
thai
Myskania
take
advannon-weekend affairs. This will integrate well j the general consensus is that Mystage ol its pre-eminent position io passed when we could see one iota ol right in Gerkania
is
ridiculous.
with the Orientation Program and will also
many,
Mj own personal opinion i.s thai lullill its obvious purpose to lead
give the freshmen more time in which to Myskania
S l a t e College.
"II Is All-Democracy against All-Depot ism."
is, at present., ncrely a
STATE ('III.I.ECK New. , Man /.',, HUH 'Irani it s/e i ,7,
make up their minds.
chance lor a select lew Io satisfy
('. ().
In all justice, ii musl be remembered Mini when
Think it over, frats. Y'our survival may de- j
these Words were wrilli'll, llie tinned S l a t e s wa.s a
pend upon it.
country ai war Kven so, ii musl b.' a d m i t t e d llial
Myskania and Posters
The W e e k l y
It Can Be Done
Last week, the NKW'S mentioned a Slu
dent Union in the Karrell Mansion as the
serious consideration of the Alumni and Administration if students could prove their
ability to keep their own property (dean.
The first sign of .student determination to
cooperate has come already, the Publications
Office seems to have been I'inalK cleaned up.
The number of -trnokers lounging in I lie office I tie past week lias been almost negligible.
The office ha-- become at last a place for business onl.\.
If students can cooperate in this, they
should be a i d e t o c o o p e r a t e in k e e p i n g t h e
rest of lower Draper clean, Campus Cum mission has set up a number of suggestions for
students to observe. The Commission has
omitted all penalties from their list id' regulations. These have no part, in an intelligent
.student body.
This is a year of trial. Not only Student !
Union but IVee use of the Commons is at
stake, If students are to hold on to what they !
have, they must cooperate.
I
Bulletin
,m
s i I D I N I 1.(1 A N s
tj
\,l
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<•> Xiiiiilii.iliniis f u r o v . e . u i v i ' „f N , . w .
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W.III.ICI
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IIMI-II II.MINI, f o r
H'l'-lniirii, IIUIIHI'H, 7:UII I'. M,
'.V are not word.', which show rational Ihoilglil
Kalher, they show Die inllueiic.. ol years ol a mount
nig wave nl propaganda and chauvinism.
11 |(
iok a year lor patriolisiu to turn io jingoistic
hysteria, bin I In- inescapable lael is thai evenillalh
II dul lurii
Today. Slale C o l l c e Muds u.scl! watching llie
" a i l e d Stales approach enlr\ into a n o t h e r World
War o n c e more Hie propaganda nulls are grinding
""I 'heir op!iuon-swa.\ llie Irnels ()nce
Hysteria,
iui,)',. speeches and newspaper report;
J"'>WIH«
llillaine
an
alre;id\
aroused
public
a
Ruplclly
public ihal soon will be maddened be
Vund reason Tin- nation as a whole i
slowh approaching Mm ,
h\ .lerical slale m mind
ihal it iiiiaiui'il in In lirsi war
Wl
:l;
'
' '"liege Muileiil, | m V ( , |„.,.,, educated Io .see
IbOHIgh dellbeli-ile al lelli|)ls In u.lliienee our think
Wl
]"«
' I"'1' 11"' "lies who should keep llie eonle I
l
(l:
Wl ;l
"'"
' " ' I he ones who .should ael as governoi
:
' ' salel.\ wilwh Im ihe less perspicacious
1,1
;l
l' '' M'lirs no ui'i ,1 exisled al S l a l e Cidlegi' loi
;' Dinning eoiir.se I'erhiips ihe male reglstralion ha
' " ' ' " " " ' '' l l i a l 1 I" iiPI»>ri one, perhaps llie m e n have
111,1 l r l 1 ; l l l r l ( l
"'
'
uppolM il lliianeiallv, pei'liap.s II
''"'"'l n " 1 l»'ve been included in ihe college curri
ellllllll
' , ' 1 "' hiluutloii al Slale h a s nol changed. Wllal w.
''""Id hoi suppori before, we cannot .supporl now
Kven il we were to establish a n officers' training nun
" " "' campus, n is doiibitui II II w „uid he of utiv us.
in Ihe present crisis, far s„ch a tminlng p r o g r a m i
U m a i l e r ol years.
Let us be rational. Let us n o t long for t h e Night ol n
unilorin Lei us nol yearn for j , B U n |
Plebes T o u g h e n U p Where once a tackling dummy might have
hung on the playing fields at West Point, another type of dummy now
hangs, devoted to the deadly seriousness of bayonet practice. Twelve
hundred plebes, Ihe largest class ever to enter the United States Military Academy, are Inking an intensive course thai would keep the
famous commandos "stepping."
Acmu
Tb
°y o'so i ' h e , r
eor
" to
m:\
PAGE S
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941
STATE fQIXEGE NEWS »
Vol.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 86, 1941
Man With Sharp Appetite
-
::*paH> JftateggjJ<jfftm3ltriffl
XXV
Studies
AssiM-lillf
Tlie undo;
lege for
yen r l>y (
Phones: (
Oninwiilil,
Entered
Give
Way
to Swimming,
Sun, Sand
at
}
Sigma Nu Beach Party
Summer school cares, studies and classes were thrown aside for one day by Brown
University Sigma Nu's and their dates for a day at the seashore. The fun was recorded
for Collegiate Digest readers by student photographer C. Robin Fish, but only aftci
he had convinced police officials and army beach patrolmen that the pictures wen
not intended for enemy use.
WILLIAM
EDWIN J.
A. HARR>
MADELIN
HARRIET
ALLEN 3
CARL MIT
MURIEL 5
DAVID SI
ANDREW
I
All coin m
must lie
Tlifi STAJ
for o p i n i i
MS IIIC'll
Wak«
Unles
freshm*
until ne
the mo
rushing
Wl
had .sis
meet a
year ea
all foul
dates vi
bined 1
one ha
from tl
calends
ated al
dates i,
been fj
Two
t unity
friends
Aire
mass f:
itory a
stitute
been d<
If th
to be i
ganize<
Counei
period,
of timf
non-w<
with t
give t
make i
Thir
pent! u
To conserve tires and gasoline, the trip to the beach (Narragansett Pier) was made
by bus. Here the friendly driver helps Shirley Buckingham onto the bus.
Collegiate Digeit Photoi by Fish
, i ^
{**"«•'\F
,ow vouf
bot
In spite of warm weather, some of the girls needed a little pei
suasion before they could force themselves in. Paul Armour or.,-.
Henry Elysious help Barbara Linggame make up her mind.
" • L'^o. a lot
f,on ago"
Some of the bunch get together to try some beach tumbling. Dick Minor
i, caught somersaulting over eight men. Nice work if you can get it.
Of course no beach party would be complete without a a.
pie of "would be" builders. Here Eugene Bellas! and gutstart a sand castle.
Climax of the fun comes- wh«n «, i
pared at the fraternity ho"se A L u ^ a T o n ™ , ' ^
b fl
'
*"*"
' P *
Which h
°d
bee
"
P
PAGE 3
-suBssKBSWSSsffi
PAGE 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941
W
: W f*
•W " f r
-
STATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26,1941
it.:M*-'//
'M
M«h*«>«l <*«l !•<•»«•••
f?pf/rpc_-
..
PAGE 3
D...I.
i
rv
i
ICIil
tgram
tating will
m Debate
nural proIon may
ne revised
removes
Era Hirsh,
uncil, last
ly organi• members
could detion can
l though
sphere: a
i fraternjan chaletc.
lule has
the var;e squads,
he same
ltramural
i subject,
upon by
mcil also
alify any
Will be
.ay after-
had
meet
year
all f
date:
binet
one
from
caler
ated
datei
been
Tv
I unit
frier}
A)
mass
itorji
stitu
been
If
to be
ganis
Coun
perio
of tii
lion-'
Hoflord
Ship Designs First, T h e n t h e Ships
At Rhod island State College a new
war course in engineering acquaints student', t. w- the lam
age" of shipyards by teaching them ship design. Prof. Bdson
Schock wo has 45 ship
designs to his credit, examines a boat which >•' V Strong s designing.
O u t i n g s a n d W i e n e r Roasts are more popular than ever on campuses this year as all
out war conservation makes elaborate parties
taboo. Here students of So. Illinois Normal University gather at Giant City State Park in Carbondale for hot dogs, marshmallows and singGlobe Photo
O n e , T w o , T h r e e , Kick A third " l i n e " takes to the
field at University of Miami
football games when the
school band forms a Conga
line during the half. Majorette Marion Foley sets the
fans " g a - g a " with her fascinating rhythm.
with
M'ivo
makt
Th
pend
ItC
La
dent
serin
minis
abilit
Th
* " ' W r " b e r of
° " " r o C e " -rtf"«'
P'es- R ° ! Defense CeunNati
°r
Harriet Elliott,
,il fAiss H a " „ a t t h e
d e c - ° ! T o U e g e of t h e
W o m e n s Co »
Cor.
Univers.tY
0,ina
<>
„
n
a
'fee Hik»
°' K°n,uck*
«cT r a i n i n g o n W a r T i m e Basis
Toughened u|
the goal of the University of Southern California
program. Emphasizing sports of contact and comtn
program will eliminate less strenuous classes such
ing and badminton. Jerry Whitney, Fred McCall u
up and a l 'em over the barrier hurdle
'
r . n w a r probt . v e P « r t ' n e m b e r of t h e
S r V d v t o T y
Boura-
COO|)(
0.7k!
The
(ice I
The (.
IICS.S
II'
sh(ju|
rest. (
sion j ,
stude>
omigj
latiojl
Htuckl
Thf
Unioig
stakef
havfcf
Are
TQki
C o ,. v,
be
(
*<« be
«ds
bo*?,
c^
Q(„ y
duration is
y Over
over Qs,
••'''•*xi.~. • •
^ " " • - 1 I "T ^
it i'(IU< u t i o n
^^*^^^HBI^s^^^^M
; """ Port in Z
•..ir me new
'
riy. ne skat-
fQOd
>
* » -e°n ; r ^ - o o n
9 oo/mg.
W
^
• but ,/, '
Doni'he a r e
.« •'•f"hfr^i^nrTtrTtirtiini#'BMi*mtflfiw*iiriif • ^Hhk-.
She M e e t s A i l C o m e r s
Jean Stuhler, co-ed
member of the Queen's College golf team, has developed her game to a point where she can shoot
at par with the best of them. She has won a place
on the "first" team and is one of the top point win
ners in varsity competition
A. .».
I
New
Coaches
This year scores of new
football coaches have
popped up to fill positions vacated by Veterans who have entered
the armed forces. Some
are new, others have
been on the national
grid scene for years,
but all will produce
thrills a p l e n t y each
week for the millions of
Americans who follow
the pigskin parade. /••"••
Ex-Frosh Coach Elmer Burnham re
places Mai Elward at Purdue.
-""Wing
North Carolina selected Jim
latum to fill boots of Ray Wolf.
Howard O'Dell will attempt to p,ull
Yale out ol the football doldrums
..... ."
A veteran line coach, Di Genu
Huusei will lead MIMIM-M.I
Glenn Presnell wi
>how al Nebraska.
run the
Bob,
-
^
Ol III,
Navy's new coach is Comdr.
John E. Whelchel.
Punting will be strong at U.
of Washington with Ralph
(Pest) Welch al the helm.
Earl Walsh assumes the Ford
ham job for the duration.
:
>«>*«mMmmmm<mm**
<*^''«<*w*<mmmMmm
im'~*-'
•ii*i.'iW -
• ' I
• •
PAGE 8
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941
*^»«^a^Kwfi©w*£CJ& jus&m .
Man With Sharp Appetit
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26,1941
K*9M**9
* * * » • » ^ - • :^P8^MBWs(BIW«»<i«a»»-
r/iriim frv Prnno
H
I More State Graduates
PAGE 3
lrV»Ua4"» • " k lincil
rogram
Vol;"
debating will
when Debate
.ramural probation may
;r the revised
I'hls removes
iy Ira Hirsh,
Council, last
only organitwo members
ad could del a t i o n can
even though
ne sphere: a
ge a fratern,y can challub, etc.
•hedule has
her the varibate squads,
r the same
I intramural
own subject,
scd upon by
Council also
isqualify any
AJ
The
lege
yi'ii
I'M
(I n i l
Jffl
WIL
EDV
A. h
MAC
HAP
ALL
CAR
MUF
DAV
ANC
j
All
HI US
Tlio
for
I
IIS
itcs will be
irsday after-
w
School's a Pleasure, N o w Algebra and geometry should be
fun, now that members of Kappa
Kappa Gamma sorority have volunteered to assist candidates for
Aviation Cadets in brushing up on
their math at Northwestern University. Here Jean Horgan instructs a
fres
unt
the
l'UK:
i
had
me<
yea
all
dab
bini j
one
froj }
cale
atei
dati
bee
T
tun
frie l
P
mat
itor
stit
bee:> !
h
to t
gan
Con
peri
of t
non
wit
Kivi
nial
T
Tests D e t e r m i n e M u s c u l a r C o o r d i n a t i o n — To aid students in finding their place in the nation's victory effort, a battery of psychological
and aptitude tests were given Massachusetts State College undergraduates. Dr. Harry N . Glick here conducts a test which will indicate if the
students can use their hands to advantage in a defense job.
Uncle Sam, capping a student nurse
al the end of her probationary period, typifies America's concern that
both the armed forces and the civilian population shall have adequate
nursing service. College undergraduates are urged to plan their courses
in such a way as to obtain both a
Bachelor's degree and a diploma in
nursing.
War Worker
While U. S. and Chinese forces fight shoulder to shoulder in the
Orient, many Chinese
like Francis Li, right,
are doing their part on
the industrial front. Li
is shown testing the
rotor of a gigantic marine motor. He graduated from Manhattan
College last year, was
a frequent contributor
to
Collegiate
Digest
during his undergraduate days.
I n t e r n a t i o n a l S t u d e n t A s s e m b l y O p e n s - Above are part of a
group of more than 350 youths from 53 countries who gathered at
American University in Washington, D. C. to "affirm the solidarity of
the university world against the common enemy of learning, culture
and free spirit."
C o o r d i n a t o r — Dr. Edward C. Elliott, president of Purdue
University, has obtained a leave of absence to become
national coordinator of civilian training in technical and
military colleges.
*"">•'
Antioch College Drivers Set Traffic Record
Not one serious traffic accident in four years! That's the record established by Antioch College, Yellow Springs, O , despite the fact its student drivers cover more than 1,000 miles each
week. Sensible rules for long trips and night driving . rigid car inspection twice a year
these
a lively safety campaign under the direction of the college community government
tl
are the factors behind the record which has won commendation from state safety officials
It I
min
abil
T
Acme
The N a t i o n a l C a l l for nurses is
sounded in this poster prepared by
the United States Public Health Service. Fully 55,000 young women with
high school or college education are
needed to enter schools of nursing
during the 1942-43 school year.
H e K n o w s His A n g l e s —
Trick shots are easy for
M a y n a r d L. Colomaio, University of Buffalo student. He
demonstrated his wizardry
with the cue by winning the
national intercollegiate threecushion billiard championship
this year.
jH'll
(il'll'
class.
When Hamilton College students held a Buy-a-Bond
ball, all corsage money went into war stamps. They
danced with the satisfaction that they had in some way
helped their friends and classmates who have already
gone to war. Are you doing your part to back the boys?
;'oo|
(Jfl'l
The
(ice
The
IK'SH
II'
shoi
rest
sion
Still]
omil
latic
stud
T]
U.ik
stag
bu
y
BONDS
Invest in America!
Students take out trip insurance before starting on an educational field
tour. Antioch student* travel plenty as half of their school year is spent
getting experience on real jobs in tome 20 stale*.
f J
iiM*ii»i«ri1lllwHjiil
PAGE 8
ifflbi
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941
Man With Sharp Appetite
STATE .COLLFnF N£WS»to<ii^y-a»*ii w^f»J»«g'*ta> * * »
,
J ,, i
BM
Board of Four Retires
To Administer
PTEB rrogram
rtP«rtfc**;<«***^|*^
, ^ | l w g | J S f l t / ^ 4 , * •s ...
Canada's
Youth
Keep *it
I
In a world whose heart bealb
rhythm
of
marching
feet
Passow T o Retire as D i r e c t o r ;
Describes
- 'he
and
ers'
1
I:
motors,
prized
as
there
youth.
is
no
Youth's
whose
quality
so
enthusiasm,
incorruptible
I
banners
c
in a w e a r y
Canada
/I
pride are flung out
today
for
the
reau's policies. Tlioir names will be
announced in lb • m a r liiiure b\
Miss Dct.aney.
Pro-Rec p l a n , a movement which was
started
B.
C.
back
It
scheme
in
is a
of
1934
in
Vancouver,
government-conducted
free
recreation
centers
which provide physical recreation
youths of both sexes. Utilizing
1
for
school
auditoriums, gymnasiums, church
and
community halls all activities are designed to d e v e l o p strength,
Li
u
and
muscular
ti
programs
of
those
expensive
n
have
of
widened
the
matic
and
clubs,
gymnastic
IT
competitions,
even
centers
orchestral
public
groups,
social
broadcasts
like
Activities
drahiking
demonstrations
concerts,
radio
Weekly
read
clubs.
to include
h,
and
flexibility
coordination.
on
and
mixers
sport
U)
a n d recreation. A n d it is all free. The
i
only required qualifications a r e friendliness a n d a desire to k e e p fit.
bl
01
P a r t Time Employment Bureau
i n a u g u r a t e d a new system of m a n a g e m e n t to replace the directorship
of retiring head, A. Harry Passow,
who had charge of the bureau during 1940-1941. Sara Tod DeLaney,
D e a n of Women, stated that the
c h a n g e in the administration will
bring into operation a board of
four members sharing equal responsibility in r u n n i n g the agency
instead of having a single man in
like
civilization.
is thankful
Growth
.S?^ 1 5 ,
,
T h r e e m e n and one w o m a n
have c o m p l e t e e h a i - r (.f I he
its e n e r g y , its a b o u n d i n g idealism a n d
cf
Bureau's
Since its Start in 1 9 3 9
pulse vibrates with the throb of bomb-
/
C o l l e g i a l c Dicjcsl Photoi by Jaques Black Slar
f)
•
CI
al
(1:
b(
.
in
ib
St
lit
to
et
,,
will
bu-
T h e B o a r d w i l l wo: k m i : plans for
t h e b u r e a u at l u t u r e ineel ings T h e
m e n w i l l do I he eauvassin ; work
i n v e s t i g a t i n g calls, and
drumming
up
jobs, w h i l e
I lie Woman
Will
h a n d l e o f f i c e work solely. T o insure
success ol (he system, . I u d e i i i s arc
asked In n ply to c a l l ' i m m e d i a t e l y
l Y r r i l z I iisl Diicetnr
r(,|z
'
'4°.
wl,
°
'
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from h a m e r Dean ol W
ell, Miss
M o r c l u n d . L a t e r , M a n .Line M a c N a m a r a assumed Hie t i t l e ol eod i n - e l l r and l a , n \ \ can:,, m as
f i e l d d i r e c t o r c o n t a c t , u e employers
a n d b u i l d i n g up a r e p u t a t i o n lor
t h e b u r e a u W h i l e I h e r e was a decrease in the c o p e r a t i o n I'Udenl in
I h e I n . 1 M a r , the bun-ail had an
easier u n a ' 111 c a r r y i n g out Us p r o Kraut
,
500 Leads Last Year
f i v e h u n d r e d lead'
were listed
lust \ e a r , a n d 'Jail student.-, were
placed
W h i l e no i n t e n s i v e i l r ^ ' '
has been M a r l e d this M a r
many
s t u d e n t s have been placed
New
l o r n i s have b e i n added and the
b u r e a u hopes to e x t e n d i's i n i l u cnee I h r o l l d i greater etl'leteiic\ and
systematic planning
Passow I eels t h a i the P T K B fills
a l o n g - w a n t e d i c e d al S t a l e C o l lege in that an o r g a i i l / i ' d p r o g r a m
p r o v i d e s a more e f l e c l i v e wa\ to
siid s t u d e n t s i h t i n mere!', i n d i v i d u a l
c a n v a s s i n g . He also s l a t e d l h a l his
p o s i t i o n as D i r e c t o r has a f f o r d e d
h i l l l With a m e a l deal ol experience
ill d e a l i i i ' Will) I n d i v i d u a l s a n d in
s e l l i n g personalities.
\Y/-||
ciSSeS
W i l l
f^ff
C\
.
CieCt
L A
I
Orricers M o n d a y
of
nc
w:
Ki
m
(it!
sci
mi
till
Th
.
Find Teaching Positions
Debate Council
Plans Program
A new experiment in d e b a t i n g will
be featured this year when D e b a t e
Council launches Its i n t r a m u r a l p r o g r a m a t S t a t e College.
Any
school organization m a y
challenge a n o t h e r under t h e revised
i n t r a m u r a l set-up. T h i s removes
t h e restriction made by I r a Hirsh,
'41, President of Debate Council, last
J u n e to the effect that only o r g a n i zations having at least two m e m b e r s
on Varsity Debate Squad could debate.
Any c a m p u s organization c a n
challenge any other even t h o u g h
they are not in the same s p h e r e : a
publication can challenge a f r a t e r n ity, an honorary society c a n c h a l lenge a d e p a r t m e n t a l club, etc.
The
I n t r a m u r a l schedule h a s
nothing to do with either t h e v a r sity or the freshmen debate squads.
They are only under t h e s a m e
governing right. Each i n t r a m u r a l
team can choose Its own subject,
provided that it is passed upon by
Debate Council. T h e Council also
reserves the right lo disqualify any
debater.
T h e i n t r a m u r a l debates will be
held on every other T h u r s d a y afternoon at T:HI P. M,
To G u s t a v e L o r e y S t u d i o
individual
|(1| .
,,„,
and
group
u,a,.bon|.
photographs
,,|M
V( , a ,.
|lu,n,
w,,s
, , , , l s U | , . 1 : l | j l , . satisfaction
with
, , „ , i n d i v i d u a l p i c t u r e s I n choosing
., p h o t o g r a p h e r , the board look t h i s
.,,, „ . , ,,,..., c o n s i d e r a t i o n
-,-,,,.. , , . , , . s| ,„,,,„, w l l l „., w i V ( , n
, „ , . , „ , m M r ; 1 ( l ,,, l h ( . U M | i l l U)11 ,.
sjx
T h ( , ,,,,1,1,,, ,,, eNlending special s l u ,.. l t ( . s , l m i f r e s h m e n a l u | i n d ( , _
(|,,m
, , , . , , , | , . n l s a n , u r H ( , c | ,,, , l l k l , , , c | v a n _
:;m,i ,,| 1111:, o p p o r t u n i t y .
|,;,lrn
underclassman
will
be
H i a r e u l a s i l l i n g l i " 01 $1.50. K e n will enM1] . s ,,,,,,,, p . | V $._> .-)(1 u h i c l i
1 n le i h , - m to twelve picl ures for t h e
e m p l o y m e n t b u r e a u . T o avoid c o n n i s i n n ,.,,,,| , „ r a e i l i t a l " better p i e .students are
re(|liesled
to
mn,s,
. , , , , U ] 1 |,„. a s i l l i n u on the sehep,,.,,,,,, , , n , ] , , , | | l a i ) ) | ^ ,,]]<• (111
llul(..,
board T h e p h o t o g r a p h e r w i l l be al
u „ , n , j i , , ; i , m n, ( , , . , „ „ „ | 1 ( ) t ,,,| , „ ,
o „ , schedule.-, l r o m !) A. M 1111m 4 ••M p
,, VI ,,. V school ( i a v
M
i n , n . .Se]Hembcr :i(l t'hroii i l l O c l n | „ T 17 a | | , , r w h i c h d a l e no i n d i vicinal p i c t u r e s w i l l be t a k e n . S111, | , , n l - s are rcciuestod to m a k e t h e i r
a p p o i n t l n c l l t s as e a r h d u r i n g t h i s
period as possible,
A n o t h e r i n n o v a t i o n is the
uni-j
lormil.v id cn.stuiiie. Ciirls are asked
to wear w h i l e or light colored silk
blouse; w i t h c o n v e r t i b l e n e c k l i n e s .
and
M''"
(iark
I wo i e\ ni i • coining up
T i r;i
Lucille Ci.iiU
and
Allel.
I'erbo
WAA
Mau.eic!
I m
ll.iim
and
l.eda I aSalle
Ue lilt
-U tin
n Mile:
w ill lie
posted '
el line n c \ l u r i 1.
;•<>(
0*
Graduates
Pedagogue Signs
Photo Contract
Kevotes on o l l i e e r
l o r the c
i n g year w i l l be belli M o n d a \ 111
f l i c Com
lis T h e h a i r el i. se \ oled
p r e v i o u s l y 1111 the W e d n e s d a \ lollow •
i n g n o m i n a t i o n s w h i c h were held
M o n d a \ noon al class m c ' i m c
T h e Senior class Will choose bet w e e n .lane W i l l i . m i s and M a n I n
ing lor WAA Manager when tbe\
go i n the C o m m o n - M o i i d a \
The
class ol l!l'i:i w 'II re\ o h ' on l l u ee ol •
[Ices
WAA
Uepre c i i l a t l M '
Jane
(Ireeiuii.ni
H irolhs
HUM k
and
S y l v i a T i l l . M A A Hepre e n i a l n e
Owen
B o m b a r d . Ncgi
Hammond
a n d Uoberl 1, 'iiliard r'lualice Board
Itcpre eiilallM'
( i e n r '.-• K u n ' and
E d w a r d Deed T h e soplioliicav
have
It
More State
Miss I r e n e Semenek, head of
the S t u d e n t Employment B u reau, has stated t h a t in the
T h e cut in the a m o u n t of NYA
past week ten mora graduates
money which was feared coming late
of S t a t e College have found
last year has been made. T h e NYA
places as teachers in the schools
appropriation to S t a t e College h a s
of New York State. They are as
been cut by $5,000.
follows:
T h i s means, of course, t h a t m a n y
Mabel Richardson, Greenville,
of t h e new applications for NYA j Science; Delia N. Dolan, Kings
work must be rejected a n d the r e - j Park, Commerce and Social S t u issuing of former jobs m u s t be care- j dies; William Howe, Hoosac
fully considered. Miss S a r a T. D e - ! School,
Mathematics
and
Laney, Dean of S t u d e n t s , who is
Science;
K a t h e r i n e Crisara,
also Director of NYA, is now busily I Jacksonville, M a t h e m a t i c s and
engaged in sorting the applications
Physics;
Mildred
M.
Niff,
and interviewing the applicants.
Downsville, grades; Mary H,
The Forum, newly formed o r g a n Cudahy, Schuylerville, grades;
ization taking the place of former
Elinor Ganley, Fort Edwards,
years' F o r u m if Politics, is conduct-1 General Science; Myrtle F o u r n ing a n investigation as to t h e r e a ier, Russel, C o m m e r c e ; Margaret
Kelly, Mamaroneck, Commerce;
A . H A R R Y P A S S O W , Retiring Head sons for the cut in the NYA appropriation. T h e appropriations of s u r Karl Brooks. East Greenbush,
of the Part Time Employment Bureau, who rounding schools and colleges are to
grades.
be investigated and a report is to
... ,
.. . .
,
, '
w
' " ' " ' " °ve'his dut.es to a board of four. be made.
;
*
S C A T o C o n d u c t Installation
On Tuesday. September HO. at
.'i:30 P. M. in the Lounge, the Forum
will hold its first meeting. To this
K a l h r y n Wilson. '42. President of
meeting Miss Brodcriek. District SCA. has a n n o u n c e d that the a n head of NYA, will send two NYA nual SCA c a m p l i r e and torchlight
representatives. A panel discussion, ceremony will be held from 7:30 to
will then lake place. Evelyn S m i t h j 11:30 P. M„ S a t u r d a y al the Greek
and A. Harry Passow, seniors, will T h e a t r e and the dormitory Held.
I n d i v i d u a l , G r o u p Photographs
represent the student body. Miss Members of First and Second CabDei,aney will also be present,
inets will be installed.
For ' 4 2 Y e a r b o o k A s s i g n e d
The New and
250
Madison Flower Shop
( I T I <'LOW K i t s
» .
I i-li-urilitli
r
I l,mi'is
I I I T J u lii'l,'
I'ltiinr H-:), .7.'l - una M a d i s o n A v e .
Yes . . . It Flattens
Your Tummy!
You 11 find
At the
ANNEX
Tin's Flat i n n s
I'anlii1 llinlli1 IJ\ Kdi'liinn
ihc H a y tn y o u t h f u l
gnirs licitcatli
l l i c s m ' T a i ' i ' l<> l i t u l
s l r i n l r i ' l i n t ' s . . . S l r i p s nl i-laslii-, s k i l l l ' t i l l s
I'll'ci I i\ r l \ H a l l CM l i t e a l n l n t l H U I , }.' I\ i l l ) ' -.1 l ' l i l l g i ' l ' , l u - l l i T s l l ] i | a i | ' t
liriit'c-
DRINK
Improved
FLATUMS
lenses - ( l a n l e n i a s
< OKS.MH.S
ni'i
.she
ro.i
aid)
41 NORTH Pff/tM.
' « i l h «i''ic shins.
Th
I
t/erJ
prelonibl.\
w i t h long sleeves
s h o u l d wear suits, p r e f e r a b l y
Orchids
i ie
Forum to Probe
N Y A Reduction
PAGE 3
Passow, retiring head, told about
T h e 1IJ42 Pedagogu • board has a n the growth ol lhe organization Irnm , „ „ , , „ , , , l h a l „ h u s ,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,1 w i l h
i t s i n i t i a t i o n .n I!K1<) l» isdgar P e r - ,,,,. 0 u M a v t , L o n > v s t m | i „ t ( ) l a k c ,
a
('(
lie
lirt
i*JiP
STATE COLLEGE NEWS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26,1941
.
i't
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ICE
CREAM
A wiiiu IITI'H I jja n i i r i i t ,
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T a l m i s l i i l i 1 I; i -11 • i ii • r c l n s i i i i ' .
Mtt|
W ' a s h a l i K ' a m i i i u ' \ p i ' t i s i \ v.
onj
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stu
ISofhiiiy Else So (UHUI
uj
Is So Good For
You
Young Contour Shop - Second Floor
ha
.v, the i « e 0 '
r
"""
, ihe University
Girls c o n c e n t r a t e on exercises that will strengthen those tummy muscles a n d achieve the svelte
me
Column'0
waistline. As much of the work is d o n e outside as possible. Racial, social, political a n d religious
differences a r e forgotten In the search for health.
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PAGES
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I I
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1941
.£E£gUm£(&*blBKS^
Man With Sharp Appetite
mm*Mu»*mmT*y***rPf*VtK***lt*
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 86,1941
•aff.
•A«|—jgg^MBiWl»»««^>^;W^
Canada's
Youth
Keeps Fit
In a world whose heart beats to the
rhythm of marching feet and whose
pulse vibrates with the throb of bombers' motors, there is no quality so
prized as youth. Youth's enthusiasm,
its energy, its abounding idealism and
incorruptible pride are flung out like
banners in a weary civilization.
Canada today is thankful for the
Pro-Rec plan, a movement which was
started back in 1934 in Vancouver,
B. C. It is a government-conducted
scheme of free recreation centers
which'provide physical recreation for
youths of both sexes. Utilizing school
auditoriums, gymnasiums, church and
community halls all activities are designed to develop strength, flexibility
and muscular coordination. Weekly
programs of the centers read like
those of expensive clubs. Activities
have widened to include public dramatic and orchestral groups, hiking
clubs, gymnastic demonstrations and
competitions, concerts, social mixers
and even radio broadcasts on sport
and recreation. And it is all free. The
only required qualifications are friendliness and a desire to keep fit.
Collegiate Digest Photos by Jaques-Black Star
n
II
Board of Four
To Administer
PTEB rrogram
Pauow To Retire at Director;
Describes Bureau's Growth
Since its Start in 1939
Retires-
The cut in the amount of NYA
money which was feared coming late
last year has been made. The NYA
appropriation to State College has
been cut by $5,000.
This means, of course, that many
of the new applications for NYA
work must be rejected and the reissuing of former jobs must be carefully considered. Miss Sara T. DeLaney, Dean of Students, who is
also Director of NYA, is now busily
engaged in sorting the applications
and interviewing the applicants.
The Forum, newly formed organization taking the place of former
years' Forum if Politics, is conducting an investigation as to the reasons for the cut in the NYA approA. HARRY PASSOW, Retiring Head priation. The appropriations of surof the Part Time Employment Bureau, who rounding schools and colleges are to
will turn over his duties to a board of four. be investigated and a report is to
be made.
On Tuesday, September 30, at
3:30 P. M. in the Lounge, the Forum
will hold its first meeting. To this
meeting Miss Broderick, District
head of NYA, will send two NYA
representatives. A panel discussion
will then take place. Evelyn Smith
and A. Harry Passow, seniors, will
Individual, Group Photographs
represent the student body. Miss
DeLaney will also be present.
For '42 Yearbook Assigned
To Gustave Lorey Studio
Part Time Employment Bureau
Inaugurated a new system of management to replace the directorship
of retiring head, A. Harry Passow,
who had charge of the bureau during 1940-1941. Sara Tod DeLaney,
Dean of Women, stated that the
change in the administration will
bring into operation a board of
four members sharing equal responsibility in running the agency
instead of having a single man in
charge.
Three men and one woman will
have complete charge cf the bureau's policies. Their names will be
announced in trn near future by
Miss DeLaney.
The Board will work out plans for
the bureau at future meetings. The
men will do the canvassing work,
investigating calls, and drumming
up jobs, while I he woman will
handle office work solely. To insure
success of the system, students are
asked to reply to calls immediately.1
Perritz First Director
Passow, retiring head, told about
The 1942 Pedagogue board has anthe growth of the organization from nounced that it has contracted with
its initiation in 1939 by Edgar Per- the Gustave Lorey Studio to take
retz, '40, who took the agency individual and group photographs
from former Dean of Women, Miss for the yearbook. Last year there
Moreland. Later, Mary Jane Mac- was considerable satisfaction with
Namara assumed the title of co- the individual pictures. In choosing
directcr and Passow came in as a photographer, the board took this
field director, contacting employers as its first consideration.
and building up a reputation for This year students will be given
the bureau. While there was a de- six poses instead of the usual four.
crease in the cooperation evident in The studio is extending special stuthe first year, the bureau had an
rates and freshmen and indeeasier time in carrying out its pro- dent
pendents are urged to take advangram.
tage of this opportunity.
500 Leads Last Year
Each
underclassman
will
be
Five hundred leads were listed charged a sitting fe^ of $1.50. Senlast year, and 250 students were iors must pay $2.50, which will enplaced.
While no intensive drive title them to twelve pictures for the
has been started this year, many employment bureau. To avoid constudents have been placed. New fusion and to facilitate better picforms have been added and the tures, students are requested to
bureau hopes to extend its influ- sign up for a sitting on the scheence through greater efficiency and dules posted on the main bulletin
systematic planning.
board. The photographer will be at
Passow feels that the PTEB fills the college in the room noted on
a long-wanted need at State Col- the schedules' from 9 A. M. unlege in that an organized program til 4:30 P. M. every school day
provides a more effective way to from September 30 through Octoaid students than merely individual ber 17, after which date no indicanvassing. He also stated that his vidual pictures will be taken. Stuposition as Director has afforded dents are requested to make their
him with a great deal of experience appointments as early during this
in dealing with individuals and in period as possible.
selling personalities.
Another innovation is the uniformity of costume. Girls are asked
to wear white or light colored silk
blouses with convertible necklines,
Classes Will Elect
and preferably with long sleeves.
Men should wear suits, preferably
Officers Monday dark, with white shirts.
Pedagogue Signs
Photo Contract
Orchids
«
Revotes on officers for the coming year will be held Monday in
the Commons. The four classes voted
previously on the Wednesday following nominations which were held
Monday noon at class meetings.
Tile Senior class will choose between Jane Williams and Mary Irving for WAA Manager when they
go to the Commons Monday. The
class of 1943 will revote on three offices: WAA Representative: Jane
Grecnman. Dorothy Huyck and
Sylvia Tefft; MA A Representative:
Owen Bombard; Regis Hammond
and Robert Leonard; Finance Board
Representative: George Kunz and
Edward Reed. The sophomores have
two revotes coming up: Treasurer:
Lucille Grants and Allen Terho;
WAA Managers: Lois Dunn and
Loda LaSalle.
Results of the revotes will be
posted sometime next week.
I i
Forum to Probe
N Y A Reduction
ORINK
-
The New and
PAGE 3
More State Graduates
Find Teaching Positions
Miss Irene Semenek, head of
the Student Employment Bureau, has stated that in the
past week ten mors graduates
of State College have found
places as teachers in the schools
of New York State. They are as
follows:
Mabel Richardson, Greenville,
Science; Delia N. Dolan, Kings
Park, Commerce and Social Studies; William Howe, Hoosac
School,
Mathematics
and
Science;
Katherine
Crisara,
Jacksonville, Mathematics and
Physics;
Mildred
M.
Niff,
Downsville, grades; Mary H.
Cudahy, Schuylerville, grades;
Elinor Ganley, Fort Edwards,
General Science; Myrtle Fournier, Russel, Commerce; Margaret
Kelly, Mamaroneck, Commerce;
Karl Brooks, East Greenbush,
grades.
SCA To Conduct Installation
Kathryn Wilson, '42, President of
SCA, has announced that the annual SCA campfire and torchlight
ceremony will be held from 7:30 to
8:30 P. M„ Saturday at the Greek
Theatre and the dormitory field.
Members of First and Second Cabinets will be Installed.
Improved
Debate Council
Plans Program
A new experiment in debating will
be featured this year when Debate
Council launches its Intramural program at State College.
Any school organization may
challenge another under the revised
intramural set-up. This removes
the restriction made by Ira Hirsh,
'41, President of Debate Council, last
June to the effect that only organizations having at least two members
on Varsity Debate Squad could debate.
Any campus organization can
challenge any other even though
they are not in the same sphere: a
publication can challenge a fraternity, an honorary society can challenge a departmental club, etc.
The Intramural schedule has
nothing to do with either the varsity or the freshmen debate squads.
They are only under the same
governing right. Each intramural
team can choose its own subject,
provided that it is passed upon by
Debate Council. The Council also
reserves the right to disqualify any
debater.
The intramural debates will be
held on every other Thursday afternoon at 3:30 P. M.
w
FLATUMS
250
Roses - Gardenias
CORSAGES
Madison Flower Shop
CUT F L O W E R S
W> ICIi'ifniipli I'lowi'i'H Kvorjivlioro
Phone cS-3573 - 1026 Madison Ave.
Yes . . . It Flattens
Your Tummy!
You 11 find
At the
ANNEX
This Hatums Pantie Girdle by Fortuna goes beneath the surface to find
the way to youthful slender lines . . . Strips of elastic, skillfully fashioned,
mrsh
CREAM
effectively flatten the abdomen, giving stronger, better support for heavier
figures.
A wonderful garment, of sturdy cotton elastic, to wear under
sport clothes, play clothes, hostess gowns, as well as your regular costumes.
Talon slide fastener closing. Washable and inexpensive.
•
•
•
Nothing Else So Good
12 OUNCI BOITli
PWi^^^^^
i
m«iii« Tr
C a.tf*H»'
la So Good
For
You
Young Contour Shop - Second Floor
dec
Girlt concentrate on exerciset that will strengthen those tummy muscles and achieve the svelte
waistline. At much of the work is done outtide at postible. Racial, social, political and religious
differences are forgotten in the search for health,
MBriii in
luHWg
mmmmmm>im»<
lifjm \xfwsBimS3*>* .»EfeHtT»tasi.*»&;
I :JH
PA&4
iTATE COLLEGE NEWS, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26,1941
Mitchellairs
Giavelli Assists I-M Council
In Promoting Frosh Tennis
Plan of MAA
Strict Economy
by Gene Guarlno
•CARLThe class of '44 made quite a mer she came in first in a contest
-GINNYCouncil Promises Cooperation
name for itself last year as a bunch staged at Washington Park.
We emerge from the midst of a
Harry
Kensky,
No.
1
man
on
W i t h Intramural Activities;
Heaven be praised! Not only has
of "tradition breakers," but they
flurry of excited frosh, over-packed
tennis team, has watched WAA acquired a president in t h e
have nothing on Nora Giavelli of State's
mailboxes, a n d fraternity propaVice-Presidency Vacant
Nora play, He thinks she is a good person of Kay Peterson, but it has
the class of '45. This budding bit of player and will give a good acganda in all forms, and risk a glance
from the now quiet Publications OfEnsuing a plan of "strictest econo- femininity is going out for varsity counting of herself in the tourna- also acquired an artiste! Have you
fice doorway.
my," the Men's Athletic Association tennis, believe it or not!
ment. When asked what he thought noticed (who could help but notice
We withdraw the ole bean in council will attempt to provide the
It seems that someone tentatively of having a girl on the tennis team, it) the dressed up bulletin board?
haste for bearing down on us from maximum activity for the student identified as Francis Mullin signed,he admitted, "It would be very nice It seemed that Kay and Armedethe direction of the men's locker body at a minimum of expense.
her name for the freshman tennis —wouldn't it???
Black are responsible. They certainly
room in a sturdy blond lad over six
which
Intramural Art Flax, who is in charge of the made katchy, kute and klever inviThe council considers itself re- tournament
feet in altitude. A nervous interview sponsible for more student activity Council is sponsoring to check on contest, has already posted the sche- tations to the world of sports.
reveals that he is one Dave "Doc" in the various sports of the college. varsity tennis potentialities in thedule
the fifteen freshmen who
Camp Johnston . . . Way out
Cooke, a graduate of the New York Therefore, in an effort to do thefrosh class. She admits she was a signedforup
(including Nora, of thai- in Chatham . . . won't know
State Teacher's College of Buffalo. most good for the greatest num- little flabbergasted to hear of it, course) but now
expects a last min- itself in a little while. The longWe timidly ask if this proud pos- ber, considerable attention is be-but she regained her usual com- ute rush.
sessor of a B.S. in Education ever ing focused on the Intramural posure and came back like a real Nora's first round opponent, Gor- promised curtains are destined t o
went out for sports and the answer
sport, deciding to leave her name on don Baskin, nearly fell over when appear in the near future to make
weekends in the great outdoors
staggers us. "Doc" received fourteen Council.
Along with the three mainstays of the list. "Anyway, I think girls he found out whom he was to play. more home-like. As if this shock
letters in basketball, soccer, tennis,
really
should
go
out
for
more
sports
His
only
comment
was,
"She's
too
wasn't enough, there is also promise
and golf—everyone a major sport! the non-varsity calibre, MAA is here at State. I t might arouse more good for me. She's an ace."
A further glance into the ranks planning to add a number of other interest for one thing." She is not Kay Peterson has already found of rejuvenating the outer walls by
of the graduate school reveals that sports to the intramural program. a girl who cares to brag about her- out that Nora is also an excellent a creosote treatment.
the former chauffeur of this p i l l a r - At present, soccer, bowling, volley self (or needs to for that matter) bowler and envisions a men and woTo the uninitiated, let me say that
then known as "Maloney's Baloney," ball, and golf are under considera- but we found out that she toon a men's
Camp Johnston is the headquarters
bowling
league.
Not
a
bad
tion.
is also back in search of higher
tennis tourney in Panama where idea. You've started something of the Lotta Bunkers, a hiking
education. Jim Is specializing inj Closer affiliation is also in line. she originally lived. And last sum- Nora!
group, and all those who like to "get
American History. The title of his Both council presidents are workaway from it all" for a weekend.
column has gained everlasting fame ing hand in hand in planning
It has triple decker bunks, a pump,
ward to more varied activities. Ac- candlelight illumination, and a great
future programs, and in widening
for the fella.
cording to Regis Hammond, presi- expanse of rolling lawn extending
the undergraduate spurt activities.
Going back and looking over the No longer will the representative.!
dent of Intramural Council, "Each in four directions.
available frosh men we find a n - of the various competitive teams
year the Council has been thwarted
other outstanding sports potential- arrange their own schedules and
in its efforts to expand its program. Betty Lou Court is in charge of
ity. This tall lad is Fran Mullin of then apply to MAA council for apWith a little co-operation we hope the camp this year and will schedule
Schenectady. Fran attended Mount proval. Instead, the Association's
this year to buy a new ping-pong camp weekends throughout the difPleasant High School and held posi- council will take a more active inMen's Intramural Council is start- table for the Commons, introduce a ferent seasons. However, any group
tions on the basketball, bowling, terest In providing State students ing the year off in a business-like bowling league, possibly golf and of six or more girls may secure perand Softball aggregations. In ten- with a varied and attractive intra- fashion. The tennis tournament for six-man soccer." I n evidence of itsmission to journey cut to the camp
nis, he led the flock as the No. 1mural program for the coming year. freshmen is already underway and good intentions Intramural Council on weekends nt scheduled.
Man!
already delegated members to The first issue of the WAA HandSince Frank Hansen, '43, vice- the starting date for football has has
investigate these different fields of book will be out in a couple of
Last Wednesday we sneaked over president-elect of MAA council did been tentatively set for Monday.
weeks. Senior Anita Holm is editor.
to the Washington Park courts and not return this year and may not This starting date depends upon expansion.
found Mullin and Nora Giavelli enter school until February, the two factors: (1) how soon Council
putting on a n impressive perform- council Is awaiting the results of will know what fields it may use
ance. Although the young lady the junior class elections before a p - and (2) if Dr. Dorwaldt can give all
DIAL 5-1913
GEORGE D. JEONEY. PROP.
came out on the short end of the pointing a new council vice-presi- the men their necessary physical
examinations in time. Nearly one
final scoring, the tallies were near dent.
hundred men have signed up for
enough to indicate a terrific battle.
intramural sports and Dr. Dorwaldt
Mullin was very confident that Miss
examined most of them Wednesday
Giavelli would make the finals in
Peterson Clarifies
evening.
the current Tournament.
The four fraternities on the camCoach G. Elliot Hatfield, one of
TRY OUR BUSINESSMAN'S LUNCH
Girls' A w a r d Rules pus, College House, Ramblers, and
State's original proponents of a
two teams from Sayles Hall will
more extensive golf program among
the undergraduates, recently carded Freshmen women who plan to make up the eight-team league.
If everything noes as expected two
a 73 in a local country club tourna- earn their class numerals for partiment . . . and that's going some!
cipation in sports should heed the games will be played Monday afterThis summer Coach spent a requirement rule released by Kaynoon. Potter Club will play Sayles
Hall's second team and Sigma
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANY. N. Y.
couple of weeks at Manhattan Beach Peterson, '42, president of WAA.
Lambda Sigma will engage Kappa
where he took up golf and physical
Numerals will be given to all Beta. Notice of the games will be
education.
Frosh who earn credit in four sports
The fate of State's cross-country by the end of the year. These sports posted on the MAA bulletin board
hopes are still hinging upon the re- may be chosen during any two or in front of the men's locker room.
Council does not plan to be consponse of the men of the college. If more of the four seasons.
tent with the usual intramural proyour interested—Keep 'em Flying!
Upperclassmen will be awarded gram this year and is looking forWAA keys after obtaining credit for
four sports in each of three years.
W A A Fall Sportogram The years do not have to be conse- i
OTTO R. MENDE
cutive, but the keys will be awarded
Features Tennis, Riding to juniors and seniors only.
"The College
Jeweler"
To obtain credit In any one sport,
The WAA Fall Sportogram got un- a girl must have ten hours of partider way this week with a few minor cipation on record. Archery, riding, 103 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
changes made concerning time and swimming, tennis and badminton
places. Exact data may be found on will be offered again as Spring
the WAA bulletin.
sports, and hockey will be replacBig plans have been formulated ed by softball. However, a girl may
to carry on a tennis tournament. All not repeat a sport in the spring
Eat at John's Lunch
those who would like to enter the which she has taken in the fall,
PLATES 2 0 c AND UP
contest should sign up on the bulle- and receive credit for it twice,
DELICIOUS SANDWICHES
tin board and contact Lois Hafley, In order to vote In any WAA
HOME MADE ICE CREAM
'43 who will arrange the play-offs. election, a member must have credit
7 : 3 0 A. M. TO I I : 0O P. M.
These can be played at times con- for a t least one sport taken within
OPPOSITE THE HIGH SCHOOL
venient to the contestants. Those
desiring Fall tennis credit should one year previous to the election.
play ten hours, four of which must
T T T T T T T V T T T " V *
be supervised. Captains Lois Hafley
and Mary Domann will be a t the
Washington Park Courts on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 P. M.
to 4:30 P. M. for .supervision and to
give instructions to any beginners
Who wish It.
Riding is to be conducted differently this season. June Clark, '44
captain, will take groups out Saturdays, but experienced riders may go
at any time providing they secure
Courtesy of Dartmouth "Jack-o-Lunturn"
slips from the riding master to attest to their having been there. WAA
(Delicious Toasted)
refunds half of the cost to those
A better m e t h o d is t o send it h o m e regularly by R A I L j . i. KIMMEY BAKERY
Albany, N. Y,
who complete the required number
of ten hours.
W A Y EXPRESS—-and h a v e it returned t h e same way.
Z-443
Five W i l l Seek
Role of Queen
For Campus Day
Monday Elections W i l l Decide
Wearer of Royal Crown,Seniors V i e For Honor
YOUR LAUNDRY THIS YEAR?...
(White Bread)
KLEEN - MAID WHEAT
HOLSUM CRACKED WHEAT
LUNCHEONETTE SERVICE
CAMERA SUPPLIES & FINISHING
SPEEDY DELIVERY
• A.M. - I I P.M.
PHONE 4 - 2 0 3 6
P L E N T Y OF
P A R K I N G SPACE
234 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
rates include pick-up a n d delivery at n o extra charge
w i t h i n o u r regular vehicle limits in all cities and prin-
WE NEVER
CLOSE
cipal t o w n s . Y o u r choice of prepaid o r collect charges.
J u s t as c o n v e n i e n t t o o , for ' m o s t any s h i p m e n t ;
Baggage, gifts, cake o r a p e t e l e p h a n t .
RAILWAlgfeEXPRESS
AGENCY
MATION-WIDI
RAIL-AIR
years
of service to the college:
Silver Jubilee Banquet Planned
Mu Will Hold
O u r service is fast, sure—and convenient. Economical
Fresh Pastries livery Six Hours
Hot Turkey
H a m b u r g Special
Spaghetti
Sandwich
F . F . P o t a t o e s & Cold S l a w
40c
20c
25c
COMPLETE DINNERS DAILY FROM 40o to 65o
NEWS in its twenty-five
Turns
Twenty-Five Year Milestone
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Will Attend
KIMMEY'S BREAD
187 CENTRAL AVENUE
From the inner sanctum on
the first floor of Draper, where
President John M. Sayles guides
the destiny of State College,
comes this bugle note of encouragement and commendation on the achievements of the
VOL, XXVI, NO. 3
Activity Budget
Faces Decrease
WHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH
H. Monette, Prop.
'/ Predict A Bright Future'—
President Sayles Pronounces
1941
A s Anniversary Commemoration
50c
Morris Diner
A L B A N ^ I w YORK, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3,1941
"To the STATE COLUSOE NBWS;
BOULEVARD CAFETERIA
Honikel's Pharmacy
ews
The successor of Queen Bea (trice
The COLLEGE NEWS IS to be
Dower i, is one step nearer being
congratulated on its long and
chosen today as the result of last
outstanding history. It has
Friday's Student Association voting.
shaped collage policy and conFive nonimees have been selected,
structively enhanced the life of
one less than last year, when a traMoving-Up Day Charade Provided Inspiration for Establishment
dition breaking sextet vied for the this institution. I predict a
bright future for it because its
regal honors.
O f Committee by Brubacher to Issue College Newspaper,leadership, by tradition, is
The girls who were nominated for! [rained through a wise apDedicke Became First Editor-in-Chief of Publication
Campus Queen as disclosed officialprenticeship.
ly by Myskaria today are as follows:
The STATE COLLEGE N E W S tomorrow marks the twenty-fifth year of
My felicitations and congratMarion Duffy, Gamma Kappa Phi; j ulations."
its
founding.
Kay Peterson, Kappa Delta; JeanOn October 4. 1916, the Class of 1918, represented by a "Committee
nette Ryerson. Chi Sigma Theta;
Mildred Swain. Chi Sigma Theta;
lo Publish a Weekly College Newspaper," Allied K. Dedicke, chairand Kay Wilson. Kappa Delta.
man, breathed life into six pages of inanimate paper and type and
Myskaria has also announced that |
ink and gave birth lo the STATE COLLEGE N E W S .
final balloting for Compus Queen •
To commemorate its Silver Jubilee, the 1941-1942 NEWS Hoard has
will take place Tuesday in the Commons from 9 Io 4 P. M. However,
asked all former board members to join in a Imnquet celebration at
the identity of the new Queen will
Jack's Restaurant tomorrow at 6 !'. M. Dr. Edwin R. Van Kleeck, '27,
DR. EDWIN R. V A N KLEECK '27,
not be disclosed until the coronation :j This week administrative authoriceremonies on Campus Day which ties will take measures regarding former Editor of STATE COLLEGE NEWS, former editor of the STATE, COLLEGE N E W S and now an Assistant Commissioner of Education in the State Department, will deliver the main
this year falls on October 18.
the deficit in the present Student who will be main speaker at the NEWS
address. Dr. Harry W. Hastings, Professor of English, will act as
True to history the voting last association budget. A budget cut Jubilee Banquet.
toastmaster. Edwin J. Holslcin, and A. Harry Passow, seniors, are
Friday was unusually light It is will ensue unless additional funds
probably, however that the increas-! can be obtained.
~
-•general chairmen of the Annivered interest that comes from a narsary Committees.
A total of 85 students have derowing of the field will greatly swell faulted in their payments of which 2 0 2 Women Enroll
The idea of a newspaper for State
College Faculty Plans
the number of students exercising there are 6 freshmen, 24 sophoCollege came from a skit presenttheir right of franchise on Tuesday. mores, 17 juniors, and 38 seniors.
In Freshmen Class
Conference—No
School ed in May, 191G by the Class of
Sororities, after looking over the sit- When the defaulters eventually
1918. Later the class received peruation will undoubtedly make an ef- make payment, the deficit will be
mission from the late President AbDr. John M. Sayles, President
fort to eliminate the splits in votes decreased to $1,043.
World Conditions Correlated
ram Royer Brubacher to publish a
of the College, has announced
that are obvious from the choice of
Last year's budget amounted to
paper the following fall. Alfred E.
that college classes will be canW i t h College Registrations
nominees listed. If this happens, $12,910 as compared with this year's
Dedicke as president of the sophocelled for Monday and Tuesday,
the new Campus Queen will be budget of $14,827. The sale of tax
October 13 and 14. This is due more class appointed himself chairchosen Tuesday and will await her tickets last year, however, totaled
The figures on registration which
man of the inaugural committee
the fact that members of the
crowning by reigning Queen Bea 1,010, whereas only 856 tickets have have just been released by Miss! to
and later became the first editor of
faculty plan to attend meetings
Elizabeth Van Denburgh, Registrar,
who will journey here from New been sold this year
the paper. October 4, 1916, was
of the Association of Teachers
York City to take part in the cereAnother possible source of income show that a total of 203 freshmen
the first publication date, when a
Colleges and Normal School
monies.
may lie in thegenerosity of the enrolled this fall. The ratio of wo- Faculties of the State of New- four column newspaper appeared.
The freshman class will be in graduate class. Although it is not men to men, which has always been
York. The meeting will be held
The financing of the NEWS was
formed of the rules governing the mandatory that they purchase stu- a problem to the women of State, is
at Buffalo, New York.
carried on throughout the first
even
higher
than
it
has
been
in
the
rivalry cup competition at Sopho- dent tax tickets, such purchases
year by the sale of subscriptions.
Dr. Sayles also made the anmore Reception on October 10. At j would aid considerably. Only four past, for this year there are 202 wo- nouncement
When the student budget plan was
that
Milne
High
that time members of Myskania will j graduates have secured tickets thus men, but only 01 men. In other
adopted in 1917, the NEWS was inSchool
will
be
in
session.
Milne
read said rules from the freshman i far, and a campaign for soliciting words, there are more than three
cluded under the blanket tax, thus
will
be
taught
as
usual
by
the
women to each man.
handbook.
I the graduates is being considered.
relieving many of the financial
staff of campus teachers.
worries.
An interesting sidelight, disclosed
This will be the tenth conby a study of the figures on total
Progress throughout the twentyference of the Association. Their
enrollment is the comparison which
five years of the NEWS is notable.
purpose is to discuss the probcan be made between the figures for
Change of type from the heavily
lems facing the faculties of
this year and those for the years
headed print of the 1916 paper to
teachers' colleges.
1917-18. This comparison is brought
the clear type of the 1941 editions
about as a result of the similarity
was a major improvement. Edwin
In the world situation of the present
Van Kleeck, editor in 1926-1927,
time and the year 1917.
Frat M e n , Freshmen
made the pages five columns wide
and lengthened the sheets proporIn 1917 the number of freshmen
Smoker tionately. John A. Murray, last
who registered was 346. In 1918 the
year's editor, made the latest renumber who returned a.s Sophomores was 190, or only 519f of the Fraternity men of State College vision of the style, when he modernclass. In other words, 49'/, left for will be hosts to the men of the class ized the headline type, substituting
army service or jobs.
of 1945 tonight at the annual Inter- the simple-faced sans serif for the
This year 217 Sophomores, or fraternity Smoker in the Commons old-style face hitherto used.
82'/^ of the class, returned. IL isof Hawley Hall. The affair is schedThe first home of the NEWH was
believed that the present national uled for 8 P. M.
Room X, which it shared with the
defense program Is responsible for
The Activities Committee has Pedagogue and the Alumni Quarthis decrease, for many of those limited mid-week functions to a terly. Its next move was to the
who would otherwise return now minimum for the coming year. In present location of the cafeteria
have well-paying jobs in defense line with this policy, rush parties annex and thence to the present
work. The inference that is to beby the fraternities are being plan- office. Recent enlargement of the
made from this comparison is that ned only for week-ends. Interfra- Publications Office has provided the
the world situation has a decided ternlty Council has also decided to present NEWS with much more room
effect on college registration. This limit the formal rush parties of each in which to work. The NEWS staff
belief is supported by examination fraternity to two, because of thehas also increased from the original
of the enrollment of other colleges. scarcity of available open dates on twelve members comprising both
editorial and business staffs, to the
Friday and Saturday nights.
larger staffs of later years.
The committees for tonight's afriuamma
It is believed by the present edifair include: General Chairman,
Alfred Stiller, '42; Arrangements, tors that Edwin Van Kleeck was by
Annual Picnic Tuesday Glen Walrath, '42; Entertainment, far the best editor in the history of
George Kun/., '43; Clean-up, Owen iContinued on page 5, column Hi
Miss June Haushalter, '42, presi- Bombard, '43; Refreshments, Hal
dent of the Delta Chapter of Pi Singer, '43.
Numerical Election Results
Gamma Mu, the National Honorary
Society of Social Studies Students,
( liiho or lli-ia—W\A MMiiiiKIT
has announced that the annual Pi
Assembly Canceled Today
Vote
Gamma Mu picnic will be held at
Irviiia, Murv
-'2
Indian Ladder on Tuesday.
There will be no assembly today
* William*, June
24
All members of the social studies since all seniors are required to ( luhh iir im:i—MAA iti-iir ntitllvu
department, and all those of thetake tests In the auditorium all day
• I loin JI;I l-ij. Ilivi-ll
28
Il.iillrnoiiil. III-KIH
88
student body interested in social with a break in the middle of the
CtiUk of lUI'l—Ui-ii. In I'IIIIIIIIII llimril
studies are invited to attend. Trans- day for lunch and rest period.
l< till/., (ji-urn'2(1
portation will be provided. The buses
These tests are given as a "follOilwanl
80
will leave the college at 4:30 P. M. low-up" from those given when the Cliihn• BIHMI,
iif 11)11—i'ri-imIIrur
Refreshments and entertainment seniors were sophomores. Tho r e ( ' n u l l s , l.iii-llli18
will afford the faculty and the stu- sults will be standardized for use in
* Tiirlio, Allan
24
dents a chance to get acquainted. other colleges and universities and China or inn— w.V.v Mttimtfer
The cost will be 35 cents per person, for the selection of teachers.
Courtesy Central Studio
I i.'inn. I.uis
12
the money to be used to pay for the
Dean Nelson stated that all col• LaSallc, Lfija
20
W H O W I L L H O L D the Royal Sceptre as five leek Campui Queen honor? buses and the refreshments. Tickets lege and employment appointments
Itiivolt'H—Tuimiliiy
O n floor, Jeanette Ryerson,- seated, left to right, Mildred Swain, Marion Duffy, will be on sale in the lower hall of must be canceled so that every sen- H U M . uf I IMS— IV AA Hi'iinmeiitutlvo
(iri-uiiiiiiii. ,liuiu
Draper from now until Monday.
•Catherine Petenon/ (tending, Kathryn Wilson.
ior will be able to attend.
Ti-fft, Sylvia
Touch Football
Starts Monday
HOLSUM
1916
State Co
Th«
"Giin //
Mill
SERVICE
• oluctoil.
mm
msmmm^
tmimi limn
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