advertisement
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 6, 1939
Page 4
Wilfred Allard Spends Summer
In Europe During Recent Crisis
by Sally Young
(this is the first part of a story
of the summer European travels of
Wilfred Allard, who was in Italy
when the recent crisis arose and
broke.<)
"New York looked mighty good to
me."
That was the reaction of Wilfred
Allard, new supervisor of French in
Milne high school, upon his arrival
in New York after two and one half
months of travel in England, France,
and Italy.
Allard started out, three months
ago, via the Normandie, for a trip
to Europe. He spent two weeks in
London, saw the tennis finals at
Wimbledon, then went to France;
the trip across the English channel
to Paris was made in seventy-five
minutes by air.
When he arrived in Paris on the
night before July 14, he found it
brilliantly lighted for the occasion.
The next day he saw a magnificient revue, which represented the
entire French empire. Troops from
Algeria, Indo-China, Morocco, the
French Foreign Legion, and a group
from England, and a Scottish reg*
Cyr were present. The King's Guards
from England, and a Scottich regiment also participated. Hundreds
of bombers and pursuit planes flew
overhead, displaying the air might
of Great Britain and France.
A performance of Faust at the
Opera, the Comedie Francaise with
its "Cyrano de Bergerac", visits to
the Louvre and other places of interest to the Parisian traveler, filled three weeks in Paris. From Paris,
Allard made a three week's tour to
the south of France, including Avignon—the home of the Popes, Nimes,
Carcassonne, Marseilles, the French
Riviera, Monte Carlo, Cannes, and
Nice, in his itinerary.
(Concluded in next week's issue) I
Fairer Sex Of State
To Become Beautiful
Do you think you're an incomparable combination of Hedy
LaMarr, Miss America and the
best dressed woman in the world?
Is your appearance perfect? If
you are one of those who answer
"yes", then you need read no
further. But for all the rest of
the population, the following information should prove a blessing.
The Dean of Student's office is
sponsoring a "grooming clinic"
for girls every Thursday in the
Lounge from 4 to 5:30 o'clock.
Here, through individual conferences, you may obtain advice and
assistance in your own particular
grooming problems.
The clinic is under the direction of Mrs. Edward Cooper, wife
of our own Mr. Cooper, and Mrs.
Quinn. Come on down and let
them make a new woman of you.
SCA Releases Tentative Symphony Orchestra
Plans for New Season
Begins New Activities
(Continued from page 1, column S)
intercollegiate groups. Representing
about fifteen colleges which send
delegates to discuss important matters confronting students. Discussions are led«by experienced and noted speakers.
At the close of the conference,
the Silver Bay Intercollegiate committee will meet to make plans for
Silver Bay week to be held in June.
Robert Martin, '40, is State's representative to this committee.
Manhattan
Hatters
The State college symphony orchestra elected the following officers
at its first meeting last Tuesday:
conductors, Bernard Perlman and
Ira Hirsh, sophomores; Ruth Moldover, '42, secretary; and George Seifert, '42, librarian.
Rehearsals for the brass section
are at 4:30 o'clock on Mondays; for
the strings, Tuesdays at 3:30 o'clock;
and for the woodwinds Wednesdays
at 3:30 o'clock, in Room 28.
Shirts
Interwoven
"WHAT'S NEW —WE SHOW''
MEN'S
'SHOP
&Bfk
ADAM HATS
221 Central Ave.
Socks
Haberdashers
STETSON HATS
1 1 7 S o . P e a r l St.
STATE COLLEGE FOR T E A C H E R S , ALBANY, N . V.,
Z-443
Debate Council
Makes New Plans
Dance Classes to Begin
For Green "Statelites"
One, two, step, slide! And a
"dig, dig, dig — well, alright!"
No, I'm not ridiculing your dancing by any means!
I'm just
"hoy-hoying" you frosh to come
out of your "recluses" and learn
how to swing your limbs to the
new jittery tempos.
You too can learn to "rip up
the rug"—or, if you're one of
those few who like to hold your
balance (and might I suggest
your dinners, too) on the dance
floor, you can learn how to do
the more conservative fox trot
or waltz without exciting your
innermost mechanisms too greatly.
Classes will begin Friday, October 21 under the supervision
of Rita Sullivan, member of Myskania.
But wait!—That's only the first
step. Next, be sure that you attend the meetings, at which
timely tunes will be furnished by
the rippling fingers of Esther
Stuhlmaker, '43.
Student Association to H e a r
First Rivalry D e b a t e
During Assembly
Janice Friedman, '40, president
of Debate council, has announced
the selection of nineteen new members to be added to the regular
squad which now brings the total
up to thirty-two. Wlliam G. Hardy,
debate coach, was the judge for the
tryouts.
On October 7, Mr. Hardy attended
the conference for Debate Coaches
of New York state at Colgate university. At the conference possible
topics for collegiate debates were
discussed and selected. Among
those decided upon are the "Isolation of the United States," "PanAmerican relations," "Ownership
of public utilities," and "War
referendum."
Assembly Debate
A tentative schedule has been
drawn up which arranges for the
first inter-class debate to be fought
out before the student assembly
between the sophomores and the
seniors this morning. The proposiRepeal of Embargo Measure
ton reads: "Resolved that the NeuTopic of Heated Debate
trality Act should be amended to
provide for the sale of war materA poll to determine student opinials on a cash-and-carry basis."
"Cash-and-carry" is defined as ion on the repeal of the Arms Emstrictly cash, no ninety-day credit. bargo, now before Congress, will
"War materials" are defined as any- be conducted Monday and Tuesday.
thing the belligerents classify as
After a heated discussion of an
contraband. Upholding the affirm- amendment to that effect introative for the sophomores are Rita duced at the previous meeting by
Kell, Peter Fulvio and Dorothea John Murray, '41, the Forum decidMclsaac. On the negative side for
the seniors are Harriet Sprague, ed to defor action until the next
regular meeting. In the meantime,
Stewart Smith and Mary Arndt.
it is desirous to obtain the genPlans have been made to send
eral
student opinion on the subject.
delegates to the annual spring State
The table with the ballots will
Debate conference which will be
held at Colgate university lasting be in front of the annex between
eleven and four o'clock Monday and
two full days.
Tuesday.
Meets Arranged
Last Tuesday the Democratic
The teams will also be sent to
Rochester where they will meet with Club of Rensselaer conducted a
the University of Rochester, Ni- panel discussion on United States
agara university and Nazareth col- neutrality sponsored by the Forum
lege, sometime in March. Louise of Politics. The discussion was unSnell, '41, secretary of Debate coun- der the directorship of Sadie Flax,
cil, is endeavoring to get college '40.
competition from out of state, nameThe panel consisted of Robert
ly southern Massachusetts, and Martin, '40, history of the question;
Connecticut. The schedule also in- j Beatrice Shufelt, '40, comparison
eludes the usual encounters with of the two neutrality bills; Janice
Skidmore, Bard, Hamilton. St. Law- Friedman, '40, the administration
rence and the University of Buf- side of the Pittman Bill; Richard
falo.
Blackburn, '40, opponents' side of
(Continued on vwjc 4, column SI I the present neutrality act.
Forum Will Conduct
Student Opinion Poll
FRED ASTAIRE
has the right combination of
great acting and dancing
to give you more pleasure
N^V*
THEY HAVE THE
Right
State College News
Nosey Newshound Scours State
For Sentiment on Vote System
FOR MORE PLEASURE
(chesterfield blends the Right Combination
of the finest American and Turkish tobaccos
to give you a milder, better-tasting smoke with
a more pleasing a r o m a . . .
A n d when you try them you'll find that these are
the qualities Chesterfield has above all others in
giving you More Smoking Pleasure. THEY SATISFY.
hesterfield
Copynjjlic 1939, LiGoliii & MvtRS TOBACCO CO.
"What is your opinion of the Ague amendment to the voting system'.'", an inquiring reporter asked
Bob Ague, himself, in a search for
a cross-section of student opinion
on this issue.
"I have no opinion for publication." replied Ague, "but I don't
think it's good publicity culling it
the Ague voting .system. The title
doesn't augment its chances of passing."
Your reporter then hailed a prominent senior who .said, "The new
system concerning revotes is very
worthwhile, bul the publication of
results will be ol no benefit to anyone and Will only hurt those people
who don i iniue up for revotes."
To our question, "You oppose
publication ol the nuinerieu! results, then?"
"Yes." he replied, "bill this is
strictly off the record."
With a promise that we would
keei> the public in the dark as to
his identity, we sailed away.
Next we picked out an interesting group of freshmen, both male
and female.
"What do you think of the new
voting system?", we asked the
freshmen.
"What new voting system?"
|
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13,
Student Council
Revises Rivalry
1939
D AND A GUEST
Rules for B a n n e r , Mascot,
a n d Athletic Contests
Undergo Changes
The rules governing inter-class
rivalry were recently revised and
clarified by Student council as was
predicted in the 1943 handbook.
The major changes were made in
section B—banner rivalry, section
C—challenging, and section F—
athletic events.
Under the new ruling in banner
rivalry, the contest shall close at
midnight preceding Moving-up day
and not before. Both banners must
be given to the president of Student
council between midnight and 8:00
o'clock on Moving-up day. The old
rules demanded that the banners
Dr. Oliver St. John Gogarty, Irish
be given to the president at midpoet and writer, who will be the
night when the contest closed.
guest of D and A council.
New Rules for Sing
In the section on challenging, a
new sub-heading was added to part
three which states that, "in the
event of a sing, the contest shall
be judged on the singing of the
class song to the Alma Mater, which
song shall be original in words and
music." This is an entirely new ruling designed to facilitate the judging of the contest and to enable
the classes to concentrate on one
song for the contest.
The rules governing
athletic
events have been changed so that
section 1 — interclass basketball,
part (c), now reads, "three points
shall be awarded to the class whose
men's team is successful in games
played between the two rival classes." The specification about following the inter-class basketball
schedule and the procedure in the
event of a tie was deleted because
there is no schedule and there can
be no tie in basketball.
Mascot Hunt
A minor change under A—freshman welcome, has been enacted,
substituting the sophomore reception for the freshmen for section 1,
part (a). Thus the freshmen will
be instructed in the traditions and
and inter-ciass rivalry rules at the
sophomore reception instead of the
first Friday of school. Under D—
mascot hunt, section five, part (b)
has been revised so that the mascot must be presented to a member of Myskania instead of Student
council. A change in section three
under athletic events specifies that
the women's obstacle races will be
conducted on Campus day. One
point will be awarded to the victor
of each race allowing for a division
of points.
State SCA Delegates
To Attend Conference
New Pedagogue Board
Will Start Activities
Marie Metz, '40, editor-in-chief
of the Pedagogue, and Stephen
Bull, '40, photography editor, announce that the photographer for
the Pedagogue and agency pictures will be taken in the Commons
of Hawley hall, starting Monday.
All are asked to sign up on the main
bulletin board immediately.
In regard to agency pictures Mr.
Paul G. Bulger, director of the Student Employment bureau, asks that
senior women wear anything that
is becoming without overdressing
so that interest will not be detracted
from the face of the subject. Senior
men are asked to wear coats and
ties.
A feature of this year's Ped pictures will be the removal of formality, no more drapes. For the sorority pages t h e undergraduate
women will wear light colored
sweaters with or without pearls or
white collars. The women who do
not have light sweaters may secure
them from the photographer's supply. The senior women and undergraduate men may wear either
sweaters or whatever Is convenient.
The prices for the pictures will
be the same as usual, one dollar
for undergraduates and two dollars
for seniors including twelve agency
pictures. Graduates who wish agency
pictures may have them for the
same rate.
VOL. X X I V , N o . 4
D and A to Offer
Oliver Gogarty,
Noted Irish Wit
World Famous Writer, Poet
t o A p p e a r in P a g e H a l l
Wednesday Night
Students and faculty of State
college and the general public of
Albany will have the opportunity
of hearing Doctor Oliver St. John
Gogarty of Dublin, Ireland Wednesday evening at 8:30 o'clock in Page
hall auditorium. He will be presented by the Dramatics and Arts
council as their first guest of the
school year.
Doctor Gogarty, tall, blue-eyed,
and distinguished in his bearing is
famous for his interesting and witty comentaries on Dublin life and
Ireland's famous literary figures.
Jane Wilson, '40, president of D
and A, is confident that "his quips,
puns, stories of Dublin life and
word portraits of great men in
Irish literary society will provide
an evening of entertainment well
worth hearing."
Native of Ireland
Born in the latter half of the
nineteenth century, Dr. Gogarty
grew into manhood at the time of
Ireland's great literary revival. His
intimate friends were most of Ireland's great statesmen and literary
figures, in fact, his town house and
country estate were favorite gathering places for such personages as
George Russell Moor, Lady Gregory,
Shaw, Yeats, Joyce and others.
Not only is Dr. Gogarty famous
for his wit but for his many occomplishments as a surgeon, sportsman, statesman and poet. As a
statesman he served as a member
of the Irish Senate from 1922 to 1936
when the body was abolished by
De Valera. As a writer he ranks as
one of the greatest lyric poets in
modern English literature and has
been compared to Heyrick, Waller
and Heine. When William Butler
Yeats edited his famous anthology,
"Oxford Book of Verse" several
years ago, he chose Dr Grogarty
as the contemporty poet.
Best Known Works
Perhaps Dr. Gogarty is best
known to Americans for his prose
works, "I Followed St. Patrick,"
"As I Was Going Down Sackville
Street," and "Tumbling in the Hay."
"Going Down Sackville Street"
is composed of his reminiscences
of Dublin's great and near-great
during the past fifty years—the
leading figures of the Irish literary
Rcnnaissance, all of whom were
(Continued un page 4, column 1)
Dr. Sayles} Rounded Interests
Give Him Fame in Many Fields
"I don't know anything about the
old one!"
Several delegates of the Student
"I don't think!"
by Anita IS. Holm
We almost went down under this Christian association will attend the
i zation for high school principals.
Had the committee which ap
deluge of mass ignorance. Realiz- annual Full Student Christian conHe is chairman of the Benevopointed
Dr.
John
M.
Sayles
succesference
at
Cornell
university
today,
|
ing that there would be no pearls
lent Association which built tho
sor
to
Dr.
A.
H.
Brubacher
tried'
tomorrow
and
Sunday.
Other
acof opinion coming from the frosh,
Alumni Residenee hulls for women.
tivities of SCA scheduled for to gel in touch with him twenty-1I As soon as the debts on those buildwe departed.
1
We then accosted an intelligent- this week will be Freshman coin-1 lour hours later, they would not ings are paid off, he plans to start
looking sophomore and popped the mission, Marriage commission and have found him. He would have a drive for a dormitory for the men
been in C a n a d a — fishing ! ! Of State.
question. He replied, "I prefer post- dancing class.
ing of numerical results, because i Stale students expecting to par- Dr. Sayles is noted for the broad
Dr. Sayles received his education
I'd like to know just how much stllfl ticipate in the conference are scope oi his interests and tor his in Mexico academy, New York,
it guy actually has on the ball." Robert Martin, Mary Tralnor, John : line discrimination of value.
Keystone academy, Pennsylvania,
This was a bit loo calloused for Wulden, seniors; Robert Ague, i NIXI lo his family winch consists and Colgate university, from which
Robert Patton, Ada Parshull, ju- of "a son, three grandchildren audi he was graduated in 11)00. In 1902
our ears
Wi thrust ourselves upon Fred niors; Helen Ivloss, Benson Ty- a dog,' Dr. Sayles' thoughts have j lie received his degree us Bachelor
May, '41, relaxing in 1 iu; Activities brlng, Alice Pucker, Bernice Duel, been chiefly concerned with Milne of Pedagogy from the State Normal
office. He emphasized. "I am against Fred Wholstein, sophomores, and I High school. Ii is. according to Dr. College at Albany, During the
H because what we don't know won't Miss Helen Curtis, advisor to SCA. 1Frederick, "his monument." He! period from 11)02 to 1000 ho was
hurl us. If I got only two votes, I
Freshman commission will have! nurtured and brought it up from a I acting principal of Glens Fulls High
wouldn't want to know about it." Its first meeting Tuesday ut 3:30 small practice school to one of the , school, in 1900 he became associDay's remarks mirrored the senti- o'clock in the Lounge of Richard- outstanding high schools in New ated with State Normal College at
ment of numerous students thai son hull. Marion Kingsley, '40, will York state, even in the United j Albany as professor of education
the ego of unsuccessful candidates be in charge of the program and States. Dr. Sayles has done his and later as supervisor of tho pracwill be needlessly hurt.
Miss Helen Hull Morelund, dean work so exceptionally well in build- tice school. More recently, until
Bill Dorrance, '42, who had over- of students, will speak.
ing a practice school with a fuculty his appointment as acting president
heard everything that Day hud said,
On Wednesday at 3:30 o'clock, renowned for creative thinking as of NYSCT, Dr. Sayles was princinow countered, "If a candidate ob- Marriage commission under the well us for teaching skill that par- pal of Milne High school.
jects to having his name published guidance of Theron Powell, '40, ents file applications for their chilWhen asked about his plans for
with his numerical results, let him and Dorothy Johnson, '41, will meet dren five and six years in advance. the ensuing year, our genial presiwithdraw,"
In the Lounge. Discussion will center During his twenty-five years at dent replied, "I'm just one of the
Tis seldom a reporter can find about "The Place of the Family Milne, Dr. Sayles has gained a men hired to get the Job done. We
prominent place In the organi- are all working together."
i Continued on page 4, column 4J in Civilization."
in
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established by the Class of 1913
Member
-
S T A T £ - C Q L L E G £ . N E W S . QCTQBEB_IA™UJi9.
S T A T E COLLEGE N E W S , OCTOBER 13, 1939
Page 2
Associated Cd&e&de Press
Tifcii 1 —mmmmmm
. rr^Wr ,, *-fffi T i
Commumcattons
Frats and Figures
I'
The XEWH uiiimn no re*ponnlbllltli-« for communication* printed In
this eolnmn. All communication* mont bear the ilgnnture of the aathor
which will h- withheld apon reqnwt.
Distributor of
THE PROPOSED VOTING AMENDMENT
CommentttaterPro
1
Con
The nn[f«-r^r;tfliiiirp Xtw*p*g*r of New Vorfc Swte Collejji?
; Editor of the NBWS:
(THE COMMESTHTATER is given the widest To the Editor of the NEWS:
for Teacher*
PnblUhetl efJWJF Frtrtnj of the college year by the N'ews latitude as author of this column, though the viewLast week in student assembly I
Last week, Mr. Agne proposed an
Board repreTtentftisf the Student Association
points expressed do not necessarily reflect those of ! proposed an amendment to the amendment to the constitution makTelephone*: Office. 3-037:5: Howe. 2-J.TH: Kowalikf. £-130; the STATS COLLEGE N I W S J
: constitution, which was designed; i n g l t mandatory that the numeriYdOBg, S - l f S S ; G a b r i e l , £-8688
Columbus day has come and gone. Time goose- as a step toward democratic stu-, c a l r e s u l t s o f a l , e l e c t l o n s b e p o s t e d
Entered as second class matter in the Albany, N. 7.
self-government in this college. _ . m +„un,v<«~ „ ,i„fie,ic «,„«-„_
steps on. Thanksgiving will soon be upon us—and dent
postoffice
I should like to explain as dearly a n d «tabl sh ng a definite manner
what does that happy day call to mind besides tur- and briefly as possible the goal f o r t h e selection of candidates for
1
: revotes. I consider the second part
key,, the folk3 back home and a long weekend for that prompted this move.
National Advertising Service, Inc.
En te my personal belief that there of the amendment a fine suggescatefaihg
ng
on
sleep?
AM
together,
now:
Fraternity
OAUft Pnhlrsatr. Ripresexuliai
are many evils inherent in any form tion but find myself definitely opBfds.r
420 MAOISOM AVT.
New xems. M. t.
I
of self-government. I am further posed to the first part.
CmC*Ml • B04T.2I* • L M J.»>:!li:l • Sjl* RMftttSfflg]
Doe* Eaterfratemity council propose to sponsor ! convinced that the student governAlthough the amendment has
once more the knock-down, drag em to the Lounge ment of this college is no exception. been the topic of discussion for a
THE NEWS BOARD
Prompted by these beliefs. I have
Lms»SO E. KOWAL.SK T
Editor-m-ChifJ .sort of system that has made Ghe Monday after .sought to pave the way toward a week. I have heard but one arguOTTO J. Howe
Co-Editor-m-C'Tv'u>f Thanksgiving a day famous in the lives of all fresh- more democratic government here. ment from proponents of the meastrre—that the amendment tends to
SkLUi E. Yoir.vo
Managww Editor man males fortunate enough tm 'cold reserved sea:
f
The proposed amendment emBEATRICE DOWER
Aiaoeiectle Editor tickets for the btggaafc ranker, of che year' Are She bodies two speetffc reforms: the give S ate college a "more democratic"
government. Democracy itSTEPHEN KL'».%K
J.».w«a«fe Editor
posting' of the numerical results
Joan MVHUT
jAweJarts Editor bewildered frosh who receive bids from the various of .ill elections, and the establishing self is a rather abstract word and
SAUL GrasDrwAiu*
Xev:s Editor fraternities again to be literally lined up 07 mem- if an arbitrary system for the se- becomes still more abstract , when
,,,
"Bern GUKK
Sports Editor bers of first one brotherftood oui then mother in lection of candidates for revotes. aPP^ 6 0 t 0 student government with
:
a
n
y
!
o
i
c
a
l
taackln
C
a
n
MAST Gasaam
FM.MWIS.IS Mtmaoer Ia3t minute salesmanship efforts
erf Bhese changes are essential °' '"
='
eP™nfuence the n,-.ril
Boon 0
EEsrwsrrH Htsus
Advertising Manager
' do not consider It radical uhaS dPoments
answer
the
question,
"How
decisions one way or another '
rh<* complete returns S e l e c t i o n s o e s ihis s > ' 3 t e m o f Posting numeriWe strongly recommend i nlent period some- be posted; IT. ia a system than has cal results extend democracy to
what simiiiar to that now in use by the! jocoriBies. been m practice in this country for the student government?" Tellers
as much power to juggle figTwo such periods might be establish*!: She first, decades. Neither do I consider it have
ures, and if we are assuming that
iiiuiiiiai
that
a
voter
should
be
InTh<; State College Service fraternity began it5 extending from the moment bids are aaued ae
formed at the anrnfteg of votes bis the tellers are dishonest (as such
first assignment of the year by introducing the Monday before Thanksgiving and lasting until the uamdidace received. I do not mm.- in amendment does), just where
dees this democracy come in?
.Association of Teacher's colleges and Normal school beginning of Thanksgiving vacation; and the second, iider tt fair however, that ame
this amendment is
Secccdry,
extending from the Sunday after Tnanksgivteg until group oc one indiwitfaail should
faculties to the city of Albany. Acting as guides
have the unojuesfitoned right to de12:30 o'clock of the following day, when all bids have dare iiecttonu, pronounce candi- idojiced, there would be an increase
aa politics. Vote trading, vote swapand as sources of information, the fraternity es- been returned. Freshmen and fraternity membera dates
re^roCea, and submit the ping and bargaining are increased
tablished information desks in Chancellor's hall would not be permitted to indulge in conversation of iltunate oesuto without In my as parties snow which candidates
and in the Ten Eyck hotel to aid in the recon- any sort, and thus decisions concerning the fraternity way presenting v. —ore than .1 -,,: withdraw and which to back.
much easier accompI choice of the frosh might be made without benefit thoioiand potential voters the facta Logroffl
naissance of Albany.
iron, vlt.cn x iiu-ec :na temiuon. .ished when there are definite figof eleventh hour, strong-minded pressure groups.
:t tan been luirgesnttri ;.; onn that ures tij worfe on.
How has this community service aided State
Of course, such a plan does not claim perfection. the joatmir :i jiaiilty aught :••- inhow much face can an
college? First, it has eliminated the aimless wander- and there are several minor details which must pueasann ;a certain landidanea. En
ifficer have if he was elected by
7
»stEsar,ion
iefent
j
;
:
M
:i
the
ings of visitors about Albany; secondly, it has es- ' necessarily be worked out should the idea be adoptinly a few totes, or if he ran a
cotKmgKaciaa :•. landiiiacy uad i
tablished an excellent feeling with the people of ed. But wouldn't it be a step in the right direction^ tor.te.-j. that L pervon vho luttntir,:- very poor third or fourth in the
nriglrial election but was selected
;
Albany by showing that, as Albanians, we have a Surely any system would be an improvement over to 5. " M* should be muhiied. or because the other candidates had
Not much, I
sense of responsibility toward visitors. All in all, it • the present type of nerve-wracking, haranguing e.-ecticns ire tften rendered usm- too many points?
should think.
, male-strorn now in use!
plex by "he tandidacy :< mqu&iihas raised the estimation of State college in the
Animosities and hurt feelings are
f:ed persons Certamlv :f the uneyes of its community.
Bouquets orchids, and a couple of long cheers qualified yield rather than suffer mother factor to bo considered.
3ne candidate may be as good or
The objectives of the service fraternity are: are in order for this year's crop of practice teachers disastrous defeat ;ui system wC even better than another but may
•seniors to you. slugi, who are not as yet too deeply be stronger and mere efficient
to be of service to the college and to the commun- buried in the Milne morgue to start getting preIt is needless to say that the poll only a few votes because it so
posting
of results
is esential to the happened that he didn't belong to
parations
under
way
for
a
bigger
and
better
Senior
ity, and to assume the burden of acting as an un?
Mop. The orchestra committee has done a fine job establishing o a system of revote the proper "social group." Under
official agent in matters which are not undertaken in the fact that it has secured a good band for the selection. It :s senseless to attempt the present system, the candidate
must face a student body knowing
by established organizations. Its services may be event, and at the same time kept expenses at a regulation of groups which operate 'hat he was defeated by an overmodest figure. It's about time we woke up to the entirely in secret. My proposition,
commanded by any civic, school, or community fact that every big dance does not necessarily need however -^ r.-A designed a.s a citeclc %l-.eiming majority although the
was party power politics.
organization of the city or state, to aid in the ac- a 8500 aggregation for furnishing the music to lead upen Myskar.ia In fact its purpose reason
the dancers in merry whirls and the class treasury is to remote needless blame from As a result, the flames of animosclimation, orientation, friendship and cooperation to an early death.
bo::tg cast upon that society by ity that naturally spring up at
it to publish election re- ce:r.g defeated in such a manner
Too many State forrnals in the past have not allowing
in this community.
only been financial flops, but must even be denied iu'ts. a prmlege .".ever before grant- ire not fanned up by having salt
prinkied in the open wounds, as
This organization is the outgrowth of the work the courtesy titles of tonal successes. The dances ed.
pelting
numerical results would do.
Now
let
us
co
sider
things
as
they
done by its members in the Boy Scouts of America. have been attended by the same small percentage
If someone can point out to me
of the student body. The majority of the members of are. We cannot •emedy any curr-n:
Its principles are the same: to do my duty to God '.he classes sponsoring each affair pay their dues situation until • i know something how such posting of the numerical
orm it- results can introduce "more demoand my country to help other people at all times. into the treasury for the support of the financial about it E'-\l do-s.'eighrides, but do not attend because they cannot Hclf bu lerlutton. \\~h t e pass this eracy" and how it would rid ourIt needs, however, the help of the student body afford the high tariff on bios, necessarily imposed amendment we will come face to -.lections of politics, I might find
to perpetuate its good work. Problems that affect '.vhen big name bands are hired So here's to the face with facts we have been seek- myself converted and casting an
ballot.
Until then,
continuance by the other classes of the Seniors :ng We will discover new problems affirmative
students and the community which cannot be solv- admirable policy of financial moderation and the of cur system previously hid We however, "No"—vote the measure
will then go on from there.
down!
ed by existing organization- would be turned over best of luck to '40 and its Hop.
Robert Agne. '41
A Voter
to it to do the best it can.
Cb0e6icrfe Digest
The Service Fraternity
Our motto: helpfulness at al! times.
Book Exchange
In the issue of the XKV.S dated February 10,
10 59, the Cornmentstater made a suggestion to
•'some enterprising student why not set up a
second hand exchange to which students can bring
all their second hand books to be s o l d " It was
therefore with great pleasure that we witnessed the
introduction of a resolution to that effect in last
week's assembly.
The present system, everyone will agree, is
wholly inadequate. The confusion outside the Coup door, the scribbling of authors and titles on the
s h e e t s , the subsequent contact of individuals
through the student mail, do not make facile and
.speedy transaction of books. Furthermore, through
the inefficiency of this system, textbooks which
are in demand are left to gather dust on the shelves,
because the owner failed to contact a purchaser.
T h e proposed exchange should serve to eliminate
this waste.
W e congratulate those few persons who are
responsible for this move which will be of immeasurable service to the student body.
The Critic
I
I
-I
THE WEEKLY BULLETIN
Tin, bulletin v.ill he the medium for all announcements of an official
nature. Htudenti and faculty an requested to look to the. bulletin for
This month the Historical and Art museum is fea- \nformaturn
.Vofict.i 'or th> bulletin mu.it be in the NEWS mailbox
turing an excellent display by the Albany district ar- not later than ~, </•> o'clock on thi Wtdm iday of each publication week.
tists. The study in watt-rcolors by Lanina Cook and
Walter Swan has brought much comment from the
M A K.MIT.OVMENl
- i i u i i v r iiMi'i.ov.MiiNr 11 u it it A u
New York critics. Mr. Swan delights in the light easy
Ml
S> \
,-.nl. n u rmploji-d,
.,f
A l l reglnl r a n t * tiro rot] lien I ltd to f i l l
stroke that results in a detailed picture of life, while vvhurn there . i n - In*, f u l l - t i m e w o r k e r * ..in w h i l e »cli"ilulu cnrdN w h i c h tuny In,
,,IHI
furl v | , ; I T I linn. i n - ri-lj u.-.t<-<l <ecured in It.,.,111 1:1 it „ f Mllno. T T I I H
Miss Cole uses the large sweeping brush and pro- tu
[in) - t r u t .ilt.-iitiiiii to tin- regula- . a r i l nitlat he tilled out to llicnllnl for
duces great heaps of snow on a New England land- t i o n * ll.t.-.l ! I » - ! I , U . I In- n-uul.itinlln all houra of Hie d a y ,
li,r
tlila m i . n t h . t n - .
scape. The hanging that caught my eye was "The
I'll til I t u l g n r , S e c r c l n r y .
I. Time -lii-.-ti mti<l he returned
Illl)l.i:\
AWAIIl)
Cloister-' by Mr. Swan—because 0! Its variegated ar- to tinS \ A ile-k nut Inter than t u i l a j ,
l
i
t
e
lliille.i
A w a r d to Hint ineiiihi-r
ray of color in kaleidoscopic balance.
1 umplete iiiiil correct.
nl 1 ollege llotine who IIIIH iiltuiueil the
i. N'u l i m e U to he hllOW!) nil the.
In the adjacent hall, an exhibition of the works
higllenl i n e r u g e i i h o l e li for Ilia flrHt
e - I n - 1 p r i o r to the dut« of the
three .seam of college w o r k IIIIH heim
by the Hudson River school brings back memories tt i m
itl/eii.hip Affidavit.
preaenled to W a l l e r H a r p e r , m c i n g i i
:i. l u l l . 1 is the >uin|i|e 1 mi
of Thomas Cole and George Boughton and their
>ln
I . I . I l i i u o r a l i l e inciiiiiin » , , , | i „ K u h e r t
irHen >ou at the time of
,- inn,
struggle against the villagers of the CatskilLs, who to
Ivnriieli, lloliei-t M i u l i n , DoilglilB liotlemployer,
thought them dangerous revolutionists because they
ini
a n d J o h n W n l d e n , acnlora,
General regulation* are:
Hi:sil)i:\( n COUNCIL
would go oft on long Journeys into the uninhabited
1. A f t e r thin m o n t h t i m e i l l eel«
T h e r e w i l l he 11 m e e t i n g „ f Hoifldoiieu
back hills The Vimv of the Hudson at Newbunjh w i l l he line lit the . W A lle„k not Inter
than 8:00 o ' r l o i k on tin- f o u r t e e n t h ( oiincll mi T u e a d i i j a f l i rniiiui. A t the
by Boutelle is typical of this school of art In depicting of the m o n t h . O l j t e r v a n r r of thin regu- 1 " O K momberu of the j u d i c i a l h o a r d
a rustic scene in photographic reality.
lation i.i t h a i to p u n c t u a l c o m p l e t i o n w i l l he aelectcd m i d rcgiilutluna f o r
Descending the long winding stairway, you come uf the p a y r o l l . A n y o n e not oloo-rvliiK g r a d u u t e w o m e n alnileulN w i l l he d l e thin r e g u l a t i o n w i l l not he credited 1 'tinned,
upon the Industrial Arts exhibition. There are a on
the c u r r e n t p a y r o l l ,
HOCIAI, I AI.IINDAK
number of hand carved pieces by Parlni Interspersed
'.'. T i m e p e r i o d ) e«tend f r o m the Oct. Ill—Aaacmhly, Interclima delmte,
f i f t e e n t h of the m o n t h t h r o u g h the
with commercial photographs by Wlnnes.
11:111 o'clock.
f o u r t e e n t h of the f o l l o w i n g m o n t h ,
,
•
•
•
•
Oct.
i:i—Cheaa,
Itl'l,
l.oungo,
HilHI
Jtonwell JOtlrlmnL. D i r e c t o r .
o'clock.
The Advanced Dramatics plays begin October 24.
I ' A H T - T I M E KMI'I.Ol'MK.S'T
Stutlentu
necking
C h r M m u n - w c e k Oct. IH-lfS— W A A W e e k e n d ,
Already the Stagecraft class Is building sets and paintl 7 - - l ' o i t i m m c e l l n g , I t o o m U06,
a n d I n t e n d i n g to a p p l y t h r o u g h O i l .
818O o cloeli,
ing flats, while the females of the Dramatics class Jolm
l ' l I I I for them are u d v U e i l to do no
Out.
1
7 — I r c H h i n a n commlNNlon meetare sewing costumes. The first play will be presented ua noon an i i o m l h l e . T h i n Include*, b t u 818O o'eloek.
by Lydia Bond, and the second play will bo pro- d.iit-, who have u l r e a d y filed a p p l i c u - Oct.i n g1, 7 —L ol luanl igaeu, cluh
mcellng, Lounge
w i t h the J' I K i t u« well an thin,,.
duced by Director Doug Dlllenbeck. As I see lt, tlomi
H
:
U
U
o'clock.
who I n t e n d t o , Inuemuch ue u eompreOct. 1»— Marriage commlaalon meeting,
Marilyn Groff as the impetuous actress and Mary h e n x h e check m u t t he made.
Lounge, .1:30 o'clock.
Kilgur T e r r e l l ,
Miller as the Imaginative Invalid will produce an ex0<
Mary
J . Me.Samara,
",1. 1 8 T V * A preneiitatloii, Oliver
cellent piece of work for Miss Bond.
Director*,
HI. John tlogarly, I'ago hall, 8:S0
o'clock.
\
k
t
/
»•
C«*«ds Tikt Air Training, 1—
Twenty U U frit ColU|« und«rfradiMl«i k«vt bttn *•l«ct«d fa Inininf und«r tkt Civil A«ron«ulici Authwily
celltft pfOflMM. ThtM iludtnti art Ittinint til «b*«M
Meter mtcMiiici.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS OCTORKR l.s IQ.^0
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Communications
Established by the Class of 1918
Member
Frats and Figures
Associated GoUe6iate Press
The MOMS assumes mi responsibilities for cooiiniiiilcutloiiN printed In
Hi's column.
All coimimniciillons must hear the signature of the. author
which will he withheld upon request.
Distributor of
G)lle6icite Di6est
Tlie iiiiilorerriiilmite Newspaper of New York Slnto College
for Tencliers
Published every Ki-ldny of thn college year by the Mews
Hoard representing (lie Student Association
Telephones: Office. n-!>.",7.'!: Howe. 2-4M4; Kowulsky, 2-124:!;
Voting, .".-1 H.-iH : Onbriol, 3(1538
Entered as second class matter in the Albany, N. Y.
post off ice
REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers Representative
420
MADISON AVE.
CHICAGO
• BOSTON
NEW YORK,
• Los A N G E L E S
• SAH
N.Y.
FRANCISCO
THE NEWS BOARD
Editor-in-Chief
LEOXAIMI B KHWAI.SK V
OTTO .1. HOWE
SAI.LV E. Yoi-Nti
BEAT-HICK DtlWKIi
STEPHEN' IV S.VK
J O H N M I IIHAV
S A I L ( !IJKKN VVAI.H
BETTY CLAIIK
MAIIV UAIIIUEL
K E N N E T H HASKI:
THE PROPOSED VOTING AMENDMENT
Con
Pro
Editor of the N E W S :
(THE COMMENTSTATER
is given the widest \ To the Editor of the N E W S :
Last week, Mr. Agne proposed a n
latitude as author of this column, though the viewLast week in student assembly I
points expressed
do not necessarily
reflect those of j proposed a n a m e n d m e n t t o the | a m e n d m e n t to the constitution m a k -
Commentstater-
Co-Editor-in-Chief
Managing Editor
Associate. Editor
AsSOCUle
Editor
thc
STATE COLLEGE N E W S . '
Columbus d a y h a s come a n d gone. T i m e goosesteps on. T h a n k s g i v i n g will soon be upon us—and
w h a t does t h a t h a p p y d a y call to mind besides t u r key, the folks back home and a long weekend for
catching up on sleep? All together, n o w : F r a t e r n i t y
'bids!
constitution, which was designed I i n g
it
mandatory that the numeri-
I as a step toward democratic stu- c a , r e s u i t s 0 r a n elections be posted
dent self-government in this college.! and establishing a definite m a n n e r
I should like to explain as clearly
and briefly as possible the goal for the selection of c a n d i d a t e s for
I That prompted" this move.
revotes. I consider tlie second p a r t
I It is my personal belief that there of the_ n m e n d m e n ^ a j f l n e ^SUggesarc many evils inherent in any form lion but find myself definitely opI of self-government. I am further posed to the first p a r t .
Does I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y council propose to sponsor | convinced t h a t t h e student governAlthough
the amendment h a s
once more the k n o c k - d o w n , d r a g 'em to the Lounge ' ment of this college is no exception. |„, ( . n the topic of discussion for a
,sort o f s v s t c m
t h a t has m a d e the Monday after | Prompted by these beliefs, I have w p e k T h , l V ( , l u , . m l b u t o n e a r g u .
j T h a n k s g i v i n g a day famous in the lives of all fresh- ' ni'o 1^!1'cIr-n'loer-Vric/'^ON'erii'm("lT" 1 icrc^ m e n < " ' " " ' P r o P o n c n t s o f l h o m e a s \ man males fortunate enough t o hold reserved seat
T h e proposed amendment em- l l n ' ~ l h i l t t h e a m e n d m e n t tends t o
^ „
;
, f , n t m t m . t h c give S t a l e college a "more clemoU [ . | u , l s f()1 ,
fch
fa,
t
k t
f h
,
.
•
,„,,.-,i„„
„ f
M , „ mimnrlnnl
rr^nlly
iTiltlC
gOVCl'llIliei.t.
1JemOCI'lU'V
l t -
Associate Editor
News Editor
Hpnrls Editor
Business Manager
Advcrtismg
Manager
j bow.l.lered frosh who receive bids from the various I J ^ J ^ ^ . ^ ^ I ^ ^ ^ ' l ^ f ^ ^ ^ ^ self is a r a t h e r a b s l r a n t word and
fraternities again t o he literally lined up by m e m . '
arbitrary'' system for the se- oeeomes s ' l l ! more nbstriirt when
|, o r H 0 f first one b r o t h e r h o o d and then a n o t h e r in lection of candidates for revotes applied to student government w i t h , ( l s t m f n u t e s a I c H n m n s h i p o f f o r t s t 0 l n f l l l c n c e t h l . Both of these changes are essential. m u fin - v logical backing Can p r o [ (l
another" " " ' consider it radical that ponen.s answer the question. How
l
l h c
':/" n '\°
,
'
' complete r e t u r n s of elections docs this system ol posting n u m e r i We strongly r e c o m m e n d a .silent period some- U(, , H I S | r c | - j t j s a system I hat has ( ' a l I T S l l l l s extend democracy to
j what similiar to t h a t now in use by the sororities, ' b e e n in practice in this country for I h l ' student government'. 1 '' Tellers
! Two such periods m i g h t be e s t a b l i s h e d : the first ' d e c a d e s . Neither do I consider it h a V l ' afi much power to juggle fig. . ,i
• •
i
i
.
.
.
.
' imimnnl thnl a cntiu- Hiniilrl he in arcs, and ll We are assuming t h a t
of the number
of votes . .his
c S t a t e College
began the
l i s , extending
from T th h
are until
issued thethei cformed
!a"'l!.^!..,
...,,....."....
! ! ! "; mthea mtellers
dishonest
• ashere
such
first l hassignment
of the.Service
v e a r fraternity
b y introducing
Monday before
a nek s gm
i voim
n ge n ta n dbids
lasting
n d i d a t e ..,!?,..
received.
I do not eone n d m e nare
t does),
just w
The Service Fraternity
Association of Teacher's colleges and Normal school
beginning of Thanksgiving vacation; and the second, :skier it fair, however, that one <l°™ this democracy come in?
extending from the S u n d a y after T h a n k s g i v i n g until g r o u p or one individual should
.Secondly, if this a m e n d m e n t is
faculties to the city of Albany. Acting as guides 12:30 o'clock of the following day, when all bids have have the unquestioned right lo de- adopted, there would be an Increase
and as sources of information, the fraternity es- been r e t u r n e d . F r e s h m e n and f r a t e r n i t y m e m b e r s t i a r e elections, pronounce candi- in politics. Vote trading, vote s w a p dat es for revotes, and submit the ping and bargaining a r e increased
tablished information desks in Chancellor's hall I would not be p e r m i t t e d to indulge in conversation of i ultimate results without in any as parties know which candidate:
tes
and in the Ten Kvck hotel lo aid in the recon- any sort, and thus decisions concerning tlie fraternity W I I V presenting lo more than a to withdraw and which to back.
choice of the frosh m i g h t be m a d e without benefit j t h o u s a n d potential voters the facts Logrolling is much easier a e c o m p naissance of Albany.
,
,
. , ,
upon which it based its decision, lished when there are definite figHow has this community service aided Slate of eleventh hour, s t r o n g - m i n d e d p r e s s u r e groups.
ores to work on,
n h a s b ( ,,, n suggested to me that
Of course, such a plan does not claim perfection, the posting of results might hp unThirdly how much face can a n
college? First, it has eliminated the aimless wander.uu\ there a r e several m i n o r details which must j1 pleasant to certain candidates. I n officer have if he was elected by
mv
estimation
defeat
is
one
of
tlie
ings of visitors about Albany; secondly, it has es- necessarily be worked out should the idea be adopta few volt
or If he r a n
• ,
i
.
contingencies
tablished a n excellent feeling with the people oi ! ed, But wouldn't It be a s t e p m the right direction'.'
A l b a n y by showing t h a t , as A l b a n i a n s , we have a Surely any .system would be a n improvement over
., ...
,,..,,-l ,-; ;,,,,-• All in oil it t h c present type of n e r v e - w r a c k i n g , h a r a n g u i n g
sense ot res ponsibility t o w a r d \ i s i t o i s . All in all, it
1
n
•
i
male-strom now in use!
h;is rai.-cd the e s t i m a t i o n id S l a t e college in the
Houquets. nr.-I.ids. ami .1 couoli of lung cheers
eyes of it- i o i n n i u n i l v .
are in order fur this year's crop of practice t e a c h e r s
T h e objectives of the service fraternity a r e :
1 senior.-, in you, s l u g ' who are nol as yet loo deeply
buried in the Milne m o r g u e to start gelling pretn lie of service lo the college and t o the i n i n m u n partitions under way for a lugger and better Senior
ily, and to a s s u m e the b u r d e n of a c t i n g as an tinI lop. The orchestra c o m m i t t e e has dime a fine job
offiiial agent in m a i l e r s which a r e nol u n d e r l a k e n in the fact that it has secured a good band for the
event, and a t the s a m e time kept expenses at a
by e i.ibli-hed o r g a n i z a t i o n s . Its - c r v i i c s may be modest figure. It's about t o n e we woke tip lo the
fact that every big dunce does not necessarily need
c o m m a n d e d bv any t i v i c , school, or community
a $r>t)u aggregation tor l i u n i s h i u g the music to lead
o r g a n i z a t i o n of the city or s l a t e , to aid in thc at
the tlallcers 111 m e r r y whirls and the class t r e a s u r y
in an early deal h.
c l i m a t i o n , orienlatiiin, friendship and cooperation
Tun many S l a t e fnrnuils in the past have not
in I hi.- i oiiiinunil \ .
only been financial flops, but niu.-d even be denieil
the courtesy titles of social stieet S.M . The dances
Thi,- o r g a n i / a l i o n is lhc o u t g r o w t h ol the work
have been a t t e n d e d by tile s a m e -auall percentage
done b\ it- iiit-n11 »<-!"—
. in the Hoy S m u t s oi A m e r i i a .
ii the studenl body. The majority ol the members oi
Its prim iples arc the same: to do my duly lo l.od
and no. n . u n i t y
to help oilier people al all times,
11 nee.] - however, the liclp ol the .-t ndeiil body
lo p e r p e t i i a l c ii 1 tl work.
Pioliletiis that
affect
s t u d e n t s and the r o n i m i i n i l v wbitli l a n n n t be solv
ed le. e \ i - l i n g o r g . i u i / a l i o n s would be luined
user
of c a n d i d a c y ,
and
I ,,,,.,•
nnnr
llilrrl
nr fourth
in
the
conu-i,d
thai a person who submits , ) r jy i n i l i election but was ,selected
to a vote should be qualified, or he,-Uuse t i„, n t l l ( ,,. eaiul'id'ates had
surfer the consequences, Our present ,,„, m u n y ,„,;,,,,;?
Not much, I
e eet ons are ofien rent creel com- ,,,,,,,,] .,,;,,•
plex
by
i
he
candidacy
of
unqual
,
, .,
,• ,
,.
,.
noillcl
Animoimink.
it ii-s and hurl fei lings are
lied persons. Certainly u the unaniii
her i act or 10 be con .irioreri.
qualified yield r a t h e r than slifler
disastrous defeat, our ..yslem will • 'in- 1 -: 1 ti 111 (h 111 may be a.- good or
he slronael' a n d more efficient, '.en be 1 lei 1 han an ii her Inn may
Ii ' • needless lo say thai tin pnil only a It v. \ o l e , iiccau: c tl so
posting ol result.- is esenlial lo the h.iiipi in il that he duin'l belong to
.-iclal ci ntip." t 'nrier
establishing of a s\ sliotl ol revote ' he prop. 1
selection, tl is a-nseless lo attempt 1 he |.'re «-11' . \ : em. 1 he cam l.dale
regulation of groups winch opera I e mu. 1 lace a -! iideiu hotly knowing
enliiely ill secret. Mv proposition,
however, is not designed as a cheek
upon M.v.-kunia. In lacl its purpose
Is l n remove needless blallie lrom
being en 1 upon I hat : ociety, by
Wing it in publish election re
- a p r o liege ne, er before grain
Now lei 11 . consider things us 1 hey
ire. We caiinol remedy any currcnl
,lH, classes sponsoring each affair pay their dues HI not inn 11111II we know 111111-1111111:
•'•'l" " " ' t r e a s u r y for the supporl 1 f [][,, fmancial aboiil it Eril dm s nut n form 1'nil Ini treliixiuu. When we pass I his
ileighritli s, lull do not ill end het-atl
ley cannot
imellrimelll We Will ctuile lace lo
afford 1 be high Un il f on bids, ttei . aril imposed
when In;; n a m e bands a r e hired So here's to tli .tie Willi lacl.-, we have been seeki.g We will discover itcv, problems
continuance by tile otln-i- classes of the Senior:
il mu system previously hid We
admirable policy of financial moderation
old lb
vill ihen go on from there
be ' ol luck lo -It) and Us Hop.
Hubert Ague, '-11
I.at
b e \'.;i
.
(ii l e a ! e d
b \ a l l n'.el'-
v • lllillu; ma iority all hough I he
' 1 a -oil ua.s pa 1 ty power polu |cs.
Ns a t'i ill' the I hi 1 to , o| aninuisii'. ihal naturally .'prtng up at
ben e, defeated in -.uch a m a n n e r
1 re not f limed up by having sail
pi iiil-'.it ii in 1 he open wound-, a.
po-.! un numerical re nils would do.
Il Mimeoiic can point out lo me
such posting ni lite numei ical
resiills can inlroduce "more dtam
nary
anil how ii would rid oureieclH)ll.s I I ptill'ie, 1 miidil find
ill'. '-II enlivened and e.i 11111: all
allirmaloe
ballot
I'niil
then
however "No" Mite
In meitsiire
down!
,.\ Voter
in it to do the be- l i l t an.
I hir inoltii
helpfulness at all lilue-
The Critic
Book Exchange
T H I ; WKUkLY IU LLI/IIN
Tills hull: till 11 ill lii Un un IIIIIIII tin till ml iluiuiii 1111 ills nf mi ol j ieitll
nut 11 a
Slmliiil,
mid liinilln
,/,, ,,,1,1, .',,! :,, /,„,/,- / , , He hull, tin i,,r
inlmiiiitliiiii
Xnllns
:,,, ' / , , Inttli 1,11 mu I l„ ,,, //,, VKH'.S' muillm e
nut lull 1 I him • un ,, , In, /, oil lie II'1 11 in .,/,!', .,1 , , , , / . j,„l,l i,u I i,,n ,, 1 1 /,'
Thls month the Historical ami An mu eimi is lealuring an ex'eelleiil display by the .Albany district arIII tin- 1 te- i| the \ r . y \ s d a t e d la-iii 11,11 \ ID, tists The study 111 will 1 1 'colors by 1,1111111:1 Cook and
Walter Swan h a , bronchi liiueh comment lrom Mi
\ ) I
I M I I en \ l l . \ 1
N I I IH.N I
I l l l ' I D O I I A I
III l i i . \ l
10 '.0. t h e I 'oiuineiil t.tler ni.ule a ^Uggcslion lo New York crlll
Ml
SN \
.1 Mil, n i s
1 lliplll '•'''
Mi Swan delights 111 the light easy
of
VII l-.-l.-l- lire r , - , , , , , , o , l
I n fill
M
l
e
a
n
I
t
e
a
e
.
i
n
lull
" ' " • ' "
""I
»'•''«
'I'll'' ciinls
n l , I , I, „ , ; , ,
|,„
• -nine 1 nti-i; ii i-ing -I llilciil
w In, nol el Up a link.- thai result., in a detailed picture ol lite wllilt . o u t l u l l 1 p i l J --l II IIH
line
.11 e
I
' I ' " -ti-'l
- c i n o il i n l l n n i n
I I I | l , , | Mil,,,.
| I,,.,
.Ml
t'-ile II-cs tlie large sweeping brush and piuI\ -.lint
nil rut inn
l u I ln' eiilll,
I i n i i s l I,,. | ,11, ,1
| „ ,,
-.i-i niiil it md ' \< liale.i- In who Ii I Uilelll - 1 an 1)1 lie.! diice-. great heap ol .amw on a New Knglutul land- Ii nn . n |i
mil (ni
s
| i , l i ,1
In-I.ui
I lo
n-i
"I.ill.innil
I,nnrnf
II
, , ,
Oi l i r e
w a s " T h e !"•' U n *
l-.llil
lliilK,.r
.1!] 1 is ii ei oiid hand Imok - to b e sold " 11 y\ .1- . 1 ape The liali) log Ih.il eailghl my
i rclnrj
•.li,-,-l~
i
n
n
.
I
In1
1 11
Cloisler by Mr Swan heeaii.e ol it: \ai It tutted ar- I n t i n - N \ V i l c s l , m i l I.ill r I tin h i i l ,
V
VVV V K I I
t h e n ton- \\ iih aieal plea uie I hat We w ilnc -ed I lie
11,1
" " " i Vu.ir.l
,ray ol color 111 kaleidoscopic balance.
Oleic
mill
i.iiri.l
"
'
'
-C » l
, - I.II.OIICll I I I , N n I , i n , - 1 . O , In . . l i n u i
I In
lilt 1 HI !u, I ton ' I a I c ollll mil l o I l i l t el lei I III la I
In the adjacent hall, a n exhibition ol the Works
Il
lln
Ii
I I I Hi
,- KIH-CI
prior
in Un- a n .
I lln
In ihe Urn! on l i n e r t'liool brings hack memories I i l i / c o s h l p M l i i l n , i l
II. m IMII-I.
Ii
Ineil
Week
a eiulib,
i
I I " U n i l . r II ,i Iin' l l,
i, i r.iKc
k i „ ,.,
I.
I ..II.in
tin••
on
ol 'I litiina: ( 'nle 111 id I ieolge Houghton and their
,
,
,
,
"
,
'
I
O
"
I
'
l
l
i
n
,
n
o
.
n
i
,
in o . K n l i c r l
'I In- p r e 1 ill
\ Ii an
e \ el \ o n e Will a g r e e . I haggle ,11,un..1 the villagers ol Ihe Cat kills who i t a i - i i , i n i .it t i n . H i m n| ,
i> o'ln II, it..in 11 a,,11,,,
Inillllnlire
Iioi'lthought
litem
dangerous
lewilulloni
Is
heeaii.e
Ihcy
!••'
o,,1I,iln
VViililen, , ,
I
l
l
U
K
n
l
.
i
l
m
i
l
.
i
r
e
.
w holly i n a d e q u a t e
\ he 1 oiiftision mil -nle I lie ('oI
Viler
lilts
in..mil
linn
wnuiii go oil mi long loiirneys into Ihe uninhabited
-In , 1 l U . s l l i l . N , |.: , , M s , | |
uji door, t lie 1 1 ibliling ol aul In 11 and 1 itles on lhc back lull (
flu- t'e 11 ol tin lludinn
al ,Vi 11 tmrgh IMI I i.lIlI I l'<tl lHiOn e i ii 'l.ll i ti .i I,n N. i \l l V t ai n, ..|,
""'•r
I I'ci'i- vi i l l I,,' „ , , , , ' , H i m , , ( K c - l i l e i i e c
' " " " "
"0'
<
II II
"II
I in Kiln,,
nil,-I,,,,nil.
VI
III,,
h h e 1 I s , lhc -ub-i-(|iieiil 1 "id.11 1 of individuals by Hotitelli- is typical ol this school ol all lit depleting " , . " " ' I " ' " " ' O l , - , - , , , , „ . . • ,,l l l n - ,,-m
Hiim
n i n n l , , . , - ,,l
Hie j , „ l „ l , , l
| „
|
a 111; I le cene ill |ihoti)gia] line reality .
' • ' I n.ii
lillnl
In
tun
ill
,,l,l.mi
nill
I,,Oil
nn,I
ri'K l l l u l I I I I I H
for
t h r o u g h the studenl mail, do not m a k e facile and
I ii-s, ending Ihe long w i n d i n g stairway, you come O In - I I I , 1 i'S| i ". iI,. i ml l l" n n\ iI l l 11,,IniI n,., li.r-ei iiliillii i' ,K1 -I Il .l nn-lli' .i l i l l ' Ml i n n n - I n , I , . „ I - „ | | | | „ . , | | B
SIM I VI. ( V I I S D V I l
sneedy t r a n s a c t i o n of books, h i t thci mole, through
" I " " ' n " ' fndu.slrlul Arts exhibition T h e r e are a •ill O n - 1 i n n n t i m v i n l l
'•'
Time
pcrlllll.-l.n.l
limn
Hi,, i n 1
| |
V--einlih
'
number ol liiind carved pieces by I'liiiiu Interspersed
t
liilcrclii-H ili'liulc,
r
l
r
t
l
'
C
l
l
l
l
l
n
l
I
I
I
,
I
l
l
i
l
l
l
l
l
l
I
II
[
o
UK
II
l
l
l
e
M
i
l
l
111 l i n k
'
I he inefficiency ol this s y s t e m , textbooks which
w , u , coinmerclal p h o t o g r a p h s by Whines
r
K
1
I L
1
m r i
are in demand are left to gather dust on the shelves,
because the owner failed lo contact a pun baser.
T h e 1p r o p o s e d
'
,, t
,
*
,* '
_, ,
I he Advanced Dniinaties plays begin October i!4.
Already the Stagecraft class Is building sets and palnt-
Inlirlceolli
nl
Hi,. lnlliuiiiiK
nmiilli.
Ih,-',!,.II I ill 1I111 nl,, lllrci'liir.
I'Vli I 1 I M I ; I : M I ' I . O V M I : M
soiil.iii-CCIOIIK
Cliil-Oiiii- ivei'b
Jel'-.ini.l
In
IblK
H.
„|ipl.y
Ihrollllh
lln.
II — ( l l i - -
"I-I.
Iiiiiimc
uVlm-b
0 , 1 pi 1,-,.-.« v v WccUcmi
Oil. n l i n n , , , ,,,,.,,||, l u ' II,
:l:.|„
„'cl„,l,
" " " " " • '
»"""'
Millll
,
' " '
e x c h a n ghe sh o u ld serve t o eliminate | '«8 Huts, while ihe I.-males of ihe Dramatics class i'.'.r7; „"",',„ "i.cm !!•',. " i h u ' V i , ! T ' " ! ! «„•,' % "'i'r^h,,,,,,, ,,,„„„,„ h i,.,i , IMltI are sewing costumes. Tlie first play will be presented »« »oou a- |,n-ii,i,.. Thl. Incluilcs -m\„„, I.,,,,,,-., i"iu , , " 1 " , " .
1
< v
l4
by Lydia Bond, 1111d the Hecond play will be pro- I '- ,'."" "!'," ,'.""",.'c',,!'." '- "'V,' "i)ji™- o n . n- 10.1,,,,, , I „ I , ,,„,.u 11K , i., m l l ( l l ,
this waste.
,.
. , , , , 1
1
.
,
,,
\\'e congratulate those few persons who are diiced by Director Doug Olllenbeck. As I see it,
Marilyn Oroff as t,
,he Impetuous
actress
andanMary
responsible for this move winch will he ol un- M111()I. a g l h ( . imaginative
Invalid will
produce
ex
measurable service to the student body.
' cellent piece of work for Miss Bond
Hoim
»l(ll
On-
I'TKII
IIH w e l l
nil 1 1 , , - ,
' who IIIIIMI.MO, l.m.p.i.eli u. 1, , , « , , , , "
1-iilKor b« mmlo.
rreU,
hen-lvo diuok mu.l
M i l i-y
Mt- N aiiinru,
i » i r . , i n i .,
HlUO
ii'iliiiK
••"oiiui,
,„.,. H- \ ,," L „
„,,,
ll
Vi..iW«,
ovlollk
»«
Oil.
IB—-I) ii'al)
,v V
prcHi-oliilioii, ""'"
Oliver
Nl., iliilin
o 1 Ineli
(lugurty,
I'ugn hull,
8:111
Co-«dt Ttkt Air Training, Too
Twtnty L l k t Erit College undtrsrtduatti have been selected for tr«inin{i under (n« Civil Aeroneulici Authority
college program- Theie itudenti art learning all about
motor mechanicf.
-.
Page 2
^^PjjBSiiWHS&sW^
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established by the Class of 1918
STATE COLLEGE NEWS QC1QR.ER n
8«M<!BSai**«««WM*
t<w
"ige 3
Gets War Post
II •
Jacob Viner, University
of Chicago, is one of the
three economists appointed by the treasury
department to assist in the
administration of U. S. financial policies during
The mill
Publlslie
I
Telophot
Entered
Wartime.
International
J2.
cZ
Um! Urn! Uml
Bob Pershing (left) dove
into the chocolate pies in
true championship fashion
to defeat Bob Kurtz by a
crust in an eating contest
at Iowa State Teachers College.
LEONAHD
OTTO J.
SAI.I.Y E
BlSATRlCB
STEPIIKS
JOHN M
SAUL On
BETTY C
MAIIY G
KEN.NUT
Collegiate Digest Photo by Krulish
GREAT BANDS
The
first as
Associal
faculu'ei
and as
tablishe
and in
naissanc
How
college?
ings of
tablishei
Albany
sense uf
has rais
eyes (if i
They're Blowing About a Gridiron Victory
Fans and bandsmen alike gather around for noise sessions whenever Whittier College's
football Poets turn in a victory over one of their west coast opponents.
PRESENTED BY £ A M E L CIGARETTES
The
to be of
itv. and
official 8
by i-slat
commani
organize
climal ii it
in this c
This
dune by
Its princ
and my
It ne
to perijel
students
I'll bv ex
In ii to d
•
Skinned Noses
Our i
All Freshmen Get Lectures on Traditions
And at Vandcrbilt University new co-eds sit in front of the statue of Commodore
Cornelius Vandcrbilt while listening to talks about the great ideals he gave to their
In ll>
I';)';, ih
"SOIllC
*
nCW t l m a mater.
Collesl«t« Oiacit Photo by Irwin
. . . were the result of this
Skull and Bones Society initiation stunt at New York
University.
Digest Photo by Fine
I'i
ici " l i d In
all their
I herelnle
in 111 II I ui t.
w e e k ' s a-
3t0iVWE MONVAY NIGMS
The
uln.lk ii'
Up (loul.
S 11 e e I M
through I
speedy ir
the ineff
are in del
because I
The prop
this wash
AMP
F
BATURINO Columbia
Pictures'
stars-
Penny Singleton and Arthur Lake —as
Blondie and Dagwood
Bumstead. A
thirty-
minute program of laugh-getting, tear-jerking
home-town comedy. Tune in and chuckle at
the latest antics of the trouble-happy
Humstead family.
We o
responsibj
ineasurali
Naii Preii Chief's Son at Harvard
Egon, son of Emit Hanfstaengl, one-time press chiel
for Adolf Hitler, is now • freshman I Harvard In
1936 the university turned down a $10,000 scholai
A
ihip fund offered by his father.
LONG-BURNING
/£
COSTLIER TOBACCOS *
CBS NETWORK
7:30 pm E. S. T.
8:30 pm M. S. T.
9:30 pm C, S. T.
7:30 pm P. S. T,
MORE PLEASURE PER PUFF.
MORE PUFFS PER P A C K /
PENNY FOR PENNY
YOUR BEST
o
k:
it
>l
1.
CIGARETTE B U Y
l'ii|»nylil. maw. It. J. llrniiilil. | 1 .l.#c.-ur.<H.l*n>, WUulun-twlKUi, N.t-
"
"
'
' '
Page 2
ST/
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
.eiMo..*~t*-vw.• wstn.ws..jM.cx\iG
I;
• - .- ^r-k^^^mk»^Wi!Jat0iKSKKSSStttM
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
*r
*vir
r r r i
M M
^ri'-m-
U. S. College Students Join in Battle to Fight Syphilis
An Exclusive Colleslate Digest Feature Prepared tw U. S. Public Health Service.
Piiblislit
East and west, north and south, college stu Jents in every
type of institution have taken up the cry "Stamp Out
Syphilis — Enemy of Youth". Young person have been for
years the victims of a "mistaken moral cen orship" which
forbade discussion of this leading threat to ycuth health. But
during the past two years college editors and students have
helped materially to blast this censorship rom its shaky
foundations. Every day more students asl< for facts andi
honesty.
Students have instigated educational campaigns and have
arranged free blood tests for students At Texas, George
Washington, Kentucky, V . P. I., Bucknell, Pttsburgh, Syracuse — and a host of other universities and colleges — student campaigns have met with startling successes. Presidents
and deans are beginning to see then way cl^ar to place the
blood test in its rightful place in routine examinations, and
are recognizing the need for courses in sex education and
marriage guidance.
I
Ten million persons in the United States have or have
had syphilis . . . a million potential mothers have syphlis . . . 100,000 deaths a year
60,000 congenital
syphilitics born annually . . . half of every year's
500,000 new case ore under 25 years of age . . .
Students and faculty alike looked at the above statistical
picture of syphilis. Many saw their responsibilities as leaders
of the future and as trainers of those leaders of the future.
Others asked, "But is this a problem for us - - for college
students and faculty?" Just this past January the U. S. Pubic Health Service and the American Social Hygiene Association answered that question. On the basis of more than
78,000 blood tests, they reported, the rate for college students is approximately the same as for the corresponding age
group in the general population. In March, the students
spoke. Out of nearly a million and a half students, in colleges all over the United States, 93.1 per cent answered
yes to the question: "Do you belie a blood test before
marriage should be required by law^
e whole people",
"The control of syphilis is a task fc
Surgeon General Parran says. Rich or poor, in college or
out, young people of today are vita v and directly cone pictures indicate
cerned with the control of syphilis
what some students are doing abou leir "public health
problem No. 1 " .
LEON ,\[|
OTTO J.
SALLY 1
BKATIMC
STKI-IIE
JOHN I
SAIL G
BETTY
MARY (
KE.VNE
Tb
first i
Assoc i
faculti
and a
tablisl
and ii;
naissa
Hi
collegi
inj^s o\
tablisl
Alban
sense
•
has r;
eyes c
Tl
ID I icily, a;
offii ia
by J
comin
organ.]
(limal
in i hi
Tl
done
Its pi
and r
It
l o j.ei
stu<le>i
«l IJJ
ID it
i
i
•
•••:•/
m
• ' J.-
<iM«,™ Into High;
?>^<.Antt-$yphtits
^ . Anft-W««" \7.^jGroapsTak^J*
ot \Group»J^-^^Students
- S t e n t s F ^^ i^ ^ SS ^f r e &$&*
p ^
TeleplNM
En tact
i t r
•" •••?'';:•
** v o ? V $ &
The una
!-»•
... j.
mother d») ^ y j w
ksSZ S i n "
° n Syphilis
"•"•nri. ,4
¥r
Page 3
Team
rcollegiate
le teachers
scheduled
11 be con'comer to
:ircles, Is
ong team,
ia it does
up process
earn.
;s follows:
t, Art Pox,
o, Steve
:ee, John
Bob PatSommers,
Hllen, '42;
icello, '40;
Cratz, '42.
)yeing
hm
*»t .tm,„,
*"'1 »Mfr.a (r '
1
Concern^
»..,
ITS
" i »
mwh i
...J,
iy
AVK.
P^„„.J?
• A * a result of ttudent interest, schools are adding to
their guidance work (above). Many are now including
blood tests in routine physical examinations (below), and
the movement is growing.
«**'f ,.*>-•• " " C •"""i:"-,,1-r- *"
5-1913
N. Y.
n
• Voluntary blood tests have illustrated the simplicity and
wisdom of routine testing (upper). When tests were made
available in student-conducted campaigns, students lined
up to take advantage (lower).
e
mark on thaj
ARROW dip
muun>
Guaranteed
(or Ufa
%
yjm
O
Syphilis Strikes 1 in 10 Adults
I
More Than Half Are Infected Before 30
ir
i c i <>n
HI tl
there!
111! I II
week
i
wlic.M
up de
s he
thnn
lupanuiii
imerinu,
of Pc-w I
ever luul
Sj )CC(
the
arc i
beta.
ordinary
The j
lussea or
H uuclrai)
bbci sue:,
Uu Teleofiok
this
V
res|i<
muni
-
I be sure
11(1 mart
• Syphilii ii a communicable diseate. It it usually spread by sexua
relation*. Syphilii ii cauted by a pale, corkscrew-like germ, Spiro
chaeta pallida.
Ip—that
or / / / • /
therpen.
ille, Wis,
t First sign of syphilis is a tore at the point of infeciinn T U „
• About three weeks after the sore appears, sensitive laboratory
testing of about 5 cc. of blood from the arm can find syphilis. This
it the "blood test".
• Treatment is long — at a minimum 18 montht of injection* — but
if it it begun in the earliest stage*, cure i* probable in more than 85
percent of cases
• Syphilis it tpread in marriage. Technically, tuch infection! are '.nV
nocent", but innocence it no protection from syphilis. Blood tests before marriage could prevent many a tragedy,
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
BBU&tfilaBmmmi-.x'f;.•-.•.r.sysf.* * . . . I
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
"»ir
The
rut
Tel
Lai
Or
SAI
BE.
STJ
JOI
SAI
BE
MA
KB
fir
As
fat
an
tal
an
na
Grunts, Groans and Lots of Dirt
CO.
inj
tal
Al
sei
ha
ey
. • • featured the annual Case School of Applied
bcience bag ruth this year, when the sophomore*
committed modified mayhem on the froih to win,
even though greatly outnumbered.
Photo by Pont.,,,
10
it)
nfl
hy
CO
or
ell
in
do
It:
an
to
-it'
ed
to
It's Taatima in Collcgcland
And scenes like this at Western Reserve University's
Mather College are being duplicated throughout the
nation. Mrs. Judith Wright is doing the pouring.
* *
No Sweatshirts Alio wad I
That's tha edict handed down by
CreUjhton University's dean, Rev.
G.H.Fit,Gibbon,S. J., fo, correct
classroom attire. So Bluejays are all
appearing neatly dressed like Don
Fleming, varsity halfback.
Thay'ra in tha Know!
W«IU.Uy Coll«M'9 "Ask Me"
SiHs provided real courteous information service for all of the coll«giis ntwcemt ri.. ( I to R) Dorothy
Pugh P.t,icia Hameright, Anne
Dumttrey, and Betty Blood.
Wid« Wo,ld
i
STATE COLLEGE
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
N E W S , O C T O B E R 13, 1939
Page 3
„„:<„S-i, .;,,,,, >,Vv..\"'
finished
Kappa Beta Tops
Football League
After First Week
Dresses
„ R,,w C o t t o n to
F r o m K.) w v v , . .
iwfe»'j-;.ii v S?
f r o
They M a k e Their Clothes
E-qht
by P r a n k Kluge, MAA president,
t h a t t h e Page h a l l g y m will be
open S a t u r d a y s from 1:00 t o
4:00 o'clock for general sports
participation. E q u i p m e n t will be
provided, t h e only r e q u i r e m e n t
being t h e use of sneakers.
H e a d s Beat Avalon-Spencer,
P o t t e r in I n a u g u r a l s ;
Frosh H a v e T e a m
Cross-Country Men
Undergo Trial Run
A n o t h e r i n t r a m u r a l football season is here again, a n d by some of
t h e results already recorded, a season of upsets seems in store. Monday's inaugural contests saw K a p After several weeks of h a r d t r a i n - '
p a B e t a win handily from Potter
ing, Slate's cross-country squad is
Club 13-7, while Avalon-Spencer set
just about ready for its first meet
down S L S by a 19-12 score.
wilh Delhi on October 21. T h e first
Kit Stores Upset
trials of the season w e r e r u n
last Tuesday on t h e W a s h i n g T h e first name definitely was a
ton park course. As predicted M a n surprise as KB was deeididly the u n ager Francello a n d Bob Cooke paced
derdog imainsl
Pntler
However,
the field, with Cooke crossing the
K B dominated tile p!,r- Innn beginning to end, iiltlmtiuli i h e \ niih
finish line about twenty seconds
p u n c h e d out a one intiriulown vic| ahead of Francello. T h e y were foltory.
I lowed closely by F r a n k Hansen, a
Bodner's cateli o! a pa ,s in (lie
('amp Johnston at C h a t h a m , renter of I.utla Bunkers' functions anil freshman
who hasn't
done too
end /.one for a firs I (pini'lei' score,
lire M i n e of VVAA's first weekend of the year, October 13-15.
much running this season. Snover,
c u l m i n a l e d a series nl . iin'r.v ml
,&
!)cnikc and Agnello finished in
passes by Hank Urnuiier
Brainier
WAA i- -sponsoring the first requirements : " " ' a l - s " be awarded thai order.
1
went nidil mi I hrou iii! . hi 111 bill ' . . o p Johnston weekend of n u , tin assiMnnt leadership,
There were only six m e n r u n n i n g ,
K B was unable in it 1'ind i h r wmniUH w a r Marling this afternoon and
'•'"<>«• who have received at least inasmuch as Steve S h a w a n d Doug
tally until late in the last quarter continuing through Sunday, T h e t w ° gears' credit must fulfill the
Mauley were disabled. S h a w will
when Pearson look a I lank pass in the price for Ihe weekend will be $1.25, ll1 ''' 1 l w n requirements a n d obtain b ( , | ( ) S | ( ( ] | h ( , u , u m f Q r U n p ( , n U r p
a
n
o
f
f
i
c
end zone. Kit's passina success was which includes food a n d transpore <>' leadership. This award s c , n K 0 I 1 because of k n e e trouble
ihw in a large measure to the fine tat ion. T h e girls will be taken to '« l i , m l l ' c l t 0 ten people and inss
protection given the passer by Al the rami, which is in C h a t h a m bv t--lucU»s taking charge of weekends p! ' ! h'l '>'
' ol SI nw will be a blow
m a k i n e some def- "
' t e n m - b u l h l s l)lru;e w i " b e
"Spiller" Stiller Potter functioned im i,imp, wnicn is in o n a i n a m , o>
m k d b v Hansen
or bus, depending o n t h e n u m - J X J X l S o n
'
' Cooke h a s lived
smoothly only when they scored Irani
l» i who sign Hi) on the WAA bulletheir lone tally on a downfield tin board.
Others must participate in fif- . , " ' . l 0 . . a " , e x p e c t a t i o n s a n d will
,
,.
i
,
, , probably bo t h e m a i n s t a y o t h e
m a r c h which was also featured by
\ varied program of activities is , " 1 ' 11 h o » f 8 ' " J™ 1 * ' \ » d b e a W f t r c l e c I team this year
passing. Bob .Seller! made the touch- planned. T h e r e will be m a n v hikes, , i n A s l a n t leadership
i
clown, a n d Will Prainenl took a pit niv of sleep ion inner spring mill" r o u p s who want to go to C a m p
pass for the extra point,
sc.si, lots of good food "sings" Johnston for unorganiwirl week(ieo. I) .li-iincv, P r o p
fn t h e other gunie Avalon-Spenc- mound the fireplace a n d plenty of | , | u l s l 0 participate in the hikes
er, reinlorced
by M'\ eral fro: h. an for all. Camp Johnston is the n,n,fl w i n t e i . ' sport* for which C a m p
r a n up two touchdown,-- and Mini
linslon is an ideal location may
In idquarters for ihe activities of
foughl oil an KI..H rally, linally I..-Ha Bunkers
lo so by get I ing six or more girls
winning by a 19-1- cure Hprou i
together and contacting Mndalyn
Madiih n Brers, '41, general chaii - Beers.
and Buhner featured lm Awiloii
mini ol ihe weekend a n d head of
KDK Victorious
I nl tit Hunkers, announced thai Loi Tuesday KDR's Panilii'r: opened i Hunkers credit would be L;IWII
defense of I heir I H le im.iiii.l litibin '-i l i m e participating in the hikes
hull a n d received much m m e coin
OTTO R. MENDE
. - . I he wei I'.end.
pelilion limn e'-ipet'lrd T h e hall
h'i i|
-inenis for credit arc n
" 11 • Colli •; ./. i n l< , •
I line score w a " U and all liuiiuli
ti e limen a n d ol hers who
Kl IK i", m i uiil!'. did \\ in 'Jn-u Robin In. lo?
111.1 ( i n l i . i l A v e .
Albany, N. V.
hall showed Ilia' I lie;, ale mil I i I..i • r not n-cch ed any |ire\ im is
l!IK-:0U ( I N T l v A I .
AVI.M.I:
must l a k e I h r e e .' I m r l hike.be t a k e n h hi!'.
( n b v sKo.t"'
n
WAA Announces First Weekend
Gym Open Saturdays
significance t o all m e n of
At Camp Johnston, October 13-15 theOf college
is t h e a n n o u n c e m e n t
,V-.L-r w o m e n s
,1 i t ' s l o b v
i \ IK
RPI First Meet
For Chess Team
S t a t e opens its intercollegiate
chess season tonight as t h e teachers
face R P I . T h e m a t c h Is scheduled
for 8:00 o'clock a n d will be conducted in t h e Lounge.
RPI, although a newcomer t o
intercollegiate
chess
circles, is
supposed to have a strong t e a m .
This is quite possible, a s It does
not take a long building-up process
to get out a good chess team.
T h e team will play a s follows:
at the number one board, Art F o x ,
'42; at
number
two. Steve
Shaw, '40; n u m b e r three, J o h n
Hoose, '41; number four, Bob P a t lon
' 'iV< number five, Roy Sommers,
' 4 2 : mm]Kr
«'*• J l m G l l l e n . ,' 4 2 :
" l ' i n b e r seven, Lou Franccllo, 40;
' " " " h e r eight, Henry Kratz, 42.
For Better
Phone
Work
4-6222
Cleaning:, Pressing
and
Dyeing1
Remodeling
SAM HERKOWITS
Tailor
514 WASHINGTON AVE.
Albany, N. Y.
Dial 5-1913
Boulevard Cafeteria
' • • ' • •
and Cull
LEFT
A B O V E
N
C
In
ilit- nl In-i
i .iiue tin- lochia
r a t e d .A II i: i l.:.i 1. Mere jus I I no m u c h
' • S i m m o n . ' |nr C o l l i - e lum e. W a l l
p t l l l r d (low II I'll ' r
a i ! ,d l " l ' l l n i i l l
a.s he ; c o i i il r \ \ . i nl !.: :. .on : i h i v e
l.ouchdou II
! • ., '
I d I heir i n a b i l i l y l o cope . ' . . ! ; ' i.i one m a n
passing
o t i i i, ;
i '-el.",
s h o w e d I h e line
i run
ning a n d pa- • uu
n-l: lm
iri.ini.
State s t u d e n t C h d . l . e
Smart c h e c k s u p o n t h e y a r n as it goes t h r o u g h t h e
comber
The rolls
o n l o p are raw c o t t o n
Alter
c o m b i n g , the y a m goes to the spinners w h i c h make
it i n t o t h i e a d
•ttil
LEFI
Bob W o o d
loi d y i n g
This d i v i s i o n of the i n d u s t r y is t h e i e a
Hlirpei' Tin i !c and Am".: i air
W e t h l e ; ,(la\ .- conle '.
roiirluded
the
week'., p l a \ nii.l . I'A K a p p a
B c l a t a k e I in- I r . , . " i i " lead W i l l i a
1L1-0 \ i e l o l \
i\ CI
\ ' a l o l i Spencer.
B r a i n i e r .'-'-i 111 < • r a n d I ' n i " on a g a i n
f e a t u r e d l-'ll
i i i l . i e k Will!-- l i l l l l l l e l
S p i ' o u Is a n d I'm i I n . I(»'d m i l l o r
A v i l l o i i T i l e i i l l ' i a cniiiesl h e l w e e n
Hie in u U l o r n , i ' , I I r e s l m i a n m i l I n
p r e p a r e s an a r m f u l o( y a r n
U.kJJll
son c h e m i s t i y is s u c h an i m p o r t a n t s u b j e c t f o i t h e
textile school students
RIGHT
toiy
This l o o m in the c o l l e g e ' s m o d e l fac-
is g a l h e n n g
the innumerable
I
• • i- l o I ive m i l l " each coin •
- - - i in m i o| l lie I iii'ee Ma.' ems
II.ii
'i '•
' M i n.lie h i k e 11 lie lour
I.I.
inn. i I o i i t l at least ' u cut •
III.
I-I , MU..I al l e n d t ,vi 'A eel-: ei.'i
o ' ' a m p J o h n : I o n ; an.I l h e \
m i l : i v " i ! : ha ' 'ii h o u r s
I In " \i i:o l':o r
reeen ed one
'. i i r ' i r r , I i i m i l i f u l f i l ! I lie abm e
thieads and
and
Y&\>>.
SI S
,i\\
I he
-1:<IT
run
re.e
MADISON SWEET SHOP
lliuiii'
\ Ir
7S.i
lol'loll-., (I-LI
Pari ol n e \ l Work s e i i e d u l e tollow:
Mmid:i\
Kappa
B e t a vs. h'olun h a l l
K l >i; i - Pm-di
TlU'.'.da.v S l . S \
I'otlei
Union \
Albanian.-
weaving them i n t o a beautiful pattern
M en and W o m e n
nl
Made
and
;&*•
!
We
Deliver
Stall
a complete
line
radios.
I.II . m i l I I I I I M I I I I
UT \ M ) \ M i l I
WILLIAMS
I! \ I I s
LAUNDRY
Philco
See " I ' l\
$7.
Willi.111!
Victor
RCA
t m e i son
:; .. is1'
lor
\MMIIIC
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(alliil
s\
lee ( i c n
'I 1 I, II -! . 11 m i l 1.,'u.nl Si
ol s m a l l
\ mil'
Yes, this is the graceful Pen
t made a railroad spike
a sissy
I .inn ii-'-,
Al.iili-.iin
\Vc c a r r y
II.i v e
/ /
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ModeL
I roni
;i u p .
I'
pal ' Ii n mi .
I n ins ol
$ 1.00
a
week
inn y lie a n a n " e d .
The College Favorite by2to1
<%> k ( • V ' ••
V
..A%
DUTCH
hUfu
OVENS
Htl.'i .M.idiMin
JII.-I
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PARTY
aboir
We
are open
evenings
u n t i l 9 : 0 0 P . M.
lir
i^u.ii
SPECIALTIES
Central Appliance Co.
51 (TiNTICW, .WKNUK
Phone
West Pointers P a r a d e in N e w Formation
K i l l as s n a p p y as x v e i
U
i tr >j 11111 J > t J I J i e s i i t . i t . v
S M i l i t a r y A c a d e m y cadets s t e p o u t i n t h « l r fust formal
u n d e r (Fie I U ..' n i l . m i l /
« • * * • » » • • - * — " -
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"
'
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l\iiu precision instrument a streamlined Featherweight,
whose I I K
Gold Point glides nimbly across your
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thlit'n
f/ui lien Parker
Vuoumatiol
Yet live devastating demonstrations prove that it: luats a lifetime,
and nl.'io easily wit list amis IH'id I lull
wits away u ruilroud tmke the same
Abbey of Woman's Home Companion
suys: " I t s sparkling, sliimmeringi
laminated style of circlets of Pearl
and J e t is the loveliest I've ever laid
my eyes on."
It holds far moi e ink than ordinary
rubber ink sue pens. For its sac less
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lever filler, and piston pump. Its Television barrel shows the level ofiok prevents running dry in classes or
exams.
I$m>--VACUMATIC-:-$^>
Go and try it today—and be sure
50
50
ftNi,.- *5 lo * / 2 Cncl/,ft.iMa/cft; * 3 f t . *5°° lo look for the Blue Diamond murk:
Vena ni.iilril with OIL- Mine Diamond ,iuon the smart AKROW clip—that
Blluruulccq im III.- lil« of Ihe uwii.:r a^uiuBt
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r»u-i»i lam QI litt.-i.tioii.it Un.uii^c,
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The Parker Pen Co,, Janeivillc, Wi*.
i r t i i i n i ii lul s r l v i . c
,u 1 f o u n d
''
'" , "' d " 1 '" y
inks
- .
. .
Esquire Mugii/inc rates it in their
top-flight gift select ions. And Jean
xarker
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
Kappa Beta Tops WAA Announces First Weekend
Football League At Camp Johnston, October 13-15
After First Week
p
RPI First Meet
For Chess Team
Gym Open Saturdays
Of significance to all men of
the college is the announcement
by Frank Kluge, MAA president,
that the Page hall gym will be
open Saturdays from 1:00 to
4:00 o'clock for general sports
participation. Equipment will be
provided, the only requirement
being the use of sneakers.
H e a d s Beat AvaIon-Spencer,
P o t t e r in I n a u g u r a l s ;
Frosh Have T e a m
Cross-Country Men
Undergo Trial Run
Another intramural football season is here again, and by some of
the results already recorded, a season of upsets seems in store. Monday's inaugural contests saw Kappa Beta win handily from Potter
club 13-7, while Avalon-Spencer set
down SLS by a 19-12 score.
KB Scores Upset
The first game definitely was a
surprise as KB was decidedly the underdog against Potter. However,
KB dominated the play from beginning to end, although they only
punched out a one touchdown victory.
Bodner's catch of a pass in the
Camp Johnston at Chatham, center of Lolta Bunkers' functions and
end zone for a first quarter score, j (he scene of WAA's first weekend of the year, October 13-15.
culminated a series of successful
<s>
passes by Hank Brauner. Brauner
WAA is sponsoring the firstjrequirements and also be awarded
went right on throwing them but Camp Johnston weekend of the an assistant leadership.
KB was unable to record the winning year starting this afternoon and
Those who have received at least
tally until late in the last quarter continuing through Sunday. The two years' credit must fulfill the
when Pearson took a flank pass in the price for the weekend will be $1.25, first two requirements and obtain
end zone. KB's passing success was which includes food and transpor- an office of leadership. This award
due in a large measure to the fine j tation. The girls will be taken to is limited to ten people and inprotection given the passer by Al | the camp, which is in Chatham, by cludes taking charge of weekends
"Spiller" Stiller. Potter functioned train or bus, depending on the num- and hikes, and making some defsmoothly only when they scored ber who sign up on the WAA bulle- inite contribution.
their lone tally on a downfield' tin board.
Others must participate in fifmarch which was also featured by I
A varied program of activities is teen hours of work and be awarded
passing. Bob Seifert made the touchan assistant leadership.
down, and Will Frament took a planned. There will be many hikes,
Groups who want to go to Camp
plenty of sleep (on inner spring matpass for the extra point.
tresses), lots of good food, "sings" Johnston for unorganized weekIn the other game Avalon-Spenc- around the fireplace and plenty of ends to participate in the hikes
er, reinforced by several frosh, fun for v . , . „ . , v j , n , u U . " U l / l C l l L y U l | —a n r l w l ~n t e Ir' s -r*t. sV » .fVo r . »w« h i 1c, 1h. 1 , C1aHmH . C . T
all. Camp Johnston is the:I
P°
P
ran up two touchdowns and then headquarters
the
of
Johnston la
is an
vlrt.-p for
f"'•*-- activities
4-;..i*i
- * '1 Jnhn«t-nn
an ideal
Wool location
l«nnf.n« may
«..,.,
fought off an SLS rally, finally Lotta Bunkers
do so by getting six or more girls
winning by a 19-12 score. Sprowls
Madalyn Beers, '41, general chair- together and contacting Madalyn
and Buhner featured for Avalon.
man
of the weekend and head of Beers.
KDR Victorious
Lotta
Bunkers, announced that LotTuesday KDR's Panthers opened
defense of their title against Robin ta Bunkers credit would be given
hall and received much more com- to those participating in the hikes
OTTO R. MENDE
petition than expected. The half over I he weekend.
time score wax 0-0 and although
Requirements for credit are as
•Th>
College. Jeweler''
KDR eventually did win 20-0, Robin follows: freshmen and others who
hall showed that they are not to have not received any previous
103 Central Ave.
Albany, N.
be taken lightly.
credit must take three short hikes
ol
three
to
live
miles
each
comIn the other game the highly
rated Albanians were just too much pleted in iwo of the three seasons,
"Simmons" for College house. Walt and one ten-mile hike nhe four
pulled down passes all afternoon hikes must total at least twenty
as he scored two of his team's three milesi; they must attend Iwo weektouchdowns. Except for their in- ends at Camp Johnston; and they
ability to cope with this one man must work for ten hours.
Those who have received one
passing offensive, College house
showed I he nucleus of a good run- year's credit must fulfill the above
ning and passing attack built around |
Harper, Tuttle and Augustine.
Wednesday's contests concluded
the week's play and saw Kappa MADISON SWEET SHOP
Beta take the league lead with a
12-0 victory over Avalon-Spencer.
Brauner, Stiller and Pearson again
featured KB's attack while Bulmer,
Home Made Ice Cream
I"'
Sprowls and Porlley stood out for I
and Lunches
Avalon. The other contest between'
the newly formed freshman outfit
and SLS saw the '43ers emerge vic78f> Madison Avenue
torious, 6-2. Part of next week's
schedule follows: Monday, Kappa
;) Doors from Quail St.
Beta vs. Robin hall. KDR vs. Frosh.
Tuesday. SLS vs. Potter. Avalon vs. •!-97:S3
We Deliver
Albanians.
After several weeks of hard training, State's cross-country squad is
just about ready for its first meet
with Delhi on October 21. The first
trials of the season were run
last Tuesday on the Washington park course. As predicted, Manager Francello and Bob Cooke paced
the field, with Cooke crossing the
finish line about twenty seconds
ahead of Francello. They were followed closely by Frank Hansen, a
freshman who hasn't done too
much running this season. Snover,
Denike and Agnello finished in
that order.
There were only six men running,
inasmuch as Steve Shaw and Doug
Mauley were disabled. Shaw will
be lost to tlie team for the entire
season because of knee trouble.
The loss of Shaw will be a blow
to the team, but his place will be
filled by Hansen. Cooke has lived
up to all expectations, and will
probably be the mainstay of the
team this year.
Geo.
I). Jconey, Prop
1 C
«*3
State opens its intercollegiate
chess season tonight as the teachers
face RPI. The match is scheduled
for 8:00 o'clock and will be conducted in the Lounge.
RPI, although a newcomer to
intercollegiate chess circles, is
supposed to have a strong team.
This is quite possible, as it does
not take a long building-up process
to get out a good chess team.
The team will play as follows:
at the number one board, Art Fox,
'42;
at n u m b e r
two, Steve
Shaw, '40; number three, John
Hoose, '41; number four, Bob P a t ton, '41; number five, Roy Sommers,
'42; number six, Jim Gillen, '42;
number seven, Lou Francello, '40;
number eight, Henry Kratz, '42.
For Better W o r k
Phone 4-6222
Cleaning;, Pressing; Dyeing;
and Remodeling
SAM HERKOWITS
Tailor
514 WASHINGTON AVE.
Albany, N. Y.
Dial 5-1913
Boulevard Cafeteria
and Grill
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
ALBANif, N. Y.
Yes, this is the graceful Pen
that made a railroad spike
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REASONABLE RATES
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T e r m s of $1.00 a week
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The College Favorite by 2 to I
DUTCH OVENS
We
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W\>l P,
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Parade in N e w F
•
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Yet five devastating demonstrations prove that it lasts a lifetime,
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•
Abbey of Woman's Home Companion
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and Jet is the loveliest I've ever laid
my eyes on."
It holds far more ink than ordinary
rubber ink sac pens. For its sacless
Diaphragm filler abolishes rubber sac,
lever filler, and piston pump. Its Television barrel shows the level of tak—•
prevents running dry in classes or
exams.
Go and try it today—and be sura
to look for the Blue Diamond mark
on the smart ARROW clip—that
means it'* guaranteed
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You'll never have to buy another pea.
The Parker Pen Co,, Jajwaville, Wia>
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 13, 1939
Wilfred Allard, While in Europe,
Witnesses Wartime Preparations
by Sally Young
(This is the second part of a story
of the summer European travels of
Wilfred Allard, who was in Italy
when the recent crisis arose and
broke.)
At Cannes, he saw> the famous
Battle of Flowers; in*Nice, he attended an outdoor performance of
"Prometheus Chained" in the Roman Arena and witnessed the Fete
des Provinces Francaises.
His first journey to Italy was
a pleasant one. Genoa, Pisa of the
famed Leaning Tower, Naples, Capri, Pompeii and Rome were highspots of his Italian visit. During
his three day's stay in Rome, he
viewed an outdoor performance of
"Aida", in the ruins of the Caracalla Baths, which was attended by
20,000 people. The Conte de Bavoia,
Italian liner, was leaving Naples
during his visit; three days later,
as he returned to France, he again
saw the ship, which had been called back to Italian waters by Mussolini.
When the crisis came, Allard was
in Florence, Italy, where very little
about the crisis was known. The
American consul told all Americans
to leave as quickly as possible, since
no one knew when Italy might join
the Germans in the hostilities.
From Florence he proceeded to
Nice, to Grenoble and back to
Paris, where he was located when
the war was declared.
The wartime Paris was very calm
and quiet. Public notices to the
civilian population gave information about procedure in case of
an air raid; all news was censored.
All skylights and headlights were
painted blue; all lights were a dim
blue; traffic signals were removed;
windows were reinforced with Scotch
tape to prevent breakage in a bombardment. Bags of sand were placed about, reinforcing all beautiful
bits of sculpture in l'Opera, le
Louvre and other homes of art.
Cellar windows were boarded to
keep gas from entering air shelters,
and all night life ceased abruptly for a period of time. The movies,
the Folies Bergere and the Bal
Tabarin were still closed in early
September. People could be found,
eating in cafes, with gas masks
slung over their shoulders.
(Concluded next week)
Assembly To Feature
First Rivalry Debate
(Continued from page 1, column 1)
The program this year includes
the regular panel discussions, formal debates and round table discussions in which three or four
colleges participate.
Those selected to fill the berths
on the varsity roster are Sadie Flax
and Geraldine Ewing, seniors; Cyril
Kilb, Catherine O'Bryan and Alma
Knowles, juniors; Edwin Holstein,
David Kreher, Lothar Schultze,
Glen Walrath, Selma Leis, Ira
Hlrsch, Harry Passow, Fred Ferris, Betty Cummings, Lauretta Servatius, Dorothea Devlns, Jeannette
Ryerson, Thomas Augustine and
Vincent Miller, sophomores.
Reporter Finds Minds In State Of Suspension
(Continued from page 1, column 2)
anyone who assumes an intelligent
and cooperative attitude, but an experienced senior penetrated the haze
of theories of the value of the system and explored its practical working. He believed that it would result in dirtier politics than now
exist. An example well illustrated
his point. Rho Dammit Rho and
Kappa Kegga Beer, two sororities,
who find it to their advantage to
work together, discover, on publication of results for revotes, that each
has a candidate who carries a n excellent chance of winning, if she
can receive backing from another
organization. Therefore, each will
switch their votes to the others'
candidates, thus securng for each
a winner. Under the present
method, he pointed out, this would
not be possible.
State college reacts to the amendments as any civic group does to its
public questions. Some favor the
whole, some favor part; others oppose the whole or part, but most
don't care.
Z-443
STATE STUDENTS . . .
Eat and Save at the . . .
IDEAL RESTAURANT
1 Central Ave., Cor. Lark
Students
Direct
Extra-Class Program
for Coming Y e a r
Student Body To Hear
Dean Moreland Today
A talk by Miss Helen Hall
Moreland, dean of students, and
a further discussion of the proposed amendments to the constitution are the features of today's assembly.
Miss Moreland will speak to
the student body about the changes in the set-up of her offices,
one of which is now the headquarters for the PTEB and the
NYA.
The amendment before the
student association is in two
parts: one, a proposal to change
the method of revotes; and two,
the compulsory publication of all
numerical results of all elections.
These parts are open for discussion. Students are urged to
state their views before the assembly before the final voting
today.
Lloyd Kelly, president of the
Student association, will make
several announcements vital to
Campus day, which is tomorrow.
The Milne clubs for practical instruction in hobbies are now entering their third week of pupil
activity. Miss Margaret Hayes, assistant professor of guidance, who is
assisted by Leslie Wiley, graduate,
has released names of the sponsors
of the twenty-nine clubs, together
with a statement of their purpose
and of future ambitions.
Registrants in courses Education
115, Education 129, and Junior Education 10, who have some specialized abilities, direct the classes
which include a field from athletics and music to cooking and
chemistry.
"At the present time
the clubs are extra-curricular, but
since they offer a chance for the
pupil to find his natural talents
and interests, it would be very
proper and advantageous to include them in the regular school
course," Wiley stated.
The sponsors for the senior cluBs
The first formal dance of the
are: Mr. Wilfred Allard, super- year, the Senior Hop, will take
visor of French, Kenneth Haser, place at the traditional Ten Eyck
'40, and Bruce Gordon, graduate, i Hotel ballroom Friday evening, NoFrench; Miss Mary Conklin, super- vember 3, from 10:00 to 2:00 o'clock.
visor of English, dramatics; Dr. Len Fennell will provide the musical
Carleton Moose, assistant professor accompaniment.
and supervisor of science, Jean
Fennell's Blnghamton band has
Godfrey, '42, and John Adam, '41,
orchestra; Miss Katherine Wheel- earned a return engagement being, assistant professor and super- cause of the enthusiasm with which
visor of English, and Dr. Thomas he was received at last year's Senior
Candlyn, assistant professor of mu- Ball.
sic, glee; Dr. Margaret Betz, inBids will be on sale next week
structor of chemistry, and Richard in the rotunda of Draper hall. ProDooley, '40, chemistry; Mr. Harlan crastinators may get bids at the
Raymond, assistant professor of j door. Unique in this year's hop will
industrial ar's, Miss Grace Martin, be the reduction in bid price. Cusinstructor
; art. David Hayslip, tomarily $3.00, the bid will be $2.50.
'42, and William Cameron, '41, arts According to Joseph Cappiello, genand crafts; Miss Carol Emerich, eral chairman of the dance, the re'40, and Cecil Marino, graduate, duction is aimed at drawing a
photography; Joseph Brooks, grad- larger crowd to the affair. "Conuate, athletics; Katherine Roosa, sequently," Cappiello stated, "the
graduate, subdebs.
formal will not be expensive, yet
The directors of the junior clubs will be far from a cheap dance."
(Continued on page i, column 5)
(Continued on page 6, column 1)
Seniors to Offer
Hop at Ten Eyck
Numerous clubs of the college are
now planning their social activities
for the coming year. Meetings and
revision committees have scheduled
such innovations as a complete
study of Italian folklore by the
Italian club and a trip to New York
city by the Classical club. Hikes
are featured by the other clubs, as
are discussions and constitutional
revisions.
The Italian club will conduct a
meeting on Tuesday evening at 8:00
o'clock In the Lounge of Richardson
hall. John Caramia, '40, president,
announces that the program will
feature Dr. Harold W. Thompson,
professor of English, as guest
speaker on the subject of Italian
folklore. Dr. Thomas G. Bergin,
professor of romance languages,
will also attend the meeting.
The Classical club has a prospective year in view as they initiate
this year with the hopes of making
a trip to New York city in the near
future to see the classical exhibit
in the American Museum of Art.
Allard Sails on Conte De Savoia
After Hectic Dash Across Europe
Obey Monitors!
LIGHT UP
Gogarty, Irish Writer
Will Speak Wednesday
(Continued from page 1, column 5)
his friends. "I Followed St. Patrick" Is an account of his experiences in retracing the missionary
Journles througii Ireland made uy
the country's patron saint in Christianizing the land. In his most
recent book "Tumbling In the Hay"
he relates his adventures as a medical student at Trinity College.
Ushers will be D and A council
members and freshman tryouts.
Those ushering are: Ruby Stewart,
Jane Wilson, seniors; Vivian Livingston, Mary Miller, Juniors; Betty
Simmons, Kay Richards, sophomores; Lois Hafley, Betty Marston, Muriel Scovel, Mildred Mattlce, Alice Reese and Shirley Eastman, freshmen.
Students will be admitted to hear
Dr. Gogarty by presenting their
student tax ticket at the door.
STATE COLLEGE FOR T E A C H E R S , A L B A N Y , N . Y., FRIDAY, OCTOBKR 20,
Milne High Clubs
Enter Third Week
Of Hobby Activity
Education
State Clubs Prepare
1939 Fall Program
In order to facilitate rapid
passage to and from classes, college students are requested to
obey instructions of Milne high
traffic monitors.
State College News
. . . that's always a signal for
more smoking pleasure
An around you, you'll see that friendly
white package . . . that means more and more
smokers everywhere are agreed that Chesterfields
are milder and better-tasting . . . for everything you
want in a cigarette, CUESTHRFIELD
WINS
CofTtlghe 19)9, IJOGMT ft Mreu TOBACCO Co.
Ttyyfak,
MILLIONS
by Sally Young
tickets sold for the Conte de Bavoia,
(Thin is the last part of a story which was sailing from Genoa. This
of Uie summer European travels of was possible only because the comWilfred Allard, who was in Italy munications were broken between
when the recent crisis arose and the Parisian and Genoan offices,
broke.)
since the boat was already more
Most men had enlisted for the than filled to capacity.
war, and it was a common sight,
Two hectic days of red tape In
if one was lucky enough to get Paris—the special permission of the
a taxlcab (three-fourths of which police commissioner to leave France
have been requisitioned), to find —permission from the Swiss legaa woman driver. Wives took over tion to go through Switzerland to
their husbands' businesses, or else reenter Italy—the checking of all
the stores closed.
cables and telegrams by the chief
The poilus, who were leaving for of police—and his troubles were
the front, would celebrate the last partly over I The Orient express
day of liberty in every way possible. from Paris to Istamboul, going
Mothers smiled bravely as they said through Milan and Genoa, brought
goodbye to their sons a t the sta- him to his ship. Tho Italian liner
tion; when the trains pulled out officials at first refused to honor
of night, they broke down complete- his vouchers, but later gavu him
room in an impromptu bunk.
ly.
The American consul at Paris
Until 11:00 o'clock the night betold all Americans to leuve there fore the boat sailed, Allard was unand proceed directly to the port! certain of passage. At, noon, Sepfrom which they were to sail for tember 15, lie left on tho Conic de
the United States. In Llsieux, a city | Bavoia, which stopped at Naples,
w a r lu Havre, It was found that the I(fame throng)) the Mediterranean
Normundie had not yet loft New | sea, and made an uneventful crossYork. Allard was present during ing, save for the observation of
three air raid alarms, Suddenly, in one submarine of unknown nationthe middle of tho night, the siren ality.
blew, awakening tho guests, who
Allard arrived in New York on
hurried to tho shelter in the hotel September 23. He had spent a
wine cellar, to remain there until glorious summer's travel hi Europe,
ono long blast indicated the con- but he was glad to be back on
clusion of tho raid. Reconnoitorlng American soil,
planes wore observed, but no bombs
He said; "I hope the war is of
woro dropped.
short duration. Europe has so much
Finally, Allard returned to Paris to offer the American traveler.
to try to make arrangements for You come back a better citizen for
returning home, Purely by chance having seen what is going on over
he obtained one of the last three there."
1939
VOL. X X I V , N o . 5
Campus Queen Crowning to Highlight
Activities of Nineteenth Campus Day
Faculty Sack Race, Clash With Colgate, Circus
Feature Attractions In Former Campus Days
"Oh, please, dear Minerva,"
prays this harassed, headlined,
deadlined reporter, "an annex
sandwich for a lead! Do you
know who's Campus Queen?"
"No, no, no!"
"Have you heard about the
s t a g g e r i n g stupendous soph
stunt?"
"No, no, no!"
A fine thing! Campus day
and no scoop I Speaking of Campus day, when did it originate?
Why? What was Campus day
like in the good old daze?
Reviews of the march of time:
Aha—look at this—a big, bold
black headline in the November
7, 1921 issue of the NEWS heralding Campus day as a college tradition because of its successful
innovation a year before. Fond
memories of a faculty sack race,
a basket lunch picnic, and somersault racing.
Then time goosesteps on. In
1922 the first Campus Queen was
crowned with a coronet of autumn leaves. In 1923 the program took the form of a circus
in the gym with the class stunts
molded to fit the theme.
But Campus day in 1924 was
to make history, for on this day
the gallant gridiron warriors of
State fought^-hang on to your
hats, boys, fought Colgate (frosh)
in a bruising, battling game.
Mudder pin a roze on us. (Ed.
Note—the score was Colgate 33,
State 0. We wuz robbed. We
shoulda stayed in the library.)
For some reason fieldball replaced football, and the GAA
girls sold lollypops to the wildlycheering spectators in the grandstand. Maybe it was the fieldball—or the lollypops—or the
GAA girls, but at any rate Campus day became so popular and the
attendance so overwhelming that
in the years from 1928 to 1930
it was necessary to Issue tickets
of admission to the coronation
and stunts.
In 1935 control of the activities
of Campus day passed from
Myskania to Student council.
But while the council is in
charge of arrangements, it is
Myskania who jealously guards
the secret of the queen's identity, as well as that of her attendants.
Myskania Announces
Advanced Dramatics
Freshmen Officers
To Present New Plays
Class Elects Thomas Feeney
As Leader of Activities
Two One-Act Plays Will Feature
Comic and Tragic Themes
Thomas Feeney and Shirley Eastman, elected as president and vicepresident respectively, will lead the
class of 1943 through its first year
at State.
Nominations were conducted at a
freshman meeting on September 27,
under the supervision of Jane Wilson and Otto Howe, members of
Myskania, senior campus leadership society, and freshmen guardians. The voting and revotes took
place in the balcony of the commons.
Assisting Feeney and Miss Mattlce are the following: revotes,
secretary; Robert Walter, treasurer;
Dorothy Cox, songleader; Lois Hafley and June Melville, cheerleaders;
Elsie Roth, manager for WAA;
Robert Leonard, representative to
MA A; and Marian Adams, reporter,
The Advanced Dramatics class will
present the first plays of the year
Tuesday night in Page hall auditorium under the direction of Lydla
Bond and Douglas Dillenbeck, Juniors.
Both plays are one-act presentations, a comedy and tragic fantasy. Miss Bond is in charge of
the comedy. In the cast are Marilyn Groff, Shirley Van Valkenburgh
and Mary Miller, Juniors.
Mr. Dillenbeck is the director of
the other play, a tragic fantasy. The
cast for this play Includes Jack Vavasour and Peter Fulvlo, sophomores.
Elementary dramatics is now considering arrangements for three
one-act plays, to be produced this
semester.
State College Maidens
Capture Bold Intruder
"Come on, girls, are we men or
mice?"
With that cry four girls
dove at an o b j e c t in their
locker room, and one ran away
screaming. When the dust of the
battle cleared, Ethel Haltorman,
'42, exhibited the prize—a weewee mouse.
His orientation into State college came quickly. He was Immediately presented to Dean Nelson,
who, caught momentarily off
guard, greeted Mr. Mouse as a
prospective freshman, Ho made
a favorable impression, however,
for the Dean christened him
"Felix" and formally admitted
him to State. After taking his entrance exams, he was allowed to
run ubout the library tables
where much excitement was stirred up.
Next came a trip to tho Dean
of Students' office where Mrs.
Casey hit high "O" and took to
the customary refuge. Mr. Hardy
received him in his usual cordial
manner and subtly suggested that
ho be kept in a cage in the activities office. At present Mr, Mouse
may be found "at homo" In the
Cooper house.
Rivalry Pushball Contest
Will Climax Afternoon
Sports Program
ADES TO C R O W N QUEEN
Class Stunts a n d Dancing
In Gym to Terminate
Day's Activities
The nineteenth annual State college Campus day program will begin at 1:00 o'clock tomorrow afternoon with a softball game between
the seniors and the faculty. The
crowning of the eighteenth campus
queen will open the evening program. Rivalry stunts and a dance
in the gymnasium of Page hall will
conclude the activities of the day.
The afternoon program will include a girls' hockey game and rivalry races, a student-faculty softball
game with the activities terminated by a rivalry pushball contest
between the freshmen and the
sophomores.
Afternoon Activities
At 1:00 o'clock, the senior softball team, captained by John Shearer, '40, will meet a faculty team.
A girls' hockey game will fellow.
Marjorie Baird, '40, president of
WAA, will supervise the contest In
which the sophomores and seniors
will meet a team consisting of the
juniors and the freshmen,
The girls' rivalry races will begin a t 3:00 o'clock. The three events
are an obstacle race, sack race,
and relay race with one rivalry
point being awarded to the class
winning each event.
The teams
will be managed by Marion Duffy,
'42, and Lois Hafley, '43.
Men's Pushball Contest
The men's pushball contest is the
last event of the afternoon and is
scheduled to be played at 4:00
o'clock. Henry Brauner, '42, and
Thomas Brierton, '43, are the managers for the rival teams. The
game will be played In two periods
of five minutes each with three rivalry points being awarded to the
winner. Frank Kluge '40. president of MAA, is general supervisor
of men's sports with Willard Frament, '40, Harold Duffy, John Bakay, and Roy McCreary, Juniors,
acting as Judges.
Coronation of Queen
The evening activities will com(Continued on page S, column 6)
Dr. Gogarty, Offstage, Explains
Ireland's Attitude Toward War
by William nominee
•
'Good at man's slaying,
Speaking in a rapid Irish brogue,
Merry In tho ale house,
Dr. Oliver St. John Gogarty dropMasters of tho song.'
ped some of the gems for which he That is tho feeling of the Irish."
is famous to a NUWH reporter in
At this point tho doctor asked
a hurried back-stage interview. tho reporter not to place too much
Before stepping to tho stttgo of emphasis on tho war. "Pontics
Page hall, he commented upon tho and war," he explained, "aro the
war, Irish literature, and the United complete antithesis of wit and culture. I profor talking about lighter,
States.
richer things."
To a question on Ireland's posiIn response to a question on tno
tion in tho present world catas- greatest figure in tho Irish litortrophe, Gogarty stated, "Ireland ary renaissance, Gogarty retorted,
bus now -12,000 soldiers in tho Brit- "The greatest man in Irish literish army, waiting to embark to tho ature? Not just Irish literature
front In France. Of course this but world literature. Why, William
Butler Yeats is tho man. He's boon
enlistment is unofficial."
tho loading figure lu tho last ten
To tho reporter's interruption, years. Ills winning tho Nobol prise
hinting that Ireland is pro-British, emphasizes this."
Gogarty replied, "No, I wouldn't
Gogarty called Now York the
say thut at all. Ireland is not
"J
definitely pro-British.
The Irish grandest city in tho world.
aro nevor definite about anything, profor New York to any city in the
Right now tho young-bloods say world including Dublin. Why? The
thoy want to soo tho fun over in town is a poem. It is a veritable
Franco. It's the traditional Irish fairyland." He maintained that the
love for a fight that is behind their noiso did not disturb hlra a bit,
"Why, it soothes the temper, doesn't
joining tho British army,"
arouse it."
He recalled an old thirteenth cenAt this moment he was called
tury Irish tune which sums up the upon the stage to present his adIrish personality and attitude dress. He left with the words, "Hope
toward life.
I see you some day in Dublin."
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