advertisement
SUMMER SCHOOL NEWS, AUGUST 4, 1939
Dr. St. John Enlivens
Moreland Hall Party
Muckraking
We've heard of "drop the handkerchief" but never "drop the vegetable." Jane Wilson was the lucky
recipient of a supply of radishes
and cucumbers found outside her
door at the dorm.
Still at the dorm—we hear there's
a new night watchman up there.
Could there be any relation between
the afore-mentioned vegetables and
"Sheriff" Monahan's
departure?
Incidentally, the new watchman was
formerly connected with the culinary
department of the dorm.
Judging by the way many prospective freshmen are roaming the
halls, the class of '43 will tend to be
somewhat Independent in its way of
dress. Many of the frosh come all
dressed up while others seem to be
somewhat lackadaisical about the
whole thing.
We were overwhelmed to find that
the average State College Summer
School student allows but one hour
a day for recreation. How amusing
to find one's self on a mental par
with the Kalikaks. It was also
gratifying to realize that an undergraduate is studying for her master's.
What dreadful blunderers
these little newspapers are.
Let us start a fund to buy Life
Preservers for our
unfortunate
schoolfellows who must tread water
on rainy days while waiting for the
bus.
Moreland Hall inaugurated its own
"formal" social season this summer
with a "vie" party last Friday evening. Guests from State College
and from the city enjoyed dancing,
cards, and an old-fashioned "gabfest" spiced with the wit of the participants.
The life of the party was Dr. St.
John who made it clear by word and
action that he was not acting in the
capacity of chaperon. He claimed
a girl for every dance and entertained between numbers with jokes,
stories and songs.
The "Beer Barrel Polka" vied
with "Little Audrey" for the attention of the group. Of the various
styles of dancing exhibited during
the evening the outstanding feature
was an impromptu jitterbug number performed by Betty Dodge and
Rudy Egnaczyk.
General Chairman of the affair
was Miss Louise Carstens of Brooklyn, assisted by Mrs. Alwell, house
mother.
Moreland Hall, 165 Partridge
Street, is one of the regular session
group houses and operates at that
time on the cooperative plan.
"Our T o w n " Opens Tuesday
Kleptomania Strikes
State Summer School
According to the psychologists,
one of the cardinal instincts of
people is to collect and possess.
As evidence of this instinct, a
student is already minus a new
Elgin watch which he left lying
on a desk in R-202; the libraries
are minus a few of their treasured
books and magazines; an English
professor is minus a Webster's
Intercollegiate dictionary, mysteriously missing from his office;
the laboratory is minus part of
its mechanical equipment and
materials, including some hairdye compounded by some neophytes in chemistry; certain of
the students are minus umbrellas
left hanging in unguarded places.
Could this kleptomaniacal tendency be curbed for the remainder of the session?
COLLEGE PHARMACY
STATE CAFETERIA
Hucstcd Hall
Breakfast 7:30-8:45
Lunch 11:00-1:15
ELSE'S HAIR DRESSING
7 No. Lake Avenue
Hair Stylist
Cut Rate Drugs
Sandwich Bar
BRIGGS AUTO SERVICE
West St. near Lake Ave.
Frank Craven, who played for two
years on Broadway in Thornton
Wilder's Pulitzer Prize play, "Our
Town," comes to the Mohawk Drama
Festival at Union college next week,
opening Tuesday, August 8, where
he will resume the role he created
in the New York production. "Our
Town" will be presented in the Outdoor Theatre through Saturday,
August 12. This is Mr. Craven's
first appearance with the Mohawk
Festival, following numerous stage
and screen appearances.
DRIN
One block from College
805 Madison Ave.
%JOT
IN BOTTLES
TONIGHT!
TONIGHT!
presents
CARDS
VOL.
I, No. 5
Milne Library Is
Scene of Forum
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, A L B A N Y , N. V., AUGUST 11,
PEOPLE
in the Commons of Hawley H a l l
from 8:30 to 12:00 o'clock
Admission, 2 5 cents per person
COME and Bring Your Friends
1939
Softball Takes Over
Examinations Loom
Alumni Field Today
As Session Closes
Members of Faculty Battle
Kappa Phi Kappa Group
Next Tuesday and Wednesday
P R I C E , SC PER C O P Y
President Lists
Faculty Changes
Are Reserved for Tests
Supervisors and Principals
State College faculty members will
Debate Censorship of
This week comes the annual cram- Barker of Stanford Succeeds
shed their dignity this afternoon at ming season, for on Tuesday and
Doctor Adna Risley;
Fiction at Tea
4:00 o'clock, when their softball Wednesday of next week State ColBaker Returns
squad tangles with the Kappa Phi
lege Summer Session students will
An open forum on the question of
censorship of adult fiction for pub- Kappa group, in back of the Alumni be taking final examinations.
Residence
Hall.
Dr. Abram R. Brubacher, presilic schools was held August 2, in the
The type and length of the ex- dent,
recently
announced
the
Paul Bulger has requested that
Milne High School library.
amination are to be determined by
Members of the panel consisted the following faculty members be the instructor. The fact that a course changes in faculty for the regular
of Mrs. Mae Parkinson Webb, Assis- present to participate: Bruce. Birch- is a three-hour course does not nec- session 1939-1940. There is one retant Professor of Librarianship, New enough, Don Smith, Hallinc, Hicks, essarily mean that the examination tirement, three resignations, and
York State College for Teachers; A. A. Smith, Snader, Fahrney, John- will take three hours. This matter three on sabbatical leave.
Miss Agnes C. Peeny, librarian, son, Clark, Clausen, Beaver, Hardy, is left for the instructor to decide.
Professor Adna W. Risley of the
Saratoga Springs High School; Mr. and C. C. Smith.
The ordinary examination regu- social studies department, has reThe Kappa Phi Kappa team will
Harold P. French, District Superintendent, Albany County; Mrs. John be composed of Barrington, Bill lations will be obeyed. No books or tired because of ill health. Mr. RisBellamy Taylor, former Board of Ryan, Tom Ryan, John Ryan, De- papers may be taken into the exam- ley's successor will be Dr. Charles
Education member, Schenectady; Goia, Amyot, Miranda, Dumat, ination room and all pocketbooks A. Barker of Stanford University
should be left on the proctor's desk. who holds the degree of Doctor of
Joseph Wells, New York State Col- Irwin, and Swingle.
lege for Teachers, 1939; Miss KathKappa Phi Kappa players consist All necessary paper will be furnish- Philosophy from Yale university.
erine E. Wheeling, Assistant Pro- of members of the State College edu- ed by the examiner.
Marion Kilpatrick has resigned to
fressor and Supervisor of English, cation fraternity bearing the same
There will be final examinations become dean of Lake Erie College,
Milne High School, and John Witt- name. George Amyot collared men in all courses. If there are any Painsville, Ohio. Mrs. Francis B.
hoft, Albany High School, 1939.
who have graduated, and who are make-ups for mid-term tests or Crellin, French supervisor, has reMrs. Webb, chairman, opened the members of the organization, to play quizzes, they will be scheduled on or signed because of ill health, and her
discussion by reading a letter written against the faculty. In fact, the before August 12. The full exam- successor will bo Wilfred P. Allard,
by a parent to the State Education whole idea of a game with the ination schedule will be found on the '3G, of State college. Miss Eleanor
Watcrbury, supervisor of English,
Department in protest against sev- faculty was that of Amyot's and the fourth page of the Nisws.
eral passages in a recent book of Phi Kappa group.
A stamped envelop must be left who resigned as a result of her marhistorical fiction which was made Schoolboy Art Smith has been ap- in a box outside the Summer School riage, will be replaced by Warren I.
available to her child in the high pointed captain of the professors' office so that marks may be forward- Densmore, '38, of State College.
school library. In reply to this, Mrs. squad. Thunderbolt Al Hicks is ed to the student. For those unfamSabbatical leave has been granted
Taylor said that it is a lack of faith scheduled to toss them in, with Ratt- iliar with our marking system, the to Miss Marion Chesebrough, Dr.
ler
Ralph
Clausen
on
the
receiving
in their children's judgment based
grades are as follows:
Elizabeth H. Morris, and Mr. D. V.
upon home training, and a reluc- end. For the Phi Kappa's, Miranda i
A Excellent.
Tieszen.
Miss Chesebrough will
will
pitch
and
Swingle
will
catch,
j
tance to expose them to sordidness,
B Good.
study at Columbia, and her succesthat prompts some parents to pro- Umpires are Ed Melanson and Mike ,
C Pair
for undergraduates; sor will be Lionel Pearson who holds
Walko.
test at realistic fiction.
passed for graduate students. the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Lockers will be furnished for the
D Passed for undergraduates; from Yale university. Miss Morris
Mr. French brought out the idea
failure for graduate students. lias left for European travel and
that censorship is a negative ap- faculty in the basement of Draper
Hall.
'
study of secondary education. Mr.
E Failure.
proach to the problems of the hlgn
Tieszen will continue his studies at
school library. "Re-education of parOhio State university and will be
ents is much to be preferred," he
replaced by George Raymond Fisk,
said.
'38, of State College.
Mrs. Webb suggested that a parent-teacher committee might be
Ralph H. Baker, who was awarded
formed to read a disputed book and
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
judge whether or not. there is any
past June at Johns Hopkins
Right now you're saying, "Never classes will have a live minute re- this
justification lor its removal from
university, will return from a leave
cess,
during
which
lime
the
profesagain
for
me."
Just
the
same,
next.
the school library.
will pass out cigarettes and of absence lo resume his position in
ft was emphasized that hazarding July 4, you'll be packing your suit- sor
chewing
gum. A great innovation Ihe social studies department. Others
case
and
borrowing
five
dollars
from
one's job for the sake of including
will
be
the
adoption by the teachers who are returning from their studies
Ma.
We're
not
worrying—you'll
be
a contested book is unwise; the libof
a
system
where no required work are Prof. Harold W. Thompson, who
back.
rarian's services otherwise arc tou
from
reserved
books will be assigned held a fellowship from the RockeBut things are going to be difvaluable.
unless
there
are
at least three books feller Foundation; J. Isabelle Johnston, who studied at Columbia uniOver [50 persons attended the dis- ferent next year. We've found that for eighty people.
with
only
a
few
changes
summer
versity; Catherine Peltz, who studied
cussion. Among the guests were sevschool
can
be
made
the
equal
of
a
Next year the teachers are going al Johns Hopkins; and John J.
eral library supervisors, principals,
vacation
in
the
Adirondaeks.
So
to alter their testing program. All Sturm, who studied at Columbia
and public librarians. A social hour
come prepared next year to be sur- tests will be of a length that can be university.
followed the forum.
prised.
j answered in one period without
The following who have served as
We're planning to begin the sea- d a n g e r of cramped wrists and shatState College Buildings son with a big Get Together parly tered nerves. Only three tests will substitutes will leave the faculty:
the first week, before the teachers be given during the session and if
Dr. William A. Gilbert, who suoUndergo Improvements get
wise to our capacity for work. [term papers are required the tests stituted for Dr. Baker; Mrs. D. V.
The janitorial staff of State Col- Every student not attending will be
Tieszen, who substituted for Miss
lege reports thai it is making many given a 1) in all courses, With this ! will be reduced to one.
Johnston; Miss Elizabeth Foster,
We
don't
want
to
be
too
radical
renovations on both the exteriors start, it will be only a natural step
who substituted for Miss Gilmore;
and interiors of the college buildings. to weekly dances in the Commons but we arc planning to have the William R. Clark, who substituted
Their schedule for the summer con- with a prize for each man student j mystery door from Ihe tunnel to the for Miss Peltz; and E. Stephen
sists of painting exterior frame- who brings two stalwart friends Commons open. Of course this will Merlon.
work, installing new boys' lockers, along for the extra girls. This, with (prevent some people from getting
and thoroughly cleaning the entire our planned program of outstanding j exercise but we aren't pulling in
j elevators.
campus.
Regents Marker To Speak
speakers and concerts, and an active
Next summer any gay young tiling
Painters are now at work on Dra- sports program, will help lo make
"Grading English Papers" will be
or opinionated soft soaper who tries the subject of a talk given by Mrs.
per and Huesled Halls, and on com- us just one big, happy family.
pletion of those buildings will do Classes are going to be better, too. to handshake the prof before the E. S. Simons, Chief Examiner of
Richardson Hull. After the summer No instructor is to bo hired who lias end of the third week will be invited Regents English Papers, State Edusession students leave, the entire not a supply of funny stories and we to pick up her books and walk.
cation Department, at 12:00 o'clock,
The suggestion has also been made Monday in the Little Theatre. There
force of cleaning women and jan- DO mean FUNNY. Cushions are to
by
one
of
the
faculty
that
"only
the
itors, half of whom are now vaca- be rented in the main corridor for a
will be general discussion aftertioning, will completely scrub, sweep, nominal sum, but no objections will better grade of students" bo admit- wards, according to Miss Katherine
and dust away all the dirt from the be made if students care to furnish ted. So you'll have to let us know Wheeling, Associate Professor of
how these improvements turn out— English, who has arranged for the
college buildings.
their own.
All hour-and-a-half we won't be Willi you.
speaker.
We See Less Work, More Play
For Future Summer Sessions
THE NEWS STAFF
DANCING
8-9038
Summer School
..„•-.••••
'
•f..i.=r.?
Summer School News
Published by the students of the Summer Session,
New York State College for Teachers
Publication office—Room 135, Milne High School
I Believe That:
Highlights
on the
THE STAFF
Kathleen Kenny
Frank Augustine
Leonard Kowalsky
Matilda Bauer
Dora Mason
Alice Brown
Adeline Miller
William Busacker
Frances Murphy
F. V. Damanda
Isobel McCampbell
Jean DeForest
Miriam Newell
Frank Evans
Enes Novelll
Frances Field
Elfreida Sullivan
Janice Friedman
Hazel Tamblin
Marion Hinden
Veronica Thompson
Mary Holleran
William Vrooman
Otto Howe
Prudence Wagoner
Robert Hunter
Highbrows
The public schools should provide education suitable to the needs of all boys and girls approximately
between the ages of 2 and 21.
Learning experiences provided by schools should
be determined primarily by the needs of present day
Before we bid each other farewell,
society. Individual interests and abilities will neces- highbrows (and highbrowesses), may
sarily be taken into account but specialization in edu- we rake you over the coals once
cation should occur largely beyond the present high again.
school years.
Apologies are in order to Dr. ClauThe schools should be concerned with the develop- sen. T'other day an abominable
ment of "whole" personalities. Emotional, social and odor permeated one of our classmoral aspects of development are frequently neglected rooms. The source was soon found
because of over-emphasis upon intellectual aspects to be a rat . . . but indeed it wasn't.
INSTRUCTOR
of learning. Children are still sacrificed upon the Alas, it was Dr. Clausen's prize starWilliam Clark
ancient altar of grade and subject matter standards. nosed mole. We sympathize deeply
with you, Dr. Clausen, both for the
Education is far more than "knowledge."
lowly misnomer and for your great
The NEWS will welcome any contributions jrom The curriculum should be organized to provide for loss.
functional
education.
Children
should
be
provided
its readers. All articles must be signed but names
We hear that Paul Bulger was the
which will enable them to increase their
will be withheld jrom publication on request. Com-experiences
understanding and appreciation of the world in which star baseball player at the Myskania
munications may be lejt in the NEWS Mailbox in they live. Much that is taught in schools today has picnic Saturday. Putting on weight
little transfer value simply because it has little rela- hasn't altered his versatility, has it?
the basement of Draper Hall.
Dr. St. John is quite the Casanova.
tion to life outside the schools.
Did
you notice him at the Commons
August
11,
1939
Volume 1, No. 5
No school "subjects" should be considered as pecu- party last Friday? He can "beat it
liarly valuable for achieving disciplinary or cultural out" with the best of them.
outcomes.
Dr. Walker loves to indulge in
Schools should be organized and operated more facetious comment. T'other day he
democratically and informally than they generally are gave himself away when he said:
More teaching and less testing would make sum- today. Adult guidance is needed but not adult dom- 'An economist doesn't get any more
attention than a priest in a nunmer school more profitable. The majority of stu- ination.
nery." Some people would call Prof.
Every
pupil
completing
a
secondary
school
curridents who devote the vacation period to study do
culum adapted to his needs should receive a diploma Walker naive. Would you?
so in order to further their education. They come which should specify the accomplishments of that
Dr. Brown's face was certainly
to institutions where they may benefit from the particular pupil. This means fitting schooling to red when a group of his modern
drama class traveled 100 miles to see
children instead of children to schooling.
knowledge and experiences of outstanding educaAll persons are educable and all have human values, "Petrified Forest" only to learn that
tors. One needs only to visit the library any hour regardless of color, religion, I.Q. or economic status of the last ticket had been sold at 10:00
The schools must recognize differences in o'clock that morning. Mind you,
of the day to be convinced that these students are parents.
Dr. Brown had said reservations
capacities to profit from various kinds of experiences were
Dr. B r o w n
earnest and sincere.
and do their utmost to provide each individual an thoughtunnecessary.
it was very funny. Quite
environment best suited to his development as a happy a perverted sense of humor, we
Many professors believe it is necessary to give individual and a worthy member of society. If we
would say.
one or two tests weekly. At least two of the re- believe in Christianity and democracy, we can do no
You'll have to watch your pauses
maining three days are given to individual oral less.
after this, Miss Graham, especially
Dr. J. Allen Hicks.
when you get into Milton's "Parareports. One day is left for teaching by the person
dise Lost" . . . and more especially
who really has something to give the student.
when discussing that infernal region
modernly known as "Hell."
If tests are necessary to check on the reading
An orchid is in order for Dr.
done by irresponsible students, why not limit the
The small town wo all come from or would like to Wyman who staunchly believes that
number and the time to be used in so doing? The have come from is sympathetically represented in eight hours is too much for any
summer school student to carry.
majority of students feel that excessive oral topics Thornton Wilder's "Our Town," starring Frank Hurray, for you!!
Craven.
Hospitable people these faculty . . .
are a distinct waste of time. Such topics are helpBeautifully presented with a minimum of proptake D. V. Smith for instance. He
ful to the individual who does the necessary research erties, this play tells of the happiness and heartbreak invites people out to his house and
that is found in a typical small town, Grovers Cor- then makes them work on his new
in preparation but very little of this worthwhile ners, N. H.
swimming pool.
knowledge is registered with his fellow classmates.
Frank Craven plays the part of the stage manager j Miss Wheeling showed some movWhat can be done to remedy this condition who tells the story of "Our Town." It is he who j ing pictures of faculty children the
introduces the various characters and tells Us a little | other day. Remarkable pictures, inexisting in our colleges and universities?
of their past histories. So subtle and natural is his deed, and so were the children.
performance that he can step in and out of his role Bobby Hardy and Peter Jones coas narrator without causing the onlooker the slight- j starred, but Sandy Clark stole the
est bit of confusion.
show.
The audience was brought into the spirit of the
The second party of the summer session held play by the cleverness of the production. They were | Not that this column is dedicated
lo Ur. Brown, but it seems that he
last Friday in the Commons of Hawley Hall was allowed to ask questions about Grovers Corners. Wc is a "scherzothrenlc." He is under
think those who did ask personal questions about the the delusion that he is T. S. Eliot
an even greater success than the first. The turn- town were members of the cast "planted" in the audi- one half of the time, and can play
tennis the other half of the time.
out was remarkable. We were happy to welcome ence, but it was all done in the spirit of fun.
The natural setting of the Union College campus
so many of our regular session students who had was especially appropriate for this play. The lighting <W. T. Tilden, perhaps).
In spite of the fact that Mr. Clurk
heard about "the last party and wouldn't have miss- through the trees representing the early morning has a haggard look these days,
sunlight was very effective.
(walking the floor nights trying to
ed this one for the world."
Because of the finished quality of the production put the youngster to sleep), he still
As usual, dancing was the outstanding feature as a whole it is difficult to single out anyone besides retains his delightful sense of humFrank Craven for excellent work, Miss Hutchinson or. He pulled this one the other
of the evening with I Jr. St. John "shining." Card- sensitively
interpreted her role of Emily Webb, the day: Greta Garbo was snatching
playing proved another popular pastime.
young girl who loves the boy next door. Donna Earl, grass and throwing it over her head.
Curtis Cooksey, June Walker and Ainsworth Arnold You see, "she wanted to be a lawn."
We of the N E W S are deeply grateful to those all
did splendid Jobs. Hugh Norton, a State College (Do you get it?)
of you who have attended these affairs and have graduate who Ls now a salaried member of the festival,
And now, lads and lassies, we
made them such a success. We are sorry it is too made the most of his part of the tragic Simon Stim- take leave of you, if you don't mind
ton, the church organist.
too much, on our bounding broomlate in the session to have any more. But come
As Acting Governor Charles Polotti said in his stick (apology to Bob Benchley).
back next year. We'll lie here. They'll be bigger speech of welcome Tuesday night, "New York State Do you suppose, Dr. Brown, that
Is to be congratulated upon the possession of such a this column (??) could have been as
and better, we promise you,
worthwhile project as the Mohawk Drama Festival." effective, written in poetry??
Need We Say More
Curtain!
We Thank You
3
SUMMER SCHOOL NEWS, AUGUST 11, 1939
SUMMER SCHOOL NEWS, AUGUST 11, 1939
Picking
Winners
F.P.A.
Mars Holds World's Attention;
Dr. Power Comments on Scares
Mars, the only planet in our solar
system beside our own in which
there is the slightest evidence of
life, will vie with Mars, the God of
War, in cccupying our attention
within the next few weeks.
The only evidence of life on Mars
is principally that of a mysterious
network of fine lines covering the
planet's surface from pole to pole.
Many astronomers believe that the
network of lines is made up of real
canals, artificial waterways constructed by highly intelligent beings,
to convey water from the melting
polar snow caps down over the
planet's surface. A worldwide canal
system would be a vital necessity
on a globe such as Mars, because it
has no oceans, rivers, or seas. The
only water available is locked in a
thin layer of ice and snow at the
poles. In the spring, it is supposed
that the snow melts and the water
flows through the canals to irrigate
American tennis fanclom is beginning to wonder whether or not the
United States' Davis Cup team will
keep the coveted trophy at home.
With the brilliant Don Budge absent
from this year's group of players
eligible for Davis Cup play, a feeling of uncertainty lias crept up as
to the ability of the American contestants to vanquish the highly
touted Australian squad.
I'atc's Worries
Walter L. Pate, captain of the
United States group, has quite a
job before him. As yet, no one is
certain who will work for the team.
The upsets provided by the Seabright and Southampton tournaments have been the foremost of
Pate's troubles. The Wimbledon
champions succumbed before the
attack of players ranked far down Myskania Holds Reunion;
the list. Riggs, Parker, Hunt, Mc- Members
Enjoy Sports
Neill, Grant—all have been defeatMyskania, honorary senior campus
ed.
leadership society of State College,
Pate's chief worry is the gathering held its annual picnic get-to-gether
together of players who can play in Thacher Park last Saturday at
fine tennis consistently. All the .1:00 o'clock. Myskania members of
American players have s h o w n the 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939 and 1940
flashes of brilliant form, but this Myskanias were present.
has been offset by their erratic perTlie picnickers played so enthusformances. In all probability, Bobby iastically at softball that the ball
Riggs, Frankie Parker, Don McNeill, was lost under the pavilion near the
Gilbert Hunt and Elwood Cooke will ball diamond. Sophie Wolzok, '38,
form the backbone of the American became the heroine when she crawlsquad. But these players, even ed under the pavilion, on all fours,
though they are considered Amer- and retrived the ball. "Duke" Hersh
ica's best, will have to show a sud- was the home-run king of the day.
den reversal of form to overcome
After a strenuous afternoon of
Australia's red-hot three of Adrian sports there was a picnic lunch
Quist, Jack Bromwich, and Jack around the bonfire. Jane Wilson,
'40, created interest by losing her
Crawford.
wrist watch which was later found
Australians Consistent
in the woodpile by Leonard FriedWhereas the United States' play- lander, '39.
ers have been on and off, the Australians have performed flawlessly
with a consistency that is amazing. Silence Is Golden Hut,—
Quist has overcome the foot-fault
IV ol Without
Laughter
defect which ruined his country's
chances for the trophy last year. He
The complaint came from one
was taking an extra hop when ser- professor of State College the
ving. All signs of this illegality have other day that his class had not
disappeared completely. Bromwich, been .sufficiently interested in
with his two-handed tactics, has imdiscussion. The professor then
proved considerably, Crawford is went through the entire register
still the old Crawford, a great tennis unci commented on the amount
player.
of talking each student had done.
One particularly reticent stuAs things stand today, one can do
dent was mildly criticized for hLs
nothing but pick Australia to lake
the necessary three of the five reserve. His prompt reply to
the professor was, "No, I haven't
matches. Should Bobby Riggs and
Elwood Cooke regain their Wimble- said a word, but I HAVE laughed
at all your jokes."
don form, the affair would be a
It Is reported on good authority
buttle royal with Utile to choose between the two squads. Right now, that the student is In line for
an "A."
however, it's the Australians by a
wide margin.
I'hi Kappas vs. [''acuity
With Schoolboy AH Smith not
Lucille Beauty Salon
scheduled to pitch lor the faculty
this afternoon the fraternity should
win u close one. Thunderbolt Hicks
Evening Appointments
is good but if is understood that the
Schoolboy really has plenty on the
4-JHHl
ball. Maybe Smith will be in there :JOK Quail St.
anyway and maybe (he faculty will
win.
CAPITOL TEACHER'S
AGENCY
School Officials
Teachers
!)(» Stale St,
I'lione 4-15KI
the land. This theory is supported
by the fact that the rust-brown crust
turns a greenish colour as if vegetation were coming to life after the
spring inundation.
Dr. Power, professor of earth
sciences, at State College, says that
life on Mars is possible but highly
improbable. He explains that because Mars has only a small amount
of oxygen, little vegetation, and extreme degrees of cold, the Martians
(if such there be) would not resemble humans, but would be more like
grubs and worms.
In regard to the "attack from
Mars" story and "end of world"
tales, Dr. Power says that if people
would question such stories and
apply a little logical reasoning there
would be no such terror and consternation as last Halloween's nightmare, when Orson Wells presented
the play "Things to Come." So
watch out that the Martians don't
get you!
Litlle Known Facts —
Well Worth Forgetting
There are at least 317 student's
cars parked on Washington Avenue, Robin, West, and adjoining
streets each day; forty-seven
faculty cars in the parking lot.
State students spend between
zero and twenty-four hours each
day preparing lessons for the
next day; except those who spend
that long preparing excuses for
not having the same lessons done.
An average of quite a few decibels of noise may be heard in
a single day in the State College
library.
If placed end to end the student body of State would reach
from the front door of Draper,
up Western Avenue past Manning Boulevard, and about six
blocks farther. A very disturbing thought, that.
If the ideas for news here at
summer school were placed end
to end, you'd have quite a job
finding them.
B i l l H a r d y Is O u r C h o i c e
We suggest that Mr. Hardy's aid
be enlisted in contacting the Martians the next time their planet
conies so dangerously close to the
eur'h. Assisted by a small megaphone there is every reason to believe that success would be his.
C. P. LOWRY
Watchmaker and
Jeweler
171 Central Ave.
Meet
Your
Mentors
Dr. Hoover H. Jordan
Dr. Jordan comes to us all the
way from Kansas—that is, in regular session he teaches at the University of Kansas. Dr. Jordan is a
Yale man but has received both
his Master's and Ph.D. at Cornell.
We wanted to know whether
"young Kansans were so different"
from us. We found that the young
Kansans are more state-conscious
than we are. They want you to
know that they still aren't overrun
with Indians. Dr. Jordan wasn't
quite sure whether they were different because he teaches "mostly
young engineers." But, "on the
whole, there isn't much difference,
as they all fall asleep in class."
Then in the manner of the proper
interviewer, we asked Dr. Jordan
about his hobbies and interests.
"Well, I don't collect stamps or
carve soap models or do anything
useful like that." However, he is
very much interested in sports. (For
an authority on baseball, he refers
us to Dr. Brown). And in his spare
time, he reads papers. That's how
a composition teacher spends his
idle hours.
Of course, what interests us most
is what Dr. Jordan thinks of the
students in State College Summer
session. He is most impressed by
their sincerity and hard work and
the interest they show in their work.
Dr. Jordan also told us a story
about State College students that
had been told to him. It may be old
to some of you but it's still good.
You see, it's like this. When a professor enters a classroom at Cornell
or at the U. of Kansas and says
"Good-morning," the class says
"Good-morning." When he offers
this pleasant greeting at State, his
class very diligently writes it in
their notes.
Unwanted
HAIR
Removed
t r a m fuce,
II r in • tt II (1
legs by electrolysis with
new Insulated n o o d l e ,
painless, regrowlli lmpos'BlblB. No
utter murks
HI your skin. Now $1.00 Treatments,
CoiiBulLutloiiH free — recommended
by
iiliyniciiiiiH.
ERNEST SWANSON
17 Western Ave.
WAGAR'S COFFEE SHOP
NOW AIR-CONDITIONED
Good Food in a Friendly
Joseph Barbagallo
COLLEGE
SHOE REPAIR SHOP
Hit Washington Ave.
Phone 3-4988
OI'KN KVUNINGS:
Comfortable Atmosphere
WESTERN AVENUE AT QUAIL
SUMMER SCHOOL NEWS, AUGUST 11, 1930
4
Quips & Quizzes
"What's sauce for the goose is
sauce for the gander." So spake
Henry Patrick on the eve of the
great battle of Run—Bull—Run. In
other words, if the professors can
mete out quizzes, so can we.
We herewith submit this examination to every professor in the
school. If you score ten out of ten
points, we consider it a total failure. So, professors, rate yourselves.
True—False
1. During this summer session I
have fully covered the material I
passed out to my classes in those
voluminous outlines (?) at the beginning of the semester.
(For
history professors only).
2. I have learned to associate
students' names with students' faces,
so that by now I can say "Yes, Mr.
Jones?" instead of "Yes, Mr. M-mm?."
3. When I laugh and chat very
gaily with the students in my office,
I really mean to be as encouraging
as I sound.
4. I have detested listening to the
bally-hoo of those students who try
to impress me with their intelligent
grasp of my subject, and have earnestly tried to squelch them.
5. I have been discriminating
enough to ascertain whether the
sweet young things making several
trips into my sanctum sanctorum
were really sincere in their quest
for knowledge or were merely indulging in that traditional collegiate pastime—apple-polishing.
6. I really felt that my subject
was so interesting that no short recesses were necessary even in an
hour and a half period.
7. I examined every test paper
and every term paper with meticulous attention to every detail.
8. I have nobly restrained myself
from indulging in the telling of any
joke which was more than two years
old, and I really was not disappointed at the feeble laughter accorded
the ones I told, by the class.
9. I fully intend to mark the final
test papers sympathetically and
thoroughly, keeping my attention
away from the more glamorous occupation of packing for that great
vacation trip.
10. I have attended at least one
Statezapoppin, directing all my energies toward making this summer
session an all-round profitable experience.
"Equinoctial" Storm
ISearn State Students
A survey of the attitudes which
have prevailed at State this past
week reveals rumblings of the
approaching lem|)est, viz.—the
examination period.
1. "If I can just live through
this week."
2. "Believe me, I've got to work
now,"
3. "They're bearing down too
hard,"
4. "Term papers during summer session aren't fair; they'll
never read 'em anyway."
5. "If I can Just make a C In
that history, I'll be satisfied."
6. "I don't know If It's my
I. Q. or my background or the
course,"
7. "I'm leaving on the s p o t Wednesday noon."
New York State College for Teachers
Examination Schedule
Summer Session 1939
Tuesday, August 15
8:00 o'clock
Anc. Lang. S118
Chem. S1A
Com. S7
Com. S108
Econ. S103
Econ. S106
Ed. S14C-3
Ed. S118-II
Ed. S118-III
Ed. S119
Ed. S129-II
Ed. S200-III
Ed. S201A-II
Ed. S207
Ed. S212
Eng. S11A-I
Eng. S121B
Eng. S213
Eng. S230
Hist. S4A-II
Hist. S121
Hist. S124B
Hist. S144
Lib. S13A
Lib. S17B
Lib.... S18C
Math. S l l
Pol. Sci. S130A
11:00 o'clock
Com. S4B
Com. S i l l
Econ. S130
Ed. S103
Ed. S105
Ed. S121
Ed. S201B-II
Ed. S209A
Eng. SUB
Eng. S37-II
Eng. S121A
Hist. S4B-II
Hist. S140
Hist. S221A
Hist. S241A
Lib. S10
Lib. S18B
Lib. S21
Pol. Sci. S i l l
Soc. S106
2:00 o'clock
Com. S4A
Com. S5
Com. S17
Ed. S14GN
Ed. S109 (initials B-R in.)
(initials S-Win.)
Ed. S201A-I
Ed. S201A-IV
Ed. S201B-I
Ed. S227
:
Ed. S230 (initials F-Y. in.)
(initials B-E in.)
Eng. S5-I
Eng. S108
Eng. S115A
Eng. S116
Fr. S107B
Gen. Sci. S1A
Hist. S4B-I (initial "C")
(initials A-B; D-Y in.)
D-208
H-161
D-300
D-2I0
D-lll
D-301
D-209
R-20
R-20
D-201
D-100
H-250
D-101
D-201
D-200
R-28
D-2U
R-23
R-23
D-206
H-260
R-28
D-206
R-33
R-40
R-35
D-109
R-20
D-301
D-200
D-100
R-20
R-23
D-211
R-20
D-206
D-lll
H-161
H-200
D-201
H-250
D-202
D-101
R-33
R-40
R-35
D-206
D-300
D-206
D-302
D-304
D-209
D-100
D-211
D-2il
D-101
R-20
D-200
D-lll
D-202
H-250
R-28
H-161
R-20
H-250
H-150
D-109
D-206
Hist. S123B
R-23
Hist. S141
H-260
Lib. S12B
R-35
Lib. S13B
R-33
Lib. S18A
R-33
Lib. S19A
R-40
Math. SIB
D-109
Math. S2
D-202
Pol. Sci. S100B
D-210
Soc. S4
D-301
Soc. S140
D-201
Wednesday, August 16
8:00 o'clock
Anc. Lang. S112
D-208
Com. S10
D-302
Com. S110
D-300
Com. S117
D-304
Earth Sci. S4
H-260
Econ. S3
D-201
Ed. S14E-B
D-201
Ed. S14M
D-100
Ed. S108
R-28
Ed. S118-I
R-20
Ed. S129-I
R-23
Ed. S200-I
H-250
Ed. S201A-III
D-211
Ed. S201B-III
D-202
Ed. S205-I
D-lll
Ed. S206-I
D-210
Eng. S5-II
H-161
Eng. S26
D-200
Eng. S113A
H-250
Eng. S139
D-209
Hist. S4A-I
D-206
Hist. S120
D-301
Hist. S122B
D-206
Lib. S12A
R-33
Lib. S18D
R-35
Lib. S20
R-40
Math. S1A
D-100
Math. S3A
D-109
Pol. Sci. S113
D-101
Soc. S104
R-20
11:00 o'clock
Bi. S106
H-250
Chem. SIB
H-260
Com. S14
D-300
Com. S18
D-304
Ed. S14E-A
D-200
Ed. S14GS
H-101
Ed. S200-II
D-210
Ed. S206-II
D-101
Ed. S209B
D-206
Eng. S11A-II
R-23
Eng. S37-IA
R-20
Eng. S37-IB
R-20
Eng. S138
D-211
Fr. S12
D-lll
Lib. S17A
R-40
2:00 o'clock
Anc. Lang. S109
D-208
Bi. SIB
H-260
Com. S9A
D-304
Com. S15A
D-302
Ed. S14SS
D-201
Ed. S205-II
D-210
Ed. S225
D-211
Eng. S8B
D-101
Eng. S9
D-lll
Fr. S130
D-200
Lib. S19B
R-40
Moreland Hall Parties
Feature Innovations
Punch-making, Jitterbugging,
and Gab-fests Are Hits
Moreland Hall continued its social season with another "vie" party
last Saturday night. Heartily sanctioning the editorial policy of the
NEWS, the girls planned to augment
their social contacts beyond snatches
of idle conversation in the library.
The party also provided an excellent
opportunity to demonstrate dancing
steps so "arduously" practiced night
after night. Twenty-eight feet hopped, slid and pounded to the rhythm of "Three Little Fishies" and
"Sunrise Serenade."
Uncrowned
champions for the evening were
Anthony Rusito and Miss Betty
Dodge who entertained with original
interpretations of the shag and the
radio hop.
Everyone indulged in "creative
social activity" through the medium
of making punch. Each person held
a spoon in one hand and a bottle in
the other. By alternating the processes of pouring and tasting an
effective system was devised whereoy an excellent drink was produced.
Hostess for the evening was Miss
Betty Beecraft of Lowville.
Social activity is being carried on
during the closing days of the summer session mostly through informal
get-togethers featuring dancing.
A new type of "social" (for summer session at least) was inaugurated Monday night at the instigation of Miss Louise Carstens.
Several members of the faculty were
invited for an evening of conversation. Iced tea and cookies were
served during the discussion of
education, the New York World's
Fair and travel in the United State
and in India.
Guests were Dr. and Mrs. Gilbert,
Dr. Drinkwater, Dr. St. John, and
Miss Morton.
Appointment Bureau
The Appointment Bureau of New
York State College for Teachers announces the following appointments
made last week: June Palmer, '39,
English and library, Setauket, Long
Island; Marjorle Milland, '39, commerce, Newfield; and Aubney Kalbaugh, '36, commerce, Fredonia.
STATE CAFETERIA
Huested Hall
Breakfast 7:30-8:45
Lunch 11:00-1:15
College-Bred Farmers
A poll of one hundred Princeton
university graduates who have become farmers reveals that seventythree of them are making money,
that sixty-nine have no mortgages
on their farms, that about half consider their immediate prospects
hopeful, and that most of them like
farming.
COLLEGE PHARMACY
7 No, Lake Avenue
Cut Rate Drugs
One block from College
Hair Stylist
Sandwich Bar
805 Madison Ave.
BRIGGS AUTO SERVICE
Went St, near Lake Ave.
ELSE'S HAIR DRESSING
DRIN
ecark
8-0038
IN BOTTLES
Download
Related flashcards

American telenovelas

36 cards

Japanese voice actors

38 cards

Spanish actors

22 cards

Fictional professors

67 cards

Create Flashcards