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DlRAHY
3TATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, APRIL 21, 1939
Langmuir, Nobel Prize Winner,
D and A to Present
Lectures on Protein Research
Singing Troubadours
AL»ANY. H. Y. /
Appointment Bureau
Lists New Placements
Those who have received positions from the class of 1939 inBayner Sisters to Entertain
Probably one of the most inter- before the British Association for
clude: John Dorman, commerce at
with Musical Program
esting lectures which State college the Advancement of Science.
Greeneville; Carolyn Mattice, Engstudents have had an opportunity to Dr. Langmuir, in his address, dislish and Latin at Allentown; Arnold
hear was that given last Tuesday cussed proteins, a class of subOn Tuesday evening at 8:30 Paladin, science and mathematics at
in the auditorium of Page hall. The stances composed of more elemental o'clock in Page hall auditorium, Ludlowville; Jane Schultz, matheoccasion was the monthly meeting of chemical compounds, the amino Dramatics and Arts association will matics at Bellmore; William Sivers,
the eastern division of the American acids.
present Joan and Betty Rayner,
Chemical society and the guest
troubadours, in a varied program commerce at Wellsville, and RoThe
greater
part
of
Dr.
Langmuir's
speaker was Dr. Irving Langmuir,
of ballads, songs, legends, dramas, land Waterman, commerce at Adam
Center.
a man recognized as one of the most talk concerned various characteris- dances and mime.
remarkable scientist of the present tics of proteins. Among these was Like the Strolling Players of olden Those graduate students and
the
property
of
specificity,
the
fact
day.
that each protein—and there are times who acted, sang and told their graduates who have been placed are:
We were just a bit curious as to thousands — has specific properties stories in the palaces of Europe, Arnold Bookheim, '32, principal at
whether the evening would offer and acts in a way peculiar to itself. these two girls have traveled from Mountaindale; F. B. Clark, '32, supanything out of the ordinary, and A particularly interesting property country to country, encircling the ervising principal at Tioga Center;
we weren't disappointed. The au- is that of forming monolayers. That globe three times. Their perform- Doris Coffin, grad., English and lidience itself — and there was a is, proteins in solution have the ances have been lauded in London, brary at Galway; Franklyn Converse,
grad., science and coaching at Earlgood-sized crowd — was interesting, ability to spread out in a layer a Paris, Berlin and New York.
for the majority there were out- single molecule thick. These films This will be the last presentation ville; Louise Grunewald, '38, comof D and A until the Advanced merce at Mayfield; Mildred Katz,
siders, students, college professors, are absolutely invisible.
'38, commerce at Highland Falls;
laboratory workers, and well known A third point Dr. Langmuir ex- Dramatics production in May.
Jessica Koch, grad., English and lifigures of science from the capital plained was the fact that the molebrary at Highland Falls; Patricia
district.
cules of proteins are extremely huge. Marriage Commission
Markham, '38, English at Monticello;
Dr. Langmuir's record is a bril- They are thousands and some milTo Conduct Discussion and Phillip Moore, grad., mathemaliant one. Since 1906 he has been lions of times larger than the usual The series of talks and discussions tics and science at South Onondaga.
associated with the physico-chemical molecule with which the scientist Is conducted by Marriage commission
research department of the General accustomed to deal.
and sponsored by S.C.A. will culElectric Company in Schenectady This last fact led Dr. Langmuir minate
with a panel discussion on
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop
and Is now assistant director there. to say that the study of proteins "Steps
to a Successful Marriage."
His work has resulted in several may be thought of as new division The discussion
will take place In the
important inventions such as the
organic chemistry—the field of Lounge of Richardson hall, Monday,
gas-filled Tungsten lamp and atomic of
magna-molecules. For the present, at 3:30 o'clock.
hydrogen welding.
science is concerned primarily with Those participating in the discusIn recognition of his work, Dr. satisfying that eternal scientific cur- sion are: Miss Helen Hall Moreland,
Langmuir has received marks of dis- iosity of "what," "where," and "why" dean of students, chairman; Dr.
tinction in degrees from universities, In finding out more facts about new Ralph G. Clausen, assistant profesand in medals and prizes. In 1932 fields. However, just as other scien- sor of science; Virginia Hall and
he received the Nobel prize for his tific research that began with curi- Gordon Tabner, seniors; Harriet
work in surface chemistry — the osity has led to important applica- Sprague, Mary Trainor, and Saul
second American chemist to receive tions so we may reasonably expect Greenwald, juniors.
the Nobel award. Just recently he. that the- further
—».™ study of proteins j All members of Marriage commis1(18-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
returned from England as an ex-j will lead to important contributions slon are urged to attend, and other
change professor chosen to speak j for the betterment of living.
faculty and students.
Frederick Receives Honor
In the April issue of the Journal
of the National Education association, Dr. Robert W. Frederick's book
on "Directed Learning" appeared
among the sixty outstanding educational books of 1938. Out of the
900 publications examined, Dr. Frederick's book received a place on this
list for his outstanding work on
educational psychology.
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It's a f a c t . . . millions from coast to coast
are turning to Chesterfields for what they
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have a better taste and a more pleasing aroma.
Chesterfields show them what real mildness
means in a cigarette.
When you try them you'll
know why Chesterfields give
men and women everywhere
more smoking pleasure—why
Chesterfields SA TISFY
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world's best cigarette tobaccos
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and TASTE BETTER
State College News*
Z-44J
Seniors, Juniors
Plan Traditional
Annual Banquets
Upperclass Presidents Select
Committees to M a k e
Last Preparations
The annual banquets of the senior
and junior classes will be conducted
this week at Jack's and Panetta's
restaurants respectively on Thursday evening at 6:00 o'clock.
Senior Banquet
The traditional senior banquet will
be conducted on Thursday evening,
at Jack's restaurant at 6:00 o'clock.
Speakers for the occasion are Mr.
Louis C. Jones and Mr. William G.
Hardy, instructors in English. The
speakers will be introduced by
Charlie Sharer in his capacity as
toastmaster.
Guests who will attend the banquet include: Helen Hall Moreland,
clean of students, Milton G. Nelson,
dean, Dr. Abratn R. Brubacher,
president, Mrs. Bertha Brimmer, executive secretary of the Alumni association. Mr. Paul Bulger, personnel
director, and Mrs. Bulger.
Committees
Committees named by Miss Hayford are: guests and speakers, Kay
Maloney, chairman, Nat Grossman,
Neil Fogarty, and Joe Bosley; promotion, Eleanor McGreevy, chairman, Charlotte Pox, Harriet Green,
Lawrence Strattner, and Charles
Franklin; decorations and arrangements, Justine Hermann, chairman,
Brita Decormier, Bernice Moseby,
Robert Gorman, Frank Quattrocchi,
and Hall Downey.
Panetta's restaurant will be the
scene of the junior banquet, scheduled to lake place Thursday evening at 6:00 o'clock. Betty Denmark will be the general chairman,
and Rita Sullivan will act as toastmistress.
Bulger to Speak
Paul Bulger, personnel director,
will be the speaker, followed by an
enjoyable program of entertainment.
Guests of the juniors will be Dr.
and Mrs. Brubacher, Dr. and Mrs.
Nelson, and Dean Moreland.
The following are on the various
committees for the banquet: arrangements, Francis Field, Florence
Frzyborowska;
publicity,
Alvin
Weiss; programs, Mary Koonz;
speaker and faculty, Kenneth Haser,
Marjorie Baird; tickets, Stewart
Smith, Lillian Rivkind; entertainment, Marion Walker, Frank Kluge,
Gordon Peattie.
STATE COLLEGE FOR TKACHLRS, ALBANY, N. Y.,
CALENDAR FOR THE WEEK
May 12 Assembly, 11:10 o'clock.
12 Rivalry football game,
3:30 o'clock.
12 Intersororlty ball, Aurania club, 10:00 o'clock.
13 Tennis, Bard.
13 House dances.
14 Lutheran Area Conference. Friendship house,
First Lutheran Church.
15 Service fraternity meeting, room 206, 12:00
o'clock.
16 Interclass track meet,
4:00 o'clock.
17 Baseball, Hamilton.
17 Interclass debate, seniors vs. juniors, Lounge.
18 Senior and Junior banquets, 6:00 o'clock.
Four Fraternities
Choose Officers
Junior Class Breaks Tradition
by Disclosing Results
of Late Elections
Another tradition of State college has been broken by the members of the class of 1940. Formerly,
it was the custom to keep secret the
officers of the various fraternities.
This year, however, through the cooperation of the two older fraternities and the two newer fraternities,
the
officers
of
these
fraternities will be published.
Those officers that were selected
at the meetings in the earlier part
of this week are: Gamma Chapter
of Kappa Delta Rho, president, Otto
Howe, '40; vice-president, Robert
Martin, '40; secretary, William
Brophy, '41; treasurer, John Bakay,
'41; members to Interfraternity council, Otto Howe, and Walter Simmons,
juniors, and Stephen Kusak, '41.
Edward Eld red Potter club, president, Theron Powell, '40; secretary,
Virgil Scott, '42; treasurer, William
Haller, '41; members of Interfraternity council, Willard Frament and
Theron Powell, juniors, and Paul
Grattan, '41.
Kappa Beta, president, Haskell
Rosenberg, '40; vice-president, Gadlin Bodner, '41; secretary, Harry
Passow, '42; treasurer, Herman
Kleinc, '41; members to Interfraternity council, Haskell Rosenberg and
George Stangler, juniors, and Arnold
Ellcrin, '41. Sigma Lambda Sigma,
president, William McCracken, '40;
vice-president, Edward Simmons, '40;
secretary, Dclfio Mancuso, '41;
members to Interfraternity council,
McCracken and Simmons, juniors.
FRIDAY, MAY 12,
1939
VOL. XXIII, No. 25
State College Sororities to Present
Annual Dance at Aurania Club Tonight
Sorority P r e s i d e n t s A n n o u n c e
Committee Members
for H o u s e D a n c e s
The college sororities will conclude their weekend activities with
formal spring house dances tomorrow night from 9:00 to 1:00 o'clock.
The committees for the dances include:
Delta Omega: orchestra, Grace
Castigline, '39; refreshments, Janet
Busacker, '41; chaperones, rloreen
Cappiello, '41.
Kappa Delta: general chairman,
Mary Trainor, '40; orchestra, Ellen
Best, '40; programs, Shirley Van
Valkenburgh,
'41;
refreshments,
Shirley Tooker, '41; arrangements,
Barbara Ferree, '41; clean-up, Mary
Grace Leggett, '41.
Psi Gamma: general chairman,
Janet Thomas, '40; chaperones,
Lydia Bond, '41; music, Lorraine
Theurer, '40; decorations, Jeanette
Evans, '41; flowers, Virginia McDermott, '41; refreshments, Lena Drapalski, '41; and programs, Laura
Frost, '41.
Chi Sigma Theta: general chairman, Mary Margaret Pappa, '39;
music. Elizabeth Baker, '39; arrangements, Helen Bifarella, '39,
chairman, Irene Poger and Mildred
Foley, sophomores, Ann Cashman,
'42; programs, Alice Brown, '40,
chairman, Edna Fuller, '39, Elizabeth
Kennedy, Beatrice Dower, Helen
Clark and Elizabeth Donahue, sophomores, Doris Barrett, Betty Burke,
Shirley Wurz and Mary Gauthler,
freshmen.
Alpha Epsilon Phi: general chairman, Miriam Shapiro, '40; decorations, Fay Scheer, '40; refreshments,
Lillian Rivkind, '40; programs, Estelle Englehart and Ethel Cohen,
sophomores; arrangements, Shirley Kaplan, '40; music, Helen Rubin,
'40.
Gamma Kappa Phi: general
chairman, Dorothy Pritchard, '40;
music, Bettye Gorgan, '40; decorations, Virginia Davis, 41, chairman,
Bertha Petit, '41, Barbara Howard
and Irma Inglis, freshmen; refreshments, Jane Barrett and Betty Denmark, juniors; clean-up, Gertrude
Lehman, '41.
Beta Zeta: general chairman,
Virginia Strong, '39; arrangements,
Doris Saunders, '40 and Patricia Culver, '41; decorations, Eloise Hartmann, '40. chairman, Elizabeth Elson. '41, Charlotte Crosby, '40; re-
' Ted Black and His Orchestra
Mrs. Poletti Addresses
Will Provide Rhythm
Group on Government
for Spring Event
Last Wednesday, Mrs. Charles
Poletti, wife of the Lieutenant
Governor of New York state, addressed a group of State college
students In the Lounge of Richardson hall. Her topic was a discussion of the workings of our
state and national governments.
She was sponsored by the Lounge
committee and Miss Helen Moreland, dean of students..
Mrs. Poletti talked informally
for about a half hour, and then
entertained questions from the
students present. She spent
some time in reviewing briefly
the meaning of the word, democracy. She then explained the
workings of our state legislature,
and showed a copy of the legislative index, a booklet published
weekly, showing current legislation. Some of her talk was centered around pressure groups, and
their influence in legislatures.
State to Select
Faculty Leader
State college sorority girls and
their guests will open their weekend
festivities tonight with the annual
Intersororlty ball. The affair will
be conducted at the Aurania club
from 10:00 to 2:00 o'clock, according
to Mary Agnes Metzger, '39, president of Intersorority council and
general chairman.
Music will be furnished by Ted
Black and his orchestra.
The remainder of the weekend
will feature luncheons conducted by
the individual sororities tomorrow
noon and house dances tomorrow
night.
Faculty guests and chaperones include:
Dr. A. R. Brubacher, president of
the college, and Mrs. Brubacher; Dr.
Milton G. Nelson, dean, and Mrs.
Nelson; Miss Helen Hall Moreland,
dean of students; Mr. Paul G. Bulger, personnel director, and Mrs.
Bulger; Mr. Edward Cooper, instructor in commerce, and Mrs. Cooper;
Mr. Daniel W. Snader, assistant professor and supervisor of mathematics, and Mrs. Snader.
Faculty guests will include: Dr.
D. V. Smith, professor of social studies, and Mrs. Smith; Dr. Carleton
E. Power, professor of science, and
Mrs. Power; Dr. Robert Frederick,
professor of education, and Mrs.
Frederick; Dr. Edith O. Wallace, assistant professor of Latin; Miss
Agnes Futterer, assistant professor
of English; Mr. Wallace Taylor, assistant professor and supervisor in
social studies; Dr. Matie Green, assistant professor of hygiene; Mrs.
Egleston, instructor in history, and
Mr. Egleston.
Committees for the ball are as follows: general chairman, Mary Agnes
Metzger, '39, Chi Sigma Theta; music, Margaret Hora, '39, Delta Omega,
and Ruth Lewis, '39, Phi Delta; decorations, Virginia Furey, '39, Kappa
Delta; flowers, Kathryn E. O'Brien,
'39, Alpha Rho; taxis, Lois Wester,
'39, Phi Lambda; refreshments, Harriet Papemaler, '39, Sigma Alpha;
programs, Christine Ades, '39, Gamma Kappa Phi; invitations and bids,
Jane Schwerzmann, '39, Psl Gamma;
chaperones, Pearl Sandberg, '39, Alpha Epsilon Phi; publicity, Charlotte
Fox, '39, Pi Alpha Tau; arrangements, Betty Sherwood, '39, Beta
Zeta.
In today's regular assembly, students of State college will be given
the opportunity to select one member of the faculty on whom will be
bestowed the Pi Gamma Mu Citation for faculty leadership.
The entire student body is eligible to vote, in order to choose the
"member of the faculty who has
done the most to stimulate intellectual life at State College."
Students will name their first, second, and third choices, and the
votes will be tallied by the weighted
ballot method. The faculty member
having the largest vote Will be
awarded the Pi Gamma Mu Citation
on Moving-up day by Thomas Laverne, '39. This will be made an
annual Moving-up day occurrence.
Describe Award
The award will consist of a bronze
plaque. If the winner is a man, he
will be given lapel ribbons similar
to those given in the French Legion
of Honor, while if a woman Is
chosen, she will be given a gold rosette. This designation is to be worn
iContinued
on i>t:<i< /y, column 2> around college in order to set the
selecled teacher aside as a leader
of the faculty.
Delta chapter of Pi Gamma Mu,
national honorary social studies society, was founded in State College
in 1927. Its purpose is to foster
<$• Despite the fact that the hunt
Red is supposed to be the soph
Increased Interest in the field of
John Murray, '41, will serve as
The
first
order
of
business
in
this
was short lived there wus never a
claws color but circumstances as is— dull moment. The fun-filled frosh morning's assembly will be a dis- social studies and education in gen- editor-in-chief of the 1943 Freshman
Handbook as a result of the recent
the color would be more suitable for walked oil with the ladder leaving cussion and vote on the Pedagogue eral.
sophomore class elections.
the frosh class or even Myskanla. a lew sophs stranded on the roof resolution according to John Edge,
The Freshman Handbook is an
As rivalry points gradually pile up o{ Drape,'"; cries were sent out to '39, president of the Student asso- Cast of "Cradle Song"
annual publication sponsored and
in favor of the spirited '41ers the o t n e r . 4 i e r s w n o c a m e t 0 l h e l r c l a s s . ciation. Other scheduled business
Progress in Rehearsal financed by the student association,
will include the N.S.F.A. delegate
poor frosh are beginning to see mates' rescue
Since
the casting of "Cradle Song" and published by the incoming junreports
and
practice
for
Moving-up
loo much red. And as for MyskanlaSo ' the' mascot was found - so
a few weeks ago, the work of the ior class. It contains information
their face is vermillion! They blush | w n a t | I s everybody happy? NO! The day exercises,
The last assembly passed a mo- cast and committees has progressed which will aid entering freshmen
to think that their hiding place was disgruntled frosh who sat back
transfer students in becoming
discovered In what can go on the hitherto and watched sophs walk tion that discussion and voting on under the direction of Agnes Fut- and
with the traditions, activibooks as a Stale college record. o f l w l t h m l i l c a f e w p o l n U s a r e n o w the Pedagogue resolution be made lerer, assistant professor of Eng- familiar
ties, and regulations of the college.
An hour and fifty minutes after I squawking cause It looks as if sophs the first order of business today to lish.
The committees in charge of pro- The cover of the '43 handbook will
the hunt started it ended when have rivalry in the bag. Myskanla insure a thorough consideration of
duction
are as follows: sets and be green with gold embossing.
the
Issue
by
the
student
body.
The
delighted Dower and wondering is aggravated because their noble atMurray 1ms selected the following
lights,
Marcla
Brown, '40, chairman,
resolution
to
be
voted
on
today
reads
Walrath pounced upon the unsus- j tempt to hide the mascot for the
pectins doggie, The funny part of I first time under the new system has as follows; "Resolved: That the Joseph Wells and William Bogosta, sophomores to assist him as assoit Is, the frosh were searching fran- been criticized. And the gay young year-book, Pedagogue, be made a seniors; house, Jane Wilson, chair- ciate editors: Alice Abelove, Wiltically while the sophs were resling j sophs who should be walking on air student publication, and that the man, and Ruth Donnelly, Juniors; liam Cameron, Beatrice Dower,
when the mascot was actually dis- with five more points chalked up to student tax be raised one dollar to costumes, Lorraine Theurer, chair- Carol Golden, Sylvia Oreenblatt,
man, Rita Sullivan, Mary Arndt, and Stephen Kusak, Norman Levy,
covered. Walrath was taking a short their credit are unhappy 'cause the cover the additional cost."
Delegates to Report
Ruby Stewart, Juniors; advertising, James Maloney, Rosemary McCarbreathing spell as he leaned against hunt is over. As Bucci put it,
The State college delegates to the Nan Emery, '39, chairman, Betty thy, and Robert Patton.
the wastebaskel between the mall-1"'Tain't no fun unless you can crawl
Heads of all clubs or other orNational
Student Federation of Clark, Eleanor droll, and Louis
through
all
the
ventilators."
boxes conniving with Dower on a
ganizations, whose activities were
Francello,
juniors;
props,
Rita
BeneAmerica
convention
at
Union
college
Now
the
victors
are
sorry
they
plan of attack. Just for something
not reviewed in the 1942 handbook
to do, the two decided to search the didn't rehide the mascot just to keep last weekend will each give a three dict, '39, chairman, Rose De Cotis edition, are requested to contact
container. When they actually saw the freshmen In an active mood. At minute report. The delegates to be and Mary Koonz, juniors; and stage Murray through student mail by
the mascot, they were so surprised any rate you can't deny that the heard at this time include: Joseph manager, Al Weiss, '40.
This play is also being produced Moving-up day if they desire to have
and excited that they both rushed sophs certainly have spirit. They Cappiello, Willard Frament, Lloyd
Kelly,
and
Rita
Sullivan,
juniors.
this
year in Vassar and New a summary of their activity inmade
so
much
noise
running
from
into the girls' locker room to put It
Rochelle.
In the twenties, during cluded in the current edition. Work
group
house
to
group
house
cheering
Carroll
Lehman,
'39,
grand
marIn safety until Myskania arrived.
its
New
York
run, it was the lead- on the handbook has already comund
proclaiming
thejr
victory
tnat
shal
for
Moving-up
day,
will
direct
Of course Walrath was slightly out
ing
and
most
popular play of the menced and the book will be sent
the
local
police
plioned
in
comthe
practice
exercises
for
the
moving
of place but almost anything was
to the printer on or before June 11.
season,
plaints
to
the
administration.
up
of
classes.
excusable under these conditions.
Doggie Practically Begs Sophs
Student Body to Vote
To Scrutinize Rubbish Baskets
On Pedagogue Today
1941 Elects Murray
As Handbook Editor
1
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MAY 12, 1939
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established by the Class of 1918
T h e undergraduate Newspaper of N e w York State
College for Teachers
Published every F r i d a y of t h e college year by t h e
Commentstater
N e w s Board representing the Student Association
Best
Comment
of the Week is by the faculty memTelephones: Office, 6-9373; O'Hora, 3-2843; Strong,
ber
who
said,
"Well
the budget cut did one thing for
2-9707; Hertwig, 3-2889; Bilzi, 3-9538
the
faculty,
at
least,
it took their minds off the EuroEntered as second class matter in the Albany, N. Y.
pean crisis."
postoffice
It seems to us that it must have been a good thing
RCPRMKNTBO FOR NATIONAL AOVIRTIBINd BY
for the student body too, because none of us have been
National Advertising Service, Inc.
swallowing goldfish or mice yet.
College Publishers Representative
* * * * *
4 2 0 MADISON A V E .
N E W YORK,
N.Y.
CHICAGO • BotTOfl ' LOS A N O I t l f - SAN FRANCISCO
In the swing field a new band has appeared on the
radio scene lately that for hot music rates near the
THE NEWS BOARD
top. This band is the one that plays the blues, Woody
JBAN STRONG
Editor-in-Chief Herman. His clarinet rates with Goodman and Shaw,
EDGAR B. O'HORA
Co-Editor-in-Chief sounding a lot like Artie. His theme song has that
ROBBRT E . HBRTWIO
Managing
Editor same haunting wail that Shaw's Nightmare has and
OTTO J . HOWE
Associate Managing
Editor he features blues in the old time manner. He looks
LBONARD E. KOWALSKY
Associate Managing
Editor like the comer in the swing field, so I'd recommend
SALLY E . YOUNG
Associate Managing
Editor you lovers of swing to listen in.
VICTORIA A. BILZI
Business
Manager
Down at Nick's in Greenwich Village, New York,
JOAN M. BYRON
Advertising Manager
Bobby Hackett's Dixieland crew has been replaced by
GRACE: B. CASTIOLINB
Circulation
Manager Goodman's old arranger, Spuds Murphy, and his crew.
His band is a little ragged yet on its Bluebird recordTHE NEWS STAFF
ings but it should develop into one of the best.
Charles Franklin
Men's Sports Editor
The ace trumpet man of Goodman's band, Harry
Betty Clark
Women's Sports Editor
James,
has a crew that should rate with the best white
William Ryan
Assistant Sports Editor
bands
In
the country after he smooths out the rough
Joseph Bosley
Assistant Sports Editor
edges. He needs a good clarinet and when he gets
Feature
Editors
this he'll be there.
Saul Greenwald
Charles Walsh
The last band which I'll mention is the other blues
Assistants to Business
Board
Assistant Business Manager
Harriet Spraguc band you've all been hearing and that is Jack TeaAssistant Advertising Manager
Kenneth Haser garden's musicrew. The man who sounds like he's
Assistant Circulation Manager
Mary Gabriel singing while flat on his back is rough yet, and his
trombone section is too predominant, but Jackson is
too good a musician to let this exist long, so we'll expect
him to be racing Goodman, Basie, Shaw, arid
oo. G. JD. r
Ellington for King of Swing next year at this time.
We, who have been thoroughly drilled in the
* * * * *
State Regents exams tradition, have learned one
Democracy seems to have triumphed in this school
lesson well. We expect to be able to prove all we if this week's election means anything. The polls were
say. If we said that the square of the hypotenuse packed all day. And everything seemed to go smoothwas equal to the sum of the square of the two sides ly leaving one to believe that the little raid on the
of a triangle in geometry, we were expected to show assembly did do us some good.
* * * * *
not only the statement but how we proved it. If
Moving-up Day Is next Friday as all of you know.
we said Macbeth was an interesting character, we The upperclassmen know enough to realize how imlearned that we had to give specific examples to portant it is, but oftimes some little freshman doesn't
prove our point. Most of us learned that lesson realize its significance until after he has overslept the
morning session. We expect to see you all there.
well, and it showed up strikingly last week in assemGood luck, Juniors.
bly when the committee reported on the Pedagogue
proposal.
The committee, as appointed by our president,
was instructed to investigate whether or not it would
For the second time in a month, student initiabe feasible to include the Ped on next year's associa- tive has taken a positive and constructive form. The
tion budget, and how that could be accomplished. first incident, that of the budget protest, was transiHowever, when that report was read in last week's tory, but the second had a strength and character
meeting, of what did it consist?
that marks it with permanency. We refer, of
1. That the student body was in favor of the course, to the symphony orchestra, which made its
proposal. Far be it from us to belittle, but that debut last week.
served a little superfluous. The proposal is highly
It was a superior job, accomplished under trying and discouraging conditions. We were more
desirable.
2. That the majority of the students would be concerned with its success than its effort. We are
willing to pay an extra dollar to support this ashamed that our pat on the back is so untimely,
for we feel that it would have been more appreciated
increase.
early
in the year.
These facts are of significance, to be sure, but
All we can do is to attempt to make up for that
then the complete report was, stated in so many
words, "It can be done. We offer the following oversight. The student body made the first move
resolution . . ." Here is where our analogy holds in the right direction. It was heartening to see a
good. We were glad to hear the favorable report sophisticated student body, hardened to student
of the committee, but we maintain that they gave talent of all kinds, rise to its feet spontaneously in
us no indication as to how the feat could be ac- tribute to the orchestra.
That gesture, sincere and gratifying as it was,
complished. We demand a real report of facts and
figures before we decide to jeopardize the future was not enough. We can do much more. If there
of the other activities and the medical fund of the are forty people in the school who will work on
budget. The statement was encouraging, but it such a project merely for love of it, and if the rewas not enough! Can an extra dollar pay for the sults of this work so genuinely please the whole
Pedagogue, and if so, how? The student body student body, it certainly deserves the permanency
happily realized that there was more to the and support it has requested.
When the budget comes up before the assembly,
question than this cover-all report, and put off
voting until the measure could be adequately ex- there will be a large appropriation for Music council. How could this money be better used than to
plained and discussed.
Today we have an opportunity to settle the subsidize, at least in part, such u worthwhile organsituation definitely. We demand from the com- ization? We approve of guest artists, but, in all
mittee more than their assurance that it can be fairness, we think the money should be used to back
done. We want to know how, and as tax payers we constructively a real student enterprise. If the
feel that the report of the committee should be more college organization, devoted to supplying the
specific and carry through the analogy. We are musical diet for State college, cannot support its
more than willing to admit the Pedagogue, but we own talent, then we say it has failed miserably and
will not write Q.E.D. to the proposition, until we we cannot justify its continuance. Here is a challenge to student taxpayers, Will you accept it?
know how it can be proved.
Jottings of An Idiot
Concert-ed Action
Forum Approves
Yearbook Plan
Panel Group Will Conduct
Discussion with Y.W.C.A.;
W e e d to Be H e a d
At its renewed session on Tuesday, May 9, the Political Forum approved the revised constitution as
submitted by Sadie Flax, '40, who
represented the Constitution Revision committee. Among the new
provisions in the constitution is that
clause which requires all committee
reports to be submitted to the
Forum for action no later than one
month after the committee has been
formed.
Pass Resolutions
Two resolutions were reported
from committees and passed. Louise
Hessney, '40, read the report of the
Pedagogue committee, and the Forum passed in favor of making the
Pedagogue a student publication and
adding one dollar to the student tax
to take care of the expense.
After a heated discussion in which
Michael Walko, Mary Margaret
Pappa, seniors, and Fred Weed, '40,
played major roles, the Forum
passed in favor of the following
resolution as reported to the Forum
by Mary Margaret Pappa, chairman:
"Resolved: That this forum go on
record as favoring the government
ownership and operation of railroads
in the United States."
Panel Discussion
On Wednesday evening, from 8:00
to 11:00 o'clock in the Lounge of
Richardson hall, the Forum panel
group will conduct a discussion panel
with the Y.W.C.A. industrial group
on the subject of "Housing."
Betty
Fallon, '39, co-director
of the panel group, Is in charge of
the panel.
Robert Cogger, speaker, announced
that the Forum's calendar for its
next and last regular meeting includes committee reports on the
Immigration Law, Reciprocal Trade
Agreements, and the N.L.R.B.
At its session on May 2, the following officers were elected for the
year 1939-1940: speaker, Fred Weed,
'40; clerk, Paul Grattan, '41; and
treasurer, Norman De Neef, '40.
State
of
Affairs
Kampus
Kapers
Arnold Bennett wrote a book called
How to Live on Twenty-four
Hours
a Day. We repeat: how? May is
uncomfortably close to June, and
there doesn't seem to be time enough
to do all that must be done.
Friday is the time for the girl
friend to show the boy friend what a
date should be. We're not quite
sure about the band, though reports
are favorable. The bids are attractive, the decorations decorative, and
we hope the evening fair and warmer. And that isn't all—the gals
don't do things half-way. To complete the weekend the sorority
houses will be decked out for house
formals on Saturday night. The
usual migration from house to house
is anticipated. (Be sure the skeletons are well hidden, girls).
On our way to Washington Park
the other day via Draper and the
front steps we noticed a class sitting on the steps in front of the
library. Continuing on our way we
found another class in front of Page.
Our taste in professors runs to the
kind who knows a nice day when
he sees it. Who cares about the
ants?
The International Relations club
did a nice piece of work—not only
in advertising the Dug-out dinner,
but in presenting a novel idea with
a purpose behind it. This week, too,
the Cradle Song posters, which are
out to win a prize, have been worth
looking at.
In a list of important State college events, 1938-39, surely toward
the top would be the organization
of the State College Symphony orchestra. Pearlman and Hirsch, the
conductors, and the whole orchestra
deserved the spontaneous rising vote
of appreciation they received. It
was certainly an acknowledgment
of talent and effort; but more than
that, could it have been perhaps
a realization that outside of the
narrow ready-made world we think
important there are others initiating worth-while things without
benefit of the public eye?
Note taken at the Albany Hospital: Janice Friedman's pulse rose
from 60 to 80 after a visit from
Lenny Friedlander.
I
Appointment
Bureau
C.E.W.
Sometimes the results of our movie Four seniors a n d seven graduates
mogul's attempts to mirror college have received teaching positions, a c life are, to say the least,—terrific. cording to Paul G. Bulger, personTake that current opus—we aren't nel director.
sure of the name, but it has to do The five senior placements a r e :
with the antics of the Greek letter Anne Burr, social studies a t Akron;
gals in inveigling freshmen for the Mary Agnes Metzger, English a n d
ranks. It would appear, to the library a t North Lawrence; Marion
uninitiated, that sorority rushing is Rockefeller, social studies a n d
a sort of combination of socialized mathematics a t Germantown; Clara
football and kidnapping. Not that Metcalf, history a n d library a t
we're idealists, mind you . . . such Franklin; a n d Michael Walko, comthings may, and undoubtedly do, go merce at Hermon.
on, but not here, and we think that The graduate placements a r e :
they're more apt to be the exception, Gerald Amyot, '36, teaching-coacheven in the most practical schools, ing a t Cohoes; A. W. Armltage,
rather than a general condition. Jr., grad., commerce a t Windsor;
Maybe such films gave people the Edwin Juckett, '25, principalship a t
queer ideas they get about "the Hyde Park; Robert MacGregor, '37,
youth of our nation."
science a t Pauling; Virginia Many,
•
*
*
*
'35, library a t Corning; Alice Owen,
New Books: We haven't seen '35, social studies a t Glens Falls;
too many. For the music mongers, and Miriam Scott, grad., library
The Kingdom of Swing, by Benny at Copenhagen; I d a Besdesky, grad.,
Goodman and Irving Kalodin, is French, English a t Kerhonkson;
worth looking up. Kalodin's essays Marjorie Kalaldjian, '36, commerce
on swing, Interspersed throughout at Osslning; Helen Martin, grad.,
the volume, are among the best on French, history a t Pottersvllle; Ruth
Mackey, grad., English at Boonville;
the subject.
McGraw, '37, science, matheAnd report h a s it that Scribner's William
matics
at
Lnnslngburg; Rea La Grua,
has ceased publication. Just a n - '37, dramatics
a t Red Hook.
other of these financial catastrophes. Some of the best literary
work In the country has come from Juniors Will Compete
its pages.
With Seniors in Debate
Good news for the seniors: R e ports from AGP state that college The senior debate team will clash
grads aren't so bad off. Figures with the juniors In the decisive i n show that more t h a n 08% have ter-rivalry debate of the year, Wednever been on relief. Incidentally, nesday at 3:30 o'clock in t h e
exactly 64% of the m e n a n d 55%Lounge of Richardson hall. T h e
of the women reported any connec- subject is "Resolved: T h a t t h e
tion between their present work a n d thirteenth und fourteenth grades
their college major, which fact we should be added to the public school
give you gratis.
system."
Other interesting figures were The members of the senior team
those staling that 75% of the menare Richard Lonsdale, coach, Marion
and 52% of the women get married. Mlnst, Duke Hersli, a n d Raymond
We're not math majors but isn't Walters. The junior team consists of
there a n interpretation there some Walter Harper, Willard Frament,
place?
and Haskell Rosenberg.
if
1
John H. Vond.ll
Massachusetts State College
For the second year/ Collegiate Digest presents its Salon Edition — a special
showing of the best in student and faculty photography this year, Featuring
photographs selected from hundreds submitted in a nation-wide contest/ we
believe this Salon Edition is a great tribute to the skill *nd artistry of collegeland's camera masters,
'f-H
•
' " ^ - ' • • ~
'~-":;' w»<mmiiyi
IBMMHHMRH
MMRMHSMRMI
s
-
—v»
STAT!-: COLLEGE NEWS, MAY 12, 1939
Pago
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Established by t h e Class of 1918
T h e u n d e r g r a d u a t e N e w s p a p e r of New York State
College for T e a c h e r s
P u b l i s h e d every F r i d a y of t h e college year by the
N e w s Board r e p r e s e n t i n g the Student Association
T e l e p h o n e s : Office, 5-9373; O'Hora, 3-2843; Strong,
2-9707; Hertwig, 3-2889; Bilzi, 3-9538
Entered as second class matter in the Albany, N. Y.
post office
REPnESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVEHTISINa BY
National Advertising Service, Inc.
College Publishers
Representative
THE NEWS BOARD
Editor-in-Chief
Co-Editor-in-Ch
ief
Managing
Editor
Associate Managing
Editor
Associate Managing
Editor
Associate Managing
Editor
Business
Manager
Advertising
Manager
Circulation
Manager
EDGAB B. O'HORA
ROBERT B. HKHTWIO
OTTO J. HOWE
LEONARD E. KOWAI.SKY
SALLY E. YOUNG
VICTORIA A. BILZI
JOAN M. BYRON
GRACE B. CASTIGLINE
THE NEWS STAFF
Men's Sports
Women's Sports
Assistant Sports
Assistant Sports
Editors
Charles Walsh
Charles F r a n k l i n
Betty Clark
William Ryan
Joseph Bosley
Feature
Saul Greenwald
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Assistants
to Business
Board
Assistant Business Manager
Harriet SpragUe
Assistant Advertising M a n a g e r
. . K e n n e t h Haser
Assistant Circulation Manager
Mary Gabriel
SL & £>• ?
We,
State
who have been t h o r o u g h l y drilled
say.
in the
Regents e x a m s t r a d i t i o n , h a v e learned one
lesson well.
W e expect to be able to prove all we
If we said t h a t the s q u a r e of t h e h y p o t e n u s e
was equal to the s u m of t h e s q u a r e of the two sides
of a triangle in g e o m e t r y , we were expected to show
not only the s t a t e m e n t b u t how we proved it.
If
we said M a c b e t h was an interesting c h a r a c t e r , we
learned that we h a d to give specific e x a m p l e s to
prove our point.
Most of us learned t h a t
lesson
well, a n d it showed u p s t r i k i n g l y last week in assembly when the c o m m i t t e e r e p o r t e d on the
Commentstater
Best Comment of the Week Is by the faculty member who said. -Well t h e budget cut did one thing for
the faculty, a t least, it took their minds off the European crisis."
I t seems to us t h a t it must have been a good thing
for the student body too. because none of us have been
swallowing goldfish or mice yet.
f
4 2 0 MADISON AVE.
N E W YORK. N. Y.
cm'.AGO - BOSTON - Los ANGELCS * SAN FRANCISCO
JUAN STRONO
Forum Approves
Jottings of An Idiot
Yearbook Plan
Pedagogue
<-
+
*•
...
In the swing field a new band h a s appeared on the
radio scene lately t h a t for hot music rates near the
lop. T h i s band is t h e one t h a t plays the blues, Woody
H e r m a n . His clarinet rates with Goodman and Shaw,
sounding a lot like Artie. His t h e m e song h a s that
same h a u n t i n g wail t h a t Shaw's Nightmare
h a s and
he features blues in t h e old time m a n n e r . He looks
like the comer in the .swing field, so I'd recommend
you lovers of swing to listen in.
Down a i Nick's in Greenwich Village. New York,
Bobby Haekett's Dixieland crew h a s been replaced by
Goodman's old arranger. Spuds Murphy, and his crew.
His band is a Utile ragged yet on its Bluebird recordings but it should develop into one of the best.
The ace trumpet m a n of Goodman's band. Harry
James, has a crew t h a t should rate with the Dest white
bands in ilie country after he smooths out the rough
edges. He needs a good clarinet and when he gets
this he'll be there.
T h e last band which I'll mention is the other blues
band you've all been hearing and t h a t is Jack Teagarden's musicrew. T h e m a n who sounds like lie's
singing while Hal on his back is rough yet. and his
trombone .section is loo predominant, but Jackson is
loo good a musician lo let this exist long, so we'll experl him to be racing Goodman. Basie, Shaw, and
Ellington for King of Swing next year at this time,
Concert-ed Action
T h e c o m m i t t e e , a.s a p p o i n t e d by o u r president,
was instructed to i n v e s t i g a t e w h e t h e r or not it would
on next y e a r ' s associa-
For t h e second time in a m o n t h , s t u d e n t initiative h a s t a k e n a positive a n d c o n s t r u c t i v e form
The
tion b u d g e t , a n d how t h a t could be accomplished.
first incident, that of the budget p r o t e s t , was transi-
H o w e v e r , when that r e p o r t was read in last week's
tory, but the second had a s t r e n g t h ami character
meeting, of what did it consist?
1.
that
T h a t the s t u d e n t body was in favor of the
proposal.
F a r be it from
us to belittle, but that
served a little s u p e r f l u o u s .
T h e proposal is highlv
desirable.
2.
it
with
permanency.
W e refer, of
d e b u t last week.
It was a superior j o b , a c c o m p l i s h e d under trying a n d d i s c o u r a g i n g c o n d i t i o n s .
W e were more
concerned with its success t h a n its effort.
tfi p a y an e x t r a
a s h a m e d that o u r pat on the back is so untimely,
dollar
to support
this
increase.
W e are
for we feel t h a t it would have been more appreciated
T h e s e facts a r e of significance, to be sure, but
early in t h e y e a r .
then the complete report w a s . s t a t e d in so m a n y
words, " I t can be d o n e .
resolution . . ."
good.
marks
course, to the s y m p h o n y o r c h e s t r a , which made its
T h a t the m a j o r i t y of the s t u d e n t s would be
willing
W e offer
the following
H e r e is where o u r analogy holds
W e were glad to hear the favorable report
All we can do is to a t t e m p t to m a k e u p for thai
oversight.
The student body m a d e the first
in t h e right direction.
sophisticated
student
move
It was h e a r t e n i n g lo see a
body,
hardened
to student
of the c o m m i t t e e , but we m a i n t a i n t h a i thev gave
talent of all k i n d s , rise to its feet spontaneously in
us no indication as to how the feat could be ac-
t r i b u t e to tlie o n hestra
complished.
W e d e m a n d a real report of facts a n d
figures before we decide to j e o p a r d i z e the
future
That g e s t u r e , sincere a n d gratifying as il was,
was nol e n o u g h .
W e can do m u c h more
II there
of the other activities a n d the medical fund of the
are forts
budget
- m l i a project merely for lose of it, a n d if the re-
Th<' s t a t e m e n t
was not e n o u g h '
Pedagogue,
and
happily
realized
question
than
was e n c o u r a g i n g ,
but it
C a n an e x t r a dollar pay for the
if
so, h o w '
that
this
there
(overall
T h e student
was
report
more
bodv
to
the
ex
plained and di a ussed.
Today
situation
we have
dcliiiitcl'.
than
We demand
to -.ettle the
from
' h e n assurance that
Ihe com-
mitter
more
done
We want to know huw, a n d as tax payer-, we
it can be
feel that the report of t h e c o m m i t t e e should be m u n
specific
please the whole
student b o d \ . it certainly deserves ' h e p e r m a n e n c y
ami mppoi l n h a - requested
W h e n the budget c o m e - up before the assembly
there will be a large a p p r o p r i a t i o n lor Music coiiii
ml
an o p p o r t u n i t y
people in the school who will work on
sults of thi> work so genuinely
and put oil
voting until the m e a s u r e could be adequately
At its renewed session on T u e s day, May 9, t h e Political Forum a p proved t h e revised constitution as
submitted by Sadie Flax, '40, who
represented t h e Constitution Revision committee. Among t h e new
provisions in the constitution is t h a t
clause which requires all committee
reports lo be submitted to the
Forum for action n o later t h a n one
month after the committee h a s been
formed.
Pass Resolutions
Two resolutions were reported
from committees a n d passed. Louise
Hcssney. '40. read the report of t h e
Pedagogue committee, a n d the F o r um passed in favor of making t h e
Pedagogue a student publication a n d
adding one dollar to the student tax
to take care of the expense.
After a heated discussion in which
Michael Walko, Mary
Margaret
Pappa. seniors, and Fred Weed, '40.
played major
roles, the Forum
passed in favor of t h e following
resolution as reported to the Forum
by Mary Margaret Pappa, c h a i r m a n :
"Resolved: T h a t this forum go on
record a s favoring t h e government
ownership a n d operation of railroads
in the United States."
Panel Discussion
On Wednesday evening, from 8:00
to 11:00 o'clock in the Lounge of
Richardson hall, the Forum panel
group will conduct a discussion panel
with t h e Y.W.C.A. industrial group
on
the subject
of
"Housing."
Betty
Fallon.
'39.
co-director
of the panel group, is in charge of
the panel.
l)i tnoerncy seems lo have triumphed in this school
Robert Cogger, speaker, announced
if this week's election means anything. T h e polls were that the? Forum's calendar for its
packed all day. And everything seemed to go smooth- next a n d last regular meeting inly leaving one to believe that the little raid on the cludes committee reports on the
Immigration Law. Reciprocal T r a d e
assembly did do us some good.
Agreements, and the N.L.R.B.
At its session on May 2. the folMoring-up
Day is next Friday as all ot you know lowing officers were elected for the
T h e upperclassmen know enough to realize how im- year 1939-1940: speaker, Fred Weed.
'40: clerk. Paul G r a t t a n . '41; and
portant it is, but oftimes some little freshman doesn't
treasurer. Norman De Neef. '40,
realize its significance until after he h a s overslept the
morning session. We expect to see you all there.
Good luck. Juniors.
proposal.
be feasible to include the fed
Panel Group Will Conduct
Discussion with Y.W.C.A.;
Weed to Be Head
How could tin- money be belter used than lo
• u b , i d i / e . ai leasl in pari
i/.alion"
such a worthwhile organ-
We a p p m s e of izuest artist-., b u t . HI all
fairness, we think the money should be used to back
construe lively
college
a
teal
organization,
-indent
enterprise
devoted
to
II ihr
supplying
the
a n d c a r r y t h r o u g h the a n a l o g y .
We are
musical diet
m o r e t h a n willing to a d m i t t h e Pedagogue,
but we
own talent, t h e n we say it has failed miserably and
lot Slate college, cannot
will not write Q E . J ) , to t h e p r o p o s i t i o n , until we
we cannot justify its c o n t i n u a n c e .
k n o w how it c a n be p r o v e d .
lenge lo s t u d e n t t a x p a y e r s .
support
its
H e r e is a chal-
Will you accept itr1
State
of
Affairs
C.E.IV.
Kampus
Kapers
Arnold B e n n e t t wrote a book called
| H o w to Live on Twenty-four
Hours
\a Day. We repeat: how? May is
; uncomfortably close to J u n e , a n d
there doesn't seem to be time enougli
Ito do all t h a t must be done.
F r i d a y is the time for the girl
friend to show the boy friend what a
d a t e should be. We're not quite
sure about t h e band, though reports
a r e favorable. T h e bids a r e a t t r a c tive, t h e decorations decorative, a n d
we hope the evening fair a n d w a r m er.
And t h a t isn't all—the gals
don't do things half-way. To complete t h e weekend the sorority
houses will be decked out for house
formals on S a t u r d a y night. T h e
usual migration from house to house
is anticipated. iBe sure t h e skeletons a r e well hidden, girls).
On our way to Washington Park
t h e o t h e r day via Draper a n d t h e
front steps we noticed a class sitting on the steps in front of the
library. Continuing on our svay we
found a n o t h e r class in front of Page.
Our taste in professors runs to the
kind who knows a nice day when
he sees it. Who cares about the
ants?
T h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l Relations club
did a nice piece of work—not only
in advertising t h e Dug-out dinner,
but in presenting a novel idea with
a purpose behind it. This week, too.
tlie Cradle Song posters, which are
out to svin a prize, have been worth
looking at.
In a list of important S t a t e college events. 1938-39, surely tow'ard
the top would be the organization
of t h e S t a t e College Symphony orchestra. P e a r l m a n a n d Hirsch, the
conductors, and the whole orchestra
deserved the spontaneous rising vote
of appreciation they received.
It
was certainly an acknowledgment
of talent a n d effort; but more t h a n
t h a t , could it have been p e r h a p s
a realization that outside of the
narrow r e a d y - m a d e world we think
i m p o r t a n t there are others initialing
worth-while tilings
without
benefit of the public eye?
Note taken at Ihe Albany Hospital: J a n i c e Friedman's pulse rose
from 00 to 80 after a visit from
Lenny Friedlander.
Appointment
Bureau
Four seniors a n d seven g r a d u a t e s
Sometimes tlie results of our movie
mogul's a t t e m p t s to mirror college have received teaching positions, a c life are, to say the least, - t e r r i f i c . cording to Paul G. Bulger, personTake that current opus—we a r e n ' t nel director.
T h e live senior placements a r e :
sure of the name, but it h a s to do
with the antics of the Greek letter Anne Burr, social studies at Akron;
gals in inveigling freshmen for the Mary Agnes Metzger, English and
i ranks.
It would appear, to the library at North Lawrence; Marlon
social
studies
and
uninitiated, t h a t sorority rushing is 'Rockefeller.
a sort of combination of socialized m a t h e m a t i c s at G e r m a n t o w n ; Clara
football and kidnapping. Not t h a t Metcalf, history and library at
we're Idealists, mind you . . such F r a n k l i n , a n d Michael Walko. comthings may, and undoubtedly do, go merce at Hermon.
on. but not here, a n d we think t h a t
T h e g r a d u a t e placements a r e :
they're more apt to be tlie exception, Gerald Amyot, '36 teaching-coachSeven m the most practical schools, ing at Coiioes; A. W. Armitage
I rather t h a n a general condition. jJr., g r a d , commerce at Windsor,
Maybe such films gave people the Edwin Jucketl, 75. principalship at
queer ideas they get about " t h e Hyde P a r k ; Robert MacGregor. '37,
youth of our nation.'
science at Pauling; Virginia Many.
'35, library at Corning; Alice Owen.
New Hooks.
We haven't seen I'35, social studies at Glens Falls;
too many
For the music mongers. and Miriam Scott, grad., library
Tin Kingdom
of Suing, by Benny a t Copenhagen; Ida Besdesky, grad.,
I Goodman and Irving Kalodin, is [French, English at Kerhonkson;
Iworlh looking up Kalodin's essays Marjorie Kalaidjian. '30, commerce
on swing interspersed throughout at Ossilling; Helen Martin, grad
the volume are among the best on French, history al I'ottersville; Rutli
Mackey grad English at Boonville;
the subject
William MeGiaw, 37, science, m a t h e Ami report has n that Heribner's matics al Lunsingburg; Rra La Orua,
has ceased publication
Just Ull- 37 diurnal u s at Reel Hook
other ol these financial catastrophes
Some nl i h r best literal'!
v.uik in Ihr country has runic from
Juniors Will Compete
lis pages
With Seniors in Debate
Good news lor tlie senior* IU-polls Irom ALT' statu that college
The senior debate team will clash
grails a r m I so had oil
Figures Willi i h r lunlor.s in the decisive In: how 'Inn more than UU'i have trr-ris ulry debate ol i h r year Wedm ci i been on rellel
Incidentally, nesday
HI :i 30 o'clock
in tlie
exactly til', ol the men unci 55'! Lounge n! Itiehardsoii hull
The
ol the women reported any connec- uhlrrl
i
Resolved
Thai Ihe
tion between their present work anil hi! iccni ii .mil linn leenl h grades
their college major which tact we should In- milled in Ihr public school
gis i- yon gratis
; ystelil
Oilier interesting figures were
Tlie members ol ihr senior team
Ihobe stating Unit 75'; ol i h r men are Richard Lonsdale, coach, Marion
'and b'i'A ol the women gel married Minst, Duke Hei.-h and Raymond
We're not math majors bin isn't Wallers Tin junior team consists of
there an Interpretation thisru some Walter Harper, Willard F r a m c n l ,
place?
and Haskell Rosenberg
ll/-*
orumpy
ll
Sptelil Honoi Awud
John H. Vondell
Massachusetts Stale College
For the second year, Collegiate Digest presents its Salon Edition — a special
showing of the best in student and faculty photography this year. Featuring
photographs selected from hundreds submitted in a nation-wide contest/ we
believe this Salon Edition is a great tribute to the skill and artistry of collegeland's camera masters.
.•
•
•
'
*
•
*
•
""y«wm"
\
is
;
d
it
n
is
h
IT
Salon Judges
Consider
Many Anafaf
'Water Shortage"
. . . when they pick winning pictures for special exhibitions.
These scenes of the judges of the University of Wisconsin
Camera Club salon show (right) Artist John Steuart Curry,
Prof. Warner Taylor. Dr. Max Thorek, Karl Oeser and
Jerry Saemen carefully examining each entry. Above they
are getting a long-range view of the prize-winners
John Faber
University ol Alabama
I «t>HlM!it, l»H*« "
'I H«'HiitliU Tiilmri'ii I Vni|.ti»> , WllUlUfl Snl
N
FOR SMOKING PLEASURE AT ITS BEST
ihii I I
Country r
ViJIKJI-
LET UP_LIGHT UP A CAMEL
THE CIGARETTE OF COSTLIER TOBACCOS
,
.Wr-*-~'
STA!
The unci* 1
Pictorial
Published (
News E \
Telephon 1
Entered
Assistant
Assistant
Assistant
Ma rvels or Nature
Still Life
I
JBAN STR i
EDGAR B.
ROBBRT E j
OTTO J. I {
LEONARD ' j
SALLY E. ;
VICTORIA J
JOAN M.
GRACE B.
Charles ,
Betty Clf
William i
Joseph B
Division
Photos
Unusual Camera Studies
Most popular of all photographic subjects
among the collegiate amateurs of the nation ate scenes of nature, for this division in
our special contest had the greatest number
of entries. The general excellence of the
photos submitted made the task of the
judges of this division particularly difficult.
If space had been available, this issue
would have contained almost three times
the number of scenic pictures; for that large
number of almost equal high quality were in
the semi-finals division in the judging. In
the three photos on this page we present
the final selections, photos which we believe pay high compliments to the ability
of college photographers to beautifully
and accurately record the scenic wonders
of the world about us. Many are the elements considered in judging pictorial photographs, but chief qualities considered are
composition, technical excellence.
Most unusual are the results obtained when the photographer sets out to create his own pictorial subjects without
relying on the set limitations of an individual or a scene.
With an opportunity to form his own compositions, to regulate his lighting, to control movement and form, the photographer gains results that are always interesting and usually
technically perfect. Second most popular division in the
Collegiate Digest competition, the still life section winners
on this page reveal again the important place the student
and faculty amateurs have attained in the ranks of the nonprofessional photographers. The chess picture is an excellent
example of a composition that has been formed and lighted
in such a manner that a perfectly inanimate scene assumes
life and brilliance. The remarkably sharp picture of the sleeping cat is one of the most photographically perfect photos
entered. The water lily print is an excellent example of an
outdoor still life creation. A l l in all, these three photos accurately reflect the range of interest that is obtainable in
still life photography.
We,
State R(
lesson vvi
say. If
was equa
of a trial
not only
we said
learned '
prove ou :
well, and
bly when
proposal.
The •
was instr
be feasib
tion bud
However
meeting,
1. n\
proposal
served a
desirable
2. ':
willing
increase.
Thea
then the
FlrtlPrli.
Jack Mendelsohn
College of the City of New Yo>
"Checkmate"
FlntPflt.
Kenneth Sigford
University of Minnesota
"Sleeping Beauty
Second Priit
Rene Williams, Jr.
Los Angeles City College
--'•:»;K<:
i
Sarah Elizabeth Freeman
Johns Hopkins University
"Apollo's Descent"
i»mm
Kenneth Sigford
University of Minnesota
"Sylvan Serenity"
TIIMIMN
Robert A . Buckles
Purdue University
f^™tj|^^
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•
»»KIIMMII«M. lawmimaii otaMfWHHaMii
- -
"
"
"
—
•
—
• • •
•
•
i
T:
P
TV
Ji
E
R
O
Col/ege Life PA 0 ( 0 5
Campus Picture Parade
IS
Many and varied arc the subjects for fine photographs available on the college campus, yet college life is one of the most neglected of the fields
open to the campus amateur. Although this division had the smallest number of entries, the photos
on this page reflect the high quality of the work
being done by the few who see in their immediate
surroundings the great opportunities for effective
photography.
Li
Sit
Vi
Jc
Cb
Gr
Be
W
Jo
As
AS
As:
Sti
les
sty
wa
of
no'
we
lea
P
K
• Featured on this page are two examples of unusual student photography. A b o v e is a triple-exposure, self-portrait of John B.
Wright, Michigan State College freshman, beating himself at a
game of cards.
we
bl>
pre
SMOKERS, HERE'S
A GRAND COURSE
wa
be
tio,
Ho
me^
IN PIPE-JOY!
pro
ser
des
IT DOESN'T TAKE
ANy STUDy TO CATCH ON TO
THIS SWELL COMBINATION
OF MILDNESS AND
RICH, RIPE TASTE
wil
inc
the
WO!
resi
f j ___ I MEAN
/PRINCE ALBERT
K<)0
of '
US
coir
SO
MILD
-SO
TASTY
of I
hud
was
I'm
hap
que
voti
plai
• Unusual effects can be gained by making bas relief photos such
as this uniaue cameo by Robert Buckles, a Purdue University senior.
The bas relief effect is obtained by super-imposing a positive transparency over the regular negative.
situ
ink
don
feel
•
1001
:
"Pledge Work"
Stcoaa) N i l
Robert W. Monk
University ol Wisconsin
"Swing Session"
*••">•*'• *»•»««
G. B. Barnard, Jr.
Georgia School of Technology
'
• • • •
, . - / - • . . -
I.
i?tVl
Smoke 20 fragrant pipufula of Prince Albert.
If you don't find it thu mellowest, fattiest
pipe tobacco you ever smoked, Veturn thu
pocket tin with the real of the tobacco in it
to us at any time within a month from thia
date, and we will refund full purchase price,
plus postage.
(Signtil) R. J. Reynold! Tobacco Company,
Winston-Salem, North Carolina
L
KJHT u p a pipeful of cool-sniokinK P r i n c e Albert
•i and forget y o u r w o r r i e s a b o u t t o n g u e - b i l e , H e r e ' s
thu rich, full-bodird smokine; of choice tobaccos with
e x t r a mildness a s s u r e d by un exclusive " n o - b i l e "
process t h a t removes h a r s h n e s s . P r i n c e Albert is
" c r i m p c u t , " too, to Rive you t h e s m o o t h n e s s of .s/i/ie
lniriinti/ u n d t h u joy of easy drawing.
Sound p r e t t y
(food? Well, t h e proposition's b e t t e r yet—for you c a n
try P r i n c e A l b e r t a t atir risk. A risk we l a k e eladly,
for 1 here's no o t h e r tobacco like it,
hums ALBERT
THE NATIONAL JOY SMOKE
pipeful* of fragrant tobacco in every
handy pocket tin of Prince Albert
\
^
•
•
:
:
i>
••"rr*.!*-1" - ^ ••-.'"•-^;- fi^f.
Portrait
Division
IS
Perfect Poses
V
y
"Pictures as they are posed to b e "
might well be the sub-title to this
division of our special Salon Edition, (or in it are featured the outstanding portraits taken by colegiate amateurs this year. In addition to having fine composition,
the winning photographers have
caught the personalities of their
subjects in a truly remarkable
fashion. Special mention should
be made of the photograph below, for it is an excellent example
of self-portraiture, a branch of
portrait photography which has a
special appeal to a great many
college amateurs.
d
it
n
is
h
r
r
Two Losses M a k e O n e Good Picture
Alex Campanis, New York University second baseman, lost his cap and First Baseman Soupis of College of the City of New York lost the ball in the sixth inning of the
game won by N.Y.U., 4 to 3.
Wide World
Mountaineer Soldiers Parade in Her Honor
When West Virginia University's military corps passes in review, it gives a smart
salute to Regimental Sponsor Jane Greer. A major in journalism and a member of
Kappa Kappa Gamma, she attended Columbia University before climbing to the
mountain school.
"Most Handsome"
. . . was the title voted Dominique LaCasse by his Columbia
University senior classmates. He
does free-lance modeling, and
spends some of his spare time
looking at the movie-star photos
that adorn the walls of his room.
C-olleyidlt? Uiti.'-.i Photo oy i t*wr.
Politicos in A c t i o n
R b J ohnson a n d D B Richard
son a r t the t o p officers in the
n e w E l e a n o r for P r e s i d e n t C l u b
f o r m e d o n the Indiana U n i v e r s i t y
c a m p u s t o s p o n s o r the p i e s i d e n
t i i i ! c a m p a i g n of M i s F r a n k l i n D
R o o s e v e l t M i s R o o s e v e l t says
n o t h i n y w o u l d i n d u c e h e i t o en
tei the < am pa i'j n, b u t t h e c l u b is
'Aerial Photographer"
Third Prli.
G. D. Aydiett
est lennessee State leachers
/ i n j u r i a Polytechnic Institute
( ollcgUu DlgcM Photo by Gordon
i
V
.
Tkty Study Liars
Is
Using students from
New York State ColI t g t lor Ttachers, tht
Empirt State's police
art conducting an intensive study into the
principles or lie detection.
Fealherstonhaush
nms
t
OW
day
y
"Campus Crumb*'
. . . is the name of the
new lunch service established by W . D.
Halsey, Jr., end S. W .
Fleischman on the Haverford College campus.
They deliver food any
place on the campus,
and report this new student enterprise is growing fast.
irred
linst
;eam
tious
with
for
for
the
facurts
reheir
.inst
i for
d a
for
• it-
/
Circle of Presidents
the
ipril
s of
day
feat
to
! on
the
A real round-table discussion was caught
from below by the photographer at
Drexel Institute of Technology. Heads
of the women's divisions of the four
classes are: (clockwise, starting at bottom) Ruth Wall, sophomore,- Marietta
Schmitt, senior,- Betty Towner, junior; and
Barbara Murphy, freshman.
1 at
met
last
.hat
etinlty
unexcs.
vith
'rayon
in'a
6-4.
ena
yic'ere
ind
M e m b e r of Q u e e n ' s Court
Sophomore Virginia Thomas was one of
the four Northwest Missouri State Teachers College students selected for the court
of honor of the "Tower Queen"
of
The Thumb's the T h i n g ! "
. . . says Eugene Phillips, University of Georgia, as he instructs a new
member of his American Association of Collegiate Hitchhikers.
first organization of its kind in the U. S. Note armbands worn by .ill
members. Phillips claims his organization was first proposed in September, 1937, while the Registered Collegiate Thumbers was organized in May, 1938,
Collegiate D<Sesi Pho. ,
out
the
atlelr
iur,
orarl
alate
ar,
th,
snt
Ls
ire
he
7111
tearof
<<r
L
^
^
i XI
1 TURKISH & DOMESTIC iv n
I
BLEND
J
||
tMtiAHKTTKS
P O P U L A R J I M M Y FOXX-winner of the 1938 American
League hatting crown, and voted the most valuable player in
the League last year-greets the new 1939 baseball season with
a confident smile and a Camel! Camels rate high with Jimmy. "I
gave a lot of thought to the subject of cigarettes-made experiments t o o - before I settled down to Camels for keeps! Camels
are better tasting-and they're milder." Be curious enough to try
Camels yourself. Smoke six packs-and you'll see why Camels are
the most popular cigarette in the world. Appealing flavor-pleasing aroma-call it what you will, but there's no mistaking the fact
that Camels give the supreme thrill of smoking pleasure at its best.
Cupvrluht, t v a i . It. J . Keynolda TabKcs('..iiiiMiny, WIniloQtalwn, N. "
^g
FOR SMOKING PLEASURE AT ITS REST...
LET UP_ LIGHT UP A CAMEL
H e ' s D o g g i n ' His Way T h r o u g h College
Edd le Gecelius, Hiram College sophomore, pays his tuition with money he earns
with his famous pedigreed Great Danes
T h e y ' r e Leading a Community Sing O v e r A d d r e s s System
S i ! l l ! ! d n d d e q U | d l e m e e t i n ' 3 P K c ; p u t t h e C f i m P i" the community ,ing .d.
of the honorary ournalism society at Ventura Junior College, the leaders took
minutes of class time and broadcast one ovPr t U , „
,
JJ
,
i ,
uauv 041 o n e o v e f
,.^ ^iit, »U c . A i •
tne room-to-room adaress system hoi-i
up, with the students in every room joining in
7%g Ctjazefte.
aczcczA
*
. . •.-;<,3l««Ssji»Mi»«*
•
.
I !*-:-.: : . ^ . ;
>
J
age 3
lis
Tennis
•art
a
*ROW
Friday
tory
marred
against
s team
nbitious
ek with
one for
her for
j
see the
rs faccourts
ien reT their
against
,lon for
had a
ule for
ing it•rlty of
There's No Evading This Dance Bid
Learning Journalism From the Type Up
. . . (Catherine Baile studies the intricacies of the modern linotype machine under the direction of J. C. Iranbarger at Indiana State Teachers
College.
Deputy Sheriff M . A . Alber was retained by managers of the University of Michigan's annual
law school dance to distribute tubpoenat ordering co-edt to attend the musical night court. Hit
welcome at the Delta Gamma house was most cordial, as this scene proves.
:e, the
I April
inds of
ng day
defeat
les to
lied on
:
.th the
Collegiate Diseit Photo by Sheellne
Collesiete Dlseil Photo by A«
c
I
A Toast with Coffee
V
. . . was drunk at the opening of the
youth hostel at Rockford College.
President Mary Ashby Cheek, national vice president of the American Youth Hostels, "poured". .
1
1
V
I.
r
$L
V
b
t
l
n
4
Pyramid of Players
P
s<
d
ii
t!
v\
Collegians Lead Drive Against Disease
Harvard Scientist First to Automatically Re
A Speed of Light
Dr. Wilmer C. Anderson, Harvard University research fello
he invented to automatically measure the velocity ol light
pose a wave-form on a light beam in such a way as to com
measurement of its own tpeed.
demonstrates the device
basic principle is to imthe light to help in the
Acme
r<
g"
i)
11
(•<
fi,
o!
I.
w
/'
III
qi
pi
O u t s t a n d i n g leaders in the d n v e t o
stamp out the d i e a d d i s e a s e , s y p h
ilis, are the n a t i o n s c o l l e g e a n d
university students A l r e a d y t h o u
sands have b e e n t e s t e d u n d e r p r o
grams e a r n e d o u t b y s t u d e n t h e a l t h
depaitments Particularly c o m m e n d
a t o i y has b e e n the w o r k of t h e t c
lege n e w s p a p e r s in p u b l i c i z i n g the
tests, lor m u c h or the a d v a n c e m e n t
m a d e in the h i g h e r e d u c a t i o n a l in
s t i t u t i o n s c a n be < i e d 11 e d t o t h e , :
e d i t o r i a l c a m p a i g n s K e s u l t s so lai
r e . e a l that t w o p i e . e r y 1 0 0 U i t . .
d e n t s t e s t e d are a f f l i c t e d w i t h the
ill
4
Here (jrace
Cadwallade
U r n . e r s 11 y s o p h o m o r e
di
now i irn tJe the tests are
id ni
,
11, g e t h e i
:
.
•
•
.
Both teams crowded in to capture
the ball when the photographer
snapped this bit of dramatic action
in the rugby match between Cornell University and the New York
Rugby Club.
Wldf Wo ,i d
>ved at
at met
ire last
o.
In that
mpeti•iclnity
11 un)n exletics.
s with
r, Frair won
asian's
2, 6-4.
Siena
le vici were
l and
lse.
its out
ill the
icipat-
their
asour,
'ictorKarl
2, talState
year,
Smith,
resent
ine is
s are
the
i will
, Rei perns of
-
mi !••••• mimmmmammm
,i* mam
Page 3
f*<'>
»NSf|^S£
'CnitV
Tennis
•bart
va.
i n
tUlMl
is»- mm mi
ills
>RROW
•%/
: Friday
ctory
!
• i
n marred
3 against
nis team
imbitious
/eek with
one for
ither for
I III Alt
•"11 IN ,'i
n» N\ T h r Atf IS U h t g u —
LOCAI o o o
-6
0
see the
•ers facs courts
;men refor their
i against
A.I.o.r. I'HVrcif/ \>v\\,
-*Jt|iuBi*>*"l
'^t>..^j1l0*Mmfl?%
1iief0^!
/i:py
.ltlon for
^ had a
:dulo for
>ving itiorlty of
1$£fi0?WM$
PS**?*
tlce, the
>n April
nands of
'ing day
n defeat
ches to
ailed on
with the
/
i
t
\
•
Congratulations to the Winner
i
r I
Beryl Sprause receives the congratulations of Jean Franz for defeating her in a fencing
match at Connecticut College for W o m e n .
< oiiegme o,tm Photo by Holt
\
Not Good Form, But He Placed Third
Harry Venning cleared the last hurdle in a most unorthodox fashion when he comWide World
peted in the University of California-U.C.L.A. track meet.
1
I
v
He Gets Up Promptly, or Else —
I
-William M c M i l l a n , Ripon College, rigged up this simple device to
cure his bad habit of over-sleeping in the morning. The alarm handle
on his clock tips a cup of very cold water on his head if he doesn't
turn it off immediately.
F
"Stage Door" is Unfair to Men
Collcfllalc Digest Photo by Inveneiti
b
. . . claim these Kent State University pickets because there are too
many co-eds in the cast. The "strikers" paraded with signs at the entrance door before each presentation.
coii«»i«ie Dis«i Photo by 8«k
t
I
n
M - M - M , yOU'RE A
PRINCE ALBERT SMOKER,
I SEE HO WONPER
you STICK SO CLOSE
TO YOUR PIPES —
yOU'RE GETTING
REAL JOV-SMOKING
Ii
lnt.s out
all the
•tlclpatin their
ivasour,
victorof Karl
'42, tal." State
;:.':-Ss,
;
i
s*
Buggy Business
K.
This N . y . A . student at
O h i o State University has
as her special project testing the effectiveness of insecticides on cockroaches,
proving that not all co-eds
are afraid of bugs.
%
in. |ii:tll. II
•
yOU'RE TELLING ME?
SAX PRINCE ALBERT'S
EXTRA MILDNESS
GIVES My TONGUE A
BREAK. AND
PA. HAS RICH
Bopy TOO
SMOKt 20 FRAGRANT PIPEFULS of
Prince Albert. II you don't find
it the mellow CHI, (»!>ti>>st pipe
t o h n t i o you ever Hinuked, return
the; put |irt tin with the rent of
the tobacco in it to u* at any
tune willuti n month from this,
dute, uml vve will refund lull
pur t It ant* price, plun pohlaKC.
\Siltn?tii \i. J. KeynoMu TobttCCO
Coiti|)Aiiy, Winnt»ii'Salriii, N . C,
I Id'
roved at
hat met
iero lost
wo.
5 in that
:ompetivicinity
vill union ex;hletics.
ics with
ur. Framr won
•nasian's
3-2, 6-4.
s, Siena
'gle vlc,te were
an and
n
n.se.
t
year,
Smith,
present
nine Ls
n*s are
the
10 will
ts. Reoe perlons of
KH .sir, |>i|R' funn, Prince Albert puts you r i g h t up
there next to ri'iil Hmolung J°V - unci no two ways
anions " c r i m p c u t " smokes smoothi'
about il.
.slower with all the rich, natural taste
P. A, .'lioicc
l'riirt'e Albert is "no-bite" treatei to a s s u r e
11 iliac
plenty of extra mildness lyul welcome coolness in every
mellow puff. Here a r e g r e a t smoking ilays for you. The
sooner you get P r i n c e Albert, the sooner you'll know the
meaning of real
juu-mnokiny!
Y
In
'.SMS* A
.1/
Curfew Rings for Jitterbugs
Hot licks and jive unconfined gave way to angry leers at the University of Washington when more than 300 members ol the Husky
H o t Club were given the gate by campus marshalls. In answer to his
protests above, Pres. Norman Bobrow was told 9 p. m. was closinq
Little Connection Between Sight and Hearing
L
A.m.
hour.
This is one of the conclusions of Robert Burnham, Rutgers University
psychologist, after many experiments with this device of his own invention. His subject here is M u r i e l Albers, N e w Jersey College for
W o m e n senior.
Adviiwna
Colle6ialeDi6est
Section
PKWICUOM 0*Ut;
W
fiwkil
•vlMinf, MlniwtpolU, Mlnn»K>U.
-".-»:•:.--•• •
:„,...,....,._
....... ,::.-,,:„.rr,,..
.JUNGE so
plueluU
ol fragrant tobacco In
i\
SlHtHtttlM1
N A T I O N A L ADVERTISING
SERVICE I N C
4J0 Midltan A»«nu», N i * Voik
4C0 No. M k M | M A V I U M , Chlc«|i>
Haiton S«n Iituciito Lui Aitftlai
THE
ALBERT
NATIONAL
uvely handy tin
o l Hilnce A l u u i t
JOY S M O K E
k
11
iWiMWWFii>Tiin-^nwwtm»wiiii*-»WM»iiiMHl) MJtji
"
•
'
"
'•'•
mummmmmmmmmmmmmim
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MAY 12, 1939
Page 3
Varsity Teams Will Play Weekend Double Bills
Brass
Knuckles
Baseball Team to Avenge
Earlier Season Defeat
in Game at Troy
VAN KEUREN TO PITCH
Split
Clashes
T h e rivalry football game between the freshmen and sophomores was finally played last Friday afternoon on t h e Page gridiron.
Twice victory was within reach
of the fi'osh as the bullet-like
passes from Virgil Scott went into
the hands of receivers over the
goal line, but each time the ball
was dropped a n d with it dropped
the freshman victory.
The frosh outplayed the sophs
and had them backed well into
their own territory a large part
of the game. T h e y displayed a
powerful attack with Scott's passing and Howie Anderson's r u n ning constant t h r e a t s .
The game will be replayed this
afternoon on the campus in front
of Page hall, Ihe game starting at
3:30 o'clock
At the M.A.A.-W.A.A. play day
ihe freshmen and sophomores
split honors. Behind "Bobby Seller! s" very effective pitching, the
frosh swept into a 12 to 0 victory.
The sophomore women won 25 to
ill, thus balancing the points
which ihe men of '41 lost.
Purple and Gold Tennis
Squad to Meet Hobart
Today at Geneva
Athletes Conduct
Farewell Dinner BARD RIVAL TOMORROW
Nine at H a r t w i c k T o m o r r o w ;
Game with Siena Last Friday
Hersh, Amyot, Quattrocchi
Faces
Hamilton
Here
Results in Lone Victory
Lust week, Press Bureau received
Receive Lifelong Passes
on W e d n e s d a y
for State Team
a letter from Bard College, whose
to Athletic Events
varsity baseball team S t a t e meets
T h e S t a t e college diamond squad
The beginning of its season m a r r e d
next weekend.
will a t t e m p t to break into the win
On May 4, Men's Athletic associa- by three successive defeats against
T h e letter listed the games which column this weekend with two games
tion conducted its a n n u a l spring a single victory, the tennis team
Bard is playing this year. Bob Fick- scheduled, against R.P.I, today and
. b a n q u e t in the college cafeteria. will forge a h e a d in its ambitious
er, their manager of baseball, in I Hartwick tomorrow. T h e previously
T o a s t m a s t e r Larry S t r a t t n c r , pres- eleven game schedule this week with
c o m m e n t i n g on the single game \ postponed Hamilton game will be
i d e n t of I n t r a m u r a l council, introwhich had been played a t the time I played at Bleeckcr s t a d i u m Wedj clucetl President Brubacher who in two more m a t c h e s booked, one for
1
the letter was written, r e m a r k e d :
nesday.
I t u r n presented Dr. Risley. "Riz" this afternoon, and the other for
We have already played Stevreminisced in relating several a n e c - tomorrow.
Van Keuren to Face R.P.I.
ens Tech, at Annandale. and
j dotes gleaned from his m a n y and
Against the Engineers today, the
Home Tilt Tomorrow
i diverse experiences as a teacher and
were defeated, to put it mildly.
Owls will be out to avenge the
This afternoon's tilt will see the
m i active participant in sports.
by a score of 21 to 1.
previous defeat in the opening game
Purple and Gold racqueteers facPresent Awards
T h e comment seemed
slightly of the season. Despite the mediocre
ing Hobart on the latter's courts
| T h e banquet was also the occa- at Geneva. T h e S t a t e netmen r e ironical, for we happened to read it b r a n d of play displayed thus far.
sion for the presentation of varsity, turn (o Albany tomorrow for their
just about the time we learned of the squad feels confident, t h a t it can
i n t r a m u r a l , and
special
awards. third home match, tills time against
State's defeat—to put it mildly—at punch out its initial victory against
J e r r y Amyot, former president of Bard college.
the h a n d s of Pratt, by a discordant the Engineers,
iM.A.A. and coach-elect of Coliocs
eighteen runs.
In the first game against R.P.I.
Hobart will be new competition for
high school, was presented a key.
Ficker justified Bard's weak show- I wo weeks ago. poor fielding and a
Duke Hersh. George Amyot, and State. Bard, however, has had a
weak
attack
deprived
D
a
r
Van
Keuring by describing the situation at
F r a n k Quattrocchi were awarded life spin on the T e a c h e r s ' schedule for
the college. It seems to t h e stu- en of a victory, after he had pitched
passes for their outstanding con- many years, with S t a t e proving itdents there, t h a t there is an a t - a great game. Despite the fact that
tributions to State college athletics. self the master in the majority of
t e m p t on the part of the a d m i n i s t r a - Kline, the R.P.I, pitcher, was in
Mr. Edward L. Cooper, faculty ad- contests in recent seasons.
tion to cut intercollegiate
a t h - trouble almost every inning because
visor of M.A.A. council, was the
Cold from lack of practice, the
letics from the program.
of tlie nine free passes he gave out,
recipient of an M.A.A. key and a squad opened its season on April
the
Teachers
were
unable
to
push
Since the letter from Bard was
travelling bag. as a token of a p - 28 with a 7-2 defeat at the hands of
received, they succumbed to R.P.I, over a run. T h i s time the fellows
preciation for his services during R.P.I, at Troy. T h e following dayi who gave us our first setback) intend to capitalize on every opport h e past year.
saw the team sink again in defeat
by a 10-5 score.
T h e clay be- tunity.
at Middlebury, nine matches to
Mailer
Excels
So far. R.P.I, has won two of its
fore the R.P.I, game, which was
Bill Haller received the award for none, a score t h a t also prevailed on
played last Saturday, the Bard t e a m three starts. In its opener, it was
The annual i n t r a m u r a l track and s p o r t s m a n s h i p in i n t r a m u r a l a t h - May 3 in a r e t u r n m a t c h with the
was soundly vanquished 15-0. by the turned back by Stevens' Tech, 7-3.
Vermonters a t Albany.
Hamilton squad which the Owls face , In the next two games the Engi- Held meet will be held on the c a m - letics, a n d F r a n k Quattrocchi was
given
t
h
e
award
for
the
most
valuSiena New Rival
pus
in
front
of
Page
hall
at
4:00
Wednesday.
neers rebounded with 3-0 win over
able player in i n t r a m u r a l athletics
11 was a team vastly improved a t
Two more games are yet to be o u r fair institution a n d followed it o'clock Tuesday.
the cost of earlier defeats that met
On the basis of past performances, during the past year.
faced
by Bard: one
tomorrow, up with a 19-5 shellacking at Bard's
Awards were also presented to . and trounced Siena college here last
against Drew; the last, next week, expense. In all three of these con- Ihe licet Bill Torrens, '39, and Bob
K
e
n
Doran,
captain
of
tennis;
Tony
Friday, seven m a t c h e s to two.
here. We would like to repeat their tests, Dave Kline was the pitcher Gorman, '39. seem like good bets to
m a n a g e r ' s "good wishes for a suc- I and since U.P.I.. has two games lead Ihe pack in the 100 and 220 Wilezynski, captain of cross country;
This m a t c h was significant in t h a t
cessful season" right, back at the this weekend. Coach G r a h a m faces vard dashes and the broad jump. a n d Ed Melanson, m a n a g e r of frosh it marked the first athletic competibasketball.
Bard nine, but it's a bit too late for the perplexing problem of a pitch-1
tion between t h e two rival vicinity
It is improbable t h a t any records,
Men receiving varsity letters in
that.
ing shortage.
It will probably be with ihe possible exception of those
institutions. T h e future will u n basketball
were
Duke
Hersh,
George
! doubtedly see this competition exWe hope that they lose the game Kline on the mound again today in the Held events, will be broken.
Amyot. Mike Walko, Carroll L e h m a n ,
tended to other fields of athletics.
against S t a l e by a large score, n a t - since he is their only pitcher who
a
n
d
Bill
Torrens,
seniors;
Willard
The
present
records
were
made
on
urally. May they have the best luck has rounded into satisfactory shape.
Of the six singles matches with
E m i n e n t and Walt Simmons, j u n Fairbank Pilches a t Hartwick
! a cinder path, which makes for
in the world against Drew tomorrow.
Siena, S t a t e m e n clinched four. F r a iors; and Arnold Ellerin, '41.
much
faster
limes
t
h
a
n
are
probable
We a r e sorry to hear t h a t opporTony Wllczynski, Walt Russ. sen- ment, Schultze, and Vavasour won
Against a powerhouse Hartwick | over the grass Held to be used T u e s tunities for building up the team
iors; Louis Francello, Steve Shaw, in straight sets, while Tomasian's
are being cut out, by the Bard ad- out lit tomorrow, little can bi ex- day.
They have a ball club
juniors, and Doug Manley, '41, re- victory required three, 1-6, 6-2, 6-4.
The present records follow
ministration. We sincerely hope t h a t peeled.
ceived varsity letters in cross coun- In the three doubles matches, Siena
inn j i l . i i u - i i — I . K j u i l — I I U
the faculty will reconsider their idea which rates with the best and only
was unable to eke out a single vicS'iO J it, IIIIHII—.1. lljun—IM.II
try.
of cutting out intercollegiate sports, recently had a fourteen game winI III yil. d a s h — T . It M I ii—IW..1
tory. T h e pair-ups for State were
T
h
e
new
i
n
t
r
a
m
u
r
a
l
council
is
especially in view of the desire for ning streak snapped. To date this
HKll j i l . IIIIHII—T. w i i f i j i i H k i — a
composed of: J a m e s Q u i n n , '40, Frameiit and Smith, Doran and
Mil., r u n — I I . lliLvni-n—-ft: IS
such stimulating competition which season, the boys from Oneonta have
SHI) .Ml. ri.lu.\—<-IIIHS nf 'littpresident; Car 1 Marotto, '42, treas- Tomasian, and Bliss and Sense.
seems to be possessed by Bard men. beaten Clarkson 11-7, Hofstra 13-2,
IHKII J u m p — T . Mi'«'liun—>V
New Comers T r i u m p h
Upsala 7-2, and Drew 11-0. The
u r e r ; Howard Anderson, '42, secreItriiiiil J u m p — I t . C n u t t i n ! —
Wc suggest t h a t the committees in
only defeat was at the h a n d s of
tary.
Shut p i l l — r . MurrlN—10'
Captain Ken Doran, '39, points out
charge of publicity for varsity baseDrew 4-2, in the first part of a twin
as significant the fact t h a t all t h e
ball a n d tennis do something about
TWO BAD ONES!
newcomers to t h e squad, p a r t i c i p a t keeping
games, especially
home bill. In "Baffler" Bill Burke, they
Stall.
A.It.
Stale
II
A.It.
ing in the Siena contest, won their
games, before t h e eyes of the dwellers have a fine pitcher with three years
S pro w i s ,
I.
I
:i
SIli'llMT,
I'.f.
:i
matches.
Schultze and Vavasour,
of S t a t e by the use of posters similar of veteran service behind him.
l
l
n
r
i
l
,
r.f.
II
ft
Illllllll'K II/.. '
It is probable t h a t
Fairbank
freshmen,
each
pounded out victorSlieurt'r, r.f.
II
to those used for giving notice of
1
1
Iliirri'll. I.f,
Oiinili'U'M'z, H
will take the mound in the enI)
ies, while a team m a d e up of Karl
basketball games this year.
:i
I)
1)
l o i l r l m l l k , ''h.
K u i r l m i i k , 111
1
counter with Hartwick which will
Sense, '39, and Irving Bliss, '42, t a l :l
II
1
Villi Kruri'ii.
K a u f m a n , lb.
We have no illusions about the
II
be played on the O n e o n t a campus.
II
1)
lied a doubles win for the S t a t e
1)
Graven, r.f.
Van lii-uri'ii,
I)
NKWS penetrating the shells of most
I t a r r i ' t t , l.f.
II
1)
I l l l r i l . r.f
Hamilton G a m e Wednesday
II
score.
sports fans at State. Why, there
'i
I)
( i l l i c i t . Hi.
(1
TUOIIUIN, lib.
Against Hamilton Wednesday. Van
might even be some who have never
I)
T h e six veterans of last year,
I ' I I S I I T , .'lb.
Illlllcr, 3h.
I)
I t u l m i T , Sib.
looked at our sports page - f o r s a k e n Keuren will probably toe the mound
I'IIHIIT. Ith.
Doran, F r a m e n t . Rand, S t a n Smith,
II
Itrupli>
.
r.
:i
Itrupli>, <\
ones! At any rate, it is necessary again. As far as is known, the men
Tomasian, a n d Kilb, a t present
l.t'limiin, p.
to keep glaring print around for from Clinton hold a victory over
compose the varsity. Since nine is
il
l l u l i n i T , lib.
1'rut t
A.It.
those people, who, on a Friday after- the weak Bard nine 15-0 and have
II.
the desired number, play-offs are
l*n.> Mi",
i'.f.
1
noon remark, " W h a t ? Slate is play- been beaten by Union 10-7.
being
conducted
among
the
II
i
•!H
7
S p o f f u r i l , 'ib.
ing baseball this afternoon? Where
neophytes to determine who will
In the Hamilton game, S t a t e will
lErnrrla, 2b.
it. r. i.
A.II . it. I I . K.
KiirjfllH,
N.N.
and w h e n ? " Besides that, It is often be shorlhanded as Hamilton insists
receive the three vacant posts. ReII
il
I urnii'ii, '^li.
II
1
F a l l . l i e n , N.H,
I
II
VTIll'I'llllllUI. -Ml.
Impossible to print the exact time on a strict freshman rule. This
:l
i
maining a s p i r a n t s will then be perJ
t
i
h
i
t
N
o
n
,
:ib.
Kui-ur.li',
r.f.
il
I
i
and place a match or game is sched- will prevent C'asler from starting at
mitted to contest the positions of
Murk, lib.
ft
II
li
N'llKI'lll,
Hi.
n
uled, for usually the indecision of the third, Sprowls playing eenlerlicld,
bottom varsity men.
Itl'IINI', l.f,
II
....
1
n
N.vo, c.
i
Aritfiiiiu, I f
m a n a g e r s extends to a period beyond and several other freshmen from
Shako, I h
I
i
i
St|.|.||..v, r.f.
'.!
our deadline.
playing who would usually see acII
II
I ' U I I M I , r.f.
I
II
M l i l i a l . l n. r.f.
lli'mpNi..\, l.f.
II
Kiiiil.'r, lb.
I
II
II
Jim C'hapell wants those who have tion.
It.)
an, lb.
Murtliii.'i. N.H.
I
i
1
i
Pratt Swamps State
any idea t h a t they'd like to parAt the
I'Ml-lil, <•.
:t
II
II
K l i n e , p.
II
ticipate in M.A.A.'s alumni day next
Mllli-r.
Last Saturday the boys suffered
year to communicate will) him. This an overwhelming defeat at the hands
in
:i
ii
1
is necessary in order that a contact of Prat I in New York city by the
list he drawn up for next year.
score of 20-2 in a game which went
It is not necessary that you be only seven innings. Ii would be unEat a t J o h n ' s L u n c h
EMIL J. NAGENGAST
certain of being able in a t t e n d this fair, however. In say that this game
D i n n e r s !5e and Up
You'll find
F I. O R I S T
function. T h e invitation applies to was a true test of the Slate nine's
Delicious S tndwiclu s an d
nil seniors, Participation will be lice ability
Van Keuren pitching Willi
Bonded Member of I I D A
the very beat
Sundaes
Your name Is asked, simply in ordei a Mire shoulder, was lul solidly for
"Buy
Where
(lie
Flowers
Grow'"
7 311 V M. - 11:00 P. M
thai you may be contacted next year lour innings Hi.-, pitching sta.\ wa:
Ice Cream in
Dial 2-3318 Ontario at Benson St.
llnalh culminated In u home inn
Opp. the H i f l i Set m i l l
li\ Millei ihe I'ralt hurler
Dai
Chess T e a m s to Clash
Town
Welded 13 i nil: 7 in a hi:', I hied
In
ihe
lourlh
inning,
At Colgate T o m o r r o w inning
The chess team -.till .porting a Toad" Fall haul, came in anil, aside
H O W A R D E. M A R S T O N
ll'Ult
aim liilereiillegluie average,
will Ii urn Ihe • i .i h li mill' in which Prill i
\j
A SHOE IS J . O S T INC.
li,ul
li\
e
runners
I
roup
across
home
|iiunie\ in Hamilton lomorow, to
nieel <'Kigali' in il s lined college plate "I iiiiil' did a lairl,\ good job,
/ ' n M II /'linn
>) /'I it inns
A POSITION IS L O S T eon: Hlei lug the lill le college pitching
mulch
VMi, l i t williuul l l . i u , i j i . i | . l m l o i i i . i n j M
experience he has hud T h e "TeachTin- will be the second meeting
ers" Were badly hampered bj tin
Kxdusive Kvcwmo ,ti
II! I hr I wo groups, .Stale ha\ me narrow conline.-. ol ihe little Pratt
• ?. 3 MONTHS' SECRETARIAL COURSE
vanquished the lied Raiders l u r e bandbox
For the daily
T h e powerful Pl'tltl hit•rOlUIGN LANGUAGE STENOGRAPHY
Moderate I'rii e.»
last tail ii '-:'.'•
A 11 miming this ters kepi a seemingly continuous
(Spaniill, U'im.ill. Iiciull lljlijnl
snack
spring In Arun rounded out State'.'. splatter ol hits bouncing oil ihe
l),i| anil Inning ,
,s
existing lino record
fences in left and ceiilei Held. It Is
H o t e l T e n F.yck B u i l d i n g
AN.|I.',I fill
Si;; boards will be played tomor- •-ale lo .-ay that three-fourths ol
For parlies
mg June I'Jill • luliilli
row with Ail Fox. Steve Shuw. Hiese hit: could have been caught il
83 State Street
INTOB0R0 INSTITUTE |
John Hoose. Hob Pulton, Roy Sum- ihe ulltlleldel's had a chance to go
large and small
Albany
151 WEST 4 i d ST.
NtW Y0KK
mers, ami l.nuis Fruneello carrying alter them
Knickerbocker Bhitj. at lima S</uar*
Ihe b a n n e r lor Stale
('. F. F , —
I i
Rivalry Ctassos
Weekend Sports
Council to Sponsor
Track Meet Tuesday
Whiskers Brought O n • Co-ed Revolt
^
. . . when Creighton University footballers grew long beards to help Omaha celebrate " G o l d e n
Spike Days". The revolt ended in a barbershop, with the co-eds proving they could be adept
with brush and razor when the occasion demanded.
1
W$®mm&fr
•>
53*^«3fWie3?S
^=witott,v
•>
I
Officials Consider New Beck Board
" P h o g " A l l e n , University of Kansas basketball coach, demonstrates the new
convex-surfaced back board which is being considered by basketball rules committees. Yes, it should make the game more difficult.
Acme
«ttCW=SA!*i
WAGAR'S
,«;r "
Aim,
*WWTI ipirwrmiwiiirTViwiwiiiwiffl-w'*"-**--.
ANNEX
e
•Pen'many
' n 9 marks.
°' « • gulp
mm-„-r'
•s^miimmimUmmmMmmmimH
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MAY 12, 1939
Page 3
Varsity Teams Will Play Weekend Double Bills
Brass
Knuckles
B a s e b a l l T e a m to A v e n g e
Earlier Season Defeat
in G a m e at T r o y
VAN
%
f
Whiskers Broufhl O n a Co-«d Rtvolt
. . . whtn Crdghton University footballer grew long beards to help Omaha celebrate "Golden
Spike Days". The revolt ended in a barbershop, with the co-eds proving they could be adept
with brush and raior when the occasion demanded.
^ " tW fm
m$ Mm
mmm®®^^^^
' • c o r d ^ t pp o ^ 'U'^
with
<>PPltreit.,, U„j ve ,
S . ' ^ . r : ; ' - ' •!*
Acm
;';•>?
Wt&Q*
.'.:-# , *
fc,^;i^Ui
•^v
"'^Hintobeathj,
;».-£dfl
Acme
IT
>^:
Official* Consitfcr N«w lack •eard
"Phog" Allen, University of Kansas basketball coach, dtmonitntes tht new
convev-surfaced back board which is being considered by basketball rules committees, res, it should make the game more difficult.
A™,-
^5555*.
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|
t<^>^'MW"g^ r .wi|i!iniiiinjjifia;gt | il
IVK
Acme
'
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m
9U/Plng
^{J
TO
PITCH
Nine at Hart wick Tomorrow;
Faces Hamilton
Here
Last week, Press Bureau received
on Wednesday
a letter from Bard College, whose
varsity baseball team State meets The State college diamond squad
next weekend.
will attempt to break into the win
The letter listed the games which column this weekend with two games
Bard is playing this year. Bob Fick- scheduled, against R.P.I, today and
er, their manager of baseball, in Hartwick tomorrow. The previously
commenting on the single game postponed Hamilton game will be
which had been played at the time played at Bleecker stadium Wednesday.
the letter was written, remarked:
We have already played StevVan Keuren to Face R.P.I.
ens Tech, at Annandale, and
Against the Engineers today, the
were defeated, to put it mildly,
Owls will be out to avenge the
by a score of 21 to 1.
previous defeat in the opening game
The comment seemed slightly of the season. Despite the mediocre
Ironical, for we happened to read it brand of play displayed thus far,
just about the time we learned of the squad feels confident that it can
State's defeat—to put it mildly—at punch out its initial victory against
the hands of Pratt, by a discordant the Engineers.
eighteen runs.
In the first game against R.P.I,
Ficker justified Bard's weak show- two weeks ago, poor fielding and a
ing by describing the situation at weak attack deprived Dar Van Keurthe college. It seems to the stu- en of a victory, after he had pitched
dents there, that there Is an at- a great game. Despite the fact that
tempt on the part of the administra- Kline, the R.P.I, pitcher, was in
tion to cut intercollegiate ath- trouble almost every inning because
letics from the program.
of the nine free passes he gave out,
Since the letter from Bard was the Teachers were unable to push
received, they succumbed to R.P.I, over a run. This time the fellows
(who gave us our first setback) intend to capitalize on every opporby a 19-5 score. The day be- tunity.
fore the R.P.I, game, which was
So far, R.P.I, has won two of its
played last Saturday, the Bard team three starts. In its opener, it was
was soundly vanquished 15-0, by the turned back by Stevens' Tech, 7-3.
Hamilton squad which the Owls face In the next two games the EngiWednesday.
neers rebounded with 3-0 win over
Two more games are yet to be our fair institution and followed it
faced by Bard: one tomorrow, up with a 19-5 shellacking at Bard's
against Drew; the last, next week, expense. In all three of these conhere. We would like to repeat their tests, Dave Kline was the pitcher
manager's "good wishes for a suc- and since R.P.I., has two games
cessful season" right back at the this weekend, Coach Graham faces
Bard nine, but it's a bit too late for the perplexing problem of a pitchthat.
ing shortage. It will probably be
We hope that they lose the game Kline on the mound again today
against State by a large score, nat- since he is their only pitcher who
urally. May they have the best luck has rounded into satisfactory shape.
Fairbank Pitches at Hartwick
in the world against Drew tomorrow.
We are sorry to hear that opporAgainst a powerhouse Hartwick
tunities for building up the team outfit tomorrow, little can be exare being cut out by the Bard ad- pected. They have a ball club
ministration. We sincerely hope that which rates with the best and only
the faculty will reconsider their idea recently had a fourteen game winof cutting out intercollegiate sports, ning streak snapped. To date this
especially in view of the desire for season, the boys from Oneonta have
such stimulating competition which beaten Clarkson 11-7, Hofstra 13-2,
seems to be possessed by Bard men. Upsala 7-2, and Drew 11-0. The
We suggest that the committees in only defeat was at the hands of
charge of publicity for varsity base- Drew 4-2, in the first part of a twin
ball and tennis do something about bill. In "Baffler" Bill Burke, they
keeping games, especially home have a fine pitcher with three years
games, before the eyes of the dwellers of veteran service behind him.
of State by the use of posters similar
It is probable that Fairbank
to those used for giving notice of
will take the mound in the enbasketball games this year.
counter with Hartwick which will
We have no illusions about the be played on the Oneonta campus.
NEWS penetrating the shells of most
Hamilton Game Wednesday
sports fans at State. Why, there
Against Hamilton Wednesday, Van
might even be some who have never Keuren will probably toe the mound
looked at our sports page—forsaken again.
As far as is known, the men
ones! At any rate, it is necessary
to keep glaring print around for from Clinton hold a victory over
those people, who, on a Friday after- the weak Bard nine 15-0 and have
noon remark, "What? State is play- been beaten by Union 10-7.
ing baseball this afternoon? Where
In the Hamilton game, State will
and when?" Besides that, it is often be shorthanded as Hamilton insists
Impossible to print the exact time on a strict freshman rule. This
and place a match or game is sched- will prevent easier from starting at
uled, for usually the indecision of the third, Sprowls playing centerfield,
managers extends to a period beyond and several other freshmen from
our deadline.
playing who would usually see acJim Chapell wants those who have tion.
Pratt Swamps State
any idea that they'd like to parLast Saturday the boys suffered
ticipate in M.A.A.'s alumni day next
year to communicate with him. This an overwhelming defeat at the hands
is necessary in order that a contact of Pratt in New York city by the
list be drawn up for next year.
score of 20-2 in a game which went
It is not necessary that you be only seven innings. It would be uncertain of being able to attend this fair, however, to say that this game
function. The invitation applies to was a true test of the State nine's
all seniors. Participation will be free. ability. Van Keuren, pitching with
Your name is asked, simply in order a sore shoulder, was hit solidly for
thai you may be contacted next year. four innings. His pitching stay was
finally culminated by a home run
by
Miller, the Pratt hurler. Dar
Chess Teams to Clash
yielded 13 runs, 7 in a big third
At Colgate Tomorrow inning. In the fourth inning,
The chess team, still sporting a •Toad" Fairbank came in and, aside
.500 intercollegiate average, will from the sixth frame in which Pratt
journey to Hamilton tomorow, to had five runners troop across home
meet Colgate in its third college plate, "Toad" did a fairly good job,
considering the little college pitching
match.
This will be the second meeting experience he has had. The "Teachof the two groups, State having ers" were badly hampered by the
vanquished the Red Raiders here narrow confines of the little Pratt
last fall, 6'4-8%. A trimming this bandbox. The powerful Pratt hitspring by Army rounded out State's lers kept a seemingly continuous
splatter of hits bouncing off the
existing .500 record.
Six boards will be played tomor- fences in left and centerfield. It is
row with Art Fox, Steve Shaw, safe to say that three-fourths of
John Hoose, Bob Patton, Roy Som- hese hits could have been caught if
mers, and Louis Francello carrying j the outfielders had a chance to go
the banner for State.
after them.
' C. K. F .
mmm
KEUREN
Rivalry Classes Split
Weekend Sports Clashes
The rivalry football game between the freshmen and sophomores was finally played last Friday afternoon on the Page gridiron.
Twice victory was within reach
of the frosh as the bullet-like
passes from Virgil Scott went into
the hands of receivers over the
goal line, but each time the ball
was dropped and with it dropped
the freshman victory.
The frosh outplayed the sophs
and had them backed well into
their own territory a large part
of the game. They displayed a
powerful attack with Scott's passing and Howie Anderson's running constant threats.
The game will be replayed this
afternoon on the campus in front
of Page hall, the game starting at
3:30 o'clock
At the M.A.A.-W.A.A. play day
the freshmen and sophomores
split honors. Behind "Bobby Selfert's" very effective pitching, the
frosh swept into a 12 to 0 victory.
The sophomore women won 25 to
21, thus balancing the points
which the men of '41 lost.
Purple and Gold Tennis
Squad to Meet Hobart
Today at Geneva
Athletes Conduct
Farewell Dinner BARD RIVAL TOMORROW
Hersh, Amyot, Quattrocchi
Receive Lifelong Passes
to Athletic Events
Game with Siena Last Friday
Results in Lone Victory
for State Team
The beginning of its season marred
On May 4, Men's Athletic associa- by three successive defeats against
tion conducted its annual spring a single victory, the tennis team
banquet In the college cafeteria. will forge ahead in its ambitious
Toastmaster Larry Strattner, pres- eleven game schedule this week with
ident of Intramural council, introduced President Brubacher who In two more matches booked, one for
turn presented Dr. Risley. "Riz" this afternoon, and the other for
reminisced in relating several anec- tomorrow.
dotes gleaned from his many and
Home Tilt Tomorrow
diverse experiences as a teacher and
This afternoon's tilt will see the
an active participant in sports.
Purple and Gold racqueteers facPresent Awards
ing Hobart on the latter's courts
The banquet was also the occa- at Geneva. The State netmen resion for the presentation of varsity, turn to Albany tomorrow for their
intramural, and special awards. third home match, this time against
Jerry Amyot, former president of Bard college.
M.A.A. and coach-elect of Cohoes
high school, was presented a key. Hobart will be new competition for
Duke Hersh, George Amyot, and State. Bard, however, has had a
Frank Quattrocchi were awarded life spot on the Teachers' schedule for
passes for their outstanding con- many years, with State proving ittributions to State college athletics. self the master in the majority of
Mr. Edward L. Cooper, faculty ad- contests in recent seasons.
visor of M.A.A. council, was the
Cold from lack of practice, the
recipient of an M.A.A. key and a squad opened its season on April
travelling bag, as a token of ap- 28 with a 7-2 defeat at the hands of
preciation for his services during R.P.I. at Troy. The following day
the past year.
saw the team sink again in defeat
at Middlebury, nine matches to
Haller Excels
Bill Haller received the award for none, a score that also prevailed on
The annual intramural track and sportsmanship in intramural ath- May 3 in a return match with the
field meet will be held on the cam- letics, and Frank Quattrocchi was Vermonters at Albany.
Siena New Rival
pus in front of Page hall at 4:00 given the award for the most valuable player in intramural athletics
o'clock Tuesday.
It was a team vastly improved at
the cost of earlier defeats that met
On the basis of past performances, during the past year.
Awards were also presented to and trounced Siena college here last
the fleet Bill Torrens, '39, and Bob
Gorman, '39, seem like good bets to Ken Doran, captain of tennis; Tony Friday, seven matches to two.
Wilczynski, captain of cross country;
lead the pack in the 100 and 220 and
This match was significant In that
Ed Melanson, manager of frosh
it marked the first athletic competiyard dashes and the broad jump. basketball.
It is improbable that any records, Men receiving varsity letters In tion between the two rival vicinity
with the possible exception of those basketball were Duke Hersh, George institutions. The future will unin the field events, will be broken. Amyot, Mike Walko, Carroll Lehman, doubtedly see this competition extended to other fields of athletics.
The present records were made on and Bill Torrens, seniors; Willard
Of the six singles matches with
a cinder path, which makes for Frament and Walt Simmons, junSiena, State men clinched four. Framuch faster times than are probable iors; and Arnold Ellerln, '41.
Tony Wilczynski, Walt Russ, sen- ment, Schultze, and Vavasour won
over the grass field to be used Tuesiors; Louis Francello, Steve Shaw, in straight sets, while Tomasian's
day.
juniors, and Doug Manley, '41, re- victory required three, 1-6, 6-2, 6-4.
The present records follow:
ceived varsity letters in cross coun- In the three doubles matches, Siena
KM) y<l. I I I I H I I — J . B y i l l i — Ml.fi
was unable to eke out a single vic280 yd. (limit—J. Byim—28.8
I try.
III) yd. clash— T. K y m i — S O
The new intramural council is tory. The pair-ups for State were
HHO yil. (IHHII—T. WllciynskI—3:17.0
composed of: James Quinn, '40, Frament and Smith, Doran and
Mile run—II. HiiyiicH—A: 12
H80 yd. relay—CIIIHH of '.IB—1 (48.5
(President; Carl Marotto, '42, treas- Tomasian, and Bliss and Sense.
lllifh Jump—T. Meehan—fi'7"
New Comers Triumph
urer; Howard Anderson, '42, secre
Itroad Jump—II. Cnutiint—2<>"/j"
tary.
Shot put—C. MorrlH—10'
Captain Ken Doran, '39, points out
as significant the fact that all the
TWO BAD ONES!
newcomers to the squad, participatState
A.II. It.
State
A.II. It. II. K.
ing in the Siena contest, won their
Sprowls,
e.f.
.
.
:i
o
0
0
Shearer, e.f
0
.. »
matches. Schultze and Vavasour,
Ilurd, r.f
2 o
0
0
Oanilewlez, H.N. . . . . 5
1
freshmen, each pounded out victorShearer, r.f
i
o
0
Ilarrett, l.f
.. 2
1
1
Dunltowtoz, S.H. .
;< o
ies, while a team made up of Karl
0
Falrlmnk, 31). ;(!>. . . . :t
0
0
Fairbank, 11). p.
:i
i
Sense, '39, and Irving Bliss, '42, tal1
0
0
Van Keuren, p. . . . .. a
Kaufman, lb.
i
o
0
0
0
lied a doubles win for the State
0
Graven, r.f
Van Keuren, p.
2
0
0
0
Ilurd, r.f
.. 2 0
score.
Ilarrett, l.f
:t
l
0
2
Hilton, 111
.. 2
0
Thomas, Sb
1
0
The six veterans of last year,
Casler, 3b
2 0
Haller, 21
1)
0
1
0
llulmer,
2b
:i
0
0
easier, Sli
.. 2
0
0
Doran, Frament, Rand, Stan Smith,
•trophy,
e
:t
o
1
Ilropliy, e
0
:t
Tomasian, and Kilb, at present
"»
0
0
1
Lehman, p
.. 2
compose the varsity. Since nine is
37
2
2
8
0
1
0
1
Ilalmer, :1b
I'ratt
A.II. K. II. K.
the desired number, play-offs are
I'fiyno, e.f
being
conducted
among
the
1
2H
0
7
Spofford, 2h
X
neophytes to determine who will
llroeeia, 2b
1
It. 1'. I.
A 11 It. II. E .
SarifiiH, S.N
I
receive the three vacant posts. Re0
0
1
0
Carmen, 2h
Falotleo, H.N
. I
Wheelahan, 2I>. . . .
maining aspirants will then be per» 0 1 1
Johnson,
lib
2
1
mitted to contest the positions of
» 0
Mark, at)
I
0
0
0
lleiiHe, l.f
I
bottom varsity men.
0
0
Council to Sponsor
Track Meet Tuesday
1
Shako,
l
I
4
11)
DompHoy, l.f
Martinez, N.H
Kline, p
..
4
:i
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
1
0
Eat at J o h n ' s Lunch
Dinners 25c and Up
Delicious Sandwiches and
Sundaes
7:30 A. M. — 11:00 P.M.
Opp. thi' High School
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classes Enroll early Special summer sessions
' starting June 19tli • July Sill » August 7Ui '
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STATE
Page 4
COLLEGE
NEWS, MAY
12, 1939
form a n o t h e r unit in a proposed "allS t a t e " quadrangle.
A new c a m p a i g n idea was instituted this year t o secure support
T h e State college chemistry club
from seniors for this fund. R a t h e r
will hold its a n n u a l picnic T h u r s t h a n pledging $100, which h a s been
Senior
Class
Supports
Drive
day, May 25, a t I n d i a n Ladder.
t h e customary a m o u n t in p a s t years,
for
S
t
u
d
e
n
t
Union
Building
Charles Shafer, '39, president, is i n
t h e seniors have been asked to m a k e
charge of the affair.
With over $6,000 pledged t o t h e t h e participation record of t h e class
All members planning t o a t t e n d D o r m fund, t h e class of 1939 is wind- of 1939 100 p e r cent. Pledges r u n
the picnic must sign up on t h e c h e m ing up i t s a n n u a l drive to secure from $5 t o $200. Although t h e first
club bulletin board.
Busses fur- pledges for t h e erection of a S t u d e n t installment of t h e pledge is n o t due
nishing transportation will leave Union building.
until February, 1940, some pledgers
from t h e school a t 4:00 o'clock i n
J. E d m o r e Melanson, '39, c h a i r m a n have already completed p a y m e n t i n
the afternoon a n d r e t u r n a t 8:00h a s a n n o u n c e d t h a t May 16 is t o full or in p a r t .
o'clock in t h e evening. T h e r e will be t h e closing d a t e for t h e drive.
be a n admission fee of fifty cents, T h e drive w a s i n a u g u r a t e d by D r .
which will cover transportation a n d J o h n M. Sayles, principal of Milne
food.
High, a t a n assembly p r o g r a m i n
Besides promising to provide a n F e b r u a r y .
"Better Specialty Shop"
afternoon of fun, the picnic will also
T h i s is t h e fifth year t h a t t h e
231 CENTRAL AVE.
ALBANY
be t h e scene of a n i m p r o m p t u club senior classes h a v e been pledging
Between Robin & Lake
meeting for t h e election of officers money to a building t o be used a s a
for t h e coming school year.
combined m e n ' s d o r m and recreation
IFOR MOVING-UPDAY
center. I n h i s speech to t h e a s - 1
•
S p a n i s h C l u b Lists
H e a d s sembly, D r . Sayles a n n o u n c e d t h a t
White Skirts
$1.98
if
this
y
e
a
r
'
s
fund
w
a
s
sizeable,
Spanish club announces i t s offiLinen—Sharkskin
plans
would
be
d
r
a
w
n
for
t
h
e
buildcers for the coming year: president,
•
Leslie Gerdts, '41; vice president, ing, a n d s t e p s would be t a k e n to
2-Piece
J a m e s Snove.r, '41; secretary, Helen commence work o n t h e construction.
White Suits
$1.98 u p
T h e n e w d o r m will be built on
Miller, '41; treasurer, Walter D a n i l e •
P
a
r
t
r
i
d
g
e
street,
t
o
t
h
e
rear
of
t
h
e
|
wicz, '40, a n d reporter, Marjorie
White Dresses . . $1.98 u p
Alumni Residence halls, a n d will
Tims, '42.
S p u n Rayon
•
Dial
5-1913
"
M
O
M
S
"
T
HE WORD
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop
For M O T H E R ' S D A Y
State Chemistry Club
Will Conduct Outing
Smith Announces Greeks Make Plans
Dates for Tests For Spring Formals
(Continued
from page 1, column SJ
Dr. D. V. S m i t h , professor of social studies, a n n o u n c e s t h a t t h e freshments, Helen Bailey, '40, c h a i r qualifying comprehensive exam in man, Helen Lasher a n d Shirley Mysocial studies will be given o n May ers, sophomores; orchestra, H a t t i e
23, 24, a n d 25 i n rooms 20 a n dConklin, '41, and G e r a l d i n e T h o m p 28 of Richardson hall. All sopho- son, '40; clean-up, Shirley Kyle, '42.
Pi Alpha T a u : general c h a i r m a n ,
more students who a r e expecting t o
'39; orchestra,
major or minor i n this d e p a r t m e n t Mildred Streifer,
a r e requested t o be present o n allCecile Pockross, '40; invitations, Beatrice Marashinsky,
' 4 1 ; refreshdays.
T h e e x a m i n a t i o n will be given o n ments, Beatrice Koblenz, '39.
P h i D e l t a : general
chairman,
Tuesday a n d T h u r s d a y , May 23 a n d
25,
respectively,
from
3:30 to Helen Lowry, '39; a r r a n g e m e n t s ,
5:00 o'clock. O n Wednesday t h e Marie Metz, '40; music, Lillian Hines,
exam will s t a r t a t 7:30 o'clock in '39; refreshments, Carolyn Emery,
t h e evening. I n case a n y s t u d e n t '41; programs, J a y n e W a l r a t h , '39.
Alpha
R h o : flowers,
Eleanor
h a s conflicting classes o n Tuesday
Wise, '39; orchestra, H a r r i e t Green,
or Thursday, they a r e requested t o
'39; refreshments, L e a h Mekeel a n d
get i n touch with D r . S m i t h i m Hope Sweet, seniors; decorations,
mediately, so t h a t a r r a n g e m e n t s can
Philomena I a n n o t t i , '40.
be made.
Sigma Alpha: general c h a i r m a n ,
It is necessary t h a t t h e e>am be Adeline Kadgis, '41; refreshments,
given a t this time so t h a t junior Rose Ritter, '40, c h a i r m a n , Hilda
schedules m a y be m a d e o u t . As Ashman, '40, Betty Hiller, '41; p r o soon a s t h e e x a m i n a t i o n is finished, grams, Justine H e r m a n n , '39, Agnes
preceptors will be announced.
Bennett, Lorraine Patterson, a n d
This e x a m i n a t i o n is being given Mary Dunning, freshmen.
for t h e first time, instituting t h e
P h i L a m b d a : music, Mabel F a r new system of t h e social studies rell, '39; decorations, J e a n e t t e Lawdepartment. Only sophomore c a n - son, '39; invitations, Mildred L a didates are t o be permitted e n t r a n c e brum, '40; programs. Betty Hardie,
to t h e exam.
'40; clean-up, Mildred Leach, '39.
The new p r o g r a m devised under
the direction of D r . S m i t h is d e signed to meet the individual needs
Flowers for t h e Weekend
of students. Since t h e c o m p r e h e n sive test will cover every phase of
the social studies field, it will r e veal w h a t phases t h e s t u d e n t knows
K I, O B I S T S
the least about, a n d t h e preceptor
will advise h i m to take courses along
li. Frledliinilor, 'S9 I,. KowulNky, 'ID
these lines in t h e future.
Melanson Reports Total
Of Dormitory Pledges
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and Grill
ARKAY
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198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
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pleasure
. V, W .V.', *.V AVAV >.". V A
V><
mmr
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to the Chesterfield factories see the
infinite care with which the world's
best tobaccos are combined to give
you Chesterfield's can't-be-copied
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It is this wonderful blend that
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THEY SATISFY
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Everything s
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Copyxiglu 1939,
llGWsn & Mines TODM <0 Co,
iX\
-^
State College-N^ws
EXTRA EDITION
STATE
COLLEGE
FOR TKACIIKKS,
ALBANY,
N.
Y.,
MONDAY,
APRIL
24,
""^Vjpi/^jp^li
1939
STUDENT BODY WILL PROTEST BUDGET CUT!
Friday Assembly
Protests Budget
Slash by State
President
of
Explains
Money
LEADERS
O F STUDENT
PROTEST
ACTION
President B r u b a c h e r Will Excuse 11:00 o'Clock Classes
to Allow Organization of Student Protest;
Edge a n d Friedlander to Lead
SPECIAL
Students
to
Revision
COMMITTEE
T O MEET
A T NINE
O'CLOCK
Will C o n d u c t M o c k I n t e r v i e w of a L e g i s l a t o r
E x p l a i n Details of S t u d e n t P r o c e d u r e
at State Capitol Session T o n i g h t
Allotment
T h i s morning, all 11 o'clock classes will be dismissed to enable students to a t t e n d the special assembly called by J o h n Edge, president of the
S t u d e n t association, for t h e purpose of further considering t h e budget
budget revision bill. At t h e meeting, plans will be discussed concernDr. Abram R. Brubacher, presi^ i n g the method of procedure t h a t the
dent, appeared before t h e .student
/I
II
IT
1 111
student, body will follow tonight a t
body last Friday to di.selose the presI nnHll/n
N A ^ H D I I
" " ' Legislature, a n d additional i n ent crisis in the S l a t e college budget
VilllUljll, llUIUCU
formation which the special protest
as affected by t h e proposed budget
committee h a s been investigating
now before t h e legislature of the
will be presented.
S t a l e of New York. Taking precedent over all scheduled business, the
Tonight the entire s t u d e n t body
president pointed out t h e effect of
will a t t e n d t h e evening session of
the 8 V ! cut on both maintenance
the Legislature. Only t h e delegates
and personnel a n d urged the stuM u s i c C o u n c i l W i l l S p o n s o r chosen to represent their respective
dents to form protesting associations.
counties will interview their senaProduction of ' M i k a d o '
Dr. Robert Rienow. instructor In
tors a n d assemblymen, b u t every
social studies, supplemented the
Thursday, Fridav
student is urged to be present. T o president by stating t h a t it was not
| morrow I h e protest committee will
only t h e duty b u t the right of all
In response to popular request {again go down to t h e Capitol to
s t u d e n t s to protest t h e budget.
J o h n Edge, '39. president of t h e S t u d e n t association, a n d Leonard " T h e Mikado" by Gilbert a n d S u l - finish up a n y business t h a t is n o t
Friedlander, '39, president of Debate council, who have organized t h e livan will once more be given on completed tonight a n d to further
Explains Budget C u t
T h e president, showed how thecurrent movement to protest Lire proposed budget cut of State college. State's stage by the Operatic society | investigate t h e pending budget r e proposed cut would mean the dis- Edge will conduct the special meeting of t h e Student association today in conjunction with Music council, i vision bill.
T h e presentation will take place 111 1 A l
morning's
assembly,
missal of a t least twelve members at 11:10 o'clock.
Uli.s
the auditorium of Page hall T h u r s - "mock Interviews" will be presented
of t h e faculty a n d a slash of $5,100
day a n d Friday evenings a t 8:30in order to demonstrate how one
from t h e $00,000 m a i n t e n a n c e fund.
o'clock.
With the smaller appropriation State
should go about interviewing his
college would accept only two h u n T h e members of t h e Operatic so- senator a n d assemblyman tonight.
dred freshmen out of nine hundred
ciety, a o n e - h o u r course, have worked
Committee to Make Report
applicants next year. At present
the entire school year u n d e r t h e
T h e committee appointed a t F r i three h u n d r e d a r e accepted each
direction of Dr. T. F . H. Candlyn, day's special meeting a t 4:30 o'clock
year. No transfer students would
assistant professor of music, a n d h a s been making investigations conbe taken a n d t h e enrollment would
J o h n Nordell, '3D, to reproduce this cerning t h e bill a n d will make its
(As
a
result
oj
tin
Stair
cnllegi
muss
meeting
tit
4:.?0
o'clock
be reduced to less t h a n one thousand.
operetta which met with such great report in assembly today on t h e
president,
lias written the following success a t its first presentation here decisions made a t their D:0() o'clock
Acting immediately on Dr. Bru- Friday, Dr. Abram R. hrubuchcr,
in March, 1935.
bacher's suggestion, J o h n
Edge,
meeting this morning. T h e special
president of the s t u d e n t association, open letter jor this extra edit inn of I hi N'KWS.j
T h e play, Nordell has explained, is committee includes: J o h n
Edge,
called a special meeting of the stu"truly Gilbert-Sullivan" with its gay president "of the S t u d e n t association;
dents for 4:30 o'clock to further
ll is a heaitening" e x p e r i e n c e in see i h e intense interest of t h e| light music a n d complicated b u t Leonard Friedlander. president of
organize t h e protest drive a n d to
humorous plot. T h e scene Is laid Debute council; Richard Lonsdale,
obtain more information on the S l a t e college s t u d e n t b o d y in t h e processes of s t a l e g o v e r n m e n t . in picturesque old J a p a n in the days J e a n Strong, Beflv Hayford, J . Edmethods to be employed, Edge then
when young men. especially of t h e more Melanson, seniors;
Robert
appointed Leonard Priedlander, '39, Y o u r i m m e d i a t e interest is m o t i v a t e d b y t h e d e s t r u c t i v e effects of
royal court, did not marry beneath j Cogger, speaker of t h e F o r u m of
and Robert Cogger, '40, to assist the proposed budget on o u r own college but mil ol ibis will ^I'IIW,
lheir station.
I Politics; Janice Friedman, Frederic
him in getting the drive under way
Weed, juniors; and Louise Snell, '41.
Favorites Return in Lead
and in choosing t h e remainder of I a m confident, a p e r m a n e n t c o n c e r n for t h e welfare of t h e people
To Interview Legislators
the committee.
A few of tlie leading parts will
t h r o u g h (lie m i n i s t r a t i o n s of g o v e r n m e n t .
:be enacted by old favorites. Charles
Tonight the entire college will
Special Meeting
In considering the p r e s e n t s l a t e b u d g e t , s o u will d o well l o l a k e Matthews,
'37, w h o played In Journey to t h e Legislature, while t h e
Handbills with Information on the
"H.M.S, Pinafore" in 193G and "The representatives of the various counbudget were passed out as the stu- for g r a n t e d t h e right m o t i v e s of those w h o present it. T h e legisdents filed in for the special assem- lative leaders a r e s e e k i n g e c o n o m y because I hey believe e c o n o m y Sorcerer" last year returns in the ties will attempt to secure interI male
lead,
Nankl-Pooh.
David views with their respective senators
bly. After calling t h e meeting to
W e a g r e e j K r o m a n who came back last year and assemblymen. S t u d e n t are a d oider. Edge thanking the students, is now a f u n d a m e n t a l need of t h e people ol t h e s t a l e .
who occupied t h e whole main floor, with them in lheir d e s i r e lo live within o u r m e a n s .
W e believe lo appear In "The Sorcerer" is r e - ' v i s e d t h a i the best time to sec their
turning to take p a r t in the o p e r e t t a . ' s e n a t o r s Is between 7:00 a n d 8:00
for Lheir cooperation. He then outlined the following plan of action: however llial I he budget is ill-conceived, unscientific, a n d d e s t r u c t i v e I The female love Interest. Y u m - Y u m , j o'clock In t h e evening,
will be played by C a t h e r i n e Krien,
Tlie recommendations for t h e
All s t u d e n t s were Lo write home to tlie best itilcresis of t h e people.
'39.
Other members of t h e cast' budget
revision
proposition
will
to their parents a n d to ask them
Kdiiraiion is i n d i s p e n s a b l e in a d e m o c r a c y .
are Robert Karpeii a n d C h a r l o t t e [ probably be presented in t h e leg Islo voice then protest. These proNielson, juniors; K a t h r i n e Happel | lature lonight. but 11 is difficult to
tests could be m a d e most effective by
Well e d u c a t e d t e a c h e r s must be t h e firs I c o n s i d e r a t i o n ,
and Donald Ames, seniors; Carol j say when the bill will be acted
the use of three methods:
T h e high schools a r e b u i l d e r s of c i t i z e n s h i p .
Golden a n d Clarence Olsen, sopho- upon. I n t h e meantime, Edge a n d
1. Writing letters to assemblyhave
been
making
T h e S l a t e College for T e a c h e r s is t h e s t a l e ' s i n s t r u m e n t a l i t y mores; a n d a chorus of forty-eight Friedlander
men and senators.
members,
[negotiations for obtaining t h e u s 2. P u n n i n g their own protest1
for t h e e d u c a t i o n of high school t e a c h e r s .
Cotincil Heads Arrangements
sis timet of one senator, who will
lug organizations.
Arrangements for the presentation make tlie necessary motion for putT h e S l a t e College for T e a c h e r s m a i n t a i n s educational s t a n d a r d s
:i. (lei ling Parent -Teacher Ashave been under Ihe direction of U'llB S t a l e college's $30,000 approsocial ions a n d similar organi/.aihai h a w wnii t h e emphatic a p p r o v a l of all t h e highest s t a n d a r d i z - Music council. General c h a i r m a n is
l s prlallon back on (lie1 budget.
lions |o protest.
Elizabeth Baker. '39, assisled by
T h e students of .State college were ing agent ies of Amcrii a.
the following committees: tickets,
In form protesting associations a c Nominates
T h e S t a t e College for T e a c h e r s cannot m a i n t a i n these s t a n d a r d s Alice Brown, '40, and Carolyn M a t - A s s e m b l y
cording lo counties. Meetings of each
A
s
s
o
c
i
a
tion
Officials
lice.
'39;
publicity,
Lillian
Rivklnd,
u
n
d
e
r
t
h
e
d
r
a
s
t
i
c
budget
c
u
t
s
proposed,
county were to be held after the
•III, a r r a n g e m e n t s , Lima Powell a n d
As pari ol ihe business of last F r i special meeting lo choose two or
lis library c a n n o t be m a i n t a i n e d :
Rosemary
Brucker,
sophomores; day's assembly, nominations were
three Irom each group to represent
sets, Carol Golden, '41; m a k e - u p , made for student association officers
Its l a b o r a t o r i e s bet o m e ineffective:
Ihein before lliejr assemblymen and
Marion Mlnst. 'Ill); a n d lights, Wil- lor Ihe year 1939-40. T h e followsenators lonight.
Its faculty b e c o m e s d e m o r a l i z e d ;
liam liogiisla, "ill
ing is a II.M ol i h e nominees:
Tickets may be secured Monday
11- eiliu at ioiial ei|iiipnicni delerioi a l e s .
President: Joseph Mclveon, Lloyd
D a n dA Will Present
through Friday ol next week in Ihe Kelley, Robert Cogger, Rita SulliIts school nl l e a c h i n g p r a c t i c e is p a r a l y z e d :
rotunda.
Admission
for
students
is
Traveling
Troubadours
van. Roswell Fairbanks, Albert P a r k Ihe student lax ticket, lea' outsiders er. Waller Harper, Waller Simmons,
lis i e n her s t u d e n t ratio becomes indefensible;
On Tuesday evening at H:30 o'clock
$.50, T h e r e will be no reserved seats. Juniors.
In Page hall auditorium, Dramatics
Its place a m o n g tin- college's of America is c o m p r o m i s e d .
Betty
Baker
announced
that
and An association will present Joan
Vice-president:
Slophen
Bull,
You a r e justified in d e m a n d i n g of t h e budget officials that t h e ushers will be chosen Irom the
and Belly Rtiynor, troubadours, In a
Stanley Smith, Roy McCreary, S t e freshmen
iryouts
for
Music
counvaried program of ballads, songs, leg- c e n n o n n which is sought shall not d e s l r o \ t h e institution, T h e
phen Kiisuk. C a t h e r i n e
O'Hryun,
cil.
ends, d r a m a s , dances and mime.
Louise Snell, Merrill W a l r a t h , sophocollege b u d g e t s between l'-MO a n d I'Msi h a s been p a r e d to t h e very
Among
ihe
members
of
ihe
chorus
Like the HI rolling Players of olden
mores.
times who acted, sang, and fold their bone each year. T h i s t u t of m o r e i h a u S ' •_, <; , in c u t l i n g the faculty are Kuy Adams, Madeline Berg, HelS e c r e t a r y ; Joseph Lurko. Maxon
en
Bernard,
Marlon
Dayton,
Malvlnu
stories In t h e palaces of Europe, d o w n , u n d e r m i n e s t h e very s t r u c t u r e of t h e college a n d will d e s t r o y
Grossman, Christine Ades, Hiiuh Reeves, William Matthews, Virgil
these two girls have traveled from
Scull, Ralph Tlbbotts, Paul Merritt,
the p o i n t s of s t r e n g t h o n which t h e r e p u t a t i o n of t h e college rests. Foote, Faye Fornmn, Richard Rlbner,
country to country.
Joseph Rowland, K e n n e t h Doran, Alice Packer, Ira Hlrsch, freshmen.
M a y we not hope, s t u d e n t s a n d faculty t o g e t h e r , t h a t t h e legislature Neil Fogurty, Leonard F r e e m a n , und
Mr, George M. York, professor of
Poatpones Seoul Meeting
will in is wisdom, r e c o n s i d e r i t s work aial restore those sources of Edmore Melanson, seniors; Nelson commerce, was unanimously reelectDue lo tlie special assembly, t h e
Keublos, grad.; Claribel Doihsler, ed a s tlie faculty member of Finance
Boy Scout meeting, regularly sched- s t r e n g t h in which we believe I lit* people of t h e s t a l e h a v e c a u s e for Bernice Martowicz, J e a n Mitchell, Board.
uled for tills noon, is postponed until p r i d e a n d confidence?
Isubel Raniel, Stilly Young, B a r b a r a
Voting will lake place according
T h u r s d a y noon a n d will be in room
Van P a t t e n , J e a n De Fillppo, Rose to tlie new procedure a t a time speciDr. A b r a m R. Brubacher, President.
200.
Flore, juniors.
fied by Mysktuiiti.
to State
College
i, Nordell
Direct Operetta
President Sends Open Letter
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