State College ews Anti-War Group To Be Sponsors Of Discussion

advertisement
State College
VOL.
XXI, Xo. 8
Anti-War Group
To Be Sponsors
Of Discussion
College Students Will Attend
Chancellors Hall Forum
Thursday Night
Tin1 cnpilnl district branch of the
Foreign
Policy
association
will
sponsor its fiftieth discussion meeting Thursday ill 8:110 o'clock in
Clinncellurs luilt,
Speakers mi I lie
subject, "Tliu I'nited States find tlie
World C r i s i s " , will he Ralph liobcy,
Bruce 1311 ven and Dorothy Dolzor.
.Mr. Kolii'v is the economic advisor
to (lie American Cyitnnmid company,
lecturer on hanking nf Columliin
university ami aullior nf " RnosevoH
versus Recovery'',
Mr. 13 liven is
Hie presidenl ami editor of ' ' The
New R e p u b l i c " ; ami New Vork correspondent for ' ' T h e
Manchester
Guariliau''.
Miss Delzer attended
the Brussels Pence congress and is
executive secretary of Ihe Women's
International League.
College students In the capital district will have the opportunity to
meet in discussion, Thursday at
4:0(1 o'clock in the Westminster
church. Dr. I.elaml M. Goodrich, de
purtmciit of social ami political
science of Brown university, will lead
the subject: " Vouth ami the World
Crisis' 1 . Dr. Goodrich has just returned from a year's study in
Europe.
Admission for students will be
twenty-live cents. A sliidcnl membership for one dollar admits one In the
Thursday meeting of the institute,
Tickets will be on sale at Chancellors
hull Thursday or will be mailed on
receipt of a chock made payable to
the Foreign Policy association.
The Foreign Policy association and
cooperating associations, which have
their headquarters at the City Club
in Albany, sponsor this discussion
on the United .Slates in the world
today.
All students are urged to
attend the group meetings.
Attention,
Want
Co-eds!
to Suit Men?
( Hi/ .Ixsiiritlti it Cnlh(/i<llc I'ns.s)
Certain hints have reached the
NEWS which State women should
appreciate. Resigning themselves
In the impossibility of escaping
women, and trying to facilitate
mutters for the girls, the men of
Northwestern University proffer
these humble suggestions In co-eds.
I, Wear a delicate perfume;
otherwise he's liable In think
there's u stray cat in your purse.
1'. lie nice to tlm poor boy.
A I'ter all it 's his money,
.'I. I Ion '| stall liim nil' ton long ;
he might mil come aniiiml again.
I. When Im asks you fur a kiss,
don 'I say, ' ' ()h, you 'II spoil my
make up ' '. If yon do Im '« apt
really In spoil your » hole make up.
D, Wear a gund, llavured lip
slick, and, by all means, nne that
(•nines nil'.
He likes In KIIHW il
In I he Imys u hen he gets hnine.
II. I leu 'I order milk u hen the
nl hers
are
11.' i s iue,
high hulls.
Order 1'iill'ee,
H e ' l l SIIM
nicer
longer.
7. I inn 'i lake his I'ralernil \ pin
serinush . He i|nemi 'l.
K. Don 'I say ' 'good uighl " i l l
l-:,ln mi a mm o'clock night,
He 's liable to say ' 'goodbye ' ' In
ynu.
II. D o n ' t l u l k about other lei
lows when you 're with him.
Men
are funny uboul that.
STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY,
Dr. Sprague to Speak
At Today's
Assembly
The program of this morning's
assembly will feature an address
by Dr. H. A. Sprague, president
of Mnnlclnir Teacher's college,
Montclnir, New Jersey, and president op the American Association of Teachers' Colleges.
At the next week's assembly
the second business meeting of
the student association for this
year will be conducted. This is
in accord with the by-law passed
by the assembly last year making nne assembly in every six a
business meeting.
Also at nexl week's assembly,
balloting will be conducted to
determine the delegate to the
X.S.F.A, conference in Dallas,
Texas, to be conducted during
the Christmas recess. The nominees are Dorothy Cain, Richard
Cox, Warren Densmore, Janet.
Dibble, Herbert Drooz, and Leslie Knox, juniors.
Open Letter Asks
More 'Big' Bands
Seniors Acclaim Hop Success,
Urge Noted Orchestras
At Other Dances
The possibility of having big
' • n a m e ' ' bands at State college
formals was pointed nut in an upon
letter In Ihe .N'HU'S from the officers
of the senior class. The Senior Hop
was II social and financial success, the
letter staled, and indicates that, larger
mid more prominent bands at State's
formals would improve attendance
ami also make the students mure
interested in I heir dances.
The open letter reads as follows:
To ilm IM it or, STATU COLLEGE N E W S :
Senior Hop last Friday night
proved a point that has been argued
ever since Statu college had its first
formal dance. The point under contention was thai if dance committees
were willing to invest, money in an
expensive ' ' n a m e ' ' band and a suitable location, the students of the
college would support the class sponsoring the dance.
The senior class dance committees
overran their budget by one hundred
and twenty-five dollars in order to
secure an excellent inchest ra and an
attractive selling for the dance.
Now, however, they can point with
pride to the largesl altenduuce a
Senior Hop has ever had, at least as
far back us records show. The result
is a prnlil In the class of approximately thirty dollars.
The presence of a nationally known
orchestra at a State college dance
was a departure from the ordinary,
but the system under which Ihe dance
was conducted was also an innovation.
If it had been run true to
form the resull would probably have
been a twenty dollar loss to the
class.
So here's In bigger and belter
s t a t e cullege I'lirinalsl
We may
never get in Hie (inodmnn Cast! Loma
class, but a demand for honestly ami
elliciently conducted dances will re
-all in affairs to uhich we will be
prniiil in invite our friends from
larger colleges,
SENIOR ('LASS O F F I C E R S .
N. Y., FRIDAY,
Moreland Names
Activity Officer
13,1936
$2.00 Per Year, 32 Weekly Issues
THEATRICAL STAR
Muggleton To Run Mimeograph And Assist In Survey Of Student Affairs
The student association will have
a Studeul Affairs secretary under tho
National Youth administration, Dean
Helen Hall Moreland announced this
week. The secretary, who will assist
in a. survey of student affairs and
operate the new student association
mimeograph, is Joseph Muggleton,
'HI).
The secretary's first major task
will be the tabulation of questionnaires on student extra-class affairs to
be conducted in next Friday's assembly, the second student association
business meeting. The questionnaire
will ask details on student participation in college affairs and work for
college expenses, and the material
will be placed on individual file cards
in the dean of women's office.
These files, whicli will be added to
for the completion op each student's
college career, will be available to the
point system committee, college publications, faculty, and individual sfudenls who wish to consult their past
record in exl ra class affairs.
The
olliee already has similar data for
last year.
The sludeiit association mimeograph, purchased last week for
^IIKI.Oll in accordance with a resolution passed lasl spring, will be at
the disposal of all student activities
for a small charge which will cover
the cost of ink. Activities not on the
.student association budget will pay
a nominal Pee in addition, This money
will be used as a repair and contingency fund for the machine.
The student activity using the
mimeograph will secure and cut its
own stencils. All stencils must he
approved by John Demi, president of
I ho student association, and I hen
turned over to Muggleton.
Group
houses, sororities, fraternities, and
nil college groups may have (ho use
of the machine.
Alumni Announces Issue
Of Quarterly Magazine
This year's second ibsue op tho
".New York Stale College Alumni
Q u a r t e r l y " was published this week.
Mrs. K'unice 11. Mossont, '--, instructor in English, is editor of the publication and AlPred Trehnnoii, '.'!8, is
undergraduate editor.
The Quarterly contains articles
and news of State college and State
college alumni. Correspondence and
features, contributed by outstanding
alumni, reveal their experiences in
teaching and related Holds,
Aie ynu afraid of walking under
ladders, or of having a black cal
cross your path? If ynu are none of
these timid souls, you lime plenty of
company, according In the iiifnriun
linn gleaned from the recent inquiry concerning the pel hiijMTHti
lions of State sludcnls.
John b'yan, ','17, says he hasn't
lime to lime a pel superstition.
When Ihe basket ball squad of
worry for John!
Miirjorie llaird, 'Id, (old (he reporter that she always picks up pins
and tilings mil pearly pins with
Greek letters, perchance V
Pel superstitions may even be
practical. Agnes Turrens, ','i7, wellknown punster, says, " I
always
throw sail over my left shoulder -
Blanche Yurka
To Appear Here
Monday Night
Dramatics and Art Council
To Sponsor Appearance
Of Noted Star
Miss Blanche V'urka, stage and
screen star, will present a varied
selection of characterizations in Pago
hall auditorium on Monday night at
8:30 o'clock. Miss Yurka appears
under the sponsorship of the Dramatic and Art association and will
be presented by Elizabeth Meury,
'37, president.
Blanche Yurka as Madame Dei'arge in the motion picture
" A Tnle of Two Cities". Miss
Ytllkii will appear in Page hall
auditorium Mondnv night.
Publication Aims
To Arouse Youth
Authorities Point Out Faults
of American Democracy
and Corrections
" T o present squarely the problems American Democracy Paces. . . .
To gel young men and women in the
colleges lighting mad at the rot,
cant, hypocrisy in government and
in politics . . . ' ' , was the declared
purpose of the recent election issue
of the " N a t i o n a l Student M i r r o r , "
official organ of flic National Student Federation of America.
This quarterly magazine may be
secured by members of the student
body in the library or in the Co-op
where il is nil sale.
Endeavoring to awaken the youth
op the nation to the stagnation
which exists in nur government,
several authors wrote articles pointing mil the faults and the necessary
corrections to be made in our .system.
Herbert Agar, author, and editor
of
the "Louisville
Courier-Journ a l " , points out that today, twenty
years after Ihe World War, " t h e
liberal democracy is held in disrespect over most of the earth—
scorned, ami satirized, and accused
uf hypocrisy."
The author urges
Ihe people to disregard such demagogues us Hearst, who paints Communism as a " b e a r d e d m a d m a n , "
and West brook Pegler, who paints
Fascism :IH a " t e m p o r a r y relapse op
democracy."
Student Body Endorses Using
Horseshoes and Rabbits' Feet
Seniors Will Direct
thirteen muuibei'H has prueiiee mi
Milne Christmas Plays Friday ihe thirteenth, (lull's enough
I 'lirisl mas play s in Millie
High
school w i l l be directed by Alice A l lard, Elizabeth Meury, ami Rea La
Crua,
seniors.
These
ilranuitic.
presenlaliiins, ' ' T h e Birthday of Ihe
InPnnla " ,
" The
Forks
of
the
D i l e n i a " , and " T h e Vanishing Princess" w i l l be presented ill Page hull
nil Deceinber I I,
NOVEMBER
ews
when I 'm standing with my back to
my Pood,"
I lick Margison, '.'17, has a very in
vol veil supers! itiou, which
is a
deep-sealed fear of eating cracker
under an umbrella on a sunny day,
Sissy!
Max
Sykes,
'III, gnve Us fond
for
though! when In. said emphatically,
' ' My pel superst itiou 1 I lime on
supi'i'si il inns about p e l l l n g . " I'roily
wise i'l'nsh!
The opinion of the Alumni b'esi
dcllce halls was given by Xorillll
Dixon, "AH, who confessed, ' ' I always
keep my lingers crossed when I think
something bad might h a p p e n . "
The general consensus of opinion
is Hint you should never walk under
a black cat, ami never let a ladder
cross your path unless you are carry
iug six horseshoes in each pocked.
Reserved seats are on sale in the
box office in Page hall at $1,00 and
•ill.50. Mail orders should be sent to
Elizabeth Meury at State college.
Telephone orders may lie arranged
through the Activities office, 5-9373.
Tickets can also be purchased at VanCurler's on State street until Monday night. Students wishing to attend Ihe perfomanco must exchange
tax tickets today.
Miss V'urka has earned her reputation on the legitimate stage. Determined to study under the best man
in the field, she finally succeeded in
becoming a pupil of Uelasco.
She displayed magnificent persistence in her efforts to have " L y s i s ( r a t a " produced. After seven years
she was successful, and her performance was excellent. Miss Yurka has
played Ibsen more frequently and
better, according to some critics,
than anyone on the contemporary
stage.
Miss V'urka says herself: " I believe in being versatile. Sane people
make enormous successes playing
themselves over and over again. More
power to them! But 1. shouldn't enjoy doing Hint."
The characterizations she will assume Monday night are taken Prom
her more successful plays. Her program consists of selections from
Ibsen's " I l e d d a d a b b l e r " , Maxwell
Anderson's "Elizabeth the Queen",
"Romeo and J u l i e t " , " E l e c t r o " ,
and " L y s i s t r a t a ' .
Her performance as Madame DePargc in " The Tale of Two C i t i e s "
was a contrast to the jolly nurse in
"Romeo and J u l i e t " . The outburst
op Theresa Defnrge, Ihe revengeful
peasant, was acclaimed tho greatest
ovation ever given on a set.
Miss V'urka says of her first experience in the moving-picture world,
" T h e role in my first picture was one
of the most interesting in my career.
Interesting because of the terrific
deliberation, the deadly calm of tho
woman up to the moment the storm
breaks.''
In the past few mouths Miss Yurka
lias been making appearances in many
colleges throughout the country.
Kappa Phi Kappa Takes
Nine into Membership
Six seniors ami three juniors were
inducted into membership of Kappa
Phi Kappa, national education fraternity, Inst night.
Those initialed were: Thomas Cunningham, Ahnizn Ilu Mont, John Edwards, Frederick Molinnan, Frederick
Slunt, Harry Wheeler, seniors; and
Frank llildobraut, Leslie Knox, and
Thomas Ryan, junior*.
After the initiation service a banquet was i
Ineled a( Ainslee flowi l l ' s Restaurant, Washington avenue,
Dr. Warren Cox, head op research
work in the s i a t e Education department, addressed the group, and
Thonuis Meehun, ';i7 reported on the
national convention held in Birmingham, Alabama, three weeks ago, The
fraternity honored Dr, Beik for his
twenty years op service to State college.
Page 2
State College News
Rntnl>llihc<! by tho Clan of WIS
Thn umlorgradtinto Newspaper of New York State
College for Teacher*
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 13, 1936
The Commentstater
Wo have always folt, along with tho history department, tho Driafl of Women, arid other prominent State
I'uhllNliiMl every Friday of the college year by the Nmws collegians, that something should be done about the
Board representing the Student AtaocUtlon
deplorable lack of interest in world affairs on the p a r t
Telephones: Ofllea, 5-1*373; (iuniaor, 2-04S*; Dexter,
of State students, Therefore we feel by duty bound
S-4:iH; Sold, •J-KTill; Gaylord, 24314
Bnlirid at secemt class malltr in tk* Albany, A'. Y„ poslofflct to announce to the world in general, but State in particular, that gront doings are about to break in Albany.
Tho Foreign Policy association and the League of
Nations group are putting on a show. We take it for
THE NEWS BOARD
granted thai you have heard of these organizations.
HAIWV T, GUMAKII
Editor-in-Chief
The point of all this is that, if you arc interested
Puiro E. DKXTKK
Managing Editor in youth and the world crisis, or if yon feel you should
WAKUKN I. DBNHMORK
Assooiate Managing Editor 1)0 Interested, turn up at the Westminster church to
DAVID I). SMITH
Assooiato Managing Editor hear more about the subject, as told by Dr. Goodrich.
Sorinn WOI.ZOK.
Associate Managing Editor Thursday at four.
No need to be shy—all Capital District colleges will
LAURITA WKI.D
Business Manager
CHAUI.KS W. GAYLORD
i&vtrtitfng Manager he represented, Tho meeting's bound to bo interesting
M11.DRKD E, NuiiiTiNDAi.K
Circulation Manager as well a s informative; in fact, we'll guarantee you a
rousing good time. I t ' s j u s t the place to bring up
those international problems you've always heard so
much about, but never fully understood.
THE NEWS STAFF
*
*
«
*
State's Stage
"Ay2 Star" Directors and Seven Other Stars
A Dozen Blackballs for Certain People
PLAYGOERAnd here's the tally sheet for the plays of a week ago Thursday:
Four and a <alf stars ('tops' to you) to Janice Nierman and
Sally Whelan for two of the finest productions Advanced
Dramatics has ever done.
Four stars apiece to actors Libnian, Cassavant, Kelly, Dittman;
three and seven-eighths to Lichenstein, Zubres, Dixon.
One blackball apiece for certain prominent upperclassmen who
just had to laugh out loud at some of the lines, and the same
for the freshman girls who thought it was smart to giggle with
them
* *##
|
Statesman
We wondered just how Miss Nierninn would direct her clever play/ and
we were pleased with the way she
did it. Her characters wore well
What a setting! what an orsuited to their parts,
Charlotte Libnian and Jean Lich- chestra! We offer a jolly red orchid
enstein were equally well poised and to the bright lad who secured the
OHAUI.KS N . MORRIS
Sports
Editor
At the same time, let us put in n good word for ideally cast.
Moth voices were well Ten Eyek for Hop. Congratulations,
11 KI.KN CI.YDK
Women's S[>orts Editor Blanche Yurka. The Dramatics and Arts council brings
A t last your increased
fitted to their suavely cutting re- Seniors!
budget
d
i
d
n
' t leave you in the hole.
to us the best talent possible. Remember that it is marks, although
Associate
Editors
Jean
sometimes
for our own Interests that they come, and support them slurred words and d i d n ' t give the We're hopping you enjoyed Hope,
Klir.abotJi Hooding, Mary Lam, Robert Margisou,
to the best of your ability,
Virginia Stool) seniors; Muriel Goldberg,
impression of listening to her inner too—or a r e we hoping you enjoyed
Hop';
We're not sure, just ran
Knuiona Van Wie, juniors
spirit.
down sixteen flights of stairs with
Miss
Libnian
should
have
more
Armistice
Hay
is
over.
We
were
most
grateful
for
Jiusiness Staff
Millie,
Warren,
Helen,
Jimmie,
Business, Grace Castigliouo, Roland Waterman; adver- the holiday. Hut we wonder at the reasoning, which parlor hostess parts, since her voice Lizette, Bob, etc. We c a n ' t count;
and poise are just fitted for them.
in
an
ngt?
in
which
the
majority
of
the
world's
poputising] Joaa Hyroti, Gordon Tabnerj circulation,
Florence Zubres did well but so figure us out.
lation are pleading for peace, allows young boys of
Victoria Hil/.i, Margaret Horn, Juno Palmer
We started off strong . . . and
elementary and high school age to parade in uniform seemed a little tense at times, as opand with guns. Perhaps i t ' s the result of a perverted posed to the easy, gradual perform- this time we're telling no Phibbs
ance of Edith Cassavant.
The . . . or maybe she's not the niarion
PlUNTKl) 1IY BoYD PulXTlNtl CO., INC., AlJUXV, N . V. sense of humor.
kind. This Cornell stuff is shearer
Put to mark with such display of militarism tho an- latter brought out her climax slowly,
nonsense . .
And did you notice
and
just
as
gradually
withdrew
into
niversary ,,t' a day when no supposedly rejoice that the
Alice's bow? Dexter minst-ed along,
war of wars was ended seems poor judgment, herself. She was very graceful, and
Death Is So Permanent
gave us a definite spirit-like feeling forgetting his first semester pledge.
to say the least.
We noticed, on the afternoon of
as she trailed Miss Libnian. We So did a lot of others. McGraw now
Armistice
day,
a
group
o(
s
i
\
year
olds
imitating
their
t)ur Armistice Day thoughts are »liulo bit
weighs less than normal since he
elders.
With all the paraphernalia of flags, toy liked Miss Cassavant's voice, and
wistful.
swung to those last hot tunes, i Probwant
to
hear
it
again
on
Page's
trumpets, and pop gnus, they inarched gravely about
The world is spending nine billion dollars on the streets. The} seemed as intent in their purpose stage. Miss Zubres had a tendency lem: We wonder if sliultees him
about
that.)
Pisa
looked
very
arms this year. The United States, most securely as. no doubt, the regiments of 1917 and 1P1S were, to slip in and out of character.
The clash of the spirits at the end heavenly a s she murmured, " H a r k ,
almost
twenty
years
ago.
Wo
hurried
on.
placed of all the nations, is letting its war budwas quite vital, but we wondered The Harold Angels S i n g . "
gets go up to a peace-time record: 1984, $479,Can it be the elevators weren't
if the Libnian Lichenstein farewell
Tlic second of our assembly sings was conducted last
000,000; 1985,1588,000,000; 1986, $744,000,000;
goodiug enough'.' We wonder if she
wasn't exaggerated a little bit.
Fiiday. The volume was somewhat weak, the words
The movements of this play were seld the cart before the horse. Min.1937. $990,000,000.
of some of the songs were known by few, and the worked out carefully, ami showed it. I nie happy returns, Bob. In fact we
A fiery brand of patriotism, based upou the I inies by less. The N'KWS has expressed its opinion F.veii the smallest detail, such as the j hope everyone's happy.
notion that a state which men have created is from time to time on the subject of singing at .Slate. sipping of the
Can't the girls pick at least two
couples to remain " a t h o m e " all
more important than those who created it, is Wo voice our hearty approval of singing, whether solo, accuratelv.
group, or mass (we except oratorios in the Activities
evening at house dances': It 's diseating at the common sense of many peoples.
office'.
Hut, in future assemblies, what wo mean is.
It was not the fault of the direc- concerting to visit another house and
Ami yet the picture is a little brighter than let's sin;;. Not sit in our seats, and move our mouths to tor or the east that the second play find none of the original members
create the illusion of singing.
Let 's learn both the
House about exchanging a
that.
gut oft" to an unfortunate start. An there.
words and the tune. A bit of eld-fashioned sentence
In 17S7 New Yorkers were dumping boatloads drill might help. And we were wondering if it would actor cannot do his best when the d a t e ! We're n-f'rod it wasn't kny
to think V.P.I).
of Xew Jersey oysters into the Hudson by hijack- be possible to ask P r . Candlyn to train the chorus in audience starts to laugh at a serious l. s .l o. Phi Pelt seems
Hid the girls have
play, even if the laughter is at lines I
° busy
ing methods to prevent their entry into city ' • s i n g to S.C.T." 1; would provide a nucleus for and not the acting.
ome hand . . . but peanut medians
markets. Two years later the Federal Consti- assembly singing.
Might we suggest that the audience j well . . . Clare the deck, there's more
land ahead: and were the DO's uptution went into effect and the various states
refrain from loud laughter, even if
We think the restrict)
What we really want to
it the singing ot " t i r e a t
agreed to let a central government settle some of
one of the lines of the plai does pnulled.
i r e " an excellent idea
I
know
does
{.'in ami Eva h u h Kva
!
seems
practically
saericoincide
with
ILirdmeyer's
"
I
'
v
e
their economic difficulties.
c-ious to sin;: that *mg in particular on i-iiscs. strict
• to you 1 equal Geneva';
And then
killed
a
m
a
n
!
Students of the world war. including some of i corners, or oilier u propria!? places.
Ham comes a-glenii 011 the morrow—
those who failed to stop it in 1914, tell us that
,
„ ,,
,,., . ,
,
.,.
' " e hear he hnrhows 110 superstitions
In Sal T Whelan s plav,
lorn „, . , , , . , , . ,
, ,. '
war is not inevitable unless you think it so. And
Kelly gave 11
, , ."
about 1,1, but he can t kit us.
they toll us that a little cooperation goes a long
formaiices he has
ever
in- ot
the tuiest per- i n
•
•
way*.
Disappearing is quite a stunt: so
Jinny isn't trying to keep tab, nor is
These hopeful things would lead us to believe
has had toe manv tvpe pan.-, and
, ,•
'
,,,- , , , , , ,
, ' , ,', , ,
,
"» him any more. Warren made it
ive felt that he did the load 111 this , • , •
that enlightened diplomacy and education may
I Kl
y.
,
., ,,
,,,
"is o i s n e u t i s to ciiiov hmiselt, even
plai exceih-ntlv.
His character was ,,
,
,
,
• , .
hand in hand serve to wipe out the tears and
; , , , us
' ,knew
, . the
,
,.1
though
the orchestra left
ear v.
always
r,u . i s 111
And Call It Accident, hi XI
IW1I.H 1,
siistaineitlet throughout
thei nolav.
He
1 ,
, .
..
l.oiij:
\111i, judging trm the looks ot Al's
misapprehensions of a thousand years, and lead un»n», lotwn and Company.. New Y . i k . I'.'.stf.
certainly he was experieiieine
t.-i^C".
bandage, he had a knife 111 the
to a social cooperation that is worldwide. And S3.00.
Kclli had str-'ii^ support in Norma
palmer his ban.I. Who pulled the
1
b\ou.
Her
a..
cut
was
hei
most
if the diplomats and educators need any motivaMts Hell.* L* » ndeV Ut s: l , » . k I• full of
" Take up thy bed and w a l k " trick
noteworthy
a
t
t
r
i
b
u
t
e
;
sl„.
],,
|,|
,|
rotnsi.oe
and
intrigue
as
the
title suggests
tion, lot it be the reminder that was placed on a
And Call
"ii Mm-ris and Ciamma K a p ' T-k,
. eiitinualli.
lies f righteiiisl. aliimst
dangerous New England highway—'"Go Slow— It Accident is an ewiiiug o l d of l i t e anions: the n a u e reactions weie well expressed !sk
1 >. : \ mi iv ant a dai • 11] urt
M'
KllglisJi U p p e r . d a S S o s .
date ' Some additional problems of
i.,
Death Is So Permanent."
l i l i l h StwirhllL'. t h e l t t £ f l l M o l l » ,-llid -Uli.' s t i i i A h c i o
the w.rk : U'hi did Bob and Kddie
t..o rapid w a k a, r
me. inherits a fortune, file* to Umdon to• establish her
travel out to Indian l.ad.br ah.lie
n .1 s t !
t h e end. o f t h e t h i r d
>cif a- an actress, after haling; failed mi&erahly mi flan we notice.!
-.: e " 1 1 A. \ L . and 11 litre did Mai
Public Enemies in Page Hall
New York's stage
In Loudon. Captain Philip Trefane
ills..11 lost1 h is glasses '
Paul Dittm.-in
. it v- hmisi If in
xifcl
ins
chariaiui
wile
lj.is.
-,\\u,
j,ai
,•
found
that
life
L L P ' s broken water main and
At the lirst Advanced Dramatic* plays of the
en ry new plai ! c attcn.pt>
It.
is I'ljx'B-Of. take Kutii and her psiekeltiook under then
the
year, some noise on the part of the audieuee WHO; Philip iissares Ruth tor a fabulous sum of w .1 s esptvuLii , o'lima udilii; in tin : M tn 11 attendant n d lanterns
!.,>! s, cue. As In held tin Pali 1 111 • ' " • mm h excitetneut f„r a v, hil<,
troubled those concerned with the productions
Bey payable to himselfi and inule> her to spend
hut i! failed to impress the dorm.
his
! aiiis
. made us n alu. tin
and rather "burned u p " certain dramatics the summer with hts »ife »nd himself .1! .1 loiieh emotional
KPH, li'PI, and College House held
struggi,
nhi.
!.
lie
was
imi
enthusiasts. Trusting that it would not happen t. osnish castle.
•r.ii'.ng. and sia.e,-,i. •. 111 leailiijj us full sway at the party 1'uesdai night.
There Uve nefarious i'kihp puts into .i,i„.ii Ins p!.-u;« . oglilf-allt ,'i ! !.< ;;:..,• t:.,^,,!\ of tin And now, it' you ask the dorm pr.-si
again, nobody said anything about it. But last
dent when she's 0,01111; to be digniweek's bursts of laughter from the hack of the !•• -rain Kuth's c.-iu-y Thv e i e n t s u.oie s m i t h ami - a 1
held, she'll reply, " O ' b r i e i l by "
evcuiivjjn. *ii».i Kuth !.*. oo.**taiis more than oiiee to
auditorium do warrant public mention
T U P \i w tip s r \ r i :
tee-alt tsw fortuti* teller's "*•:.;;:,; ;,g»ii;s. " vratel t i e
. cii won a f. n niiiuii tivhm. ,-il
Tho Advanced Dramatics class makes a deli and a fai: v„*!i" Tl.ree a t t e m p t s t„ murder her are
Library Tea Is Wednesday
uile attempt to present to tho best c4 its ability !i.*.ie as\i one of vUtck uouid l . s 4 like s strange and , r t rs in t!.,se p.ais who! can ..INOV
U 'eiin '..isi
the future. The
The 1 ibrari school will sponsor s
«ie}>k«a««Je
a,v*dt-Ki
The
return
fruni
An.erl.a
of
amateur stage attractions of value
Flaw* in
tea for ad faculti ami students ill
P x i g i e t . Hwti'* Aiidfe»wd »wi*tbeart AIM) the .. . . . a . , d-.sakes u.-utme, m,.t, than
the production, or lighthoartonlnoss on tho part i,<--•;-e
..»
al.K.l.t, > i « M » . i i i
between
the lounge ,>( li'iehar.lsou hall Wed
dls-Miefy of t^e pj.it >.*,,-, Ruth in tirt,e
Hut theie
"telle* mi : I iais.
ues.iai atleuiouii at ;, : 1.1 „ VhieJl,
©f tho audience, do not justify boisterous action »!v stiiS attsaUtRj nes.'.s before tUe si>.ri ei}4»
The time required Iwliuvn tin
!'li«' tea will lo.ituii' a special exhibit
<\{ any kind at tho plays
Katli's »i«Tt5c t,juj,tiipi.s *t>4 iitd*lieiaWe mi.iKsrrnx
Ih.f.i aad fo.jrlh acts of the sovoud
of books in lumoi o< (!ood Hook luvk.
1
Tho plays, are self-support lag through the : « * ! f»Si *>.vWt i't s{fc»Lhsjg t W liOVel. l»Ul U i l e l e s t i s 1 iai is ssimetlui'.g tike thirty seconds ——
studont budget, and hoeklers will not be mis***.! ».ssS<assNsS Ikj t i e j4*a.»aBtiy sk;4lSin§ evwsu »»d t h e Drill work for ss.ige ,iews. with ,-a.l,
u,„.,, „,, l , o M , , i i ., , , , . , , ,
^
if they stay away Kvoryono who has s ssadeni mffcmvumt itmnts of t b * AtttlMr. MJ>_ !JS»» n-i.-. K*» uwn.be, * » * ^ w d to a definite task iight,,,^ and .,mte a VHC.IIIOV M W « * B
eS»,iine« tim^-ft-xti
mtterini
*»4 t&tv&t it (»veitin» for
las ticket or pays ton coma has a right is m u o , ik* rwadk-r, wJkt« tmi&F* * CttutMMtMR c.f tkutnxlt* and i , . cainevl out HI .he shoitest of ,!», t„ep|,,ee and the eu,t a i« in the
*
*•
*
*
Cover To Cover
hut ttttt a right to abuse tho privilege
a n a s t e a n <$ *rt!«iji.
rtw*. *iU reiuv the „w v««ll
ilsyi of !a»t itvu.
m a scene of ih„ MV,mi, |llsv> u> .
cnu*e of iinpmper curtain iuiihtrg.
Volume V
' NATIONAL
COLLEGE
NEWS
IN
PICTURE
AND
PAR
IMUC 7
Determining drivers
reactions
r
T» A. Tests made on this ma1 C o t chine show scientifically the auto driver's reactions to
speed, vision and muscular control by an intricate series of
lights, gadgets and controls. It's
shown here with its inventor,
Harvard's Dr. Harry R. deSilva.
Acme
Best collegiate testers
T a o f - ^ r c Representatives
J. ao LCI & of 18 colleges and
universities competed in the an*
nual judging contest at Atlantic
City's Dairy Industries Exposition, won this year by the team
from Ohio State University. Contestants are shown tasting butter.
Dunking iiLSr? £ Trnf^- '}&%$$
scene of this ducking party attended
by all New York University freshmen
at the urgent invitation of the sophomores,
l!i«r«.i|lonal
11
-
•mm
~*—
fist
- i. 4
.
.
-
-
,
•
.
.
.
.
.
.
-
,
.
.
.
.
. ••*
.ml *
Follows fathers footsteps
P Q m „ « i a n o r Tak,,1B u c u e {r°n\ his'father,
V ^ d l l i p a i g l l C l tJ)e | a t e senator fr0|n Louisiana, Russell Long used brass bands, sound trucks and
loud speakers to win the presidency of the Louisiana
State University sophomore class.
ACM*
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 13, 1936
Page 8
Uniforms
Cadets of the U. S. Military
Academy (West Point) wear
fifteen different uniforms on various occasions of their academy
career. Here are illustrated the
complete cadet wardrobe, from
the summer uniform at the left
to the full field uniform Worn,
during maneuvers.
A«K
THE NE\|
HABBV T. GUMAEB
i]
Faro E. DEXTER
u
WAKEEN 1. DENSMORE... . |f
DAVID B. SMITH.
\\
SOPHIB WOLZOK
If
LAURITA SELD
\l
CHARLES W. GAYLORD
•<
MILDRED B. NIGHTINGALE.^
CHARLES N. MORRIS
HELEN CLYDE
755* D/GEsr/o/v's
I
Assooia
Elizabeth Gooding, Mai
Virginia Stoel, sen?
Kamona Va'
Busin
Business, Grace C'astiglioi;
Using, Joan Byron, G(
Victoria Bilzi, MargPEINTED BY BOYD PEINTI
SMOK£ &Af&£L
He has proven that there is life outside the earth
Tiiarriirprxr
^' Charles Lipman, University of California, is examining air tight bottles in
J - / 1 S C O V e r y which specimens of bacteria from meteorites many years old have been set free
in a,known liquid to find out whether bacteria will regain its life after its long dormant state.
iilun.iiwinit
•
Camels increase digestive activityencourage a sense of well-being I
—
Wide World
W
Death Is $
Our Armistice Day
wistful.
The world is spend
arms this year. The I
placed of all the nati
gets go up to a peaa
000,000; 1935, $533,0'
1937, $996,000,000.
A fiery brand of j
notion that a state ' | |
more important tha)
eating at the common
And yet the pictu
that.
In 1787 New York .
of New Jersey oyster
ing methods to pre
markets. Two year
tution went into efl
agreed to let a centr; .
their economic diffic
Students of the w
those who failed to
war is not inevitable
they tell us that a 1
way.
These hopeful thi
that enlightened di
hand in hand servi
misapprehensions o:
to a social cooperat
if the diplomats am
tion, let it be the r<
dangerous New En
Deatli Is So Perms
He has world record for consecutive birds in a shoot off
P K a m n ^ ec * k'''v> ^ c r n s ' n s t ' t u t e (Mich.), is the Woken
v > I l d . n i p state's champion trap shooter. In thefinalsenne
Lil
Lilly
established the record of 225 consecutive hits.
Cotrriffct, I N ) , B. J. a*t—HU TtkMM Ommi,
Wrote First Real
College Life Novel
Pnameflr 3 ? 0 1 1 K E Y HTZGERALD Z
Biltim
Who w r L v L h ' S ™cest?r\the
™
attornc
WOrds t ot h e S t a r
*7fi P o c c o c More passes swere thrown in the
/ U A o S S c S University of Arkansas - Texas
Christian University battle than had ever been at'
tempted before in an intercollegiate football game.
P w
L
Spangled Bannn
rnnceton he spent his first year writim? a Tm„ 1
show, therefore flunked
^ f f S ^ & ^ £
Picture!, Inc.
X&i,^:.••:>
.•.,*•*,.,,..
coliew Kfc a .,
studies. The show w„
hit. By tutoring during 1
summer, he successful
got back to Princeton ill,
next year, and played
chorus girl in his shou
He left college to g. 1
war, watched the exc.
ment wild-eyed, as
Ernest Hemingway. I
This Side of Paradox
1920 was greeted as
, ^ r s t authentic novel
The flow of digestive fluids, so vital
to proper nutrition, is speeded up.
Alkalinity is increased. You get
more good from what you eat.
For an invigorating "lift"—for
matchless taste —and "for digestion's sake"—the answer is the same:
Camels. Camels set you right! And
they don'c get on your nerves.
Wliulen-Siltra, N. O.
AFTER THE GREATEST FINISH UNDER FIRE IN
GOLFING HISTORY: Tony Manero gets set (ot eating by smoking Camels. The gallery went wild
when Tony Manero scored a spectacular 282—4
strokes under the record—to win the 1936 National
Open Golf Tournament. In spite of the long grind,
Tony's digestion stands the strain. Tony himself
says: '"For digestion's sake —smoke Camels!' hits
the ball on the nose. I enjoy my food more —
have a feeling of ease—when I enjoy Camels with
my meals. Camels set me right."
I
V"1'-"
Wii
wh le 'th S i F , t Z 8 e r a l d « n be read in Esqu
wayV nn M
l & P r ° n 0 U n c e F , t i * e r a l d <"ld Hem..
° I o n 8 e r important to American literature
/
••&.*
R Jee d S I
\ in tU,e C o r n e " Unive.
thine e L t ' S'"C,e h ? ,' ,refe ' Ted »»ging to ,,
thing else, he considered himself unfortunate 1.,
henting two coal companies in Pittsburgh. For
the president's desk and
m
coal, a | | the while
frequently thinking back
to the days when & sang
over radio with a college
tw>. When h,s two brothers grew old enough to
handle the coal buJnwJ
Kennedy started humblv
over KDKA in P i t t S g h
sang in a church choir.
_
fyw lecturer's garb
" R a t " f?r e #. U,,
' v *"»y of Richmond
h
d,i£?L
T "***• » drilling talk
Phyllis Reinert
played the lead
in What a Modern College Should Be likf when
it was produced by
Capital University play
if*.
parade at the Virginia university
l!*"^***^ -Jffle^L
3i^
'*"**
HOLLYWOOD
RADIO TREAT!
_
_
£ \ _ i "for I
o5 ' w e . . - I
Him ^"SfogV^*
1 clS Cameb set
a
8
Sr'nd'
AST
L
!
k
e
'
H
S
^
^T'
active n e u r o ^ R ? '
,,
' g
y . hands,,,,
Hem n
|n
CMneU
Make Mewi
Setting a new intercollegiate record
Public En
At tiie first Adv
year, some noise
troubled those eo)c
and rather " b u |
enthusiasts. Truij
again, nobody saw
week's bursts of J
auditorium do wa.
The Advanced
nite attempt to pi ;
amateur stage at
the production, o
of the audience, c
of any kind at til
The plays a ^
student budgot,||
if they stay avv<
tax ticket or ps
but not a r i g h t |
ITH healthy nerves and good
digestion, you feel on top of
the world. When you smoke Camels
with your meals and after, Camels
help in two special ways: Tension
is lessened and Camels promote
digestive well-being.
So enjoy your Camels between
courses and after eating. Strain eases.
too.
—
r C j W,th
ovi?Zcolui?
.^Pittsburgh Syn,Ph,,„
m rk
offeredI to h.?
T
* n d '"« baritone voice 1
«n7pro«?am o 7 V e 8 t h r e e , £"nes ™My on . mm"
twn B
k ^ , C 5 a y o u t , , f u | PrtJ8'de"? of corpo...
n e d y W u,t
SSL
^ i n n i n g to talk a U i
3®3S!
us***
Ctffifl Cl>w«tiM bdaf you •
fUU HOI/K'S BNTIRTAINMBNTI B*auy Guo<la:m'i
•'Swing" B»iid,..<ito/i« lioll'l
COOCMI Orctt«Mr«...Holl|,w<MMl
GutitSuit. .Mil Kuptn HuibM
pr»tid«il TuMtlty - 9.10 p m
I.8.T., 8: JO pm C.S.T., 7:10 pm
M.S.T., tfiM pm P.S.T., UVM
WAIC-COIIMM* N.»work.
•-
mm. j ^ .
•aflb
COSTLIER
TOBACCOS!
IN',
.1
I u l i .(,
,i!
Hi "it-
wiMiMMtwiawa*
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 13, 1936
Paf 8
State Co
Kstnbllihed bf <\.
The undergraduate N e i H H k
College
Published every Friday
Board reprosentln
Telephone!: Office, S
2-4314; Seld,
Entered as second dais ma
THE N j
HARBV T. GUMAEB
»-
FRED E. DEXTEB
m,
WABBEN I . DENSMOBE.J;
DAVID B. SMITH
g|
SOPHIE WOLZOK
B
LAUBITA SELD
K'T
OHABLES W. GAVLOBD.'.
MlLDBED E . NlOHTINGAt
THE H
OHAIU.ES N. M O R B I S . . ; '
HELEN CLYDE
Assoc
Elizabeth Gooding, ifVirginia Stool, *' .
Jinnioiiu I
Uut
Business, Gruce C'ustigL*
tising, Joan Byron,,
Victoria Bilzi, Ma
PBINTED BY BOYD
Pais
Death Is
Our Armistice Di
wistful.
The world is spew
arms this year. The
placed of all the na
gets go up to a pea
000,000; 1935, !$533
1937, $996,000,000.
A fiery brand of
notion that a state
more important tli
eating at the commc
And yet the picl
that.
In 1787 New Yor of New Jersey oystl
ing methods to pj.
markets. Two yea
tution went into | \
agreed to let a cent
their economic dififl
Students of the:1
those who failed t<
war is not inovitab]
they tell us that a
way.
These hopeful tfc
that enlightened d
hand in hand set"
misapprehensions <
to a social coopers
if the diplomats a]
tion, let it be the i
dangerous New Hi
Death Is So Peng
He enjoys an audience from a college town
Tf\£>ni-ir\rn>orirka
^hen Pre5'dent Roosevelt was touring the south
j D i e C u O n e e n i l g on one of his pre-election junkets, he was welcomed
to Morgantown, W. Va„ by a large crowd of University of Virginia students
and that school's student, band.
Uram pounds through the Cornhusr\ers„for another gain
/-11
Andy Uram, brilliant Minnesota back, shook oft* the tackier shown in
V > l l a . r g e this picture and eluded the other Nebraska men to make five yards be- •
fore being stopped by the secondary. Minnesota won in the last few seconds of play,
7 to o.
Picture!, Inc.
And the conversation turned to politics
V_>anUlUdXc p r e m e Court Justice William Bleak ley was touring the state seeking the
They represent 77 years of football coaching
gubernatorial election on the G.O.P. ticket he
O
l
r
l
c
f
c Glenn "Pop" Warner, 65-year-old Temple University
stopped off at Alfred University to visit his son.
H e s shown talking with his son's fraternity V / l Q S U e r S mentor, has been coaching for 41 years, while "Gloomy
GiT Dubie (right), former Cornell University coach and now at Boston
brothers in Delta Sigma Phi. ,
College, has been tutoring gridiron teams for JJ years,
Pictura, inc.
- • " .
-'K
PI
World's foremost World Court authority
J
Prof. Manley O . Hudson, Harvard University,
U Q g C w a s last month elected to the World Court
bench to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Frank
B. Kelloj»f», former I J. S. Secretary of State.
International
J
Public EG
At the lirsl Ad|
year, some noise
troubled I hose e0
and rather "btl
enthusiasts, Truj
again, nobody sal
week's bursts of
auditorium do wi
The Advance^
nite attempt to p
amateur stage aj
the production, JJ
of the audience,;]
of any kind at t$
The plays M •<
student budgetf
if they stay awf
tux ticket or nj
but not a I'igQj
He's investigated every poison murder in Iowa in 40 years
ry
. Dean W. J. Teeters, University of Iowa, knowsfirst-handthat
J Q X p £ l T crime doesn't pay, for he's been state toxicologic for 40 years, and
has analyzed everything from lioptleg liquor to pies, "Dear Dean Teeters,"
wrote one man recently, "my wife baked this pie for me today and since she is not
in the habit of baking me pies I wish you would test it," The analysis found
enough poison was in the filling to kill a dozen men. "I reported back to the man
and have heard nothing since,' he adds,
He was caught "queening" on the campus
T
J
Her. „™ .h. «., V*?%H fy **« in their respective sports at Dn U'l
athletic association.
W*im
"^^wJrPaBHH
at Dre»el Institute of Technology, together
•''ders-of thefivemaior snorts
' *e 4presidwt
i tne
thTwonS's
iRfw^H PJ
women s
P i i n f f i K m o n f ^"'"nment for Freshmen at Arizona
\ U I U » " I « e » C S t a t e Teachers College at Flagstaff
n g tri, ,tw,u
8cvere
d we a8
" f t • proves.
*"*'" W
i
^Carter
>
«»is
photo
Sophomore Eugene
is4the executioner
this time.
Captain Matt goes for a high one
Leader fift f* M a W Pj» t a n e l , i ' b r * ' « / captain w d end 0 / the University
.7
r Michigan s gridiron team. He s an outstanding M M vgrabber
w m Iand
na
stellar performer on the Wolverine eleven.
* -
lfe
wsss^igsa
state.
••• •*--•••'• S335JJ3
COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 13, 1936
Page 2
•£*
. -*< -
>:.
mm
State
,»~"
& • • •
Ritabllil
The uuderirraduJ
Off
Publlibed every Frl
Board repre*
Telephone*: Offl«
2-4314; m
Bttlered as second clatf,
40 major colleges and universities in die country use the Notre Dame system of
football, and use it successfully. An oftnsive system of football is nothing more or less
than a means of getting the ball into play. It is a pretty well established fact that material
ismoreKkery to make the system than the system is to make the material. In other words,
if you don't have football players, or lads who can be taught to play football, no system
wilt work. And if you happen to have a bunch of supermen, any system will work.
The Notre Dame system, developed by the late Knute Rockne, and spread over the
country, has enjoyed such success, however, that its use is steadily increasing, even though
Rockne has been dead for somefiveyears. Besides the army of Notre Dame graduates who
are teaching the hop-shift method of getting a play started in the institutions Of higher
learning, many others are introducing it to the high school fields. Still other men, graduates
of schools besides Notre Dame which used the system, are spreading this rhythmic, colorful oferiaive weapon throughout the country.
THfj
HABBV T. GOMAEjj
F U D E. DEXTER. I
WABBEN 1. DENSS| J
DAVID B. SMITH. J1
S™
mi
SOPHIK WOLZOK.il
IiAUBITA 8ELD. . . I ,
OBABLES W.
-> ,
GAY| j
MILDRED E. Niont
m
OHAKLES N. MORE
HELEN CLYDE
J
Elizabeth Goodh
Virginia Stf
Bam
An ounce of oil will cover i ; to 20 acres
T W a r m m n r ^ ^aa> *° t*i"1 t * B t a m e r e o u n c * °f o& will cover a 15 to aoJ L / 1 8 C O V C r y acre pond have been produced with this new polymolecular
apparatus devised by Dr. W. D. Harkins (standing) and Dr. R. J. Myers of the University of Chicago. They have discovered that molecules that make up films can
stand on end or lie down-^and it is the lying'down molecules that cover so much
water.
, -rriTrfflimmnii.i
>
tdauttnkc
Business, Grace Cr
tisiug, Joan Bj
Victoria Ii\lx
M
l l 1 The right half, fullback, and left half are lined up in the positions they
• A * 1*0,0,16 will occupy after the team lines up. The quarterback, in the middle of the
group, calls the signal clearly to each side. The ends line up at the end of the group with the
linemen in their proper positions to wheel around and run up to the line of scrimmage.
PRINTED BY BOYD
Dead
Our Armistice
wistful.
The world is
arms this year,
placed of all tin
gets go up to a
000,000; 1985,4
1937, $996,000,0
A fiery branc
notion that a s
more important
eating at the coi
And yet the I
that.
In 1787 New ;
They'll use light waves for rulers
TJ
• •
The war department is now tuning up
•l r c C l S l O I l its latest precision laboratory at the
University of Michigan, where ordnance reserve officers
will be taught the manufacture of artillery munitions. The
hoto shows Prof. O. W. Boston working with one of the
iboratory gauges.
E
Life as an Exchange Student
*k o •
1 " The team hops from the huddle into the formation shown here, the
O tg/luto
line balanced, the backs in the characteristic T formation, and the
ends slightly split. The T formation of the backs, from which quick opening plays and
plays on which the quarterback handles the ball may be run, is, like the balanced line,
characteristic of the Notre Dame system. While the signal for the play to be run has been
given in the huddle, the quarterback calls another set to give the cadence of the hop-shift
to his mates.
of New Jersey o;
ing methods to
markets. Two
tution went in'
agreed to let a c
their economic I
.Students of t
those who failej
war is not inevi'
they tell us tha
fay.
These hopefvj
that enlightene.
hand in hand
misapprehensio;
to a social coot,
if the diplomat'
tion, let it be t)
dangerous Ne\y
Deatli Is So Pe
("~\NE of the outstanding
^ projects for the promotion of international understanding and goodwill is the
student exchange system by
which undergraduates in other
countries exchange places with
students in our universities.
Herewith COLLEGIATE DIGEST
presents photos of U. S. exchange students studying and
living' at Lingnan University
(Canton, China).
These
photos were taken by Marvin
O. Lewis, who returned this
fall to his regular studies at
Penn State after a year abroad
I
Six nations
at
Rollins
And she tyows her stuff, too!
International $7%
Queiroz of Lima, Peru, is one of the
six foreign students attending Rollins College this year.
o
.
T?r1ifr»r ^°' 8 QarPen.tcr» sports editor of the
O p O l CS . C C l l t O i University of Wichita student news^
paper, is the only woman editor of men's sports in that section of
the country. She's shown getting material for her column from
Keith Fulton, captain of the Wheatshocker team.
OH, WELL, WHEN
ONE GOT MOT
THE BURMESE
SWITCHED TO
ANOTHERH
THEN I NEED MORE VOU CAN SOON
PIPES-My WWORITE STOP THAT WnW
PRINCE _ ,
BRIAR SETS HOT
TOO FAST AND ( A L B E R T j
IBURNS MV TONGUE
Real Scotch atmosphere
Scotchmen u'gV'a
football coach, Gordon Mac
Donald welcomes John Bryce, a
native of Lanarkshire, Scotland,
to the Michigan Presbyterian
school.
Tha
CA iff ' ^ e " ^ l t na ^ Dac '' "** m o v e d out to what corresponds to the wingI flC Orlljl
back position in the Warner system. The quarterback lines up between his guard and tackle. The left halfback has his hands open to receive the ball—but
it may go to the fullback, to the left halfback's right, or to the quarterback. Every play in
the Notre Dame system repertoire may be run from this formation, with the number being
doubled by a shift to the left and by running the play in the opposite direction. Some
former Rockne coaches have used a shift of the guards from one side to the other, to give
an unbalanced line. But in this picture you have the original formation as used at Notre
Dame and many of the nation's other big schools where Rockne disciples are spreading his
football gospel.
Explorers
American exchange
students go on bicycle
trips through southern
China. Here they are
shown lifting - their
cycles over the abutment of a new bridge.
Study
These exchange students are watching this
home worker making
Chinaware. Mr. Lewis
is at extreme right.
Public
At the first i
year, some noj
troubled those; 1
and. rather " ;,
enthusiasts. T
again, nobody
week's bursts i
auditorium do
The Advawi
nite attempt tr.
amateur stag<$
the production
of the fiudieiia
of any kind at
The plays I
student budgf
if they stay
tax ticket or J
but not a rigj
ME
^^W '£&*** f>0
•
.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmme
TLa
C^Unrao
^*uar^8 m t n e Notre Dame system must be speedy, for, as shown
/ JIG U / i U f g P here, they frequently pull out to join the interference. The right
guard on this play, a characteristic Notre Dame end run, must get into the picture ahead of
the quarterback. When it is remembered that one of the chief characteristics of the system
is speed, one gains an idea of how fast he must move to keep ahead of the halfback, who in
turn must be off before a defensive lineman can shoot through the hole just vacated by the
guard.. The end run is the real basis of the Notre Dame system, with the play going either
inside or outside the end- The success of this play i» the result of getting to the point of
attack with the fullest possible blocking strength with the least possible delay. On this
particular play, the left end will charge down thefieldto try to block the safety man-and,
if the rest ofhii mates perform their blocking duties correctly, the Fighting Irish will have
scored on another perfect play.
EXACTLV— YOU'LL SET A
NICE, EVEN CAKE IN NO
TIME THAT WILL MEAN
A SWEETER, COOLER
TASTIER, AND
I n a i u m r a t i n n £ ' w ' , , " m ^ ,fred ^
H » M»»hand) u shown »n
V 2 S L
7
i,h* inauguration parade as he marched to the convocation
« which!* was inducted as fifteenth president «f Hohart College.
I'LL REJUVENATE
MY PIPE WITH
PA.
tinpr., 1MM, II. I. KnraoMt Totwuxo O w n i i y
HERE* WHY THEBES NO OTHER TOBACCO UKE PRINCE ALBERT: P.A.IS CHOICE
MELLOW TOBACCO-"CRIMP CUT'FOR COOLNESS—WITH THE'BITE*REMOVED BY
SPECIAL PROCESS. ITS THE LARGEST-SELLING TOBACCO
IN THE WORLD. AND SWELL FOR "MAKIN'S*CIGARETTES.
r
He inaugurated new civic education plan
SOUNDS loofc
I rrRIGHT,
JUDGE.
PRINCE AlBIRT MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE:
Sauk* 20 fraaraat ajaafal* a* Friaca Aktart- If raa a W t ftai it taa • * ! • « •
art, UrtiMl mf tahacca raa war u u t W , ratitra Ilia pachat Ma vfefc tha
raat af taa laaacca ia it la u» at aar aaaa witaia a awatk fraai tfcw 4ala, aad
t
TOBACCO COMPANY
lSltm$4 ft. I REYNOLDS TOftAC
NartfcCaraaaa
PRINCE ALBERT mmm
TM MIMIIII,
Bargaining with shopkeepers
. , , invariably draws a curious crowd of natives. Here are Kenneth Young of Harvard and W. J. Norton of Bowdoin.
\§mmm0»»
« i » a f ilia * f f r a a-raat iabacca ia
IB •-
She championed women's rights and goals
^ n s V l l r ^ r ^ d r e s s i n g tn * annual conference of businessmen at Wellesley recently,
O p c d K e i Amelia Earhart (shown here with Roger Babson) urged that "women should
strive for goals outside what is known as their sphere" and "not merely to follow in men's steps."
International
Custodians of law and order tal\ things over
C^nrtfohk T n e R e v " William Glavin, C. M , prefect of discipline, disv - r f U i l l d D cusses regulations with police officer H. J. Dorrenbacker
after; Dorrenbacker had enrolled as a pre-law freshman at Niagara Univer'
sity.
Radio player in action
TKmaArctat
^ec* fusing, famed CBSportsman, uses
• L J I U d U C d o l glasses to put him right down on the
playing field when he's broadcasting an important game. He's
shown here in the new and modern booth in the Duke Stadium
HO NO DRAFT VENTILATION
HO DATE.. I JUST GOT A PERMANENT"
X h.his
i s young lady just said a telephone fullAnd when you come to think of it, she's
right. There is no reason for not having a
car with such modern conveniences, when
General Motors is able to produce and sell
its cars in such volume you get these improvements at no extra price.
GMERAL MOTORS
Before the battle
Toat A r ? r p u p ° ' o b e r u n Co'kiP freshmen test the giant
I Col ball that is to be used in the traditional freshman'
•phomore pushball content, which the sophs won this year.
Gopher band chief
Q f r n H ^ r Winston Jewson is
4 Public-Minded Institution
O U U l t c I ifo m «h , stepping
baton wielder who leads the Univer'
uiivmnm • POMTUC • QUWMOWIK • um.k • u MI.M: • <;AI>II.M<;
sity of Minnesota band when it plays
at Gopherfootball games.
*>mnim>*m'imimii—• Q^P**^^f
i. wn>fV
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 13, 1936
Coach Hat fold Namm
Final Vanity Line-up
Canute's Corner Runners Cancel
R.P.I.
Cobleskill Meet
Freshmen.
-C. N. M.
Coach Hatfield's gas house gang
treks mildly north December S to
engage the Engineers of Rensselaer
Polytechnic institute in a court contest. Here's a little light on how
the court caperers from the collar
and cuff city stack up.
Coach Ed Donald of the technical
school 1ms named Tuesday, November 17, us the date of opening practices Back from lust year's squad are
six veterans, including Captain Lovoniun and Qilcoyne, former Troy High
School players who held down starting berths during the 1935-1038 season.
The four lettermen who will report
are Fellows, Ward, Silvera, and Safford. No novices they, either. Banked with reserves gathered from the
team that represented the class of
1939 a year ago, the team presents
a powerful unit for the Teachers to
cope with initially.
11erein .clow,
sche dule
Dec.
Dec.
Dec.
.Ian.
Jan.
Fob.
Kelt.
Fob.
Feb.
Mar
5
12
JO
10
S3
12
13
SO
27
(i
UlTs
State
Williams
Brooklyn IN lv
I'riitt
Steven*
Middlcbnrv
Vermont
Union
State
MIT
11 -game
llllllll
Home
Home
Home
Home
A wn v
A mi v
Awav
Awav
Home
Here we go predicting with the
game a whole week away. It's the
Frosh-Milne High game we mean, and
we pick the Frosh.
Our selection
may be construed as a patriotic one
or as one arrived at only after careful observation of and comparison
between two squads. What we have
done is adjudged that the speed advantage of the embryo net nudgers
will outweigh their height handicap
—by ten points, too.
Here's an interesting fact:
the
freshman team can't be called the
yellow anil white this year even
though their class colors are just
that. They will wear purple anil gold
uniforms with an Indication somewhere on the suit that they represent not the college, but the freshman class taken as a part of the
college,
Drifted this way, piled up at the
column door, as it were, are arguments used in discussing whether an
orchestra or the victrola should be
used for dancing after basketball
games. Now, the MAA, or men's athletic group, has always supplied, and
would have to supply this year whatever pittance goes to the orchestra
for their offerings.
Il so happen* that home ga
demand guarantees by I he home
team anil thai home game? \\ il h
tennis like Niagara call for hi; <j 1 HI I
unices.
Hi", una run tecs, in I HI I I .
mean little left over money to s p e n d
on dancing. And the .MAA - | > i i
uiarily interested in putting mi a
good exhibition of bti-licllmll r u l h e r
I hail in running a dance hall.
But they are willing to go social
and satisfy demand within their
means. Undoubtedly, at one or two
games, an orchestra will musicate.
It has been subtly hinted, though,
that a victrola, being what is is, needs
no intermission nor rest period. And
yet who can blame a band for not
playing steadily for two hours for
pin money—which is all we have.
Swimming Pool Sought
Coach (I. Klliul lltil field is llives
figuting I he possibilities of obtain
iug Hie full use of n HWiniininy pool
one night a week for Klale students,
Lust year, the limiting of lliu nuin
ber of swimmers to ten per niglil
crumped the stylo of (lie project.
In the course of his negotiations,
Mr, lliitliold has been conlucling the
curators of I he Albany Academy
pool, which might possibly be ubtaiued for private use.
The cross-country meet scheduled
for this afternoon between the State
harriers and the Cobleskill Aggies
has been euneelled. The contest was
originally booked for this afternoon
on the Cobleskill course, but the
necessity of cutting classes to make
the trip made the meet nn impossibility for the State crew.
Manager Reynolds, tit tempting to
salvage some sort of get together
from the remnants, suggested alternative dates. However, since these
dates were not acceptable to the
Aggies, it wns no contest.
Tho Teacher-harriers have engaged
in two meets this year and have
come out on top in both. On October 24, they nosed out the Delhi
Aggies, with Tony Wilc/.ynski, '39,
leading the Held home. A week later,
the squad walloped Hard by a still
more
comfortable
margin,
with
llayncs, '38, and Wilczynski breasting the tape in one-two order.
With no member of the squad due
to graduate and one successful scnson behind them, fine things in the
form of an equally successful season
with broader scheduling are to be
looked for from next: year's team,
Books To Be Exhibited
For Milne Students
A bonk fair in Milne high school
under the direction of Alice Allard,
Frances Smith, Alma Knyder, and
Virginia Stoel, seniors, and .Miss
K'atherine K. Wheeling, supervisor
of Knglish, will lake place in the
conference room of the library, the
week nf November Hi.
Students will display their choices
of books and each faculty member
will contribute several favorite hooks.
The proceeds from admission will be
used In buy reference books for the
use nf the school. The exhibitions
will be followed by a tea for parents,
faculty, and college members.
Kach member of the senior Knglish idasses will select from the display such books as he will purchase
for his own personal library.
Lotta Bunkers
To Have Outing
The varsity basketball squad
has been cut from approximately
twenty to a more easily workable group of thirteen.
Survivors of the slash will continue
the daily practice sessions which
have been going on for two
weeks now on the Page hall
court under the direction of
Conch 0. Billot Hatfield,
The system of play Coach
Hatfield is engendering in the
squad emphasizes first of all
possession of the ball and then
a speedy attack,
It demands
stamina and nggressivencss, and
more particularly, smooth passing.
The sqund as it now stands:
Richard
Murgison, J. Ryan,
Bancroft,
Erwin,
Harrington,
Byrnes, George Aniyot, Morris,
flurd,
Hershkowitz,
Lehman,
T. Ryan, and Walko.
Classes Prevent Hill - Dalers
From Attending Run
This Afternoon
The Dance.
Paga 8
Fall Season
Snowflakes
Hiking Club Committees Prepare Camp Johnston Cabin
For Week-end
Twenty members of the Lottn
Bunkers, the camping and hiking
group of the Girls' Athletic association, will spend the week-end at
Camp Johnston.
Yearling Cage Team
Is Fast in Offense
Barrington Cuts Squad to Twelve
A s Daily Workout Continues
The basketball squad which will
represent the class of L940 on the
court this year has been going
through its paces in I'ugc Hall for
three weeks now. Coach Harrington,
lacking many tall players to work
with, iuis equipped his team with a
quick-passing, sharp-breaking offense.
The freshman squad, cut down to
a working unit of twelve, consists of:
Halog, Fulrbunk, Frament, Harper,
Baser. Kelly. Leggett, Quiiin, Kelvea, Simmons, Tuttle, and
Van
Keurnn.
Daily drill of the type the freshmen have been getting points toward
a team of well-nigh tireless players.
Walt Simmons, who played for Milne
High a year ago, has been canter for
the first live in scrimmage. Harry
Halog and Shorty Leggett, both diminutive but very fast, have seen
most service as forwards and lire
working together exceptionally well.
At the guard positions I'Tnmcnl,
1 laser, and Tuttle have shown most
tulent.
In a brief scrimmage ug'iiust a
team from the varsity squad, the
freshmen quint demonstrated an exceptionally well integrated passing
attack. Further, they showed all the
speed that had been attributed to
them.
The cabin in the hills below
Chatham has been thoroughly cleaned
and renovated in preparation for
the first outing to bo conducted there
this year. The bus will leave school
at five o'clock this afternoon. The
returning bus will leave Chatham at
two o'clock Sundny afternoon.
Elizabeth Appeldoorn, '38, is chairman of the week-end.
Committees
assisting her are as follows: assistant chairman, Christine Dershimer,
'88; faculty, Virginia Stoel and Eliz.
nbeth Strong, seniors; publicity,Joan
Kdgcumbe, '38, Delia Dolan and
Helen Lowry, sophomores, and Harriet Sprague, '40; food, Tholma
Miller, '38, Juno Palmer and Marion
Rockefeller, sophomores, ami Frances
Field, '40; clean-up, Lillian Ilines,
',')!), Ellon Best and Klizaboth Clark,
freshmen; and transportation, Elizabeth Allen, '39, Helen (tribbin unil
Virginia Mitchell, freshmen.
Since the number of people who
can enjoy a week-end is limited to
twenty, another has been arranged
for November L'0, 21 and 2^, to accommodate those who can not go this
time.
Alumna Assists Author
Marion Moore Coleman, '20, has
done the vcrsilicntiou of all poetic
translations in a recent pamphlet,
" B r i e f Survey of Ukrainian Literat u r e " , by her husband, Dr. Arthur
I'rudden Coleninn, of Columbia university.
No Superstitions
-H. F. CResults of the hockey tournament
are coming in with the first snowflakes, The juniors have accumulated
the most points. Scores of games are
as follows: sophomores 1, freshmen
0; juniors 1, sophomores 1 (thta
wasn't a real game. Frosh helped
out both sides); juniors 3, freshmen 0.
The gnme between the freshmen
a ml Milne scheduled for October 30
was postponed und will be played
this afternoon at 3':lfi o'clock. The
Milnites have met stiff competition in
Schenectady and Delmur, and the
frosh will have to be on their toes to
score against them.
Some of the Lotta Hunkers seem
to enjoy snapping their fingers at
01' Man Hard Luck. Saturday thirteen of them hiked out to the golf
course und hud their pictures taken
on tho thirteenth hole.
This nfternoon twenty—a safer
number—are ignoring the evil reputation of Friday, the thirteenth, and
are going out to Cuinp Johnston for
tho week-end. Here's hoping the bus
doesn't have u tint tire, the stove
doesn't blow up, and nobody falls
out of the top bunk.
Frament Is Tourney Victor
Will Frament, freshman, has been
declared the winner of the fall tennis tournament by virtue of divers
victories over opponents bracketed
any where on Hie schedule. Frament
looks like varsity material, according
to those who would know.
While Mrs. Coleman was enrolled
at Slate college, she was a member
of Myskania and of Delta Omega
sororit v.
EAT AT JOHN'S LUNCH
OPTICIANS,
Dinners 25^ and up
FREDETTE'*
Delicious Sandwiches and Sundaes
7:30 A.M.—11:00 P.M.
Opp. the High School
COMI'lfTfc OPTICAL 5 t C V l C €
Dial 5-1913
Geo. D. Jeoney, Prop.
Boulevard
Cafeteria
and Qrill
The Department Store of Albany That
Is Ever Anxious to Be of Service —
Meeting the Merchandise Demands of
the College Woman.
ALBANY, N. Y.
198-200 CENTRAL AVENUE
*tf(*
ix A *>MJ$!P/
MAKE
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AND HAVE A GRAND TIME ALL THE WAYI
/
A
Keep your crowd together . . . and keep expenses down . . . do your
group traveling in a chartered Greyhound bus. Have more fun and save
more money I Rates per person are reduced far below even Greyhound's
regular low fares. Vour bus becomes your private car . . . goes where you
wish when you wish. It's modern, roomy, well-heated, easy-riding, And
you know when chartering a Greyhound coach that you are dealing with a
responsible travel organization . . . a dependable, well-managed company,
famous for its nationwide service,
For
Information
— Phono
or
jf.*
AW !*''•
is>.
Wrlln
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350 Broadway, Albany, N, Y.
-Ai
Phone: 4-6106
J GREY-HOUND
^LrA
Wi
fcage 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 13, 1936
Collegiate Night-Lifers Reveal
Sacred Secrets of First Dates
As a sequel to the "cupid-con•clous" story of two weeks ago, tho
NEWS inquisitor now reveals the remits of his extensive research on
"first dates." The numerous and
varied answers given to the question,
" W h a t do you remember about your
first date at State college?" indicates
that there is no hardship in the field
of " d a t i n g . " Almost all the students questioned had had thoir first
date very early in college life and
had followed this ono with a sufficient number of others to make any
early recollection very vague.
Clem Wolff, '39, best expressed
this state of affairs when he carelessly said, " I didn't know what to
do then, but how I'vo learned 1 "
Flossie Ncibach, '38, wouldn't
even try to recall her first date.
" I ' m too thrilled with my last one
to think back any further," quoth
ahe.
All conventional theories about
dates were shattered when Ralph
Van Horn, '37, stated very confidently, "My
first
date was
" b l i n d . " I met the girl at College
house and then went with her for
three years."
Mymiy Crounse, '39 (of Campus
day "Stcnchen-Stink" fame), was
not so enthusiastic about his first
evening with a " S t a t e " girl. " I t
had the kick of a man without any
legs," bemoaned he.
Up in the library we found Ken
Derail, '39, who proudly acclaimed,
"She fell down stairs to meet me,"
while Dot Cain, '39, quoted the old
proverb, "Anticipation was better
than realization."
Jane Wilson, '40, very adroitly
confessed that she "looked forward
to another mall."
When Johnny Ryan, '37, was approached, ho contemplated that he
could "sny something that would
burn some people up very easily,"
but his remarks finally subtle(d)
down to the statement, " A freshman date, a trip to Nassau, and a
little 'Ade,' but no 'Hall.' "
To Have Anniversary
The Chemistry club will celebrate
its twenty-fifth anniversary with a
banquet on Wednesday at 6:00
o'clock in the Cafeteria of Husted
hall, according to Raymond Pisk,
'37, president,
Tho gi ral chairman of I ho
dinner will be Nathan (Cullman, '37.
Hastings Names Rules
For Lovenheim Contest
The final date for the submission
of manuscripts for the Leah Lovenheim contest in essay writing will
bo May 1, 1937. Dr. Harry W.
Hastings, chairman of the English
department, is I lie faculty member
in charge of the contest.
Essays'may be submitted at any
lime up to that day. The prize
which will be awarded for the bosl
essay is $25.00, and is offered annually by Jerome Lovenheim of Amsterdam for excellence in English
composition.
Plays and stories will not he considered.
All undergraduates may
submit an essay. Kacli manuscript
should lie signed with a fictitious
name, and accompanied by an envelope in which are given the title
of the essay, the fictitious name, and
the actual name of tho author, ami
loft in room L>4 of Richardson hall.
A bibliography should be appended
to show the source of information
and opinions.
The manuscript should be from
1,000 to 5,000 words in length.
Special credit will be given for originality of thought, A committee of
three will judge and award the prize
and at their discretion give honorable
mention.
Hellenics
What a week-end! What a week- Gam, And at Delta Omega, Marjorie
end! All the sorors can say is— Kalaidjian, '30.
"Thanks for the holiday. We needed
Catherine Paris, '30, made herself
i t . " But consensus of opinion seems at home at Sigma Alpha. Gamma Kap
to be that the dances were swell— said " h o w d y " to Arleno Cornwcll
right in " s w i n g " style.
Divine, '35, as did Kappa Delta to
Hellene snooped around, and here Blossom Evans, '30.
goes (with what's fit to print)—•
Pi Alpha Tail registered in its
From Alpha, Rho — Alyco Trulan, guest book Mnthildo Centner, '34,
'39, was received into pledge mem- Margaret Jneobs Sold, '35, and Dora
bership. Guests at the house wcro: Levine, Vet I a J labor, and Helen Loth,
Mnxino Robinson, '31, Mrs. Robert '38,
Qunylo, '28, Carolyn Fitzgerald, '32,
Marie fleesler and .Nina r.aube,
Helen Otis, '31, Donna. Vee Camp'.'Hi, gladdened the EBPhi hearts by
bell, '31, and Hetty Steele, '34.
.Inlie Hell, '38, spent the week-end their presence.
Tii (lamina Phi Sigma cnino the
at Chi Sig. Said sorority formally
ninsl guests — Eleanor Leary and
initiated Jane Mnlauey, '38, . . .
Muriel Clarkson, '30, of Eta Phi Marguerite O'Donnell, '33; ' Retty
was seen strolling around college. Dolnney and Lois Kelly, '34; Betty
Burns and Mrs. William Swiff, '35;
Seemed like old times.
Up at AEPhi, Evelyn Greenborg, Ruth Doady, Lois Frnry, Mrs. Rita
'33, Rose Dabrusen, '35, and Ruth Hiochinnn, Elsie Ilildobrnnd, MerceLichtcnborg, '37, came back for the des Martin, Mrs. Marion Appleton
dances and also for the formal in- and Mnrgnrel Stoddard, '3(1.
itiation of Pearl Rnndberg, Jeanne
Weinberger, and Sylvia Weiss, sophTroubadours to Meet
omores. Monday night the sorority
was given a supper party by ils
The Troubadours will meet. TuesI'roviace Director, Carolyn ICrnus.
day IKIOII in room III to reorganize,
.Miriam Coutant, '.'!(i, found herself James Vnndorpoel, '.'!", president, of
to bo tho lone star visitor at I'si the organization announced todav.
Few things that grow require all
the care and cultivation it takes
to raise the mild, ripe tobaccos
in Chesterfield Cigarettes,
Proper curing by the farmer
gives flavor to Chesterfield
tobaccos iust as it does to
fine hams and bacon.
• \tH. \\O<AU &ft|¥{}jroe*C?p Co.
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