174 BEGIN DUTIES IN MILNE MONDAY

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<->BsM Rr
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 9, 1934
Page 4
State Coll ege
COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN PLAN FOR PROM, LUNCHEON, AND TEA DANCES
174 BEGIN DUTIES
IN MILNE MONDAY
Professor Sayles Announces List
Of Student Teachers; Number
S h o w s Increase
VOL.
D i s c u s s i o n of D o r m i t o r y F u n d
W i l l B e in N e x t
9:05 O'clock
10:05 O'clock
ham, 8th crude English; Elizabeth
Kilt
ish:
I la
Ik
kcr. I-aiin fi" Janet Splccr and Florence
Chairmen of the committees in charge of Junior Prom arc, left to right: Lois O d w e l L E v e l y n Staehle Milton Goldberger, Dorothea
Gahagan, William Jones, Marion Heinemann, Julia Reil, Lucile Hirsh, and Wilfred Allard,
GROUP PUBLISHES
LAWS TO GOVERN
STUDENT OFFICE
(Continued from /raw I, column 3)
2. Freshmen ami members of the Junior
Emergency college a r e not permitted to use
Hie Olliec unless summoned for work by the
head of one of llle .activities ill tile Office.
1. Sctlees will he provided by tlie Administration. Students are requested, therefore, not to sit on the desks.
4. Each aetivily will be held responsible for
the condition of ils desks and that portion
„f the Office in which each is situated. No
papers, books, or clothing are to be left on
the tops of the desks. No papers or cigarette ends are lo be thrown on tile door.
5. Ash-trays will be placed oil the corner
of each desk. Kindly use them ill the Office,
and refrain I
i removing them from lite
» ' f c , C'a'r'i I s ' o r K i i c W f . " ' '
*
"
ARE PLEDGES
STATE WILL MEET 88FOR
SORORITIES,
DEAN
ANNOUNCES
HARTWICK QUINTET
(Continual from page i, column t)
Oneonta Court Five Will Invade
Page Hall Gym I n Contest
Saturday Night
Next Saturday, the Slate college varsity quintet will face the Hartwick five
from Oneonta in the Pago hall gymnasium at 8:15 o'clock.
State teams in the past years have
Office. People in charge ol desks will empty
the trays and keep lliein Inside tile desks each consistently defeated the Oneonta court
'I In- d ' to the
X11,™ vlnita
y nielli at 5:15 o
in III,- Engineer's ' " I ' v e f„r the use ol
acllvitlcs. if this -vsl.-lll -''wiil,"o°ne"kcy'
C Cm,M
°ullUs'
Usl
-vc:"' l l i e
Purp
' ° "'"'
GoW
,.;„, „,, the highest senre ever recorded
' •'" the P"S° hall courl by defeating Hie
i activity will be provided
ii,"
nimcx
wfii,
I tartwick team to the tune of 61-21.
Tito small lunch-room oil
used
by the
men
"f
Hie college as
a
-| | R . g l n t ( ,
u..,m
will
Ruth Sackrider, F r a n c e s , Smith,
M a r t h a Smith, K a l h e r i n c Spoore,
and F r a n c e s Wirpsz.a.
Alpha R h o : Marjorio
Kelley,
Grace Parker, Marjorie T y m e s o n ,
and Phyllis Vermilc.
Gamma P h i S i g m a : Jean Cerrilo,
Anna Keinliard, Ruth Keuss, and
Arline W e b s t e r .
S i g m a A l p h a : Flora Alexander,
Helen Follctt, and I n n a Kuehn.
P h i Lambda: Dorothy Kent.
Stiller t h e loss of
Choral Society to Sing
OverWGY Friday Night
1935 PROM QUEEN
TO GRACE DANCE
AT AURANIA CLUB
(Continual from nngo /, column 5)
Reutowich, Fred Morhniau, and William Davidge; invitations, Dorothea
Gahagan, chairman, Helen Foley, Fraud s Roilcy, and Pearl Hamelin; chapL-roues, Lois Odwell, chain,,an, Anna
Anys, Elaine Cronin, and Florence
d a m n u m ; refreshments, Marion lleincinann, cl,airman, Edilh Estabrooks,
and William T o r p c y ; dowers anil taxis,
Florence Ellen, chairman, and Eileen.
Wallace; arrangements for
Prom
Queen, Catharine Kearney, and Lucille
Manning, co-chairmen; and publicity,
Daniel Van Leuvan, chain,,;,,l, Ruth
Williams and Hilda Hemes.
COURSE TO BE GIVEN
A Iwo hour descriptive course in astronomy will be given Mondays and
Wednesdays at II): 1(1 o'clock in room
160 during the sic
I semester if the
registration warrants. Consult (be regis liar or Dr. Carlelon E. Power, Professor of natural science, room 259.
• T ' f f l p f f ' w h o ivlsl, m „s,. ,he tele
no Coplafu Bancroft, who, to date. Ims the
The College Choral society will
„iii please remember no, lo lounge ohoui the scoring record tnr litis season, anil who broadcast a program "f folk-songs via
smrjr
station W G Y from the studio in the
mliec of Control com
d of ill,- brads „f in practically every game
. Jt I" .1
nker is gruelling liis men in daily DeW'itt Clinton lintel, Friday night
nf ibis Commute
M r I I I II
reports thai tin- line-up for from 7:00 until 7:15 o'clock, Dr. Fredml ilii
I nil
drill
will lie
Bible ,n
tin: coining contest is indefinite as yet. erick II. Cnndlyn, head of the music de[iirson or persons
uirii
forcing Ibis,- rules
However, In' says lh.it the team will partment, announced today,
Office. Keguiar nice
... shape mi hv Saltirdav anil that he cxlulu ed
In
op reports• ' to
The program will include groups of
" peels I" iloleat Hartwick by at Icasl
ihese
rules.
ten points regardless " I the loss ol songs sung by men and groups by woP n ' n -tor- c '" c"m" "''"•
r.'lii-sl'e.T'i'i'iici'iiio'
„.-,.,./ Control.
Captain Dancroft,
JrriTHHI
•> „re Particular
men. The men will sing "Reaper's
Song" of Czechoslovakia!! origin and
"Johnny Come Down from Hilo," a
sea chanty. The women will sing "Peal
Fire Smoorlng Prayer," of Scottish
(Continual /.voi /'iw i, column .')
Sinn,lis. and l-.r'i
Tosl. History I'; lean
origin. The combined society will open
Printers
of the State Catlette
News
The following commlttcs have been I Norrls, Margaret Hill, Elizabeth Slnw- tlie broadcast by singing "Wassail
iiaiiiiil inr the lea dance: natrons and sun, Margaret McCnnn, and Margaret Song" u( English origin, and they will
patronesses, H a r r i e t t Ten Eyck, choir- Deloncy.
.
, , . _ , . , .
P h o n e 4-0070
1:05 O'clock
man, Edna Fehnicl and Ruth Reiner;
The committees assisting Christian also close the program with "Rantln'
arraitgements, Evelyn Hall and Mar- a r e : decorations, Doris Howe, chair- Rovin' Robin" of Scottish origin.
garct Broderick
chairman; music man, t aria Nielsen, and Edward HernElizabeth Walsh, chairman, Helen holz; programs, Zcnnbia Carrara,
W i t h o u t Flowers—Prom's a Plop I
Rich Gcorite Pratt, Grace Prltchartl, chairman, June Blowers, Kenneth
Order Your Corsages from
Dorothy Davis, John Hawes iind Drake; faculty, Daisy r Bryson, chairCharles Clowe; decorations, Marion j man, Ruth Sane, and William I lavidgc.
Shea, chairman, (larol Bcldekapp, Mary i and. arrangements, Eleanor Brown,
Zabriskic, and Mary H e l m c r ; refresh- chairman, Ruth Brooks, ami Milton
Florist
mi'iits, Anna Koreit, chairman, Janet I Goldberger.
211 Control Avenue
Dial 5-24-lfi
12:05 O'clock
STATE
H i s t o r y Professor W i l l Speak on George
Edith Dellollander, 7th year English!
Frances White, 7th grade science; Mary
Moore, 7th grade mathcmalics; Lorraine
Grow and Martha Unger, 8th grade social
science; Nancy Stephen and Kathryn Wi •
kins, 8th grade English; Orvis Hazard, William Crawford, and Aaron Jasper, 8th grade
science; Marion Nelson, 9th grade social
science; Pauline Ilyrnes, Latin I ; II. Kito
Somers and Kalherinc Simmons, elementary
algebra; Isabelle Winter, special, algebra;
David Uray, general science; l.etlle Osboni
and Marguerite P u n s , Knglisb 11; bllzabeth
Saicse, Latin I I ; Madalyn Dickinson, Latin
I I special; Ahnira Knss and William Rogers,
History A : Paulina Ofinick, Mary Itawles,
and Dorothy ltockwcll, French 111 Theresa
Modi, geometry; .Maxwell Plotnick, physics;
Fernanda Glzzorclll, French I I I ; Harriet
Van Wely, intermediate algebra; Osmer
Brooks ami Gertrude Ktifahl, commercial
law; Kiitli Walker and Evelyn Mm den,
English I V ; Anna Hermann and Helen
Davitt, typewriting.
Olillla llofTman, 7lll grade mathcmalics;
Ida Putnam and Mary Foley, 7lh grade
social science; Ellen O'Neill and Anita bralick. 7th grade science! liose Sovlcll, 8tb
grade nialliemalics: Leon liny and Itich.ird
MeDermott, s i b grade .lien.-,-; l e n Ingra-
12
COLLEGE
FOR TEACHERS, ALBANY, N.
"Mi'tffi s h f t a b;;7 •:; i- bee,, i,i,i,
j^ ,.„• state *.•„.,
G. F.Williams & Son, Inc.
36 Beaver Street
Albany, N. Y.
Luncheon, Dance To Be Tomorrow
J O H N B.
SKINNER
Washington
Drive
F E H R U A H Y 23,
Assembly
Varsity Debaters Will Discuss
Germany's 'Nazi Program'
In Talks Thursday
A Stall- college women's varsity dehate team will contest a Irani from
Middlebttry college, Thursday night at
8-.30 o'clock in the Lounge of Richardson hall, according to Kenneth Christian. '35, secretary of debate council.
Bessie Martinan and Dorothea Gahagan, juniors, will uphold the negative
side of the question, "Resolved: That
The Present Nazi Program in Germany is Justifiable." This debate will
continue inler-collegiale forensic relationships with Middlebury which have
been carried on for several years.
Dr. Donna! V. Smith, assistant professor of history, will speak in the
student assembly in the auditorium of
Page hall at 11:10 o'clock this morning, Gren[ell N. Rand, '34, president of
the student association, announced. Dr.
Smith will speak on the topic, "George
Washing,on."
The student assembly will vole this
morning on the following proposal lo
change the traditional ring requirements : "Myskania recommends thai
the traditional ring requirements he
changed to lit the specifications of lite
ring approved this year for die class
of 1935."
If litis recommendation is passed Ibis
morning by the student assembly, there
will be a permanent change in tlie appearance of the college ring from the
traditional round seal in gold in a black
onyx lop will, an oval seal cu in stone,
according lo Doris I [owe, '34, chairman
of (he ring cotntllillee. Other members
ol the ring committee are Helen Kiel,,
Thurston Paul, Clifford Kail, juniors,
and Virginia Flora, sophomore rcpre-
On Monday, March 5, Donald Benedict and Charles Robson, seniors, will
debate a team from I lamiltoii college at
Clinton mi the subject, "Resolved : That
Propaganda Is a Constructive Porce in
the World Today."
Because of a forced curtailing of the
debate council's budget, due to decreased
payment r»f student tax, it has been
necessary to cancel debates with Syracuse, anil I lobar!
Debate council plans" to attend an inler-collegiale conference at Colgate uniRobert Robinson, president of the versity in the spring, if finances permit.
senior class, who serves as chairman
if Ihe annual drive for the Alumni
lorinilory fund.
$2.25 Per Y e a r , 32 W e e k l y Issues
1931
208 Quail
sNRA,
Street
Near Wttitvrn Avenue
Week Iind Special—.Shampoo ami Finger Wave $1.00, regularly $1.25
Dial 1-94HI
Ey« Enmiiwl
IN. P. F R E D E T T E
EYE
Hewitt
Building,
Room
10, 61 Columbia
1'IIXBI)
Street,
Albany,
Boulevard
Dial 5-1913
" g-9212
Cafeteria
Grill
GLASSES
OCULISTS' I ' U H S C R i r a O N S
ffwe
and
r.'lns
Telephone J-27.W
Geo. I). Jeoney, Prop.
N.
Y.
198-200 Control Avenue
Albany, N. Y.
Try Our Special Dinners S1.00
Coach Drills Varsity Squad For W e e k - e n d Contests;
B a k e r m e n to Face P o l y Outfit H e r e T o n i g h t ;
Varsity to Trek to Clinton T o m o r r o w
By W i l l i a m
C.
Nelson
This week-end m a r k s the climax rif the 1933-34 S t a t e college basketball
season when the varsity I'urple and (jold encounters the Brooklyn Polytechnic quintet here tonight, at 8:15 o'clock in the P a g e hall gymnasium.
The State basketeers will meet a Hamilton college five al Clinton, New
York, tomorrow afternoon at 5:00 o'clock.
•
SORORITIES LIST
NAMES OF NEW
PLEDGE MEMBERS
Several sororities have recently
pledged additional members since those
announced al the conclusion i>f the formal rushing period early this month. A
list of Ihese members-elect together
with the names of the sororities, appears
below.
T h e n a m e s of t h e p l e d g e s of
Kpsilon
Beta I'hi sorority were inadvertently
omitted from the MEWS lust week, when
a list of those pledged upon receipt of
preferential bids was published. They
are: Jean Kerr, '.io, and Eunice Cotton
and Helen Sheldrake, freshmen.
(libers recently pledged are as follows :
Delta O m e g a : J e a u e l t e Cronk,
'.37.
Psi Gamma: Margarcl Koeis, '37.
Chi Sigma T h e t a : Ethel Schlick,
The Poly learn has a spotty record,
having won only four games out of
thirteen. Thc State quintet has won
three out of seven contests. The PolySlate game last season ended in a victory for the technicians on the home
court. Coach Baker has been grooming
his men and insists that the morale of
the team is al its peak. With a week of
intensive training just past, he expects
In take the Poly boys into camp. The
preliminary to the Brooklyn game had
not been decided as the Nl'.WS went lo
press. Dancing will follows the game.
Music will be furnished by Bill Jones
and his Playboys.
TO PLAY HAMILTON
The Hamilton game last year marked
the encounter of two undefeated outfits, Hamilton had defeated many outDRIVE TO BEGIN
standing teams in the Eastern tier of
Professor John M. Sayles, principal
the slate, while the Purple and Cold
of Milne High school, will lead an
had chalked up three victories up to
open forum discussion on Ihc topic "The
game lime, The irnbroglio ended with
Dormitory Fund" in lite II :ll)assembly
the Slate i\vv on top of a 3-1-23 score.
Friday morning, Sludenls may proThis year both teams have suffered depose any questions they wish In be disfeats al the hands (if stiff competition.
G
a
m
m
a
K
a
p
p
a
P
h
i
:
Edilh
cussed. The purpose of the fund will be
The contest for undergraduate editor
The contest, which will he played at
explained so thai the slutleul body will
uf the .Uimiiii Quarterly
will end Scholl, '36.
Clinton,
is to be part of Hamilton's
Mr.
Otto
Borchert,
president
>.\
die
Beta
Z
e
t
a
:
Sylvia
Silsby,
'37.
have a clear conception of the aims of
Pi Alpha Tau: Sylvia Slavin, '3d. winter spoils carnival.
the dormitory drive which will begin North Atlantic Region of the Lutheran Thursday, according lo Mrs. Eunice
Coach
Baker,
as usual, declined lo reMessent,
'22,
editor-in-chief.
This
is
the
Alpha
Rho:
Beatrice
Swartfigure
Friday and continue for ahoul len days, Student association of America and sevaccording in Koberl Robinson, presi- trnl of his fellow-students from New | first year thai freshmen as well as and Eleanor Van Morn, freshmen. lease a starting line-up for either game
in
accordance
with
his "Baker and noGamma
Phi
S
i
g
m
a
:
Marie
Schreindent of the senior class and chairman
body knows" policy. However, il's not
York city and vicinity will be guests of | sophomores have been elie,ible fur this cr, '35, and Lois Erary, '36.
of Ihe drive.
Dsitio
Ml s
problematical
thai
ihe
entire squad will
Phi Lambda: Dorothy McKniglil
the College Lutheran club al a specinl P
"'
' ' Messent said, and the
nior class will be divided ini
action on the court this week-end.
two groups for the drive. ' Dorothv "leeting lo be conducted Sunday after- successful candidate will retain il for and (ieraldiue Schlicder, j u u i
J ,,u
a
n
d
'
A
l
a
r
y
(i.
M
a
r
k
b
a
m
and
lewel
s'luad
consists
of
"Mip lluruell,
Grifliti and Mavbelle Matthews will noon at 4;()() o'clock al the Friendship t w o y e n r 8 ,
Mordus. soph,
,res.
Osslc Brooks. "Speed-hoy" Stone, forThc
serve as captains of the teams. Each house, Mf. Stale sfreet. Lutheran stu""'krflTmltKile editor interprets
w a r d s : George Bancroft, center; CliiT
senior will receive a card filled m w-ilh , t
.,
,. , College activities for the alumni magf
Kail. Chuck Lyons, Jerry Amyot, Tom
a l data except the amounl he wishes to ; 7 n i M " | , s 1 , o m K u s S L i l . f n f ••" ' a/ine and thus represents the student I p n q T A „ P M R T v
Caller. Arlton R. Bush, "Sonny"
r T 7 A p f r
pledge, lie will insert this item and ! L , >"'" ndleges wdl meet with the Al- | J 0 t | y , Twelve students tried out for this ' P 0 S T A S S E M B L Y C H A R T
Huddleston, guards.
Tl
return 111, anl lo ihe captain of hi bauy club.
position lasl year. I Icleu I ioddurd, '34.1 . " ' seating chart for student assot
•
group. If he cannot pledge al (his
I ielen 11. Smith. "35, vice-president of j was chosen undergraduate editor on the lion assemblies in Page ball auditorium
lias been posted on Ihe main bulletin
_
time, lie will return the card without ihe Lutheran club, w
•eside. A ""eritsof lie,- nrttclc-. "Wc- Actiuirt; tlie board
in Ihe rotunda of Draper ball. . T O A T T E N D C O N V E N T I O N
inserting anything upon il.
.,, ,
,
. „ , . , ,
I A fleruoon l e a l l a b i l ,
which appears
If any senior does not receive a raid
William Rogers. '34, president of
i will be served al 5:30n clock. i„ | h l . currenl issue of the Alumni Miss Elizabeth Van Denbiirgh, College
registrar, stated today. Seniors and Chi chapter of Kappa I'hi Kappa, nabynexl Monday, he should apply to his Cninmillee members for ihe luncheon \Qutirlrrlv
grauuatc students teaching in Mnnc ii,.Hal honorary educational fraternity,
team captain, lo Nobinsnn, or m Mrs. 'include: Elizabeth Johnson, '34, Carl
All articles contributed must lie writHigh school will not be required lo at- will represent Ihe chapter at Ihe seventh
O/KIIIII /'
! Nielsen. '35. and Alice Kemp, '37.
ten or typed and signed w i t h the w r i t e r s ! ,,.,,,, .,
, , , , , , , , „ . ,, ,,
general convention of the fraternity to
i
*
, ',<•
i
ii I P I , p s | i n i i i t M i l l , I I n i l
name and clas., numeral. 1 bev mav he
, ;,
.
... ,
, , be conducted in Cleveland, Ohio, Thursday, I'tiday, and Saturday.
of any length but must have an Interest . , , . ' , ' " " ' " k ' n , l ' " K T w l " ,K ' "Wulnrl
(or alumni. The following lop'- '•
been suggested:
Otto Borchert To Be
Lutheran Club Guest
EDITOR CONTEST
FOR "QUARTERLY"
TO END THURSDAY
'
"Collcgcs' Chief Task Is Preparing Students
For Citizenship Duties," Says Paul Shcals
Students In Education 115 Supervise Groups
In Milne High Extra-Class Activities
"Possibly ihe mosl importnnl task that schools ami colleges face ton
day is ihe preparation of sludenls (or Ihe dulies of cilizenidiip," says
Mr. Paul II. Sheats, assistant instructor in government. The training in
:
: N!'»1"'V:Cn„":i
Nineteen clubs have been organized for extra-curricular activities in
thc past has been faulty. This preparation should nol be neglected during
Milne lligli school and Junior High school ibis semester, Students in
the college career—Ihen is ihe lime lo lac,
• a g
I citizen. Citizenj Education 115, a course in extra-curricular activities, supervise these
I Italy
groups and ail as sponsors lor llie clubs.
ship is, Mr. Shcals asserls, pari of a person ami nol a lllillg which can
Every student of the junior high '34; dramatics for ihe senior high
be put into operation by pressing a button at specified times,
i ,v!ii,']i"s,i!i,li,i'sli'i|, is K.-CIIKschool is a voluntary member of one ol school. I.elilia Connelly and Laura Vro"ft is generally assumed thai Ihe exM r . S h c a l s believes thai "the whole
Tr
the groups. Meetings are c luctcil on man, seniors, and Catherine Mull.irn.v.
Making
nl,i
1.1
ercise of voting is a citizen's first and local party structure is based in the
Wednesday mornings from 11:15 In graduate
student; currenl
events,
W'nrlcl
major responsibility lo his govern- lasl analysis on the much overlooked
12:00 o'clock, except lor a few group Olympin D'Aiulo, '34, and Marjorie
Articles must be in die Alumni oil'
ment," Mr. Shcals says. Voting is es- and frequently ignored election district
Hirelings
scheduled
ill
die
after
s.
I.uildy,
graduate
student;
artcraft,
sential lo a good government, but this commitlceinan and coiumiltccwontati room 5. Richardson ball, on or before Meetings of the clubs lor the senior Allllll Eussilc, '34; library, Isabel Carldoes nol mean voting Duly at the general who are chosen in die primary election. Thursday. The seven members ol Ihe high groups are couducied in die class son, '3-1; mathematics fun, Dorothy
elections. "The importance of ihe pri- Wider participation by Ihe citizens of editorial hoard of the Alumni Quarterly j 'i e-rooms on days from 11:1111 to Maloneyjinil Mnry Wisneske, seniors;
mary election," he says,"eannol lie over- die United Stales in primary elections is will judge die nialerial, and die recipient ',' :00 o'clock.
typewriting, Helen dates and Miristressed, C lilions show, however, necessarj if local governments are to of ilie position will be announced in nr
Sixly students arc registered in Ibis am Wood, seniors; French, Marie
thill e v e n ill A l b a n y , w h i c h h a s Ihe be represented by honest, public-spirited carle March edition of Ihe STATU I'm
course, Miss Helen Halter, assistani I'rindlc mid Malildc Centner, seniors;
greatest representation al thc polls of
n and women selected by die likewise i.i i.c \'i w>, Mrs. Mrssenl added.
professor " i social science in Milne traffic, Charles Murphy, graduate slitall ihe cities of New York slate
ly 11
and unimpeachable committee
High school, staled loday. The purpose dent! excursion, Catherine HefTcrcn
one eligible voter out of nine lakes lite niei
of die course is lo leach llle 111 w and '34, Anna Mickey and Mildred Y igs,
trouble to vole in the primaries of any
practice of extra-curricular activities, special sludenls; glee club, Alice Owen
parly. Civic righteousness seems to he
pliasislis placed on 'siibllc guidance' and Muriel Blester, seniors; folk
limited to ihe general election."
cording lo
Sbeais. I
ilizeuship, according
t„ Mr. Shcals.
! ) „ , . ( . n f A | | , , , n v S n n n I v l i s > Halter'staled thai almost all ,,f dances and ballads. Thomas Gnrret'l• t l .
Mr Shenls believes tlwl to cole al Fortunately, sludenls are be. ling
OIL III i l l l l . l l i y a - " ' " I Hio sixiy students |,rc(er supervising an '34; and studenl council, Muriel Dentoi
die general election after failing to vote more and more interested in public afMr. Roy Smith, secretary of the I'orl nxtra-curriciihir activity to do
Ml
al die primary is like going to a parly fairs. Mr. Sbe.ils finds evidence ol this of Albany, has invited the members of p r o j e c t , H o w e v e r , t h e l a r g e r e g i s t r a A c o o k i n g club for boys, o r g a n i z e d
in Ihe discussion meetings of various commerce club lo visil the port, ac- tiou does tun permit every one lo acl by Miss May Fillingham, Instructor
served. The general voter justifies bis religious groups in which be has ob- cording in (iconic Story, '35. president as advisor to some group.
and supervisor in foods in Milne High
non-appearance at the polls for primary served a large number of students par- of the club. The trip is pla
'd for Ihe
Thc clubs and their supervisors a r e : school, is perhaps the most novel.
elections by llliuking thai be would be tiripating,
near future, Story succeeded Roger dramatics for the junior high scl 1,
Fight sludenls will conduct homemerely ratifying die choice of die party
Mr. Shcals said, in speaking of this, Bancroft, '34, as president of commerce boys and girls, respectively, Robert rooms during Ibis period. The group
organization; but here is where he is "I commend most heartily the growing club, when B a n c r o f t left College lo Willard and Myrtle McNeil, graduate includes: Vincent Bouland, special sludeceiving himself. Though slatislics Interest in currenl topics, evidenced hv accept a position in the commercial de
ludcuis; aviation, Donald Benedict, dent! Madolyn Dickinson, Marlon Ershow thai comparatively few
ninees Ihe sllldenl discussions ol religious partmenl in Frank fori. The club has '34; nowspai
Dorotby Klose audi vin, Mary Foley, Elsa Kjolseth, Gcrnl'
arc contested, yet the primary ballol groups, V.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A., and also scheduled a hauipici lo take place Bessic
Steikar, seniors: debating, Ken-! dine Peters, mill Marv W'allhcr, send Relations and Social in the spring.
serves as a check on usurpation and mis the Inleriiali
nclh Christian, '351 beginners' dancing, iors
I Leila Edwards, '35. Hilda
Commerce club meetings will he con
use of power by a political machine Science club as a real start towards
Marion Mlcczek, Margaret I Inlliday, I irCauip and Louise Herskind, graduate
dueled on alternate Thursdays al 3:15 and Agnes Crouch, seniors; etiquette ' students, will formulate home-room
when die voters' arc aroused for or good citizenship."
o'clock.
again-1 .1 certain nominee.
for (be ninth grade, Marion Cornell, I programs and observe home-rooms.
•'• lists''
"'
. J W . ^tepCili'of*;.™' College Cluh to Visit:
Lucille Beauty Salon
CONDUCTS- CONTEST
Tlie contest fur undergraduate editor
of the .lluutni Quarterly will lie condueled from lotloy until Thursday,
.Match 1. This contest is open In all
sophomores,
Each competitor will submit articles
In |ho Alumni ofllcc, Rlcardson hall
signed with the noine and class of th,
contestant. They will be judged on ap-
Y.,
TALK BY DR. SMITH, YOTING ON RINGS STATE WILL MEET PDRPLE AND GOLD WILL ENCOUNTER
WILL BE IN 11:10 ASSEMBLY TODAY MIDDLEBURYTEAM BROOKLYN, HAMILTON IN COURT TILTS
One hundred seventy-lour seniors
and graduate students began their practice teaching Monday, in Milne High
school, according to Professor John
M. Sayles, principal.
The schedule for those who will teach
.during the second semester is as follows :
8:05 O'clock
Mildred White and Sophia Zelnick, 7th
grade science: Frances lliggins, 711, year
English; Agnes Erh and Corlnno A. > awkler.
7th grade social science; Acton Civill and
Paul Sands, 8th grade science; Jessie M c
Avoy, 8lh grade mathemiltlcsl Blanche Villi
Bureil, 8tb grade null llvm.it ivs; Mary Knslic,
clinic mathematics: Hilda DcCamp ami l a p
silla Scbnstcr, biology; Maurice J. Colbert
and Dorothy liccnc. social science:
tub
Lc f a r o and Mary Williams, English 9; Itiitb
Mcllnr, French I ; Prank I'etrolljl and C.ertrude Sawyer, bookkeeping I: Minnie McNicklc and Virginia ShcrrlTI, !• rcllch I; Lois
Itawley and Thomas Sniyely, French I I ;
Elizabeth Kammerer and Myrtle 1 eck, geometry; Madalyn Owyer and Dorothy Shuliro, History (l: Marlon Lloyd and Lazarus
' i n k i n , English I I I ; Maxwell
Plolink,
F1
physics laboratory; Frances
llammerslcv.
French I I ; Gladys Murphy, French 111;
Aiidna Cluni and Hilda Proper, History L;
Marian Welch, Latin I V ; Allen Bailey, intermediate algebra.
18, N o .
—!ilfliiiWMi €Z»rimt\»
i m x - i u i T . 1 I T 1 H -T\ A11I.IT
State College News
Established by the Class of 1918
The Undergraduate Newspaper of New York State
College for Teachers
T H E N E W S STAFF
M A R I O N C. HOWARD
162 Western Avenue, 3-0975
Editor-in-Chief
W I L L I A M C. N E L S O N
Managing
Kappa Delta Rho, 117 S. Lake Avenue, 2-4314
JEAN
CRAIGMILE
Advertising
Phi Delta. 20 S. Allen Street, 2-1337
Editor
Manager
KATHRYN HAUG
Finance
Manager
Gamma Kappa Phi, 21 N . Main Avenue, 2-4144
D A N V A N LEOVAN
Associate
Managing
Editor
401 Western Avenue, 2-2650
RUTH WILLIAMS
Associate
Managing
Editor
Beta Zeta, 680 Madison Avenue, 2-3266
MILDRED FACER
Circulation
Phi Lambda. 536 Mercer Street. 2-6533
Manager
SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS: Almlra RUSB, Bessie Stctkar, and
Thelma Smith, seniors! Ruth Brooks and Valentine Reutowlch,
juniors. DESK EDITORS'J Kurl libers, Mary Hudson, Emilia Rogers,
and Glenn Ungcrer, KEJ'OIITEHS: Beatrice Cue and Rose Rosenbeck, s e n i o r s ; Bessie Ilnrtman, Emily Hurlliurt, Olga l l y r a , Dor
orthy Meserve, Esther Rowland, Helen Smith, and Mary Torrens,
j u n i o r s ; Hosclla Agostiue, Elaine llalrd, Phyllis Bosworlh, Margaret Bowes, Loretla Buckley, Prances Brecil, Elsa Calkins, lluldah Classen, Doris Coffin, Margaret Diets, Frances Donnelly,
Ruth Edmunds, Rase Elnhom, Blodwyn Kvans. Jacqueline Evans,
Eudorn Earrell, Margaret Flanigan, Merle Gedney, Marie Geesler,
Elizabeth Griffin, Elizabeth Hobbie, Dorothy Merrick, Aubrey Kill*
baugh, Virginia Chappell, LaVonne KeUcy, Jeanne Lesnlck, J a n e t
Lewis, Martha Martin, Eleanor Nottingham, Evelyn O'Brien, Charlotte Rockow, Dorothy Smith, Edith Scholl, Nina Ullman, and
Elizabeth Whttmati, sophomores! ASSISTANT FINANCE MANAGER'
Julia Rlel, MS. ASSISTANT CIRCULATION MANAGER: Margaret Wals*
worth, ' 3 5 . ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGERS: Beatrice Burns
and Elizabeth l'remcr, juniors* BUSINESS STAPI': William Davldge,
Edith Garrison, j u n i o r s ; and Mary Cllckmail and Carolyn Simouet,
sophomores.
WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT?
Communications
Hv M. C, I I .
(For sale in the Co-op)
£\ssoemtcri CEoUcpiatc ffivess
T h e M o t h e r by Pearl S. Buck. T h e J o h n Day
~m | 9 3 3 (M.iioMi'l^ii-^cfuiu.tO I 934 •=*Company, New York. 302 pages, $2,50.
W i t h even a deeper breadth of understanding
than was shown in T h e Good E a r t h , Pearl Puck has
drawn
her characters for her latest novel, T h e Mother,
Published every Friday in the college year b y t h e
Editorial Board representing t h e Student Association. T h i s story is also more simply written, t h e mechanics
Subscriptions, S2.25 per year, single copies, ten cents. helping all t h e more t o create the a t m o s p h e r e which
Delivered anywhere in t h e United States. Entered as the author h a s desired.
T h e book opens in the kitchen of the small
second class matter at postoffice, Albany, N. Y.
thatched farmhouse where t h e mother sits on a low
b a m b o o stool behind t h e earthen stove feeding t h e
T h e N E W S does not necessarily endorse sentiments tire with g r a s s . She is happy with her lot; her husband is a pretty y o u n g m a n , though not loo careful
expressed in contributions. No communications will be about saving t h e precious bits of silver so slowly
printed unless the writers' names are left with the Editor- acquired, T h e old mo , r, though half blind, sits at
in-Chief of the N E W S . Anonymity will b e preserved if so the door-way all day watching t h e children while the
desired. T h e N E W S does not guarantee to print a n y or m o t h e r a n d t h e m a n work in t h e fields.
all communications.
After a lime, however, the m a n takes their meagre
store of silver a n d wanders off lo the city, never to
r e t u r n . T h e m o t h e r ' s life, once so normal and contented, n o w becomes a slaving existence against alP R I N T E D BY C. F. WILLIAMS & S O N , INC., ALBANY, N . Y.
most unsurmotmtable odds. In lime, she too is Burplanted by a y o u n g e r w o m a n w h o feeds t h e fire. I n
spite
of (he feared results of her great hidden sin,
Vol. X V I I I , No. 12
Feb, 23, 1934
Albany, N . Y.
the daughter-in-law bears a man child, and the mother
becomes t h e " O l d O n e . " whose j o b it is t o watch t h e
children playing about the door-yard.
T h e hook is simple; in its simplicity lies its
MAY CHANGE RING
T o d a y , in student assembly, t h e cjucsiiori of t h e s t r e n g t h . O n e section of Chinese peasant lite is the
scope for this novel, rather than t h e crowded canvas
proposed change in tradition will again arise witli of T h e Good E a r t h . T h e central character, is t h e
regard lo t h e junior ring. W h e t h e r or not this re- " n a t u r a l " w o m a n , while her life of toil and childvision of t h e old tradition will be adopted is a matter bearing, even her great sin, all a r e a part of that
naturalism. S h e is indeed symbolic of t h e normal
entirely subject lo the will of ilie student body.
life of woman, so seldom found in modern novels.
A survey of records shows that t h e exact origin O n e can certainly say of T h e Mother, "truly a great
of t h e junior ring tradition is obscure. In 1921, h o w ever, a motion, originating with Myskania, was put
nefore t h e assembly thai the junior ring he s t a n d a r d A M o d e r n T r a g e d y , by I'hvllis Bcullcy. T h e Mac«/ed. A ring committee, consisting of t h e four class Indian Co. New York. 43-1 pages. $2.SO.
presidents and one other member from each class, in" T h e Sew York Times" has dubbed this book "a
vestigated the rings which previous classes had novel which clarifies our a g e . " This title is very opt
secured, T h e motion was passed. T h e junior ring because i h e book certainly dues show this age as
and the ring requirements became a tradition at that one of unrest, dissolution, a n d economic depression.
time.
T h e novel has for its background the Leeds
For several years now, junior classes have seen country of Yorkshire, England. T h e entire story is
the need and advisability of changing t h e class ring. centered around the depression and its effect on the
T h i s year the junior class lias wanted to change the cloth m a n u f a c t u r i n g trades of that vicinity.
ring to one with black onyx stone. T h e m a t t e r was
W a l t e r l l a i g b l , t h e key character of the book,
taken up with Myskania; Myskania lias accorded this becomes involved in a swindle, propagated by Leonclass tin 1 privilege of having such a ring. T h i s , how- ard T a s k e r , the typical hard-headed promoter, T h e
ever, does not mean that tradition h a s been changed, character*, a s well a s t h e scenes give dramatic conMyskania h a s merely countenanced the exception t o trast, for besides T a s k e r , we find Henry Clay C m s land, an honest, depondoble m a n of the old school.
the original ring requirements for the one year,
W h e n the company finally goes under, we find an
W h e t h e r or not this new ring will become the aiua/ing reaction, ihough a natural one, from these
traditional ring rests with the student body. T h e pro- three m e n ; Crosland com mils suicide, and T a s k e r
posed change will affect the lop of t h e ring, changing nies to leave the country. Waller, though overthe gold seal lo an oval seal cut in black onyx. As whelmed with the disaster and taken lo prison, is
in previous years, each class will select a suitable given t h e reassurance of hope, T h u s t h e book conies
out all right after all.
shank with the appropriate numerals and design.
Strangely enough Miss Hcntley has divided her
T h e proposed, ring is certainly a much better looking r i n g than t h e old, heavy, plain gold one. If t.ic bonk into acts and scenes rather than chapters. S h e
old rei|tiirements are out of date, w h y not change has placed at the beginning of t h e hook a table of
them so that other classes might also he benefited? dramatis personac. She h a s also given the book more
If this c h a n g e in tradition is not made, t h e old r e - of a dramatic pitch than is found in most novels.
i|uireiiu-nls will again apply to succeeding classes, It is the type of book which might easily be made
subject to exceptions allowed by the various M y s - Into a play, for one can mil help but notice how
kanias. It seems advisable, therefore, thai t h e pro- carefully tno a u t h o r h a s m a d e the scenes a s nearly
like a stiige setting as possible.
posed changes be made now.
ereetinn .if -nine form of "las- covcrltlK walls
similar in those used ai present t.i meal ail
ami'E,,:::,,t,Ki:^''.Xv:'!i:a,,!!."r!
u( ftiicli a iirajt-CI wmil.l nut I.,- Ion i<rc;it
wlieu tlic m i n i m i of the Btutltnls nml faculty
1
I R p i t f n a O v P T ClslSS o f ' 3 5
New Methods For Ancient History Course
Place Stress On Social Studies Aspects
T h e N E W S h a s received a letter p r o t e s t i n g t h e lack
of provisions for t h e protection of students from t h e
The presentation of ancient history enccs from which the pupils may select
elements as the pass between D r a p e r Hall and H a w l c y
through social science methods consti- their readings is placctl before each
Library. T h e recent inclement weather h a s rendered tutes an experiment now being con- student. After the pupils have covered
such protection practically indispensiblc. T h r o u g h o u t ducted for the first time in Milne High the general field, they are free to work
the winter a n d particularly d u r i n g t h e severe s n o w school under the supervision of Dr. nut individual projects. The fields of
art, literature, science, war, and coms t o r m of this week, t h o s e desiring t o study in t h e Donnal V. Smith, assistant professor merce are sonic of the fields used t o
library have been forced t o brave sweeping winds and of history. One of the innovations of find something in which the student is
this course is that mimeographed proswirling snow on t h e peristyle in order to study in t h e ject sheets instead nf textbooks arc interested. Sonic of the project work
hall. O n Tuesday, t h e small indoor passageway b e - used by, the pupils. Each one of these consists of original stories, debates,
construction and Illumination of manutween t h e t w o buildings w a s opened up, b u t t h e p r o - sheets treats a unit subject over a long script, making of miniature pyramids,
p o r t i o n s of this passageway a r e hardly adequate t o period of time, in fact, from the begin- totnbs, ami wood block prints.
a c c o m m o d a t e t h e n u m b e r s of students who make daily ning of civilization to 17R9.
Although the course tines not follow
These project sheets or units have the syllabus for ancient history, Dr.
use of the library. W e hope and trust that the powers
t h a t be a r e not intending to consign t h e students to such titles a s : "The Christian Church," Smith believes that the students will be
able lo acquit themselves just as creditthe misery of either route for t h e remainder of the cold "Primitive Man," "Communication," ably on a Regents' examination as pupils
"Religion," " T h e Establishment of an
weather.
Agrarian Culture," "Social Conflict who arc taught by the usual method.
W e deplore p r e s u m p t i o u s n e s s a t a n y time, but we and Cooperation." Each unit has an in- The student-teachers who are indeem it n o t unreasonable t o suggest that something troductory note which "sets the stage." structing under (his new system a r e :
Ahnira Russ, Hilda Bradley, anil Wilshould be done t o r e m e d y t h e condition. Consideration An outline follows which covers the liam Rogers, seniors.
field completely. A list of general referof t h e problem reveals t w o possible solutions. O n e
is t o widen the stairway which forms a part of of the indoor passage, since t h e n a r r o w n e s s of this stairway is
the cause of m o s t of t h e difficulty in that thoroughfare.
T h e other is t o enclose t h e peristyle, a s t h e peristyle
between H u s t e d and Richardson balls is enclosed. O b viously, t h e latter suggestion is more practical.
IMItor, STATU COIXKIIR N a m :
T h e S T ATI. C01.1.UOK NKWS has enO u r mind is open t o a n y reasonable opposition t o
tered the I ' M All-American Newsthis plan. Hut we feel that t h e rectitude of o u r argupaper contest conducted annually by the
ment is unimpeachable. T h e circumstance we are dismien peristyle lillssuKcwuy ctiilnecliiw Draper National Scholastic Press association
cussing is not alone inconvenient; it is d a n g e r o u s . T h e lull anil lliiwley library. Many limes .InriiiK in the Department of Journalism at the
r e m e d y suggested is not prohibitively expensive, a n d
University of Minnesota, according to
t h e r e is precedent for it. T h e administration can n o t it very inconvenient fur ti ureal number .if Marion Howard, '34, editor-in-chief.
be entirely ignorant of t h e condition; some m e m b e r s
The college newspapers entered in the
of t h e faculty m u s t have found occasion to visit t h e
contest are judged on the writing, choice
Library this week. T h e situation should not be allowed
of type faces, variety and type of headto continue as it is any longer than is absolutely neces- drifts in tin- liujsasetvay well nlllb |ircclnileil
the use .if Hi.- peristyle. Seeinnl, lllc liiilnor lines, and make-up. Ratings awarded
are : All-Ameriean, superior ; first class,
lorllil 'Kill proved ilnngci
s ami very in- excellent; second class, good; third
class, high average; and fourth class,
vlnusly. tills Is n.il llic remedy lotlie problem.
no honors.
It is Ilie consensus nf opinion Unit iln-
Books
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
Page 2
LI.
(Tollcmale MmM
• '/,'"'I
ALBANY, N. y„'
SECTION
"National
Collegiate
News in Picture and Paragraph"
NEWS COMPETES
FOR 1934 N.S. P. A.
CONTEST AWARD
In 1927, the N'KWS was rated an All-
Ainericau newspaper. In 1929, the
XKVVS received an All-American I Innor
rating. In 1930 and 1933, the Niiws was
rated first class.
problem is timely ellooull ami m K i-iil cli.illc.li
ti. IMIII.i.n in,i nnly tli,< consideration of lllc
udmlnlslrnlloii leu also speedy action lo alleVntirs sincerely,
A Junior.
February 211. 1 "-11.
Calendar
Today
11:111 SitiiU'iii assembly, auditorium. P a g e hail.
Tonight
8:15 Slate
college,
Brooklyn
Polytechnic institute liaskethall game, g y m n a s i u m ,
Page hall.
Sunday
•Pull L u t h e r a n
club
meeting,
Friendship
house, r,4d
State street.
5:30 M c n o r a h club bridge party,
55 T e n Kvcb. avenue.
K:IHI V.M.C.A. discussion meeting, Lounge, Richardson
hall.
Tuesday
•1:15 Y.W.I'.A. discussion meeting, Lounge, Richardson
hall.
5:30 Chemistry club dinner,
cafeteria, [lusted hall.
K:.ill Advanced dramatics class
plays, nutllloriutn, P a g e
ball.
Wednesday
3:00 F r e s h m a n
lea, Lounge,
Richardson hall.
5:15 French club meeting, room
2(1. Richardson hall.
Thursday
S:30 Debate, Stale college versus
Miililli'burv college,
Lounge, Richardson hall.
Friday
11:11) Stiuli'iii assembly, auditorium, Page hall.
5:30 Biology d u b party, room
-'5'), lliisti',1 hall.
Saturday
8:15 Stall' college, Si. Stephen's
basketball game, g y m n a sium. Page hall.
Tuesday
4:15 V.W.C.A. discussion meeting, Lounge, Richardson
ball.
8:30 Advanced dramatics class
plays, auditorium, Page
hall.
Question: "Da you think thai Ihe
Collegiate Digest is of sufficient
value and news interest to warrant
the continuance " / Us distribution
with
the STATU COIXKGE Nraws?"
William Rogers, '34: Y e s ,
frankly, 1 do. I think that anything like (hat which gives us a
look beyond our own circle of
College life is of value. W h e n I
first saw it, I was very much interested; and should like to sec it
continue,
Marjorie Kalaidjian, ' 3 6 : I
think the students like it; but I
don't think they find enough m a terial of interest t o themselves. It
does, however, create an interest
in t h e affairs of other colleges,
Therefore, we should continue it.
Helen C. J a m e s , assistant librar i a n : T h e Digest seems to feature
mostly news and pictures front
very small, obscure colleges,
which otherwise would be p r o b ably unheard of. If it should conlain more items from t h e larger,
more well-known colleges, 1 think
it would be of more interest,
K e n n e t h Christian, '35: I like
il because the NlWS is naturally
limited in giving us intercollegiate
news. T h i s presents it graphically
ami in a pleasant w a y . i t gives
us a comprehensive view of all the
phases of college life t h r o u g h o u t
the country, Incidentally, I think
some of the pictures are beautiful,
Rutherford Baker, coach: I
think that it is very hard to s a y .
If there are only a few people who
find enjoyment in reading t h e
Digest, 1 think it is worth while
continuing. T h e fair thing to d o
would be to lake a comprehensive
vote. Personally, I am neither for
nor against it.
William Nelson, ' 3 4 : Y e s ! Of
course! 1 peruse it with interest
on the occasion of its distribution.
It indicates wherein we fall short
of or come up t o the level of
generally
accented
collegiate
standards. It also provides t h e
rah I rah I boys a n d girls with
numerous additions for their
mural displays.
i.
H E I L , C A M E R A M A N ! — D u b l i n Univers i t y students g i v e t h e cameraman t h e Nazi
r^s salute w h e n h e photographs t h e m at their
post-graduation celebration.
Keystone View Photo
|
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
ntvnnunu^AUllL
?
r
1
>
K'.-til
7
HUHf"
"
,
1
:
I
:£p?
';
1
LZ'
i
1
A--^
'•'Jf :l ?ral
Site.
« j - • ~~
I
'&
1
•
DEPICTING OLD S T Y L E S , !
Frances Morgan poses with her
father. A. E. Morgan, president of
Antioch College and chairman of
the Tennessee Valley Authority.
v T
. * -> "
NEVER TOO OLD TO LEARN —
these two grandmothers have enrolled
in pre-Iegal courses at Long Island University.
Tr -Huru Pliolo
OUTSTANDING COLLEGE GRADUATES
Charles E. Hughes
Brpwn University 'II
Voted . the nation's moat outstanding
lawyer'before bis appointment aa Chief
Justice of the U. I. Supreme Court,
Mr. Hughes, former New York governor and Republican preaidentiai nominee, ia the only man aver to resign
from the Supreme Court and to be reappointed later. A former Secretary of
gut* and World Court judge, he ia an
outetaading statesman and juriet.
John Gabbert Bowman
George A. Welsh
University of Iowa '99
As Chancellor of the University of
Pittsburgh, Dr. Bowman is best known
as the man who made that institution's
Cathedral of Learning, a 40-story
building, a reality. Former president
of bis alma mater, he holds honorary
degrees from Rutgers and Oglethorpe
universities and Co* College.
Temple University '05
A graduate of Temple's School of Law,
Mr. Welsh is now judge of the United
States District Court of Philadelphia.
A former member of Congress from
Pennsylvania, his selection was inspired by his conspicuous record In
public service.
_J
'
'
«
«
•'
Queen Gertrude 1 Reigns Over Classof '35
.r3i~L
mim emu IIME-
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934,
•
•
-
••••}--
Page 2
State
O
Queen Gertrude I Reigns Over Class o T 3 5 ^ ^ LjnnJLMnD_UHH
, :
m n w i u nAimi
•
EJ
The Under)
MARION C. HOW
WILLIAM C. Nl
Kappa !
JEAN
CRAIGMII
Pb
KATHRYN H A B
Gamma
^
DAN V A N LEI
R U T H WILLIAI
Del
MILDRED FACE!
Phi!
SENIOR ASSOI
Thelma Smitll, [
juniors. DESK E
nml Glenn Ung|
lieck, seniors; 11
orlllj- Meserve. I
•Un
juniors
Karet Bowes, 1.0
ilali Classen, I)
Ruth Edmunds,
Eudora Farrell,
Elizabeth Grlffii
baiitth, Virginlii
Lewis, Manila S
lotte Hollow. !
Elizabeth Wtiiti
Julia Kiel. MS.
worth. '.15. Ai
ami Elizabeth I'
Edith Harrison,
sophomores.
J$S&
!'RE TELLING YOU —WilTell couldn't compete with
this formidable line-up of co-ed
archers at the University of
Southern California.-
"IT'S OLSEN" . , . "AND JOHNSON'*I
—but this time in the role of beauty ]
judges. They selected Anne Scott (second row center) as Ohio State's Makio I
yearbook queen.
DIRECT DARTMOUTH CARNIVAL—
these Dartmouth College students laid the
plans (or the famous carnival which is considered the highlight in the east's mid-winter collegiate social season.
SHE DIRECTS large part
of all student Activities at
Butlci Universii — Dorothy
Daunci.
Published
Editorial 13c
Subscription
Delivered at
second class
The NEW
expressed in
printed unlo
in-Chief of t
desired. T l
all commun
PRINTED uv
Vol. XVIII
Today,
proposed
reKlinl to
vision of t |
entirely fij
A sttrvl
nf the juil
ever, a int;
tefore Ilia
•zed. A t |
prcsidcnS
vestiKiitecl
secured] fj
anil Hid rf
time.
THEY'RE QUICK ON THE TRIGGER
—Northwestern's co-ed rifle team shown
practicing on the lake shore before a recent meet.
Keyitone View Photo
DECK TENNIS ON LAND — University HP
of Maryland co-eds are rapidly adopting g
this new land sport as part of their intra- | ^
mural program.
International Newa Photo
RELIC OF COLLEGIATISM—Birmingham-Southern College students take a ride
in a fast disappearing "collegiate" car.
Page 3
S T A T E COLLEGE NEWS, . F E B R U A R Y 23, 1934
Page 2
S T A T E COLLEGE N E W S , F E B R U A R Y 23, 1934
iDwra DAWN
«f Alfjflfl
1
Queen Gertrude I Reigns Over Class of '35
Prnm-at. Aurania-Club
_ _ _ A . * _ InnuiiLliininr
THF, SWRJASE.
' j
HE HAN THE PICKET LINES in Yankton College's
"date" war, so the strikers administered this punishment.
TO STUDY STRATOSPHERIC WEATHER—balloons
will be sent up by these Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientists.
Keystone View Photo
CORRECT CAMPUS WEAR—This week we present three patterns, two ensembles and an "all-day" school dress, that are outstanding in their simplicity and attractiveness. At the left is
an ensemble that can be procured in 12 to 20-year-old sizes,
with 34 to 38 bust. The smart dress illustrated in the center
penal comes in sizes 14 to 20 years, with 34 to 44 bust, while
the combination shown on the right may be had in small, medium and Urge sizes for the cape, and 12 to 20 years, with 34 to
40 butt, for the dress.
Adv«nc« Stylo*.
fpllwiafc Burst
SECTION
114 S. Carroll St., Madison, Wis.
Enclose amnios, coins, money order or check tor 20 cents for
each pattern anil cost of mulling. Please Indicate pattern number and alaa on order.
(HOME ADDRESS)
V2N16—Printed by the Alco Gravure Inc. of Chicago
""""•'•mMumimm
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934,
.,
-JOueen Gertrude_I Rdfn._Over < J ^ »
TiAimi
M
\ \ _
Page 2
(Mkwit M$t&t
SECTION
"National
HOW
7RE YOUR
»**VESr
Steady Smokers
turn to Camels
A MATCHLESS BLEND
ANTON LEKANC, winner of over
"•^"^^^^^^
actW the same
0 #*Me*.
tanoi
Camel* »•;»
c os
^kwM 1 ^'
than any
40 titles and trophies, smokes
Camels steadily—withoutasign
of jangled nerves. He says:
"The most important elements
in ski jumping are correct timing and healthy nerves. In fact,
they add up to the same thing
because you cannot have correct
timing without healthy nerves.
I have been jumping at championship ski-runs for years. And
I have smoked Camels steadily
for even longer. They are the
only cigarette that I don't get
tired of. A day's last Camel
tastes just as good as the first
one. And Camels never interfere
with healthy nerves."
n
a
»
Countless thousands are
changing to Camels. And they
are urging others to join them!
Camels are milder. They have
a rich, satisfying flavor. And
they leave your nerves smooth
and unruffled.
'AJ&t, fw-CLOCQS
CLtni
*
N E V E R G E T ON Y O U R N E R V E S . . N E V E R T I R E Y O U R TASTE
r-i
TUNE IN! S
^
y
^
^
/- -<• r i ! i ICIMA Orchttlra and other Headline™ Every Tutlday and
^
M PST
-
-°°"•"•"—*"'*"-*
1
Collegiate
News
in Picture and
Paragraph"
m
^
]
m
Pfge_f
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, .FEBRUARY 23, 1934
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
%*nnnumi
Page 2
Most Rev. P. A. McGovern
James E. Scrugham
Cube E. Parker
Creighton (Jnivci sity '91
A member of Creighton's first graduating
class, tile Rev. Mr. McGovern has risen
to the high post of Bishop of Cheyenne,
Wyo., a position which he has held for
20 years. Known throughout the nation
as a champion of education, he has done
outstanding missionary work in a diocese
comprising 101,340 square miles, He
was elevated to the hierarchy in 1912 by
Pope Pius X.
University of Kentucky '00
Kentucky's outstanding alumnus has occupied positions of high trust in the
fields of education and government. He
served as engineering dean of the University of Nevada, public service commissioner of New York State, Governor
of Nevada, and editor of Nevada State
Journal. He is at the present time Congressman from Nevada and a member of
the House banking and currency committee.
University of Tulsa '99
Now a trustee of his alma mater, Mr.
Parker lias' done outstanding work in
education among the Indians of the
southwest. From superintendent of the
Armstrong Academy for Choctaw Indian
Boys to superintendent of five Indian
tribes under President Wilson, he has
been a constant friend of Indian education. He was registrar of the U, S,
treasury from 1913 to 1915.
TVAWM.
I
»•••!•
|«5
VIA
Dr. Emmett B. Carmichael.
University of Alabama, conference chairman of American Association for Advance»>"" o ( Science.
M B
...
- ••••
-•
- Queen Gertrude I Reigns Over Classof '35
muv emD HOT I
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
Page 2
ts
DO
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it-
ine
•sis
nes
lip.
113
!12
Page 3
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
| Queen Gertrude I Reigns Over Class of '35
.1 i..„:„- Prom at Auranifl Llub
i
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FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS at Middlebury, Vt., College, (left to right) Ruth
Wickware, William Waite, Mildred Moore,
Randal Hoffman, Phillip Brown, Marion
Wishart.
Bi^lal]
E D I T S LITERARY MAGAZINE—
Florence Pitts, editor of Converse
College "Concept."
Maiming Photo
Collegiate Digest Travel Bureau is organized to
help you choose an enjoyable vacation, at no cost
to you. Below you will find a coupon which we
ask you to check, clip, and send us. W e will forward the requested literature to you as soon as
possible.
Travel Bureau, Collegiate Digest
Box 472, Madison, Wisconsin
Gentlemen: Please send me the literature on
the following:
D Yellowstone Park
• Alaska
D Rocky Mt. National PL D Dude Ranches
• Europe
D Zion National Pk.
•
Glacier Nationol Park D Hawaii
•
Banff-Lake Louise
D Other
•
.
' '
•<*.-•
•
THE COLLAR'S T H E THING—along with the slender lines
of the models shown this week for the smartly dressed co-ed
who wishes to make her own dresses. At the left is a simple
frock with a V-neck, sizes 12 to 20 years, with 34 to 42.bust.
In the center panel are illustrated patterns for an ascot and a
bib collar, coming in small, medium and large sizes. At the
right is a striking frock which comes in sizes 14 to 20 years,
With 34 to 42 bust.
Advance Siylee
-•
%H••'•
• ..«';•-.,'-•,'... -J
W H O DOES T H I S R E M I N D YOU OF?
—Evelyn Wilson, Southwestern Louisiana
Institute co-ed, in a real old-time costume.
OKDEK PATTERNS
from
SECTION
114 S, Carroll St., Madlaon, Wia.
Bncloae elampa, colna, money order or check for £0 centa for
each pattern and coat of mailing, Pleaie Indicate pattern number and alee on order.
I expect to travel by
D railroad • automobile •
plane •
steamship
(COLLEGE ADDHLSSi
I HOME ADDHESS1
V2N17—Printed by the Alco Gravure Inc. of Chicago
*——
STATE COLLEGE
Page 2
NEWS, FEBRUARY
.«.—» i i. M ,iiiiijim i—iiiiiHiiniiii„l'|i|iiii|ll|)ll|WWIi
i
H
Page 3
STATE COLLEGi: NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
2 3 , 1934
BAKERMEN D0IH
HA1OTICK QUINTET
Queen Gertrude I Reigns Over Glass of '35
At Annual Junior Prom at Aurania Glub
NEWS NOTES
Six correct predictions—one incorrect—not bad!
T h e Bakcrmen looked like a college
ball team last Saturday against the
Southern tier aggregation from H a r t wick. Who couldn't against a one man
teaml
I m u s t s a y t h a t t h e m o r a l e of t h e
t e a m w a s slightly improved, s h o w i n g
t h a t t h e boya can hold out If they are
taking over t h e opposition. T h e s u p p o r t from t h e bleachers w a s also a n
i m p r o v e m e n t over former g a m e s .
" F l i p " Burnell made about half of
his shots count—which is and isn't a
good record. "Flip" was doing some
nice floor work, but missed too many
cripples. However, Congrats, Flip, on
the 19 points.
G e o r g e Bancroft held h i s m a n , o r
m e n , w e should say, t o goose e g g s ,
while h e m a n a g e d t o r u n u p a n e a t
Bum of 13 c o u n t e r s .
Charlie Robson, not a basketball star,
but a pill player of a certain degree, Is
reputed to have taken over the entire—
almost entire—squad from Hartwick on
bis private court at the Y.M.C.A. on
Saturday P . M . Did you get that cue?
T h i s week-end the P u r p l e a n d Gold
g o into action against a mediocre
t e a m from Brooklyn and t h e H a m i l t o n college quintet. I predict t h a t
t h e B a k e r m e n will b e t a k e n into c a m p
o n b o t h occasions. B o y s , please s p a r e
t h e brick b a t s , I predict you will w i n
t h e St. Stephen's game.
T O CONDUCT TEA
S t a t e D i s p l a y s N e w Offense S y s t e m ;
The next student-faculty tea will he
W h i p s O n e o n t a Cage Outfit
conducted Wednesday afternoon at 3:00
o'clock in the Lounge of Richardson
B y 17 P o i n t M a r g i n
hall. T h e freshman class will sponsor
the lea. Dr. Caroline C. Croasdalc,
In the annual court tilt with the Mart- College physician, will pour. Anne
wick quintet from Oneonta, the Baker- Rand and Virginia Stocl will serve as
student chairmen. Officers of the class
men emerged the victors by a wide
f 1937 will serve as a reception commargin, indicated by a 47-30 score.
mittee
The Purple and Gold offensive, as
such, was noticeable for the first time
CLUB T O MEET
this season and the floor work of the
French club will conduct a council
team was up to a collegiate par. This, meeting Wednesday afternoon al 3:15
added to the fact that the team is o'clock in room 20 of Richardson hall,
learning to drop the pill through the according to Marie-Louise Sharon, '34,
president. T h e council members will dishoop, chalked up a fancy advantage (or cuss plans for the annual French fete.
the State quintet.
There will be a general business meetT h e Ilakermcn took the lead early in ing of the club at 4 :15 o'clock, followthe game, and at no time did they r e - ing the council meeting.
linquish the advantage to the Oneonta
courlmcn.
Both coaches substituted frequently
IS VICE-PRESIDENT
throughout the last two quarter periods
Philip Riccardi, '34, was recently
willi no distinct advantage to either
outfit. Personal fouls were also numer- elected vice-president of Kappa Phi
ous in the last two frames, being com- Kappa, national honorary educational
mitted with equal frequency by both fraternity, to succeed Roger Bancroft,
'34.
quintets.
"Flip" Burnell anil George Bancroft
led the scoring attack of the State colIS RECENT VISITOR
lege outfit with thirty-two points. BurAlvina Lewis, '33, recently visited the
nell scored nineteen, while Bancroft
added thirteen more to the total. Petrlll office of the STATU COI.I.KHK N E W S .
of the opposition tallied fourteen points Miss Lewis was euroute for the annual conference meeting of the New
for the Hartwick team.
State Youth conference at
T h e b o x s c o r e o f t h e g a m e f o l l o w s : York
Rochester, which she attended as a deleSTATE
rti
(11
in gate from Westchester county. Miss
l l u n u l l , If
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I
1» Lewis was formerly editor-in-chief of
]ln,i,Us, If
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* the Nliws and a member of Myskauia,
Bancroft, c
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1 3 senior honorary society.
Hall. iK
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II.,old,ill, C
Petrlll, iii
Hansen. IK
llai•iiaril, r f
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Harrison, IK
lli.'Koiy. r f
Totals .
••
Jangled nerves are like a leak in your reserve of energy.
And if you could count the units of energy a normally
high-strung person wastes each day—the result would
astonish you.
So if you find yourself drumming on your desk or
table—or indulging in any other nervous habits—start
protecting your nerves.
Get enough sleep—fresh air. Make Camels your
smoke. You can smoke as many Camels.as you want.
Their costlier tobaccos never jangle your nerves.
CAMEL
Thur.day
CAKAVAN
' • « " " ' " * C ' « " Gray',
CASA LOMA O r c A . . , , , , and oth.r HmadUnm
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DR. E. H. MORRIS
TOLEADY.W.CA.
GROUP TUESDAY
Dr. Elizabeth II. Morris, professor
of education, will lead the discussion for
the second meeting of the Young W o men's Christian association for this
semester, Tuesday afternoon at 4 :15
o'clock in the Lounge of Richardson
30 hall, according to Daisy Bryson, '35, undergraduate representative. The topic
for discussion will be, "Present Day
Problems in Education."
"Is College a Preparation for Citizenship?" was Ihe topic ol the discussion
meeting led by Mr. Paul II. Sbeals.
Biology club will conduct a labor- assistant instructor in government,
atory party in the biology laboratory, Tuesday afternoon al 4:15 o'clock in
room 259 of Draper hall, Friday after- t h e L o u n g e .
noon at 5:3(1 o'clock, Gertrude RosenDr. Adnu \V. Risley, bead of the
berg, '34, president, announced today. history department, will lead the discusInitiation of new members will be con- sion next Tuesday afternoon. His
ducted at the party. The initiation pro- topic will be. "Good Sportsmanship."
gram will be novel, including a supper "Spread of Nationalism," will be the
in the laboratory and entertainment topic for discussion on Tuesday, March
later ill r n -'oil of I lusted ball, All 13, and will be led by Dr. James B,
students who wish tp join the club in- Palmer, professor of education.
Other events planned by Y.W.C.A,
to attend the supper may sign up on a
poster on the main bulletin board in the for Ihe second semester include a disrotunda of Draper ball. A nominal fee cussion of College traditions by Carowill be charged I" cover expenses, Miss lyn Kelliy, '31. Easter morning matins,
Silver Hay dinner, World federation
Rosenberg added,
speaker, and a dance.
Dr. Carlton E, Power, bead of the
natural science department, and Mrs.
power, and Dr. Ralph G, Clausen, instructor in biology, and Mrs. Clausen,
will be initiated as new faculty members of the club al the parly.
The following committees have been
T h e art exhibit n o w displayed outappointed to lake charge: program, s i d e t h e a r t s t u d i o iii D r a p e r b a l l is a n
Sarah Logan, '35, chairman, Doris Hell, Inspirational study conducted by Miss
Elinor Contain, Margaret Dickson,
Muriel Pieslcr, and Miss Rosenberg, Ali.e Morgan Wright of State street,
seniors, Klma Neslcrsou and Kulli Wll according to M iss Eunice Perine, assistant professor of fine arts. This is a
Hams, j u n i o r s ; invitations,! nillia lloff
man, '34, chairman, Helen Bromley sillily in p a s t e l s w h i c h M i s s W r i g h t d i d
special student, Esther Gcrsten nni w h i l e o n a I r i p t o t h e w e s t .
Gladys Kohler, juniors, and l.uella
Worsen, '.V>; refreshments, Miss GcrThe exhibit on display during the exsten, '35, chairman, Miss Pieslcr, amination period and the week followMarion Cornell, and Leon Roy, seniors, ing was the work of the students in
Miss Logan and Sylvia / a r c h , juniors,
and Arline Kiibn and Mnrgarel Schuy- Fine Arls live, six, and seven, Miss
ler, freshmen; posters, Miss Coiilant, Perine odded. This work included stu'34, chairman, Ellen Downing, Anita dies Illustrating the proper arrangement
Kralick, and Roy, seniors, Ruth Steb of flowers. Tin- type ol drawing called
tier, '35, and Miss Schuyler, '37.
"pencil painting" was confined mostly
Art Studio Conducts
Display of Pastels
In o u t - o f - d o o r
scenes. T h e r e w e r e
FRESHMAN CUBS'
WILL CONTINUE
IN NEWS CLASSES
During the second semester, editorial
classes for the STATE COLLEGE N K W S
State college demonstrated its unique
originality Friday night at the Aurania
club when members of the junior class
and their guesis gathered to witness the
crowning of Gertrude Morgan, '35, as
Prom Queen, clung to ibeir purpose
and enjoyed a gay evening and a dignified coronation in spile of the serious
handicap of the very bile arrival of the
orchestra they bad engaged.
Due lo ihe extreme cold, Nelson
Maples' S,S. I.cvialhan orchestra was
delayed anil could not reach Albany
until nearly midnight. However, the
coronation of Queen Gertrude 1 took
place serenely on schedule. Miss Morgan entered Ihe ballr
n attended by
Doris Howe, Gertrude Nealoud, Grace
Prilchard, ami Julia Red, juniors, and
was crowned by llarriette Goodenow,
'34, Prom Queen last year. Following
the coronation, all the Queen's "subjects" marched in a grand march before
her throne.
'
freshman "cubs" will be conducted under the direction of Thchna Smith, '34,
senior associate editor, and Ruth W i l liams and Dan Van Lcuvan, juniors,
associate managing editors. Miss Smith
In the meantime, however, the Ions will direct the class which meets at
wail was made pleasant for Ihe im- noon on Monday. Miss Williams will
patient would-be dancers by talented conduct the Thursday noon section. Van
and willing members uf Stale college Leuvau will continue lo conduct the
and a group of men from Union col- special class in journalism which meets
lege. Marion Mleczek, '3-1, staged a on Wednesday, from 12:00 to 1:00
ballet dance, and Rolando DeMarco, o'clock. T h e "cubs" of this class will
special student, a tap-dance. DeMarco soon issue a mimeograph copy of their
and William Jones, '35, harmonized own newspaper.
some popular snugs; and large groups
T h e classes last semester were directof State and Union college men sang ed by Hcssic Stetkar and Almira Russ,
their college snngs. Popular songs in senior associate editors, and Van Leuwhich a large part of the guests joined van. These classes received instruction
were accompanied at the piano by in writing news stories, the elements
Robert Robinson, '3*1; Jean Craigmile, which arc combined in journalistic writ'34, entertained with her interpretation ing and the methods of writing interof "Shanghai Lll,"
views.
The class of 1935 may be proud of the
way their college iriends, as well as
VISIT SORORITY
they themselves, came to the rescue and
[Catherine Moore and Katherine
made a bright evening in spite of a
great disappointment. This was a Prom Long, of the class of '33, were guests
unique—and no doubt it will remain at the Chi Sigma Theta sorority house
unique in the future history of Proms. for Junior Week-end.
Dr. Smith Will Speak
Fraternity To Initiate
In Student Assembly
Nine Neophytes Sunday
Nine neophytes will he formally initiated into Gamma chapter of Kappa
Delia Rho fraternity Sunday afternoon, according lo Donald Benedict,'34.
Charles Kissamand Benedict, seniors,
and Arllou R. Hush, '35, will have
charge of the ceremonies.
Those who will be initialed a r e :
Michael Griffin, Sebastian Albrcchl,
loscph Otiellelte, sophomores; John
'DOIIII, Alonzo Dii.Mont. Ralph Van
Horn, Edward I. Sabol, William Young
and Fred E. Dexter, Jr., freshmen.
A banquet will be given the new members al the chapter house, 117 South
Lake avenue, after their induction.
Honorary faculty members and alumni
will b e gllesl
speakers.
FRANK H,
[mint Ir,
I f'W
WELCOMES MEMBER
Epsilon Beta Phi sorority welcomes
Mary Riley, '35, into full membership.
I)
Bertha K. Brimmer, executive secretary of tin- Alumni association.
A committee composed of forty members (if the cla^s will assist the captains.
The committee will be organized in the
alumni ofHee, room 5 of Richardson
hall, Thursday.
"Wo hope that the amount pledged
by the class of 'M will total 820,000."
Robinson added.
A senior class meeting will be conducted in the auditorium at 12:00
o'clock, immediately following the
assembly.
G. F.Williams & Son,Inc.
P W « for c '" c"m"'""°
X
K l i H S I
J
are
Particular
36 Beaver Street
Albany, N. Y.
Printer* «/ the Stat* Colimio Sewi
P h o n e 4-0070
H o s i e r y , l ' n j n m n a , L i n g e r i e , Gloves, a n d M i t t e n s
"Practical tillti /•«• All"
NANCY A N N SHOP
EVORY & CO.
793 M a d i s o n A v e n u e
General Printers
36-38 Weaver Street
Wu'ru Beady
far Clirlltmtll
°i""' «»«»'»*•
Dial 5-1913
" 5-9212
Geo. D . J c o n e y , P r o p .
also
91 Steps East of Pearl
Street
examples of Ihe methods used in buildTO CONDUCT PARTY
ing up a portrait or oiber drawing from
Menorab club will conduct a bridge human life.
party Sunday afternoon at 5:30 o'clock
at the home of Mrs, Ben Hcrshberg, '33,
GIUMM F i t t e d
TeUpUnno 4-2154
1.JL-H i:»,m,lneil
,55 T e n Eyck avenue T h e following
committee has charge of arrangements!
Dinah Kapp, '36, chairman, Harry
EYE
GLASSES
YniTcr, '34, and Eleanor llaselunss, '37,
At the last meeting it was decided
OCUMSTS' P H K S C B i r n O N S l'lIXBD
that the annual banquet would be conHewitt lluildhm,
Room 10, 61 Columbia
Street, Albany, N. Y .
dueled at the Copper Kettle restaurant,
on Sunday, March 11.
N. P . F R E D E T T E
SMOKE AS MANY AS YOU W A N T . . .
THEY NEVER GET O N YOUR NERVES!
IN I
111 !
2
CLUB WILL HAVE
INITIATION PARTY
AT 5:30 FRIDAY
Jangled nerves
make you
throw away
vital energy!
TIIMF
H i n t
1
il
1
o
0
"
THE SIDE LINE
Boulevard
Cafeteria
and
Grill
198-200 Central Avenue
Albany, N. Y.
Try Our Special Dinners Sl.00
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 23, 1934
GLUB
DIRECTOR NAMES
DRAMATICS GLASS CHEMISTRY
TO HAVE DINNER
TUESDAY AT 5:30
'SORCERER'CAST
TO STAGE PLAYS Chemistry
club will conduct a dinner
STATE FIVE ENDS
COURT CAMPAIGN
SATURDAY NIGHT
; State's varsity basketball team will
in the cafeteria o*f Husted hall, Tuesday G. A. A,-Troubadours To Present attempt to close its court campaign with
afternoon at 5:30 o'clock, Harold Gardvictory when it meets St. Stephen's on
Gilbert and SuUivan Operetta
ner, '34, president, announced today.
the Page hall gymnasium court, SaturMarch 23 and 24
The committe in charge of the dinner
day night, at 8:15 o'clock, according to
includes: Florence Standhuk, '35, chairGeorge Ketcham, '35, varsity basketball
The advanced dramatics class will man, and Dorothy Graincr and Sylvia
Tbe Girls' Athletic association and manager.
present a program of two one act plays Saroff, seniors,
the Troubadours, men's musical organNeither team has an impressive court
Tuesday night in the auditorium of
Initiation of new members will be ization, will present another of Gilbert record for this season, but State should
Page hall. The first play will begin at conducted in room 250 of Husted hall and Sullivan's operettas, "The Sor- emerge the victor. St. Stephen's has
8:30 o'clock. These will be tbe first after the dinner. The initiates will be
bowed to both Hartwick and St.
productions directed by the class for divided into groups, and each group cerer," on Friday and Saturday, March Michael's. The Purple and Gold dethe second semester and present plans will present an original stunt as a part 23 and 24, in the auditorium of Page cisively vanquished the former, and
indicate that there will be at least one of the initiation program. All students hall at 8:30 o'clock. Lucille Hirsch, '35, lost only by five points to the latter
play each week, with the annual pre- having had more advanced work than will direct the production.
compared to a thirty point defeat adsentation of a three act piny in May. chemistry one and any others who prc> The cast includes: Dr. Daly, Robert ministered to St. Stephen's by St,
Miss Agnes E. Futterer, assistant pro- sent original and acceptable papers be- Robinson, '34 ; Constance Partlet, Fran- Michael's.
fessor of English, serves as faculty ad- fore the club are eligible for member- ces Studebaker, .'36; Aline, Alice
Last year, the Slate quintet emerged
ship. Eleanor Coutant, '34, will be Owen, '34; Alexis, William Jones, '35; tbe victor over St. Stephen's by a score
visor to the student dramatists.
chairman 1of initiation. Miss Graincr, Sir Marmaduke, Thomas Garrett, '34; of 38-2o,
The first play, directed by Dorothea Leo Plank , and Sophia Zelnick, seniors, Lady Sangazurc, Mildred White, '34;
Coach Baker has made no predictions
Mrs. Partlet, Jessie'Eaton, '34; notary, as to who would be in the starting
Gahagan, '35, will have tbe following will assist her.
New members of the club who will Donald Benedict, '34; and John Well- line-up.
cast: the warden, Wilfred Allard, '35;
James Dyke, Samuel Spcctor, '35; be initiated at the party are: Orvis ington Wells, Joseph Ryan, graduate
Dyke's sister, Elaine Cronin, '35; the Hazard, '34; Janet Brown, Eloise student.
The committees are: business manpriest, Kenneth Christian, '35; assist- Cooper, Allen Lewis, Inez Litis, Alfred
ants Frank Hardmeyer and Thomas Lucas, John Stewart, and Ruth Wil- agers, Katbryn IJaug, '34, and John Phi Delta Sorority Has
Bills,
'35; advertising, Glenn Ungerer,
liams, juniors; Norma Blake, Philip
Kelley, sophomores.
Annual Alumnae Event
Agnes Beck, '34, directs the second Carlson, Martha Dashnaw, Emma '3d, and Sarah Logan, '35, co-chairmen,
Hannah
Parker, '34, Charlotte Rockow,
play production. The following will ap- Guattery, Donald Huddlcston, BenjaPhi Delta sorority conducted its anClarence
Saki,
Karl
Kbers,
and
Ruth
min
Kolker,
Mildred
Scbultcs,
Myra
pear in tbe cast: Mrs. Scbultzc, Mary
Stephens, Florence Tate, and Angela Edmunds, sophomores ; tickets, Carlton nual alumnae week-end Friday, SaturKane, '3(j; Mr. Scbultze, Cecil Walker, Zannieri,
sophomores; and Fred Dex- Coulter and Marion Heiiiemaiin, jun- day, and Sunday at tbe sorority house,
'36; Jim, William Jones, '35; and Mae, ter, and Norman
Gunderson, freshmen. iors, co-chairmen, George* Kctchani, 20 South Allen street, according to Jean
Doris Howe, '35.
There will be a charge of fifty cents '34, and Ham'cttc Ten Eyck, '35 ; house, Graigmile, '34, president, Activities of
Paul Cheney, '36, and Dorothy Munyer, the week-end included a luncheon Satfor the dinner.
'34, co-chairmen; sets and props, KenWELCOMES MEMBER
neth Christian and Ruth Brooks, jun- urday noon, and a' joint meeting of
Phi Lambda sorority welcomes Mariors, co-chairmen, William Nelson, active members and alumnae Saturday
garet Burnette, '36, into full memberCOLLECTS TINFOIL
Alice Fitzpatrtek, Helen Danahy, Dor- afternoon at 2:00 o'clock.
ship.
Tbe freshman class has undertaken othy Griffin, seniors, Elizabeth Gregory
Guests entertained at the house were :
tbe task of collecting tinfoil for the and Thurston Paul, juniors; costumes, Ethel Bislaud, '27 \ Florence Unindoll,
ARE GUESTS
benefit of children crippled as a result Wilfred Allard, '35, and Marian Pike, '31; Jean Credle, Virginia Hawkins,
Recent house guests at Phi Lambda of infantile paralysis. They have placed '34, co-chairmen ;- faculty, Almira Uuss. and Marjoric Wilson, members of the
sorority were Ruth Conger, '31, and boxes for the reception of the tinfoil in '34, chairman ; music. Philip Riecardi class of '32, Edith Judkins, ex-'32; and
tbe rotunda of Draper ball.
and Julia Shields, seniors, co-chairmen. India Newton, '33.
Dorothy Hurlbut, '30.
Miss Gahagan, '35, to Direct First
Presentation of Semester
Tuesday at 8:30
'34 TEAM LEADS
IN SPORT LEAGUE
Junior Five Wins Second Place
In First Round of Winter
Court Schedule
The first round of the intra-mural
basketball league has been completed
and the tabulation shows tbe juniors
and seniors in first and second places
respectively. The New Era team, now
ju third place, has an opportunity to go
into a tie with the juniors if they win
their two remaining games which they
have yet lo play because of their late
entry into the race.
This season has marked the most extensive schedule ever arranged for intra-mural sports at State college. Al
Jadtck, manager of intra-uiural sports,
has recently initiated a schedule for
intra-class boxing tournaments. Jadick
stated that be expects to stage both
tennis and baseball schedules this coming spring.
The final standing of the basketball
league for the first round is as follows:
Team
Juniors . .
•New Kra
Sfiphoniov
iirndimtcH
!• reslimcn
• Must 1
round nut!.
Lost
1
1
1
2
2
s ...
4
5
ii
av U H more K.'inifs in c imjilete
Won
, ,. 4
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; f
WELCOMES MEMBERS
Gamma Phi Sigma welcomes tbe
following into full membership: Margaret McCann, Beatrice Burns, and
Elizabeth Bennett, juniors, and Harriette Rhodes and Catherine Mullaruey,
graduate students.
^^ach year Turkey and. Greece ship us
thousands of hales of fine tobaccos—
But why send 4,000
miles for tobacco ?
... because spicy, aromaticTurkish is the
best seasoning there is for a cigarette.
It adds s o m e t h i n g lo flavor and
aroma that no other tobacco can give.
A
BALANCED
BLEND
OF FINEST
Chesterfield usesTurkish tobacco—from
Samsoun, Smyrna, Cavalla and Xanlhi.
Then it blends and cross-blends them
with various k i n d s of choice homegrown tobaccos in t h e right balance to
give you a cigarette that's milder, a
cigarette that tastes belter.
AROMATIC
TURKISH
AND
'**'**-".
DOMESTIC
TOBACCOS
© 1934, LIGGETT Sc MYERS TOBACCO C O ,
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