S t a t e College N e w... LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE SLASHES COLLEGE ITEM FROM BUDGETS DR. BRUBACHER FORECASTS AN

advertisement
foe,.
p
State College N e w l
NEW
VOL.
X I I f . No. 23
YORK
S T A T E COLLEGE
FOR
A L B A N Y . N". V. F R I D A Y . MARCH
TEACHERS
22. 1929
$2.25 Per Year , .'{.'J Weekly* Issues
LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE SLASHES COLLEGE ITEM FROM BUDGETS
DR. BRUBACHER FORECASTS AN DR. RDGG STRESSES
INTELLECTUAL EXPANSION HERE CHILD EXPERIENCE
$100,000 IS SOUGHT
FOR CONSTRUCTION
Student Should Say " I K n o w
Because I Experienced,"
Educator Avers
Legislature M a y T h i s W e e k
Appropriate Funds For
Necessary Work
( h i l d r e t l should learn !o say " I k n o w
Unless funds are appropriated this
week by the state legislature before it
adjourns, State College will go without its projected new library, and will
continue to have a huge mudhole as
part of its main campus.
It is expected that the legislature
will this week act to provide funds to
carry out the projected improvements,
including grading and seeding of the
campus in front of the three new
buildings, fencing the campus, laying
walks, connecting the old and the new
buildings, and converting the present
auditorium of Hawley Hall into a library.
It W i l l Accompany New Physical Development, A l u m n i Are Told;
Experimentation In Science And Education Indicated;
College To Have Best Library In Country
l!v
WILLIAM
M.
FKLNI II
because I base experienced," D r . H a r o l d
K.lil.i, ill I In, I. M V'l'l- ( "Ml-,.I NKWS
( h e a l s l r i d r s f o r w a r d in tin- cdin•aiinmil field m a y c o n f i d e n t l y be expected o f P. R u g g , o f T e a c h e r s College, C o l u m b i a
S t a t e College w i t h i n the next l e w years, a s u m m a r y u f the address I n President U n i v e r s i t y , t o l d t h e general session o f
\ . K. B r u b a c h e r b e f o r e the eastern d i s t r i c t a l u m n i association S a t u r d a y , shows. the round table conference S a t u r d a y ,
A l o n g w i t h the projected e x p a n s i o n i n physical equipment w i l l come a s i m i l a r
when he delivered the theiiie address o f
intellectual e x p a n s i o n , D r . H r u h a c h e r i n d i c a t e d .
I n the intellectual expansion he
the session.
expects t o >ee put into effect the l o l l , i\\ iug :
1, F . x p e r i m c n l a t i o i i i n sciences, p a r
" A teacher can only gel mil o f a pert i c u l a r l y i n the wide held o f gen
son what he puis i n , " he c o n t i n u e d ,
oral science.
; " a n d as teachers, it is up t o us t o en2. Kcpiipmcnt
o f the finest h i g h
courage the pupil to express himself m o r e
school l i b r a r y in the slate o f N e w
! f u l l y in whichever line he possesses cap
Vork, f o r Milne H i g h
School,
P r o f e s s o r George M . V o r k , head o f
model practice unit.
abilities.
the c o m m e r c e d e p a r t m e n t , w i l l he o nle
,?. K x p e r i m e n t a t i o i i
and study o l
I
" T h e m a i n purpose o f education is
of
the p r i n c i p a l
c u r r e n t problems in e d u c a t i o n , by
j not solely teaching people to live w i t h
speakers at the a n
I lie education d e p a r t m e n t .
I
each
o i l i e r , bill r a t h e r there is another
nual c o n v e n t i o n o l
•I. L i b r a r y
resources
f o r college
end,
equally i m p o r t a n t , that o f l e a r n i n g
the P a s t e r n C o m students f a r superior t o those o l to l i v e w i t h oneself
Pducalinn by e x mercial
Teachers'
Icrcd t o any other teacher t r a i n perience rather than by 'learning,' is the
?;
Training
associa
ing i n s t i t u t i o n i n the c o u n t r y .
best method. T h e c h i l d learns only w h e n
l
i
o
n
n
e
x
i
I'
r
i
i
l
a
v
i
n
'
Physical Expansion
he h i m s e l f , not the teacher, reconstructs
*
In t h e m o r e physical expansion w i l l P h i l a d e p h i a .
the s t i m u l i o f existence into m e m o r y .
«r
l i e w i l l speak t o
he t h e f o l l o w i n g , a c c o r d i n g
in Dr.
" A person, g r o w n o r y o u n g , is l i k e an
more
t h a n 1,000
Hruhacher:
i mules)', (iimiiftl Nevvsimpers
o
r c h e s t r a , w i t h many parts b i n a l l i n teachers o f eastern
1, A model d e m o n s t r a t i o n r o o m l o r U n i t e d Stales w h o
tegrated under the leader, and under the
Mrs.
Franklin D. Roosevelt
model leaching.
o
f
w
o
r
k
i
n
g
as
a
whole
to
g
e
l
necessity
w i l l attend the con
2. P r o j e c t e d expansion o f the com- v c n t i o i i , his topic
ihe best results. T h i s wholeness is the
merce department I n a capacity heing
most significant t h i n g about personality, '
commercial
Mr. York
o f 200 o r 250 students.
HFAR
le.icher n . l i n i n g in slate colleges a n d this necessity f o r c o o r d i n a t i o n . Present A W F M R I Y W I I I
,!. A r c h i t e c t u r a l ! ) line building.-.
I T ILL
nDAI\
n o r m a l s d Is. l i e w i l l present a n a n - dav schools deuv ibis in practise, dis nOOCmOU
-I. A m o d e r n and b e a u t i f u l line a r t s alysis o f I I H courses o f leading schools i n t e g r a t i n g the child's mind into definite i MDC RnfiQFVFI
T
TODAY
studio.
periods,
g
i
v
i
n
g
eight
minutes
f
o
r
i
b
i
s
,
mKJ.
KUUDDVDLi
I
U U A I
a i it I w i l l d i \ ide them into technical, gen
5. Office space f o r each d e p a r t m e n t , e i a l and e d u c a t i o n a l groups.
ami twelve f o r (hat, w i t h c o n f o r m i t y '
\\
T a u k l i i i 1). Roosevelt, w i f e o f
ami a m a x i m u m o f f o u r offices
rnor w i l l today address a j o i n t
S i x suggestions w ill he made by P r o being stressed instead o f i n d i v i d u a l i t y . " | | u ,
f o r departments w i l l i several fac- les-.nr V m i ,
I n the fust speech o f the general meet- nsscinbly. I l e r subject has not been an
They are: In generally
u l t y members
broaden t h e t r a i n i n g o f the c o m m e r c e i"K. D r . James I.. Meatier, new presi- noiinced, but it w i l l probable deal w i t h
(i. A completely equipped model h i g h t e a c h e r ; t o give a t h o r o u g h t r a i n i n g i n dent o l Russell .Sage College, spoke ,,u M l l m . phase o f e d u c a t i o n .
YORK WILL ADDRESS
PHILADELPHIA MEETING
t
school.
a r t , historv and science ; t o p r o v i d e tea
7. Room f o r an o r g a n in Page I l u l l . •.nnably good i i a i n i n g i n technical subK. \ c w
gymnasium
f o r intercol
jects . I n p r o \ ide practice leaching units
legiale s p o i l - and f o r dances.
u n l i n i the college ; I,, o b t a i n some actual
D r . Hruhacher spoke t o the semi
business e x p e r i e n c e a n d I n p r o v i d e a
annual meeting o f the district a l u m n i at m i n o r - u h j e c l f u r each student.
Ihe supper i n i h e cafeteria o f I lusted
( Mhcr speakers o f note w i l l be I )r.
H a l l , f o l l o w i n g the close o f ihe f i f t h a n
Paul S. I . o i n a x , o f N e w Y o r k U n i v e r
una I round table c 'crence f o r school - i n , I )r.
I I n hen
Tonne, of \ e w
l e a t h e r s and a d m i n i s t r a t o r - .
R o c h c l l c ; Proles.,,,- I , . F. N i c h o l s o f
Milne High Will Grow
Harvard
a n d Professor
( harles !•'..
M i l n e H i g h School w i l l be able to ac- Ill-own o f ( . i i . i i . i College, P h i l a d e l p h i a .
c o m m o d a t e 500 students and f r
Kill
These items w e r e p r o v i d e d f o r i n the
budget submitted t o t h e l e g i s l a t u r e by
G o v e r n o r F r a n k l i n D . Roosevelt, b u t
were s t r i k e n out by the l e g i s l a t i v e b u d get committees.
T h e budget as f i n a l l y
passed b y i h e l e g i s l a t u r e d i d not c o n t a i n
any a p p r o p r i a t i o n f o r the c o m p l e t i o n o f
c o n s t r u c t i o n here.
Supplement Expected
Supplementary legislation to provide
f o r a l l o r p a r i o f the planned i m p r o v e ments is expected t o he passed late this
week.
Unless t h e m o n e y
is a p p r o p r i a t e d ,
funds w i l l not be available f o r c l e a r i n g
a w a y the rubbish n o w i n f r o n t o f i h e
three new b u i l d i n g s , nor w i l l money be
available to pay f o r g r a d i n g and seeding.
A l t h o u g h a peristyle has been b u i l t
" A W e l l Rounded L i t e . '
" T h r e e things
\ | r s , K , „ i s t . v e l t teaches l i t e r a t u r e and to connect R i c h a r d s I hall w i t h H u s t e d
H
a
l l , Ihe d o o r w a y al i h e H a s t e d H a l l
are necessary t o complete a l u l l h i e . " A m e r i c a n
history
at d i e T o d b u n t e r
he - a i d . " A w o r k t o do, a p r o g r a m o l , e h , „ , | , a p r i v a t e i n s t i t u t i o n in N e w V o r k end can not be completed w i t h o u t an a d d
i
t
i
onal appropriation.
constant g r o w t h a m i development, a m i , - l l v
Funds are not now a v a i l a b l e f o r r e f r i e n d s to serve. T o find ,,ne's w o r k is
Resides her pedagogical a c t i v i t i e s , M r s .
c o n s t r u c t i o n o f the a u d i t o r i u m o f H a w to h u d one's place i n h i e . "
Roosevelt is a member o f die W o m e n ' s
ley H a l l , t o make the necessary changes
|K,<l„,ris i,l seeiiniKil i -nn l : ,
,,ul, I ilv I lull, the C o s m o p o l i t a n C l u b , a n d in c o n v e r t i n g it into a l i b r a r y . N o f u n d s
iisiu-,1 ,,M ,,.,,;,• _> ,,i it,is issue- Kthiiiii
the C o l o n i c C l u b , all o f N e w V o r k .
are available f o r c h a n g i n g the w i n d o w s ,
for
leveling
the l l o o r
o r f o r placing
bookshclving.
Does Wedded Life Interfere With College Activities?
Without
t h e fence, pedestrians
will
o n t i n u e t o make o f i h e C o l l e g e campus
Manied Co-Eds Fail To Agree On Important Question cami
its buildings a t h o r o u g h f a r e . P a t h s
W e d d i n g hell- i n i v II,,w l i n e t o r the w o r k i n g in M i c h i g a n while I ant finish have been w o r n a e r o - . the grass b y p e r sons t a k i n g short , tit ,.
leeree- ihe mod
i,ig inv c u r - e here. I. t h e r e f o r e , d o
college eo i d . b'asl
hihave any p a r t i c u l a r
eoiilhel
between
i I'II vv a v hi huhhv's heart t i n
1
A tier
uied m a r r i a g e and College activities.
intellect I.liber than In ,,|,l
posile shop l o r leaching w o o d w o r k i n g , I
,ses g r a d u a t i o n i b i s .lime, I shall leave f o r
Hhi-lung
Hide- dot
-l .ieh.
-heel metal w o r k , electricity ami p l i n n h I U n d e r g r a d u a t e tledieatioil o f the n e w
lliese dav- a n d wield die psychology
hell',,it to j o i n my h i i s h a i l t l . "
ing.
A separate print -hop w i l l also he college a m l i t o r i u n l in Page H a l l , ihe ecuhook instead ot the h i , „ , i n and r o l l i n g
Prances M o o r e lolm.soii, '2'), r e m a r k s :
pro\ ided.
i r a l h u i l t l i n g in ihe three new s l n t c t i i r .
Husbands are ai odds.
N o in,,re " I tin,I hou ('keeping very simple. T h e
T h e new M i l n e H i g h School l i b r a r
w e , I n l I lusted I I , i l l , w i l l he by l b . pin
T h e subject f o r the s o p h o i n o r e - l ' r e s h preparations l o t meals and general home inan iulerelass debate w h i c h w i l l be i n
I
n w i l l be the hue,I ativ where in l b
( ,,liege T o , l i b - i d . , i n ' - when t i n may ihe.v display a Ihnirish o l p-cudo
k n o w l e d g e b e t , a , a d m i r i n g w i v e - , n,, r e - |
s i b i h t n s d,, n ,1 lake up very much the a u d i t o r i u m on F r i d a y m o r n i n g , A p r i l
-I.He ,,! New V o r k
l l Will be Hilly ai
• I . present tin ir t h i r d annual pel
i i n n , may they b u i l d castles o f " h o t - a i r "
,,i uiv
e
My college w o r k , there
ihjei'l n l beauty , ( u i i f e r c l l i e I ootiis |,
ice I n , - in \ i i n l H I early u i May
5, is " R e s o l v e d :
T h a i the p o l i c y o f
w,,i I. ill lain,I al, i v |n oeeilui (
uih I
I hi dale l o r Ihe T r o i i b a d n i u m i n s t r e l N o p h i s t n . i i e d c o e d - meei the male blull tore, i- i n , more difficult t o handle now a r m e d i n t e r v e n t i o n by die U n i t e d Stales
I in l.atiti A m e r i c a t o protect its citizens'
h\ g r o u p - l o i ,I,bale-, w i l l he adl
,vv w a - o r i g i n a l l y set l,,i A p r i l 25 but w i i b a h i d e more than die p r o v e r b i a l than H w a - b e f o r e I was m a r r i e d .
ib i b , |M — rl>ilii> ot I,,,I,hue n i n i h eg i a i n , a - a h .
d o n e a n i h e g I o l d h a v c n c v c i taken p a i l i l l e x t r a curt iculai lives and investments is j u s t i f i e d . "
and ,,pe
g into the library t h i o l
h l e c l r i c i l y shed, an all poyv el f i l l j act i v i l tes and. so, b u d very l i t t l e change
arched d wav
Inew a u d i t o r i u m , die o r g a n i / a
will dav..
The sophomores w i l l d e f e n d the p o l i c y
:
II
be
p
i
,
,
,
b.mge
i
l
schedule
to
h
i
die
dale
l
o
t
'
light
today,
hut
il In
lliuig
he in die social h i e here."
" A demonstration t
and the freshmen w i l l uphold the n e g a • •Me o n a [ o p e n i n g the new audi
i n n , the c o m
emancipated c o e d w I
the light ot
M r , M I .ottise S p r u n g , '.ill, declai
vi,led in which ii w i l l
live.
\ - i n g l e r e b u t t a l speech w i l l he
h l l i c u l l | n sludy al home g i v e n by each team.
u p e r v i s o r ,,i olhei model t c c h e i
l.'lphiio
which i- |,,r,,,i-i
lot Ihe bei husband's eye
;|1|S1
- n d i i . l a high -eh,,,,I class vvhib a m l j I ,-.i ,,t A p r i l
Matrons Interviewed
each night
' " ' ''"•' m a n ) i h | | l ( . supination- learn is composed n l
Ildl
ege class o l p e i h . q i - i i l l v inembei s , ,b I
| •,,,,,,,,,,,,
| , „ , b , I , ,.nh.,,l, an , |,,
"•'I'""' '
" ' '"> l l h r e e members o f the g i r l s ' v a r s i t y d e Mil,lent - vv e.| ,e a t t e n t i o n
Mv four
c h i l d r e n are ai bale team, A u d r e y O ' K i a d y , W i l h c i m i u a
stage die pi i I
. o n e on lb,- new stage M a l e I , illege, loo.
he a i l d i l o i n i i i i w i l l bay,' -p,
I, a l „ i
F i , d i n i n g week ends lli.it Schneider and Gladys l l u n g e r f o r d .
wag i , l i l t e d Ibis week bv President u e l l v over vacation periods, and then „ l
will
organ. M o
picture appara
break t i n | „ w - I,, the
e n d , win u the we Ml.)\ enjoy a l i t t l e recica
together.
\ R Hiuh
T h e f r e s h m e n w i l l he represented b y
,(
,,,,,,,1 ,.,, I'.,,:,- '. I "„ "l " " i,
W
e
a
l
e
ail
educating
ourselves, and 1 F.lva N'eilau, R u t h K i o i i i u a u a n d G e o r g e
secret
begins
to
lose
it
iioveltv
Intel
"
F i c d e r i e k \ \ ( r i t i n h , '.ill, is acting a ,
V i e w , W i t h I h e II 1.11 l i e d s l l l t l c l l l b o d y
, c innl thai die c h i l d r e n g a m a g r c a l c i in
P. Rice. A l l members o f the f r e s h m a n
u n l i v e I n w a r d real study "
veal die f o l l o w i n g :
team have bad high school v a r s i t y e x p e r i l i m a l.ollg V a i l I aer, ' . I I . w i n , w a ,
ence i n debate and Rice was a m e m b e r
ill.
I l a , I year, s i i ,
" I don': Innl
,,i ihe men's v a r s i t y team.
t
State Co-Eds Win First Place
I h e judges w i l l be chosen by . M y s k a A n a i i e m p i is being made
,rni an fund uiinihei o n the p r o g r a m , w i t h a any l o n l h e t between Uiairied and , o i l ,
orchestra c posed ot both g i r l s a m i r e g u l a r m i n s t r e l op, m u g c i r c l e t o s l a r l male h i e except I'm a cotnplete lank , , i
With 'Bread And Butter" Notes lliil. T h i s is the f u s t l i m e i l l s e v e r a l
years d i a l a debate has taken the place
men t,, play f o r die Troubadours, H U M the -how and a s l u m p r o g r a m o l
T h nigh S t a l e t o l l e g e g i r l s r a n k
o f a sing between ihe t w o classes. F'ive
cal show, ITi.I.n night, April 2o. Plan, n l , to till i l l between the Ivy,, m a i n a r t , I hud n i v - e l l oiil o l e v e r y t h i n g at school
httl e i g h t h in a recent p o p u l a r i t y quesexcept studies,
A f t e r classes each day.
points
i n iiiterclass
rivalry
w i l l be
are under way t o organize a small ,y in
t
i
o
n n a i r e al H a m i l t o n College, they
I tin,I ii ueee-saiy t o run Inane and pie
awarded in the winners.
phony a- a nucleus l o r a f u t u r e Stale
were g i v e n first place i l l ihe vole o i l
pal
e
l
i
e
ev
emiig
meal.
Socially,
in
"Easter
Vacation
This
Week?,"
College orchestra. Those who are inter
w h o scut in ihe first "bread and b u t school. I have d r o p p e d every t h i n g .
I
esled are asked t o g i v e t h e i r names t o
Branson Forgets Time Is Fleet lint I that students regard me in an abso
l e t " letters, " l i r c a d and b u t l e r " letl i e r n a i t l A u e r h a e h , '2<>; F r i e d a Sellaters are notes o f i h a n k s f o r a date.
Intel) different
light.
T h e ) seem t o
" W h a t ? Paster vacation i h i , week ?"
drinskv or Adolphe Sclmll, j u n i o r s ; John
I l was f o u n d that S l a t e College g i r l s
t h i n k me ohlei anil m i a different plane.
was the a i l - w e t o l P r o f e s s o r H a l l i a r d
Curtis o r Donald l i r e y , freshmen.
sent t h e i r notes w i t h i n t w o days a f t e r
My associations i l l social circles have
S.
H
t
o
i
i
s
o
i
i
,
head
o
l
d
i
e
chemistry
T h e first ineeling o f Ihe orchestra w i l l
then
visit.
R i c h a r d W h i s t o n , .10, w i l l c a p t a i n t h e
d e p a r t m e n t , w h e n asked by a r e p o r t e r
been
transferred
t o a post graduate
he t o i l , , , at 12:15 o'clock in the a u d i men's v a r s i t y basketball t e a m f o r I'Ji'Jl o r h i - vacation p l a n " I didn't
Vassal- a n d W c l l c s l c y headed t h e
crowd."
t o r i u m o f H a w Icy H a l f ' I h e i n e e l i n g
,i(l. H e was elected by an u n a n i m o u s vote
know it w o u l d begin f o r weeks y e t , "
g r o u p o f colleges w h i c h supplied i h e
w i l l he f o r o r g a n i z a t i o n o n l y , a c c o r d i n g
K d n a Palkeiislein Asncs.s, '.'.'), a more
o l t h i s year's l e t t e r m e n . W h i s t o n p l a y s
best p r o m and house p a r l y dates.
to ( i r e v , and a date w i l l be set f o r re he e x p l a i n e d .
recent bride, says: " A t pieseut. my l l l l s i r i g h t g u a r d on the v a r s i t y ,
hearsal.
baud a n d I a r c separated since he is
»,'i.l
2
lr|'wnTlK,ve,'t;;ple!c^abonOoncs j TROUBADOUR
:
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MINSTREL
WILL OPEN PAGE HALL
CLASSES WILL DEBATE
ARMED INTERVENTION
MEN AND GIRLS PLAN ,
^TuU^^tt^rZ^
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA\ \-^i:VU\Z^!Z!S ft*
WHISTON TO CAPTAIN
MEN'S FIVE NEXT YEAR
i
__„JL;
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 22, 1»29
State College
News
Established in 1916 by t h e Class of 1918
T h e U n d e r g r a d u a t e Newspaper of New York
State College for Teachers
( .
THE NEWS BOARD
WILLIAM M. FRENCH
Editor-in-Chief
Kappa Delta Rho House, 480 Morris St., Dial 6-4314
THOMAS P. FALLON
Business Manager
12 Garfield Place, Dial 6-4874-U
Louis J. WOLNER
Managing Editor
54 West Street, Dial 6-3595-R
MARGARET J. STEELE
,
'
Associate Managing Editor
224 Jay Street, Dial 3-1730
MARGARET PIENNINGE
Advertising Manager
Newman Hall, 741 Madison Ave.. Dial 6-6484
Published every Friday in the college year by the Editorial Hoard
representing the Student Association. Subscriptions, $2.25 per year,
•ingle copies, ten cents. Delivered anywhere in the United States.
Entered as second class matter at postoffice, Albany, N. Y.
:
The N E W S does not necessarily endorse sentiments expressed in
contributions. N o communications will be printed unless the writers'
names are left with the Editor-in-Chief of the N E W S .
Anonymity
will be preserved if so desired. T h e N E W S does not guarantee to
print any or all communications,
PRINTED
BY M I
Albany, N . Y .
.IS ART PRESS, 394-396 Broadway—Dial 4-2287
March 22, 1929
Vol. X I I I , No. 23
A PERMANENT MUD HOLE?
A stuffy, overcrowded library that Rives one the headache, a huge mud hole in ihc front campus, a rear campus
despoiled by thoughtless pedestrians, dashes in the rain
from one building to another,—all these face State College students unless the legislature this week sees lit to
appropriate funds for the completion of construction here.
The abolition of such conditions was once in sight when
provision was made in the governor's budget for the completion of construction, but the legislative budget committees removed the items from the budget as it was finally
adopted. W i t h their wisdom in so doing, it is not the purpose of this paper to quarrel.
We do sincerely hope, however, that tiie legislature will
not adjourn without .providing for the much needed construction which will make the college serve the interests
of the high schools of the slate in the best possible manner.
It does little good to equip a battle cruiser in the best possible manner, and then neglect to put in an adequate engine.
Just so, State College can not be a true "battle cruiser" in
the field of training high school teachers unless it is equipped, with an engine. Its engine, in this case, is an adequate library. The present library is such as to discourage
study. It is the stuffiest, most crowded and most poorly
ventilated room in the college.
Its size is so inadequate
that when a new book is purchased, an old one must be
thrown away, even though it, too, is valuable.
The condition which applies to the library can also be
applied to the other points we mention in the first paragraph.
The mud hide in the Western avenue campus, in front
of Richards, Page and Milne halls is unsightly, and not
compatible with the architectural beauty of the college
buildings, The paths worn by pedestrians across the rear
campus, too, are unsightly. A fence will protect the campus from its despoilers.
When the new buildings were constructed, it was planned
that passage from any one building to any other could be
made without exposure to possible inclement weather. The
passageways are provided, but one can not walk through a
brick wall. Money is needed to tear out a portion id' the
wall of Musted Hall, and to make a doorway there.
We fell sure that if the legislature were to send a committee to investigate the use of the money the college asks,
there would be no hesitancy in granting it.
Students, we know, hope for the appropriation.
They
can do more than hope: before going home today, they can
write personal notes to their senators and assemblymen,
pointing out the desirability of equipping State College so
that it can really put into most effective use its new buildings.
HELEN TEACHKS EDUCATION, TOO
When little Helen Terwilliger, thirteen year old student
in the eighth grade ai Walden, wrote a litter to Chief
Justice William Howard T a l l , the press of the nation
seized upon it, playing it to the skies as a human interest
story, with columns of editorial opinion.
It seems that Helen learned the oath that the Chief Justice was to have administered to Mr. Hoover upon the
hitter's assuming the president') of the United Slates. The
oath reads:
" I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the
office of President of the United Stales and will In the
he.st of my ability and power preserve, protect ami defend
the Constitution of the United States."
Listening to the adininistrati
>i ihe oath, as part ol a
radio program ai the Walden school mi inauguration day,
Helen noted that Mr. T a l l said "preserve, maintain and
defend." Replying to Helen in ,i letter sin h as one would
expect from the gentlemanly, affable T a f l , tin- I hie!' Jus
lice remarked thai Helen was in error in quoting the mistake; that he read) said "preserve, maintain and protect."
Subsequent reviews of movietones show that Helen was
right, and that the t h i e f Justice was in error twice.
An analysis of the editorial opinii n throughout the
country indicates that the editorial opinions of the press
are not so slercohped as ihe news column*.
The New York .Nun thinks that
Tl» Chief J11 »lui- witd 111 h i , l , i i , i i , M i . a lYinilhitt'i
Hint public men inii.l be cau-fiil nu« because Hie uh.iltL'uuntry listens in llien .peeelies. Wei,sin via. inrliinulr nut
to have bad a hundred thousand Helen TenviJIigcis listen
IUK in when in bis t d d r e u liii llaluillnii he spoke ul ilu
"Tend curiae of public c m l i l . "
I.ctlel. IIIIIII-IIIIU him l,„
redundancy uuulcj have e m e d in- il„»i»tcp,
The Worcester (Mass,) Telegram points to the advancement ' " mechanical science which has made possible
Helen's proof:
And who or what has cleared it up beyond all possible
doubt? The lalking film. The w o r d is (here, Kubody's
ineiiioi), no malti-i Iimv .iceuiaic, need be ielicit upon. The
work of Ihe tnoM prolieienl stenographer need nol be con
sideicd. The sound film tells (he siorv. The sound liltn guc.
like Ibis: "Piescivc, maintain- -and defend."
in his reply, Mr. Tafl told Helen that Ibis was not the
lirsi time in history that such an error had been made,
He recounted that Chief Justice Fuller had made a similar
slip on a blizzardy day when Mr. Taft was inaugurated
president. The Watcrbury (Conn.) Republican finds this
interesting:
Dr. Hunt Suggests Biography To Form Reading Habits;
Make Child Responsible, Dr. Andrus Advises Teachers
I t would be Interesting, i f not important, to know how
many of our presidents have been sworn in with the precise words of the Constitution and how many variations of
those words have been administered. Perhaps now that Mr.
"Tuft's slip has become public, some antiipiarian will delve
into the records of the past and inform us on this point.
English, as the administrator sees it, j "The old conception of education," W.
was the topic of Dr. Charles W. Hunt, | ( ; Kinimell. supervisor of history in the
dean of the school of education of West-| s t , i u , c d u c , l l i ( ) | 1 department, told the
ern Reserve University, t Ieveland, in the
„
round table discussion in English.
He teachers ol history Snlu.day, was that
brought out in his talk the value of a education's primary goal was the acq ingood speaking voice to a teacher. " A d - sit ion of iitfnrinntioii.
The new concept
ministrators should cultivate readliiK I j n v i , | v i . s t | H . s a n i t , information and actniiinterests in order to get their pupils
into the reading habit," according to Dr. *
"• l l » l " « * H f"»i a purpose.
Sees Higher Requirement
Hunt. He recommends the field of biography for those who will have to deal
M a s t e r s ' degrees may sum] be required
with people first-hand.
f teachers in high schools, H a r o l d ( i .
Dr. Harold W. Thompson, professor
n i p s o l l , o f Ihc slate education
English,
explained
ol h
nglislt, e
x p l a i n e d the
the value
value of
o l vie
v i e - , , „ - , „ „ , „ ( l l | ( ] l h ( . | , „ , ' „ section.
He
The New York Herald Tribune waxes more psychological when it refers to:
"The defect of an old man's memory?" Mavhe. Hut
probably Mr. Taft has a more accurate memory than most
of his juniors, all the way from Helen's thirteen to bis own
seventy-two. The human mind plays strange tricks, (mil no
man has the rijihl to be cocksure what even he himself has
said. Let public men beware. There will he Helen Teiwillitters at the radio listening, and "talkies" to confirm the
Helens; and some day some one will be caught In a f.'iull
of memory or in an unconscious slip of ihe tongue far
more serious than Mr. Tail's form of the oath, and he
will be unable to deny the graven record of his words.
The Buffalo Evening Times, in an editorial headed "Not
According to M'oyle" declares that
One hardly
cernment and
in calling Ihe
or the candor
the error."
knows which to admire the more the diswell informed citizenship of the school girl
attention of the Chief Justice to his mistake
and courtesy with which Mr. Taft admits
t r o l a records o l A m e r i c a n dialects i n a I h , i w i , | h v s l a , { S | i r s ,],,-„ , m c - t h i r d o f the
classroom as a means o l i l l u s t r a t i n g '<> | i n . , r n l
| . . „ j n teachers had n e i t h e r a
the students the d e l e c t s in speech.
, m j o r n o r a m i n o r in L a t i n d u r i n g their
George W . N o r v e l l , o l the slate edit- c o | | t , „ c r L . a r s .
cation d e p a r t m e n t , discussed the a d v i s a ......
: '
'
.
.
Of all the papers which have come to our notice, only
two have made any note of what should he an obvious
fact: the unusual situation whereby a school girl knows
her oath better than the Chief Justice. The Times makes
rather an indefinite reference in mentioning her "citizen
ship," The Providence (R. I.) lournal finds thai
ll is peculiarly significant. It relleets a novel development
of dual forces a combination of our radio broadcasting and
oil, public school study of the Federal Conslil lit ion. A gen
(•ration ago. even if we had had the radio, a school girl ,,f
thirteen would probably not have known ili.u the Chief
Justice had made a slip In administering the Presidential
oath."
No definite reference has been made by any paper to
the as yet unusual teaching methods employed by the teacher
of the eighth grade history class in teaching the oath, then
lieing it up with the actual ceremony by means of the tadio.
N'o comment has been made on the value of Ihe radio as a
first hand teaching device. It has not yet occured to the
radio corporations to use this as a practical example in
propaganda for radioizing the schools. Think of the slogan:
"Does your Helen Terwilliger have the advantage of the
radio in her school ? "
That the radio is bound to be of great value in the
teaching of several subjects in schools can no longer be
doubted.
It will not, of course, displace the teacher and
turn the schools into huge receiving stations, The programs
offered will have to he scrutinized with thought hv teachers
and administrators. But that Helen Terwilliger lias within
the last few days learned more history than she could out
of books in several school room periods can scarcely be
doubted. Furthermore, she learned current happenings while
her fellow students throughout the nation were probably
"doing" the Civil War.
Helen's teacher, the Walden school administrator and the
village board of education are to lie congratulated upon
furnishing Helen with such an excellent learning situation.
That she look full advantage of its unusual circumstances
has been fully demonstrated.
Thousands of other school
children should be given equal opportunities. They can't
all be Helen Terwilligers, of course-nor would we waul
them to be; but each child should be given Ihe maximum of
tdv intakes, which with his ibdiL ind effort, will nuke
him a better, more discriminating citizen.
, .
.
NOVEL
OF ERIK
CANAL;
-B\ W..M I-'
Komi' Haul. By Walter I). Edmonds. .S47 pages. SJ.50.
Huston; Little, Brown and Company.
But once in a blue moon does an author succeed in paint
nig in a novel the interesting and epic lives of people in a
distinct atmosphere. Mark Twain did it lor the folks ol
the Mississippi; Melville mosl cerlaiuh did it for the sea
l a r e i s o f M a u l ticket in his " M o b y D i c k " ; now we have as
great an epic o f the old E r i c canal hv W a l t e r I ) . Edmunds,
Koine H a u l has a hit o f d i e lane ,,'f A l g e r about its first
lake his
c h a p t e r ; a poor hoy, l a t h e r rccciul.. died, out
wa\
in the w o r l d , dust mi bis boots, meets h i u h w a . men
and so nil.
.Alger, t h o u g h , is put behind w i l h i n a lew pages, and is
gone f o r good ; ( I t e r a f a t , good u a l u r e d w o m a n o f the
canal boats holds o u r hem's head 1 ( , I,,-,- | „ , ,
• .-, , , „ ,
incut i n the approved m o t h e r fashion A l o n g comes M o l l \
w h o helps make l i f e c o m f o r t a b l e on a canal boat.
While
there's action enough, I IK- book is not sudden w i t h hap
p e i u n g s ; il is as much a p i c i u r e . ' I a slow itu>v i 111> age as
it is a n o v e l .
T h e a t i l h o r is, in a w a s , a s
I' the canal, being horn
al B o n i i v i l l e ; il is relaled d i a l f r o m c h i l d h o o d he was fas
ciliated In the a i l c n . his l a v o r i l e occupation is said | o
be listening to great stores ,i lure and legends u l the " o l d
days."
I l is these tales w h i c h have f u n n e d a basis l,,r a
t h o r o u g h l y excellent purlr,'i
e ut , „ , interesting epoch in
A m e r i c a n h i s t o r y , w i t h a l l ihe gl.nnui unl h u m a n m i e i , a
lhai a bystander might appreciate
On.-, rmih'iit
mill .lilmiiiislnilioii
o/ (.,-> m,iii\
l l \ BlacliB
and ( h i t m a n
77\> pages
$5. H a l l u i i u r e
Mills llup
kins I're.ss.
I l Ihe answer In ail) question t e l a t i . c hi ihe g o v e r n m e n t
and a d i n i i i i s t r a l i
il ihe H e r m a n n p u h l i i could uoi he
l
I i " tin's bouk, ,i w o u l d cause considerable w
lei to
the present reviewer. W i l l i its 77(1 pages, this hook is ncarlv
encyclopaedic in its i r c a l m e n i ut the i n t e r n a l o r g a n u a l i o i i
and methods u l procedure o l the republic.
N u m e r o u s bouk-,
have Heated the political s) ste
the g o v e r n m e n t s o l
K u r o p c , and their i n t e r n a t i o n a l relations but it has r e m a i n e d
f o r the present w r i t e r s | o c o m p i l e a w o r k a b l e , l l i o r o l l g h
Mud) o f the machinery o f a great stale m a l l its i n t r i c a t e
parts.
T h e book c o v e r , m o r e than mn- w o u l d e x p c i l t o
get i n an advanced course in the g o v e r n m e n t and a d i u i l i i s
I r a t i o n o f C e r i n a u y , yet i l is so well i n d e x e d and d i v i d e d
i n t o chapters that p a r t i c u l a r bits o f i n f o r m a t i o n are at
one's l i n g e r lips.
A f e w of the topics treated a r e : the
Reich and the states, presidency, cabinet, d e p a r t m e n t a l org a n i z a t i o n , revenue, state and local a d n i i n i s l r a l i o n , justice,
c o u r t s , economic enterprises a n d , o l p a r t i c u l a r value i n o u r
r e a l m , a t h o r o u g h study o f the H e r m a n educational a d ministration.
.• ,
111
I lie
I s o l l l i e l o f h i g h schools.
D e f i n e s Self E d u c a t i o n
1,1' It
HI
Mil I. t *••* HI
mi tt]l I | |
lilNLIMLl'"
L^pe'i'Iiso!"'!,! mullein 'languages i n " Seiicneei t.-ely, mid tin- . l i s , , , - , . . „ ' v ,,,i,'|, ,,, ,i,„.i,. n i hm
Dr. Ruth Andrus of the Laura Spell
''" ^l,,',,,,.'!'.'h,,'' ,','"*' ""'"'em
•rued hi- \ h -
inan, R o c k e f e l l e r F o u n d a t i o n , began Ihe p;,',,,VlL" f^i 'lln' 'l.u'-fc' of 'success « n " : ihe lium'
round table discussion i l l home economics hi i ,,i l
m children who struggle with
' ' j ' j j j ^ 'f!',1.l^,,,,:|",|.1l'll ,,''•',','.""']. ,,','iV-li'•'"ili.L-""i-l il'
m,'.' l l \ ,|e|',!i'i,lciue'',,n ill,'ir te.lcliei's lu'r help
liftieuli im.lih ni«; tin lad, ,>i stud) halls,
ami. ibe^d.ii, M-II.-,. in l,-i,gili „ f the class pel-i.„l
she Ills,,
,
aIM ,'l's"1"l'!l ,),','.' .
pinjeel im-thiiil-. in lb,
s. Ii.„c.-iad> .,
by saying thai the basic p r i n c i p l e in selfeducation is l e a r n i n g by d o i n g .
"The
responsihilitv f o r the result must res; <>t
Ihe c h i l d , so that she looks at what she
has dune in the light o f what is necessary
f o r her to d o , " a c c o r d i n g to D r . A n d i ' u - .
Gymnasium To Have More Facilities, President Says;
Van Kleeck Praises College Democracy Of Opportunity
iCni.liiuicil
he installed
"(iyinnasiiiin
increased
I'age
of
facilities
Hall
| ||iy|,
will
is opened. T h i s
and w i l l
HO x 4-1
feel
have
Scl
I Ixlceck,
be g r e a l l y | a |
Ihe n e w g y m n a s i u m
when
lighted,
from Page 1.
in the a u d i t o r i u m .
in the center.
\ i 1.. 111 > ;
I'alwill
.iiperinleiident
Is', V a n
of
schools
\ y ; , | , | , l i ; K'iehard A . Jensen, '_'K, p r i n
" f j r ; , , ; i | , , , | u , S r h c i i c U | s school, and l-'lm
w i l l he w e l l L H . , ,
a n open
I,
'_'/,
space
[ , ' , , n „ | e y . '_'W,
M
\ | ; „ . | ; , , r i ' i , n l d c c l m v d l h a i State ( , , l .
Behind L,,,,,
| u , | ,,,,,.,,
|,n-
,| i r t .,.
aibaiitage.,
columns
will
he r o o m
for
f o l d i n g [ m , „ i e i \ , ; i M • ,p]nutiuitl.\ to cover in ,i
bleachers.
T h e g y m n a s i u m w i l l also hi short Mine tin w ..i k necessar, f o r a ile
uqiupped w i t h cloak r o o m and showers
ui ee, i luse pel's, ,nal f r i e n d s h i p s t h r o u g h
D r . Brtibacher told the a l u m n i .
l u i n g h i i g w i t h - i n d e n t - here, and "splcii
A n art studio w i l l be installed on l l
ecu
nics department
lirsi
lege ,-1,-isM-
w i l l take over ll
lloor. T h e rest o f the b u i l d i n g
|ensei
,.,.,,, ,,,'
Revises
Views
u
|i;H
lm-||„,(|s
cutirse- a r e u m t h
sealing .ilK) students.
"Tln-v are not prescripl ions
T h e college l i b r a r y , w h e n it is m o v e d i .,, v , , . U i " !,,. „ v , |
lu
the present
Hall,
will
auditorium
of
he able In s t o r e
nines. W i t h
llawley
\ ] : _ , „,,,,,lei
KIH.IMKI vol J , , , „ , „ , , , ,
us,- ul' the state l i h r a r j
volumes
"l!|,e;wee!i
to supple- [ - i m l t - n i .
ill c.d
-•llggesled t h a i a \ e,
lln
field had given l i n n a new o n
"•'•teaching
large lecture r o o m w i l l he capable " I
I, I leaching
ns."
Jenwen
will I
be devoted t o oliices and r e c i t a t i o n r
\
examples o f
did
Hip Hoot- o f Richards H a l l , and the lion
more than a million
D / ^ f M ^ C .
..
hihty ol revising tile English syllabus, h M ,,„. ,,,„„„ |n,,|, Sl. | s -lf ,|,„, ,„,,„„,,i,
due lu the radical change in the per- . m tin un mal i aiiinij id tin- junior lng.ii
!;l.,
dechired
|,,,,ken
being
Inn poiiit-
that
down
a teacher
piactiia
the h a r r i c i
and being a
She c l i u r a c i e n > e d
this
as tin
incut use o f the campus l i b r a r y , the col g r e a t e - i git'i ,,i M a l e I ollege to her
lege w i l l have greater l i h r a n f a c i l i t i e s I
V a n Kleeck Lauds College
,i .- , ., a, ,• ,,-,:,,;,,,.
I l i n n n u n i u i uiipui I 11111' i , r c g a r d l e s •i i i .i
•'va.lahle than a n y o i h e , l e . u h e . t i a i n m u ,
^
^
^
„
(
(![.
j a | ;,
i i i s t i l t t l i u i i I I I lite c o u n t r y ,
Advocates " O p e n M i n d "
the intellectual e x p a n s i o n , he said
In
that
Dr, lirubaclier | .
he hoped the educati
would
feel
animations
itself
free
of curieni
lepartmeul
to
conduct
problems
ex
in edii
•atioii, ",nu\ attack them w ith open n
,11,1 show t h e w a s o u t . "
lie
advocated
experiin-iUaiioii
• cienee here, d e c l a i n i e ih.,1 " t h e ed
iotial w o r l d i - , online to l e a h / e ll
an
i
gcoil hole
and
,ub.|i
s c i i n e i w i l l he p r o v i d e d , he - a i d .
Besides H i
B r u h a c h e r , i h o - e s,
i n K al d i e .upper were
M,-s II,
K a r l o r d . le.ichei al the l l a e k c l l .11
"The Paganizution
Of Christianity '
T o p i c .Sunday N i g h t 7:M)
by Rev. F. 1.. Squires, Pastor
ALBANY
(iOSPEL I'ABliKN. U;IJ:
lUstandipg
facloi
hen-, M r . V a i
i c a c h u m <hotilil m.i In h m i ' e d n. ilio-a
vx 11, > ,-.ai alTuid an , s |u n-; \ e ...eial l i i c
|-
« ' " ' ' I he a n v t i i , ndmis m i s t a k e [., - . 1
a w . n H o n Ibis - i n , I , i ileiiiuera, v." M i
\ m i I x l e . i I. poinled o u t . \
In i g r . ,1
. o h . m l iu'e dial .'stale I ,dlei;e u l f e i e d h i m
was l b , o i i p o H i n n t i •
ake h i e l.,m<
NEXT NEWS APRIL 5
l a i. i l i c e l a m a - io,|,-n al 5 15
i '.., k
I , - , , w i l l be I I mined ..I
lo
clock I n c . , I , , . , \ p i d .' T h e
x. l b . \ l v - w i l l be I ' l l
"Dependable Flowers
IE
Trlnj,:,r/,
II
Ill
lln
I,, oil
/•.,,/•
llo,/,/
ff&*£
tH.OWER SHOP
(,1'l-bSI \ \ A S I I I N t , I O N W E .
S u n d a y iiioroiog s e r v i c e IU:1S
".1
III//.,,,//*
I'alw
Suu.lu.i
Mr,
I t J i w , , ',,-, /•. Ua,lm,l /(,,,/o.S,
Alban y
Teachers' Agency, Inc.
74 Chapel S ., Albany,N.V.
W e need leiic lers f u r S e p t e m b e r
a|i|H)iuliiieliU.
W rile
fur inloi-
illation o r « a l l u l llic office.
STEUBEN STREET
Corner J a m e s
I'lt.iiii- I .H7S
CALL
A
YELLOW CAB
Dial 4-6161
l.iiuousiiii's renieil fur
all occasions
STATE COLLEGE NEWS MARCH 22, 1929
Croasdale Praises Physical Superiority Of Girl, 4 SENIORS CONTRACT
DEBATERS CHOSEN I Dr.Scores
Tiny Feet And Hands Of Old Fashioned Co-ed
TO 1EACH NEXT YEAR
TO MEET HAMILTON
Klein Is Only New Member Of
Tearr Which Met
Pittsburgh
Freshmen girls come to college today
healthier, heavier and an inch taller than
llicir sisters of a decade or two ago, Dr.
L". Caroline Croasdale, college physician
fiutis. Dr. Croasdale's observations arc
si-id nil records covering a period of
fifteen y.ars in which thousands of college girls ail o\er the country have been
weighed, measured and their general
phi siral fiiness noted.
l.uiiis M. Klein and Knl.nl T. R,,ss.
seniors, and Emanuel (irccn ,'imi I .miis
J. VVnlner, juniors, will delink' ...MUIS!
Hamilton ciillcfre linv April 25. Tiny
were chosen al try-mils i w c u l l j .
Dr. Croasdale attributes the increasing
Willi I lie exception nf Klein, die leiini
is composed nf the same speakers which physical superiority of today's girls to
debated llie University of
I'itisbtirjih .uid,. 'i' games, better nutrition, and more
here in I'Yl.ruan. Klein i- pi i sidenl of
cieut'.lic care of children from infancy
the debatt council and eap:.i
i the ,i high school.
baseball learn.
"The modern girl has an outdoor
Judges al the i n -mils u r n : Donald
('. Hrvanl, insinietiir in KuylWi; Wil- freshness, which even the use of cosliam I'. Vollln-eclil, i.MinriM in ,;,,veni- nelics dues not conceal. She glows with
ineiil, and K'u.wll II i In km,HI, in-lrut:
In.' ;:,.>„] hr.illh swimming, hockey, walkInr in liistnrv.
i;,e, and all such olit-dnor activities have
The sulijeel ,.| tin debal, will he " UY
solved. That llie i n n -< hin in the •;• ihiced," Dr. Croasdale said.
United Siat. • h. ,,l...lislied "
"1 think, generally speaking, that the
;..;• ••, i i ,h -.s has aided development.
"CHRIST NOT DRAMATIC"
,-v,er i,(,.lies, more exposure to wind
"(liri-l in Mi' l.n.pnl I.. -In- drauialic,"
.i ,1 wi,-liber have made today's girl more
said Dr. Samuel I. Skcvinel..u
I Tern
,,!,• HapliM Hillivli ni hi- ad.lre-s In the
V. \V. C. \. vespn -rrviee Suiidaj al"(j-rl- wear bigger shoes than they did.
ternooii.
Mr. Sk-eviiiKlon -:re,M,| e-,„rialh hull, ||i ( ulooni and' (lie I'lory I'hey w.ar larger gloves. Their clothing
I, n.i i- and lighter. They dance and
,,i ilu- h'.aMer sea-...II.
"ARE
MISSIONARIES"
"Teachers are missionaries to help
people understand the progress made
along educational lines," Miss Anna Garswim, walk and live a large part of every
Four seniors have obtained teaching lin Spencer, sociologist and lecturer, told
day outdoors in the sun and air.
positions since the last issue of the the senior-sophomore assembly Friday.
"The superiority and development of
NEWS went to press. They are: Mildred
the girl coming to college today is a
Lansley, who will teach commerce at
natural consequence of the concentration
on health and nutrition. The schools, Mineola; Blanche Lockwood, English at
the home, the papers, and magazines have
popularized health until girls are as proud
of endurance, good health, strong muscles, and superior physical development,
even as women used to be of tiny feet,
undeveloped bands, small waists and skins
never touched by the sun."
Students
Davenport; and Anne Mosher, English
Wfr"
at Amsterdam.
F.Isie Hutchinson, '2'J, has contracted
to teach history and Latin at the Ricli-
Disc, .minate
mondvillc high school, Schoharie county,
according to Professor John M. Sayles,
S t u d e n t s of S t a t e C o l l e g e
should be especially appreciative of
the quality
of
Boulevard
and
Golden
Guernsey
Milk.
Wherever
t h e r e is a t r a i n e d
understanding of w h a t m a k e s for
better minds a n d
bodies,
t h e r e a l s o is a n a p p r e c i a t i o n
of the m o d e r n m e t h o d s that
surround our products,
secretary of the placement bureau.
JrUflyft H . (Sraues
Lucille Beauty
Salon
LUCILLE ALTOPEDA
208 Q U A I L S T . ( R i c e Bldg)
Dial 6-5787
8 4 5 Madison Ave.
DRUGS And PHARMACEUTICALS
Telephone
3-3462
SPECIAL
$15. Permanent W a v e for $10 w i t h
Free s h a m p o o and finger w a v e
Shampooing and Waving for
Long Hair - - - $1.75
For Bobbed Hair - $1.50
Manicuring 50c.; Facial M a s s a g e $1
EiHlh Chutxurl t'inurwavtr is hack with us
CUT FLOWERS
BOULEVARD DAIRY CO,, Inc.
231 Third
Street
Telephone
4-4158
IMPORTED POTTERY
Telephone 4 4929
Brenson's Flower Garden
"F.oiuers
That delicious
interval
H. C. Henderson
For Every Occasion"
16\ Washington Ave., Albany, N. Y.
Get Your Barbering Done At
The College Barber Shop
When the curtain goes down,
and the lights come u p , anil
184
ONTARIO
ST.
NEAR WASHINGTON
AVE.
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
the landaulet is waiting . . .
203 Central A v e n u e ( n e a r R o b i n )
Salads - Pastry and Toasted Sandwiches
in that interval, so to speak,
Every s a n d w i c h made up fresh to individual order
between supper and Sardou
...
a good cigarette seems to
acquire a New Significance.
BUCHHEIMS
QUALITY
CLEANERS
AND
432 Central Ave.
DYERS
Albany, N. Y.
Klein M a r k e t
And perhaps you have noticed
331 C E N T R A L A V E N U E
that Camels always play the
Vhulw.MmU,
I'UHIII'IJ
((ml \'i'i/rtubl(f.t
Spmul
AttriitiunTu
Sr/timl
Oryuiilzuitoit
l e a d i n g r o l e i n t h e s e gay
litlle comedies of
pleasure.
Oriental and Occidental llestnuumt
AMERICAN
AND
CHINESE
Open 11 until 2 A. M.
D a n c i n g 10:30 till I A. M„ E x c e p t S u n d u y
44 State St.
I'll one 3-5943
A R K A Y FLORIST
T e n E y c k Hotel Uuiidil>«
PHONfc. 3 - 4 4 3 9
"We
Branch 15 So. Pearl Street
Understand Eyes"
EYEGLASSES
OPTOMETRIST
5 0 N , Pearl Si,
Albany, N A •
OPTICIAN
PRINTING OF ALL KINDS
Student toid Grou/Ji' at the State College for Teachers
will be given 'pedal atten lion
0 i'll'.J, It. J lti.yi.ul.la T.iliuw.'C:,, . Wmsluu fiuluiu, N. U,
Mills
Art
Pr^«
IVUUo / v l L I ICaa
i
394-396 Broadway
4-2287
Printer* of State College Ham
STATE COLLEGE NEWS MARCH 22, 1929
4
DR. SOUTH WILL VISIT Students May Continue To Dance Daily At Noon Hour;
UNIVERSITIES IN OHIO Gymnasium Must Close At 12:15, Dr. Brubacher Says
PRIZE IS OFFERED
FOR WINNING ESSAY
Dr. Earl B. South, assistant professor
df education, and Mrs. South, will spend
Easter vacation with relatives and friends
in Ohio. They will leave Saturday by
motor.
Dr. South will visit the college of education of Ohio State University at Columbus. H e will also visit the Israel
Putnam Training School of Ohio University, at Athens.
While at Athens, Dr. and Mrs. South
will be guests of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph
P. Porter. Dr. Porter is head of the department of psychology of Ohio University, and editor of the journal of A p plied Psychology.
Pi Gamma Mu Will Give Five
Dollars For Best Theme
On Social Science
Pi Gamma Mu will conduct an essay
contest, which is open to any students
interested In social science,
The topic
will be "Why social science should be
taught in high schools," and the prize
will be five dollars ill gold.
Essays may be given to Helena UbcIIc,
'29, president, before the contest closes,
April 22.
FRESHMAN FIVE BEATS
SENIOR MEN'S QUINTET
The freshman class won the men's
basketball championship Tuesday, whin
Courtesy finntietl Newspapers
its quintet defeated the seniors by the
score fjf 27-19. The seniors had preMiss D o r a D a d m u n , '29, w h o will
viously beaten the juniors, and the freshmen had won from the sophomores. interpret the role of " H i l d e g a r d e T a n Klssam and Lavigne starred for the b u n " in " T h e Unehastcned W o m a n " ,
freshmen, while Carpenter and Cooper I to be presented Friday and S a t u r d a y
were the senior bright lights.
nights, April 12 and 1.5.
Geo. D. Jeoney
Phone
tory class is being conducted in the auditorium at that time, and the dancing is a
disturbance," Dr. Brubacher said.
The gymnasium will be closed from
12:15 to 1 o'clock until Richards Mall is
opened and the class is transferred there,
according to Dr. Brubacher,
College students may dance in the gymnasium each noon, including Wednesday
and Friday, from 11:45 to 12:15 o'clock,
President A. R. Brubacher announced
llu's week. The janitor will lock the
gymnasium at 12.15 o'clock he said.
"Owing to a change in program, a hisDIRECTION
STANLEY
COMPANY
f™\
IT Z.
WEEK OF MAR.
SEE and HEAR
J o h n Gilbert
25
tt
MAR.
25
All Singing
Production
Jessel
LucKy Boy"
Pathe Sound
Ne«s
VitapHone
Acts
Movietone N e w s
AMERICA
WEEK OF
All Talking,
All Musical
George
'Desert / S i l t s '
PROCTOR'S
Grand
HIGH GLASS VAUDEVILLE
OF
S T RAN
RANU
MARK
MARK
ALSO OPERATING ALBANY AND REGENT
THEATRES IN ALBANY
AND
THUR., FRI.. SAT.
MAR.
21-22-23
••Neil McCobs'i Daughtci "
Irene Rich and Robert Armstron
R.C. A. Photophone
MOW. TUES. WED.
MAR.
2S-26-27
'TAXI
/ J " Lutest comedy of
Chester Conklin - R C. •>. Photopho
LELAND
('.
II.
llVVKLEY,
Owner
THE
_
Starting Sunday, March 24th
STORY
OF
T R U E LOVE
IN A JAZ MAD
AGE!
6-7613
64
JUST KEEP A'COMING
198 C e n t r a l A v e n u e - a t Robin
Albany, N. Y.
lRc<d wirce"
FEATURING
We're here and ready when you're
h u n g r y to help you out with the s a m e
courteous attention and services we
have a l w a y s given you.
Conrad Nagel and J u n e C o l l y e r
S O U N D and E F F E C T
High Grade
Delicatessen and Lunch
CLINTON
SQUARE
811A Madison Ave.
WEEK
B e t w e e n Quail and O n t a r i o S t s .
OF
MAR.
£ cutaway Girls1
25
With
Shirley Mason
and Arthur Rankin
MAISTELMAN BROS
299 Central A v e n u e
Central Avenue's leading confectionery and icecream parlor
Drink
_ : i ~W7 y
THE LINEN CHEST
LINENS - HANDKERCHIEFS
P I L L O W S - CURTAINS
Delicious and Refreshing
Gift from the Linen Chest means m o r e
PAU$E 4/*j>
46 South Pearl Street
PALLADINO
Personality Bobs - Finger Waving - Permanent Waving
H u m e S a v i n g s Bank lildu
M N . Pearl St.
3-3632
^•: ; IT'S REALLV A SHAME
, TO INTERRUPT THE PROFESSOR'S CHASE o r THE
DIURNAL LEPIDOPTERA
AND T U R N THE BULL
ON H I M
B U T YOU
HAVE TO BLAME THE
ARTIST FOR T H A T .
Strand
133 N . P e a r l St.
4-6280
DANKER
"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS
40 and 42 M a i d e n
Lane
Albany, N. V
Smart
Coats - Hats - Dresses
l r or
8
Girls and Misses
Gym l o g s - i losiery
,,-:~m
The
CUCII-CSIII Co.,
/
I T
I ,...T,--,..
Obviously, lew of
chance — or temerity — to nuk
matudors out ol outailvetf. Hut
even in lliu normul coureu ol human events, there's nothing "*>
welcome as a refreshing pause.
I lappily there's a aoJa fountain
refreshment stand—with plenty
of ice cold Coca Cola ready —
around thecoma from anywhere
With it-, delicious taste and to
ahei -seiiseuf refreshment, it uwke
a litile minute long enough for a
l>ig rust.
MILLION
A PAY
Steefel Brothers, Inc.
^•••J:
Vitaphone
Acts
H A D
T O
ti E
G O O
D
Allium. Qt,
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