State College News ANNUAL JUNIOR PROM PHI DELTA CHAPTER OF NATIONAL GROUP

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ANNUAL JUNIOR
PROM
State College News
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
Vor.. X L N o ,
1!)
FKIDAV,
PHI DELTA CHAPTER
OF NATIONAL GROUP
Leads
FKIIIUMUV
I,
M)27
Junior President
10 cgnta pet' copy, M.00 per year
Headed Juniors In '24
Unites With Sororities In Four
Leading Universities
In Country
250 COUPLES WILL
ATTEND GALA NIGHT
David Meyerhof Orchestra To
Play For Dancing; Nine
Until Two
NINA HANDY IS PRESIDENT
MISS
Committee To Extend Society
Into Colleges Headed
CURTIS, CHAIRMAN
Favors For Women Are Vanity
Cases And For Men Are
By B i s l a n d , ' 2 5
Bill F o l d s
Phi Delta sorority ft I Stale College
has united with organized groups in
About 251) couples will allend Ihe
four other leading universities throughout
junior Prom which will.be tonight in ihe
the country to form the nucleus of a naI'en Eyck hotel ballroom. This is the
tional sorority, This sorority has the
Ijulii event of ihe junior social year,
distinction of being the first Protestant
David Meyerhof.-, so, en-piece orchesnational sorority at Stale College,
tra will play for dancing from nine 'till
The Alpha chapter, had its beginning
two,
Refreshments will be served durin I92-) under the name of Alpha Delia
OtiilrfOsyilifion i iilnii ing Ihe iiiiermis.ion.
There will be
Albany Evening News
Oinieroii and was recognized by Presieigln dances in each half,
dent A. R, llruhacber oil November II
Courtesy A funny Evening NOWH
Cl.AKKNCK
Nl-ll'IIKW
The
favors
for
the
male
guests arc
11 A. |I-:,\\SI-:,N'
of that year as a State College sorority,
pin seal leather bill folds with gold
P I T H G, Mourn-.
In the spring of 1926 the name of the
lips, T h e women guests will receive
sorority was changed to Phi Delta. Dr,
gold vanity boxes containing powder,
Brubachcr, Miss Alice T, Hill; head of
rouge, lip-slick, perfume and coin slols.
the Spanish department, and Professor
O n y one favor will be distributed lo
and Mrs, Clifford A, W'oodard of the
each couple.
biology department lire honorary memPresident and Mrs. A R. Ilriibaihcr,
bers of the chapter,
Nina Handy is
Dean and Mrs. \V. | | , Melzler, Dean
president.
Anna E. Pierce. Miss Fl irence E, Winchell, Miss Mary Grahn Professor ami
The extension of the organization into
(i. M, York and 0 ficli Rutherford
other colleges is being carried on by a
Girls Will Go As "Stags" With Miss Grahn, English Instructor, Francis Griffin, President In Mrs.
Baker will be diaper, nccommittee headed by lithe! Bisland, '25.
And Jensen, Presidnt,
Privilege Of Cutting
Tin's committee has succeeded-in annexSophomore Year, Victim
Chrissie Curtis is general' chairman
W i l l Speak
In On Dances
ing to the Alpha chapter a Beta chapfor prom assisied by music chairman.
Of Frosh Prank
ter at New York university, a Gamma
Darnel Parklitii'sl; favors, Margaret
chapter at the University of California,
"Junior Tun dance tomorrow will be
Moon - ; programs, Dorothy T e r r e il,
" reJunior luiu'iieoii, i me of (lie triclly
The 2(i7 juniors who entered Slate
a Delta chapter at Hunter college, and a siriclly junior affair," Chrissie Curtis, junior affairs of the• week-end
ire.diinenis, Elizabeth S t r o n g ;
'ollege September 12, 192-1, have had Patricia O'Counell; ehapcroiics, house;
an Epsiloii chapter fit the University of
in
H
o
t
e
l
'
f
e
n
Doris
'28, chairman of junior week-end affairs,
I'arierl experiences and uniform success, Arnold;
Mowerand taxis, Grace
Cincinnati,
•
Eyck,
Saturday,
has announced.
Fliey were welcomed heartily as the first Hooper; dislributii n, Florence P oiler;
February
5, al
Although ii i Hot leap year, the girls I2:-I5 o'clock.
if the annual "Unconditional Classes.' floor, Francis Griffin,
The juniors attending and their guesis
M iss
M ;i r y
for tin- most |pari will ,140 "stag," and
I hey entered under a new system of
arc:
Chrissie Curl i s , Grove N.T-'cr
Grahn,
instructor
she.v have tin privilege of cutting in on
irieiit.iiion, That is, they became ac- Colgate university; Clara Hagey, Norill English, and
the dances.
ihc ('ollege, classmates, man Adams, Albany; Eva Dietz Shu
Richard A, Jensen,
planned witn
What the other juniors will wear to
"The gymnasium will he Oct
(|ecorale<
( laren.-e Shu, Union; Elizabeth Phetlepresident of the
md instructor! by a week of lectures ol
Prom is a question in the minds of
place, Richard LaTourrettc, Syracuse
junior class, will
the
class
colors
and
banners,
sororily
ulv.ee.
every girl in the class of '28, The
university; Virginia Higgins, Kenneth
speak.
Gilbert
Ga\s freshmen, they proved ilicir adher- foster, R, p , | . Kthel Van Eniburgh,
Ninvs has undertaken to satisfy their banners and palms," said Goldcna Pills, nong, '28, will give
:
e in College iradiiion, by discarding Robert Browning,
feminine curiosity.
chairman of decorations,
New York; Ruth
the
history
of
the
over-size Ircslunair bullous provided Lane, Mack Jaiiizeu, Lafayette univerRuth Pane, who starred in "Deirdre 1 '
The orchestra of David Meyerhof will junior class, durl i i i i i t i s E. Griffin
iiy '27. Clarence Nephew was elected sity; l.enore Hutchison, Caird Higgins,
will wear jade green georgette.
ing
its
freshman
play both al Prom and the Tea dance.
.hiss president and with the aid of other
Ruth Moore will wear a black chiffon
Tea service will be supplied by the year al College. Goldcna Pills, '28, will freshman athletes proceeded to form a P. P. I.; Ruth G, Mo ire, Richard Parvelvet period frock.
stow, Union university; Ruth Kelley,
various sororities and houses, and re- review the activities of the class of '28 winning basketball learn.
They also Edward Vreeland, Chestnut Hill acaHelen Klady's frock is of white geor- freshments will be lea, punch, cake, lints, during its sophomore year.
Margaret
gette, trimmed with ostrich feathers anil
Moore, '28, will speak of (he achieve- pulled the varsity team out of the mud. demy; Helen k'hidv, Addison Sims
and minis.
On March 13, 1925, (hey visited the Seattle; Evelyn BaCU, Harry Briggs;
rhiuestoncs,
The following of the faculty will pour ments during the junior year, and Emily
P.thel Van Emhurgh will appear in a lea: Miss Elizabeth I). Anderson, Mrs. Williams, '28, will give the class sophomores al soiree, disconnected the Margaret Stoulenburgh, Harold Lamlighting system and made away with the bertson, Schenectady; Alice Goodeile*
green taffeta period frock.
prophecy.
Queciie
lloman
Paust, Miss
Mary
Ruth Kelley, who played the part of Urahu, Miss Kthel lluyck, Miss Mary
Marjorie Young, '28, is general chair- banner. Francis Griffin was chosen the Walter Benedict, R. P. J.; Goldcna Pills,
Gilbert Gahong; Doris Crosby, Frank
Naisi in "Deirdre'' will wear black geor- Elizabeth Cobb, Miss
man for the luncheon. T h e chairmen for sophomore president,
Corinne 'I
Next year's freshmen were inclined Phear, R . P . f.; Mildred Gabel, I.. A
gette, trimmed with gold.
the various committees a r e : Kalhcrinc
Miss leanetla Wright am )r. Can
Nancy Morgan, the sprightly Lady Croasdale.
Sax ton, '28, pr< 'grams; Dorothy labic, lo be playful. They even Iried to break Quinii, R. P. (.; Be.itrice Gaughan, ElY'iolelta of "The Knave of Hearts" will
'28, decorations; Harriet Parkin.)!-.1 , '28, up the Get-Wise parly, October 16, by mer Clarkson, T r o y ; Mabel Peterson,
kidnapping "Griff," (he sophomore presi- Bridgeport, Conn., Richard Jensen; Pawear black crepe dc chine, tulle trimmed.
house committee
dent, leaving him on a road outside of tricia O'Counell, Georre Weber, Albany;
Rosaiyn Chapman's frock is orchid
\lbany. Much lo their surprise, "Griff" Marian Rich, William Hausmau, Algeorgette,
,
soon walked into the "mental torture bany; Aniline Foster, G. Rankin, ScheHarriet Parkhurst will wear pink
nectady; Grace Hooper. I:'.. Youngs, ST.
session'1 in the auditorium.
georgette,
December 16 marked the superiority of Stephen's college.; U n a Johnson,'William
Hclly Strong will .wear embroidered
'28 over '29 in Ihe iuterclass gym meet. Taylor, New Y o r k ; Betsy Miller, Haryellow georgette.
March 12 came soiree, but no frosh; old Davison, N e w a r k ; Viola Blanche,'
Chrissie Curtis, chairman of junior
: Chrissie Curtis, '28, chairman of Prom
since the annual soiree banner rush had Leon Murilow, Tribes Hill.
week-end, will wear white satin crepe.
committee, finds it no easy task to have
Funeral rites were performed over the
been prohibited, April' 16 was another
Virginia Higgins' frock is light green ail the burden and blame put on her
Representatives from the other classes
crepe hack satin.
shoulders, According- to Miss Curtis the coffin of Miss Alice Gooding of the biol- sixteenth of the mouth which recalls a and their guests include Florence HudPlorence Potter will wear wine velvet most troublesome things have been the ogy department last night at the post- sophomore triumph. On ibis day, '29 son, '27, Morris Slack, Albany; Anne
discontent over one favor for Prom and exam jubilee in (lie gym. Her death bowed in defeat to the superior "gift of Stafford, '29, John Gainor, Albany Meditrimmed with silver cloth.
the complaint that the favors for the was caused by overwork in correcting gab" of '28, who had won the debate! cal college; Hazel Powker, '29, Mark
junior men and junior girls are not examination papers of unwise students, Thai evening '28 gave a parly to '26, Pringlc, R. P . I . ; Nina 1 -lands-, '27, Robequally good. "Contrary lo belief (lie it was disclosed al (lie inquest
sister class. May 22, the sophs amassed ert Kibhe, Union college; Evelyn Belfavors are really equal in value," stated
Professor George M. York, head of more points in the iuterclass rivalry by linger, '26, Edward Shtimachor, Union
Miss Curtis. However, as a result of the commerce department, entertained winning the track meet from the frosh, college; Helen Stone, '2'), Robert Danthis controversy, there is a sudden rise ^vilh songs. A stunt was put on by largely the work of Leah Cohen, June ker, Williams college; Eleanor Welch.
in the popularity of the Slate College Professor Adna W, Risley head of the 3 the lug-of-war was I heirs. Victory in '29, Sidney Peckard, Williams college:
Mildred Scheihie, '30. died
men. Every girl now wants to ask a history department. This stunt included song the night of Moving-Up day capped Thelma Temple, '27, Carl Godlewska.
suddenly at her h o m e in Oneida,
St.ate man lo Prom in order lo gel a ill its cast Coach Rutherford Raker, in- ihe climax. The iuterclass struggle was Warsaw, Poland; Lois Dunn, '27, Earl
T u e s d a y afternoon, a c c o r d i n g to
vanity case,
Abbott, Schenectady; Helen Montgoma telegram received by M r s .
structor in physical education; Ralph won by '28.
Kimball, her house mother. MilThe junior year was started by guiding ery, '27, Thomas Fallon, ' 2 9 ; Ruth'
Silly questions are in line with the Heaver, mathematics instructor; and
Prownell of the education de- the freshmen along Ihe faculty "deceiv- Bates, '29, Robert Shillingiaw, '29; F
dred finished her examinations
trials of a chairman, Miss Curtis re- Dr. S, M.
Friday and went h o m e Friday
lates, "Some one rushes up lo me and partment .
ing line," October 22 the juniors for- Marie Towuscnd, '27, Carlton Moose,
night, At that time she had a
whispers 'Can I bring my brother lo
The jubilee is held annually under Ihe mally welcomed the frosh. On October '27; Cornelia Williams, '27, LaVcrne
Rrom?' Another person wants to know auspices of Myskania. Hilda Sarr, '27, 2,3 an object-lesson in junior superiority Carr, '29; Clara Tenny, '27, * "Harold
slight cold, but thought it nothif one is allowed lo come stag lo Prom was general chairman, assisted by Kath- was given byi winning (lie prize for the Baiimes, Union; Ethel Tenny, '26, A j ing serious, S h e has hail heart
since il is allowed to come stag lo the leen Doughty, '28, chairman of cnier- best campus' day stunt. December 10, lluir Jones, U n i o n ; Elizabeth Fulvcr, '29,
trouble ever since she was in
Tea dance. Others want to know how laiiimeni; refreshment chairman, Mar- those of '28 defeated the mighty senior! Raymond Clark, Colgate; Ethel Oshigh school, said Mrs, Kimball.
long the reception line will stand so lhal jorie Sceger, ' 2 8 ; music, Helen Slone, in debate, February -t, the junior class boiirne, '27, James Baker, Schenectady;
Mildred, w h o w a s 19 years old,
they can come late and avoid it. A '27 \ arrangements, Winifred Van Salis- published their own issue of the NKWS, Marion Carter, '30, Joseph Smith, Alr o o m e d with Mildred J o h n s o n ,
fiiyorlte question has been 'What are the bury, Ml); publicity, Ruth W a d s , '0.7; adding lo ihe other events of junior bany; Nona Powers, MO, John Kelly,
'29, at 186 W e s t e r n avenue,
1
(Pair* 6 Column 1)
favors going lo be?' "
decorations, Florence Potter, '28,
week; prom, luncheon, and lea-dance,
DANCE TOMORROW JUNIOR LUNCHEON IS '28 HAS UNDERGONE
FOR JUNIORS ONLY TOMORROW, 12:45 VARIED EXPERIENCES
GIRLS WILL WEAR 'mat
RAINBOW COLORED
DRESSES AT PROM
TASK OF CHAIRMAN
OF PROM, NOT ROSY PERFORM FUNERAL
CURTIS, '28 LEARNS RITES FOR GOODING
AT EXAM JUBILEE
MILDRED SCHEME, '30
DIED TUESDAY AT HOME
STATU C O U M E NEWS. FBBltTMBY 4, 1027
Stale College News
'
• KSTAHMSIIKH nv nit,
CLASS or 1918
The Umlorgrncltinle Newipaper of Now York
Slnlo College for Teiichen
THE NEWS
EBWIM V A N KLEKCK
BOARD
,.,,.,.,,,.,
Uditor'in-CMef
Ki(p|>n Delta Rho Home, West 'IJM
HF.I.KN 7AMHERMAN,, •
,,,,,,...
Ihisiness
8B8 Madison Avonito, West
iM-tl
VIRGINIA HIGOINS
Managing
Manager
Editor
5B0 Washington Avcmio, West 2000-J
SARA BARKI.KV
,
Associate Managing Editor
59 So, Mke Avenue, West 1G9S-J
TIIFXMA TfiMi'l.B. lUNION EDITORS
.Subscription
Manager
I'sl Clamma Home,
2752
R U T HWest
KKU,KY
KATIILKKN Dot'ofrtV
MARV LANOOON
MtMIRKIl CiAIIFX
HUTir G, MOORE
KATHARINE SAXTON
DOROTHY WATTS
f-Ki.A V A N SCIIAICK
FRANCIS, GRIFFIN
VIRGINIA HIGOINS
A&FXAtDF, HOt.MSTKR
A N N P . HOI-ROYD
Vol, X I , No, 10
Friday, February i, 1027
STATE COLLEGE IS POWDERING HER NOSE
THE JUNIOR PROM MEN! THRILLS! ,
Minerva will get another thrill of a life time this weekcud seeing so many men around. State College will have
to brush tip and powder her nose in honor of the hig event,
Girls I a man! Isn't he good looking! Yes, dear soul,
he is good looking, and so are all the rest of them,
"Who arc you bringing?."
"Him."
"Oh!" arid with an understanding smile, "great!"
Prom, like Christmas comes just often enough to make
it attractive.
t
+
*
+ *
*
*
+
Soft lights, music, flowers—•chaperons I
WE
P A I D , N O W LET US D A N C E
DOWN WITH QUEEN CARE
A period of great stress and strain over, we emerge,
weak, but apparently triumphant. Whether or not our
metal proved strong enough id resist the acid test of examinations, we do not know, at least we try not to think of It.
And so we dance, laugh, make merry, all in a mad effort
to forget, cover up our real emotions, and to show the
stent faced world we don't care. Isn't this typical of the
life of today? Strain, physical, mental, moral, and then
jazz, head-splitting, life-giving jazz—something, anything
to divert, to relieve, and to cover tip, Must we have tip's
camouflage, this nutlet of our excess nervous energy which
has been accumulating drop by drop through those tense
weeks preceding and during exams? Is this life? Are
we but children, receiving from the capable hands of
Mother Nature a lesson winch we will use again and again
in our lives? Or, are we merely carefree, fun-loving creatures, out for a good time, endeavoring to claim our own
from the just, impartial hand of fate, who, seeing our past
energies and attempts, wishes to compensate us for what
ill reality was our duty? But why compensate? Must the
scales always balance, gram for gram, ounce for ounce,
pound for pound?
"If you dance, you must pay," said our grandsircs,
" W e paid, now let us dance," we reiterate with foolish
sincerity.
Come one, come all to the burial of Queen Care—Big
celebration—Down with the fiend! Trample her under
foot! Fire! blood! death! destruction! Once this malicious spirit is subdued—Calm! Rest! Peace! , . .
O b ! Foolish children! If you hut knew how you .'""e
deceived. This wilcy witch will allow herself to be submerged only for a short time—she will lie low, icady at
the crucial time to strike. Beware, lest in your frenzy to
make up for your recent trials, you but double your weakness and make yourself a fit prey for the torments and
teasings of this treacherous Queen!
TEACHERS' CIGARETTES
(From Boston Transcript)
"Applications for positions as teachers in the schools of
Lynn will not be considered if it is known that the candidates smoke cigarettes. This, at least, is the way in which
matters stand at present, following a vote of the school
committee. At an earlier meeting the committee declined
to adopt a recommendation of Mayor Bauer that teachers
who smoked should be dismissed. It is an interesting situation. Apparently teachers who smoke, if they are already
holding positions, may continue to indulge in cigarettes,
but no teacher who smokes will train the young idea in
Lynn if the school committee knows the awful truth.
There arises a question of demand and supply. If the
Lynn rule were to be of wide application, would there be
enough of the non-smoking teachers to meet the demand?
The habit of cigarette smoking among young people may
be highly deplorable. There arc a good many people who
think that it is. But the indications are that it is widespread. How many of the students in attendance at the
itate normal schools are cigarette smokers in their own
homes? To forbid smoking on the school premises ii one
thing. To try to prevent it elsewhere is quite another,
It may also be said of the action in Lynn that it puti
a premium on deception. The honest teacher, willing to
admit a fondness for the cigarette, is barred. The unscru •
pulous gets the job and smokes when not within the range
of the vigilant eyes of Lynn school committeemen, or
where children may be turned into tattlers. There is, of
course, new opportunity for the. activities of Paul Pry of
larger stature, And probably the sale of cigarettes in the
city of Lynn will not be diminished, It may be added that
Ibis article is not a defense of cigarette smoking by schoolma'ams. It merely suggests that with a multitude of young
people in the ranks of the smokers it is not the easiest
task in the world to put the school teachers in a clan by
themselves."
LEGISLATION RESPECTING SALARIES FUTILE
Albany High school women teachers who allege that they
arc being discriminated against because of their sex in their
salary in violation of the existing state law have made a
legal appeal to the state education department.
These teachers and the hundreds of others who supported
the passage of the bill which made "equal pay for equal
work" mandatory throughout the state were unquestionably
sincere. But they have harmed the pay situation more than
they have helped it, In general, the law has not raised the
salaries of women Icachcrs, Where it is not being either
Ignored or evaded, its result has been to lower the salaries
of llie men teachers rather than to raise those of the women.
The law is contrary to the economic principle of supply
and demand, Such being true, its utility and advisability
are doubtful, Certainly no one will deny that women
teachers have a right to all the pay they can obtain and no
one will deny them sympathy in well-chosen ways of getting it, It is true that women often fill positions as well
or better than men, But to legislate that any group must
receive as much or less or more salary than any other is
untitle interference into local control by the stale.
In the end these teachers will find that anything that helps
raise any leaching salaries or to keep salaries raised will
react to the good of the profession in general, But that
has not been the result of the equal pay law.
COLLEGE MORALS, WHAT AGAIN?
Apparently going on the supposition that T h e Plastic
Age represented college as it really is, Liberty is conducting a campaign to investigate the variety of charges
it alleges arc being made against young men and women
in colleges. Following arc examples of questions contained in a letter sent to various papers;
[fnve social lifTnirs nt tlm college during llie pnst two yenrs been
wet or dry?
Is llqiioi' tnsy lo net on or near llie cnmpusr
Ifnve you noticed n cliitnga In the iittitucln of the sliiilcnts lownnl
tile social conventions?
What proportion of the girls of your ticquiilMntiM will engage
III (icUing parlies?
Again the question of the morals of college students
will be rehashed in the public print. . . . Such publicity will contain no fundamental criticism of our colleges and universities, Nothing will be said of standardizalion. Neither will it get at the real problems of
higher education, .'licit as those of admittance and over
emphasis of athletics, problems that undergraduates
themselves are trying to help solve, Likewise neither
will it indicate the inclination of many college students
to treat with disrespect common "rah rah" tendencies,
and instead, by means of honors courses, etc,, to place
greater emphasis on (he fact (hat colleges primarily are
institutions of higher learning.
STUDENT PROTESTS, "DIVINE DISCONTENT"
EDITOR, T H E IN'KWS:
This College is full of complaint, according to the Iwo
letters of discontent in last week's NEWS. It is a natural
stale of "divine discontent I"
The Y. W. ('. A. litis been making futile attempts at
starting a student forum, such as the large colleges have,
to represent stutle it opinions and activities, other than
literary and journalistic,
In place fif such a forum, supported by student thought,
(he student body of our College prefers a multitude of lifeless clubs, supported by extracted dues. They groan because they must attend the meetings, be bored, and yet
urged on by "tin cods" as one " '27 " gracefully expresses
it. Of course, there is the advantage of one's' picture in
the Bed!
In view of too much outside, useless activity, and lack of
social culture, which these social "clubs" fail to produce, and
with the undemocratic sorority method of selecting the
chosen few to partake of what social culture exists, who
can fail to see that llie way out is to abandon these clubs.
We should substitute in place of them ail organized student
body, which will push the "dorm," and represent student
activity and interests—such as a student forum.
Then, with literary, and journalistic, artistic and dramatic, as well as religious representation, and a reorganized
social life, Stale College may and can, take her place among
the "modern" colleges.
DOHOTIIV M. WATTS, '28,
TEN YEARS AGO AT STATE COLLEGE
From the files of the News for Feb, 7, 1917
"The meeting of College Club of January 12th was postponed, as the speaker, Professor York, was very anxious lo
hear a lecture by Dr. Fosdick, who was a former classmate
of his a t Colgate, Professor York will speak at the next
meeting, the time of which will he announced later."
___Q
"On Friday night State College will play one of the fastest New England College teams. Springfield, who will bo
the opponent, recently was defeated by Dartmouth by only
three points on Dartmouth's floor. Everybody should see
this game,"
0
"The College Department of H, E, will co-operate with
the Times-Union this week in furnishing a judge for the
letter writing contest on pure foods for housewives of this
vicinity."
O
"All girls are delighted with the plan of the Girls A. A.
to hold another of the popular gym frolics, The affair
planned is to be something like a country circus and all
members will come dressed in a rural costume,"
"The State College hpekey team won its first game this
season on the Western avejiuc rink Saturday afternoon when
it defeated the National Hockey club by a score of 2 to 1 "
Make Your Program
Attractive, Zajan
Says
llv BKUTIIA ZAJAN
Last week we discussed the psychology
nf iiivoluiuarv attendance al assembly.
Unattractive programs were cited
as another possible
cause for I tic poor
attendance at joint
assemblies,
Our aim is not
lo provide an interesting program
lor you. It is to
give you lime to
provide your own
program, to inlcresl yourselves.
A motion is idways in order for
Herlha /.iil'.ui
informal
discussion on any subject
of interest to you as a group representing our College. The chairman will do
her best lo encourage arguments for both
sides. Yon recall whai satisfaction you
derived from your discussion and action
in regard 10 the Slate Linn and in regard
to personal announcements.
Discuss the programs, what you can
do to make them more attractive for
yourselves, what speakers or what interests you would wish discussed by authorities, The efforts of Executive
Council will be directed toward helping
you obtain such authorities.
We shall discuss college politics In the
iiext issue of llie NKWH.
Advance Prom Tip
"Oh, Mr. Turble, I'm jusl awfully
def'ghted to think I have this dance
with .vim, Big brave men are so easy
lo idolize, Weren't you selected for
fullback on Hie All-American this
year? You weren't?
I thought it
was you? o h it. was Mr, Worse,
You say, . . . you almost won
the croquet louriiainenl? Oh!"
"I'm so glad you cut in Mr.—- Mr,—
Mr,
oh, yes, of course. Mr. Simp,
or rather, M,r. Limp, How stupid of
me,
I do adore dancing with you.
Big brave men are so easy—
_.TT_
BASKETBALL CATCHERS
DA, DA, DUMB!
Co-ed; Wlins that?
Player; That's a basketball net.
Co-ed; Is it bard to catch them?
—'ITN O B L E YOUTH
"Yes, Dad, you may have the car
tonight," said the son, generously, to
his parent,
—TT—
TWO T R U E
You were out 'neath the stars and the
big round moon,
When the sky was sharp and clear,
And the motor purred a soft, low
Thank Cod for the Junior Prom I
croon
It's something to talk about weeks in For the listening trees to hear.
advance,
It's somewhere to go where they'll let a There at your side, behind the wheel,
dame dance,
Sat the lad who ranked ace high,
Somewhere to wear something decent Sure he did, and you told him so;
for once,
And, boy, what an awful lie!
Somewhere that won't smack of (iuals
_ •ITand Hunks.
N O MORE WORRYIN'
Somewhere to show off the latest in
men,
Kiiid professor disseminating infor
Or to meet a new necklie and fall hard inatioii on Hie contents of the exam:
again.
"It would be well lo learn all those
Lord, how I'm tired of eight ileus and (lotos given in class and all rpiestions
such,
based on the text, You are also hrld
Fed up on cramming—much too much. rcspons blc for ihe readings assigned
Weary of movies with gangs of girls,
and any outside references noted liniBored stiff with tin's planet, however it ng the year. There is no cause I'm
whirls,
worry."
I crave high-hat stuff—any kind of a
—'ITride
WISE WINKS
That costs inore'n ten cents, and you
In Elizabethan English, "to w.'nk"
_ have all inside.
Off will) goloshes, oxfords, wool hose, meant to close your eyes and keep
Show me a few yards of silk; I'll wear them closed; in modern days, "to
wink" means—well, you know what
CLOTHES,
Just give me French heels and oh, boy, you mean—you li'l rascal!
_TT—
how I kick!
Can I Charleston? Just listen; you'll
Last snappy snarl—If we don't gel
hear my knees click,
by it'll be—for cryin' out loud.
And the man—any kind of a mug will
suit mo
So long as it won't say "That means a
flat !•;."
Anything youugcr'n the youngest prof
here,
"tl" PROM FORMULA
Anybody with feet, and a tune in his
Money
ear.
Clothes
Borrowed
I'd ask the home man but lie hasn't a
Men
tux
+
=-R good lime
And the others f know look good dressed
Polks
Klu Klux.
There's my new Collar Ad—but he'd
Me
just say "so long"
TTWhen my. friend—in my clothes—came
W
I
/ A T T H E TEA DANCE WILL IK)
lloating along.
Co—So
State
College
is no longer
Sure, I've loaned all my armour except
co-ed ?
some rouge,
Going—
Howzat?
So I'll just wear a flush and go lake a
Cone—I hear thai all the little "dears"
good snooze.
Golly, no, I'm not going to from—I'd ire going to be slags.
disgrace
The whole college and bust up the place
I he way I fee! now—one semester all
(lone!
Besides I'm stone broke—just haven't
the mon.
Main—A girl may go to Pmm "blind,"
Take my warpaint? Sure thing—close
but she'll soon see.
the door when you go
Eggs—Yes,
then she'll have a dream or
And leave ten cents busfarc— I'll lake
i nightmare.
in a show.
Jolly Junior Jugglers
Jolly Junior Jugglers
BLIND JOKES
J.
J. J.
Uieer up Juniors, don't feel blue
lunwr Prom has come for you.
Sophs' soiree, and seniors' ball
Why Junior Prom outshines ihem all.
So cheer lip, juniors, don't feel glum,
lo |i-~ with exams, for Prom has come!
J-
J. J.
J.
J- )•
"Well," sighed tne head of the Stale
Institution for the Blind, "(iuess we'll
have to make additions to this building.
I beard a hunch of those Slate College
students say that they are 'going blind.'"
J' J' J'
I iuy—Did that woman come "blind?"
Tim—No, she's a chaporone,
A "peach" was stepping out to Prom
w a s m r o lli;ul
....,,
"
piissing fair,
Wall—Are you going blind to Prom:
I he blind" she look fell bard for her, _ [''lower—] guess so, I ciui'l see drag
So the "peach" is half a "pair."
ting .limmie.
STATE COLLEGE NttWS, mUUVARY 4, 1927
Spike Heels Are Handicap Of Modem Girl;PROF. CANDLYN PLAYS Junior Week Is Always Season Of Gaiety;
WITH NATURAL ABILITY
Goddess Minerva Answers Fashion's Edict
Tradition Takes Root In Founding Of State
Playing the piano or pipe organ is as
lnln'Vlrw* Willi Mlnrmi nntl fir, Ci'tin llllf n« ri'luirlcil by Dorothy M. Willi*;
Mlncl'va sits upon ii bench iii Wnshinglnn Part?, and watches llie Stale College maiden as she approaches, Minerva
glances HI lijr own sandaled feel, anil
then ill lilt* irtlH feel of llie prelly eu-c.l.
She tills along ill an acute angle, her
heels making her nnlural wall* a kind
of hird Imp.
( o h ^ u r f i / U , — i'm io\
jSerPij to mrtjt y6v all J ^ )
rl"f-atiVile — \i\fT X cnuvV- C
"Ii niiisl he 11 rend I'II I id have a sirup
In'lv II n yniir I' i'!i." she innrnnirs in
Minerva, "Ii mum he dreadful In lime
In he proifped forward as ymi walk,"
murmur.. Mineral in reply,
Jnsl then the boy friend's ear appears.
The prelly maiden speeds onward, looking like a turkey in its adolescent period,
stumbling over the grass, shr.cking,
" W a i l , George—oh—I eawn't go fust.
With these s h o e s l "
As Minerva mounts her pedestal daily,
she hides hciieaih a mask of serenity,
her horror, and amusement, as she
v\ niches (he daily procession of women
sludenls.
Their scanty, simple, and hcnllhy dress
interests her.
Their cropped hair delights her, Their
irfni legs are ;i pleasure, Itul their feci 11
",\'n Wonder," she ponders, "they are
.to lived in night,
Their poor little
shapely feel crowded into short vamped
or pointed pumps with spike heels, nod
perhaps a strap tightly fastened,
No
wonder that when they go swimming
they cover bunions and corns with bathing shoes!"
"VV'hal can he done about it ?" she
asked Dr, (', C, Croasdale, one day, as
ihey sat chatting of many things in the
ollice.
" W e l l , " replied Dr. Croasdale, "It is
all the fault of Goddess Fashion,
"She has commanded the girls for the
most pari In dress correctly, but she forgot the feel."
Minerva frowned al (ioddess Fashion's porirah in the last number of
Vogue.
"I see no reason why such shoes
should harm a girl for an evening of
dancing," continued Dr. Croasdale. "The
junior may go to proui in them, lint for
a day of study, and teaching, I con
demit such footwear, and Chink the flatheeled, rouiid-loed oxford ,is attractive
as the spiked-heeled pump."
"You are und iitbtedly ri da." niur
inured Minerva, and again resuming her
mask, she m irued her pedestal, a god
de s, untroubled by human foolishness.
natural as walking to T, Frederick If,
Candlyn, director of music al Stale College, wdio recently won a national prize,
for an organ composition. Mr. Candlyn
is also organist at St, Paul's Episcopal
church,
Aboul twelve years ago Mr. Candlyn
left England for America, For a time
he studied in New York city and in 1015
came to Albany as o r g a n s t of Si. Paul's.
For a lime he studied music at Slate
College and in \')2l) became a member
if the faculty of llie music department,
widen he has directed two years.
In the World war, Mr. Candlyn
served in the ,W,id Infantry, li. S. A.,
and later at general headquarters with
the postal express service.
Although his duties al Si. Paul's and
Stale College require considerable of
his lime, Mr. Candlyn still finds opportunity In compose church music. Since
coining to Albany he has written Communion services, anthems, Te Dennis
and so forth,
Mr, Candlyn has recently returned
from England where he visited his
mother and sisters in Northwich and
-Unified choir music in Chester cathedral,
Thomas J. Candlyn, was organist in
a professional
career.
His
father,
i 'andlyn was in the choir.
lly r.ela Van Schaick
Stale Colle.jc tradition began to take
form eighty-two years ago when an act
was passed "for the establishment of a
normal school for the instruction anil
practice of teachers of common school in
the science of education and the art of
leaching."
In IH70 il was the custom for each
graduate In compose an essay to be given
at the. commencement exercises.
The
i pics that were chosen would hardly
appeal today. For instance, "Ministering Angels," "Wrecked at Last,
J'hc
Good Old Times," "Sunbeams" and
many others show the. popular appeal
then,
The first hand-books that came oiii
were published under the direction of
the V. W. C. A. This tradition is still
in use, hut the junior class now takes
die responsibility for them.
"Junior Week" is no longer so Important a custom here. The first week
of the second semester used to be set
aside for the juniors, al which lime they
justified their appclatlon of "jolly." Il
was a season of gaiety, opened.by junior Wednesday when the class took
charge of chapel exercises.
Thursday
evening was always the junior reception
lo the whole Cnllc'c. Friday occurred
llie Prom, and al the close of lire, week
die junior banquet',
The men of the normal in LS7-I eslali
lished an improvement society called the
"Independent
Order
of
Normals,"
Though intended to be permanent, it is
no longer In existence, Its object was
to "improve in education, composition
and debate, enlarge fund of general intelligence, exhibit due consideration for
opinion and feelings of others, maintain
perfect command of temper, and seek
for truth."
The freshmen seemed to be rather imposed upon hi former years. There was
a rule that no freshman man could walk
with a young woman within a block of
(he College, and that no freshman woman could walk within one block of the
College witli a young man, No frosh
could go in die Hampton or Kecler's
unless with parents or guardian.
The
freshmen were nOt permitted to sit in
(he pit or llie first five rows of the
balcony of Harmanus HIeccker Hall,
Colonial, Grand or Poland theaters unless accompanied by an upper classman.
It was a strict rule (hat no freshman
could speak in student assembly unless
especially requested by Myskania.
When the "Echo" was the Collate
publication, it was (he custom to support and maintain il entirely by the students alone.
Many of the traditions established
years ago are still in use today; for in,-;
tancc, the mascot hunt, Moving-up day
nd several regulations for freshmen,
MUSIC ASSOCIATION NEED ENFORCEMENT
CONCERT IS FEB. 17 GROUP, SAYS ZAJAN
Compositions Of Prof. Candlyn Defends Creation Of Officer^
To Carry Out Work Cf
And Harmony Students
Commission
Are In Program
Two s nigs composed by student*.
n the harmony course will he included
in the M u s e association concert in (hi
ami loiMim T h u r s d a y evening, February 17, al H:15 o'clock.
r h r complete p r o g r a m announced
unlay by T. Frederick II. Candlyn
iii.itriu'tnr in music, follow-:
( Irrheslra, (a i Semper Fideles b.\
Sousa; I lit Minuet from L'ArlcsiciiiK
Suite, by Bizet.
W o m e n ' s chorus, (a I Xoii nobis
D
me, liy llyrd; ( h i Hois Kpais. by
I .idly; (e) T h e Hrownics, by l.eoni.
Mixed ('horn,-, (a) T h e Chase, by
German; (hi My line's an A r b u t u s
an Irish a : r a r r a n g e d by Stanford.
Orchestra ( a ) Slavnic Dance in C.
by Dvorak: ( I D The Angelus, by Mas
senel.
W o m e n ' s chorus, Folksong group
inclining:
(a) W a k e Thee Now,
Dearest Czccho-Slu\ akian; (b) Highland Love, Scotch; (e) Listen. Gianetla, Italian; and (d) T h e Keel Row
a Tyncside Air,
Men's chorus, My Little Rosebud,
by I'like.
Mixed chorus, C h o r u s of Bacchantes, Gounod.
Two songs composed by students in
Music I I I , the h a r m o n y course.
Women's chorus, (a) Sleep, Beauty
llrighl and (b) S h a d o w March, by
( 'andlyn,
Alma Mater, by H u b b a r d - L . i n s i n g .
Students will be admitted upon preseiilat'on of student lax tickets. An
admission of fifty
cents will be
charged others.
lis-
IIKHTIIA
X.VIAX.
;
Many students base inquired aholll the
necessity of creating new olTiccs in the
Campus commission when we already
bine so many dormant offices. Certainly
we eannnl entrust the duties involved
in student citizenship to inactive people.
We have Lug had need of a group which
would take the responsibility of on fore
big onleriy habits among our .sludenls;
a group which will make u^ realize that
each of ns i- one of (lie "wolves" thai
make up Kipling's "pack."
t'nless we are conscious of our place
in the community, we become careless.
The result is a display of selfish individual nature such as spoiling the appearance of our corridors, locker rooms and
mail-box with ugly, carelessly made, individual lost and found notes, second
hand book, or entertainment announcements,
His FAITH unconquerable, his passion for
work irresistible, his accomplishment not surpassed in the annals of invention, Thomas
Alva Edison has achieved far more than mankind can ever appreciate. February eleventh is
the eightieth anniversary of his birth.
Willi the Campus commission consisting of a director chosen by Myskania and
executive council, and two members of
each class appointed by class presidents,
we should see signs of recovery from
llie serious malady. I feel certain that
I he visible results of the work of the
Campus commission will convince those
who object to the creation of new offices,
that we have acted wisely,
i agree with them, that we have many
useless offices which should be eradicated.
In fact, we have a few organizations
which should be scratched from our list
of clubs. Perhaps, soon, we shall have
a plan whereby we can abolish those
organizations which have outgrown their
usefulness or which no longer show evidence of carrying out the purpose for
which they were created.
Wherever electricity is used—in homes, in business, in industry—there are hearts that are consciously grateful, that humbly pay him homage.
CLUB MAY UNITE WITH MISS FAY WILL HELP
NA TIONAL ORGANIZA TION
CAMPUS COMMISSION
Political Science club will discuss
joining the National Organization of
International Relations clubs at the first
meeting of the second semester.
The federation receives aid from the
Carnegie Endowment in New York. It
furnishes a limited number of books
yearly for the use of the clubs allied
with it. The Carnegie Endowment also
provides lecturers who go from club to
club and speak on political science subjects.
Cooperation with the c a m p u s commission mail box committee has been
promised by Miss H e l e n T. Fay,
m a n a g e r of the Co-op,
T h e Co-op will discontinue its practice of sending notes to the students
who do not remove their n a m e s from
book order lists when purchasing the
books. Miss Fay will po,it a list instead. This will relieve the mail box
of a large volume of notes each week.
^273)
<s^
GENERAL ELECTRIC
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY '4, 1027
SPEAKER APPROVES
TYPE OF STUDENTS
"ECHO" ONCE ONLY
STATE PUBLICATION
Studtntt At State Impressed
Me As Being Fine Type,
Says Stoddard
Covered Fields Now Included
A, j . Stoddard, superintendent of
Schenectady public schools; who" addressed the student assemblies January 7,
lias scut the following letter to Kvelyu
Graves, '29, secretary of the student
council:
"It was very thoughtful of you,lo extend the thanks of the student hotly of
Sf:ite College for Teachers to me for
my address before them on January 7.
Please believe me when I say that
have never enjoyed more any opportunity of speaking before an audience.
The students at State College impressed
mc as Being of the fine type of which
\vc should have even more entering the
profession of teaching. I always enjoy
any occasion that enables me to become
acquainted with those who are planning
to go into teaching—there could be no
finer work."
COLLEGE BRIEFS
The winner of the home economics
contest to determine who could prepare
Ihe best holiday dinner menu will be
announced al the February meeting of
the eastern district of the Home P'conoinccs association, according to Professor Florence E. Winchell, bead of
llic home economics department,
Dr. Risley Receives Books
Dr. A. W. Kisley, head of the history
department, has received copies of "The
American l< evolution in New York; it^
Political, Social and F.cuuoiuic Significance." This is a 3711-page book com
piled by the division of archives and
Itisp ry of the state education department for general use as part of the program of the executive committee on the
150th anniversary of the American revolution.
Copies are being distributed free under
Di. Kisley's direction to history majors
and minors and to others especially interested.
Dean Pierce Supervises School
Miss Anna !•*.. Pierce, dean of women,
is supervisor of the School of Religious
Education conducted at the fellowship
house of the First Presbyterian church,
The school has resumed sessions for the
second winter term. More than 10(1
students are enrolled. Religious teaching, informative ant) pedagogical, is in
charge of fourteen instructors, clergymen and Sunday school workers representing various Protestant denominations.
BEST BOOKS SECURED
FOR RENTAL SHELVES
"Students are not takimr advantage of
the rental shelf," declared Miss Helen T.
Fay, manager of the Co-op, today. "The
Co-op secures the best books of the day,
which arc the most expensive. But al
present, the circulation does not even pay
for the books themselves."
Some of the best books, according to
Miss Fay. arc "Wives" and "Naturalist
of Souls" by Gamaliel Bradford. These
have been rented but two or three times
during the semester. The rental shelf
may include only fiction next year.
Books added to the Co-op rental shelf
include ''Romantic Comedians" by
Glasgow; The "Man Nobody Knows"
and the "Book Nobody Knows" by
Bruce Barton, and the "Story of Philosophy" by Durant.
GRAVES IS TO GIVE
SOCIOLOGY LECTURE
What Doe, He Do?
Address Is First Of Series On
Child Development And
Parent Education
In News, Quarterly And
Pedagogue
Before Ihe days of the Quarterly ami
.he Peel, ihe f.ioil and the News, the
College men and maidens of the late
V',dorian years had', their publications,
too.
The F.clto, a predecessor of the
Quarterly, combined in it Ihe fields
now covered in the Pedagogue, llic
Quarterly and a little of the News.
The magazine was divided into
soVcit departments which were brief,
iitit which compensated for lack ol
juniitity by their quality. It contained
ni editor.al department and a literary
tcpartuicnl, which had one or two
HI, ms, a few shorl stories and occasionally a review or criticism. A deMARJOIUK OTT
partment called "Fragments" was de
.•oted mostly to descriptions from
life. The "Intra Muros" department
MERRILL-PALMER IS
jschanges, athletics, humor ami alumni notes were included, The latter
FOUNDED TO TEACH department
was later discont'iHicd.
This publication lasted for several
ARTS OF WIFEHOOD years
until the Quarterly look its
"Training of women in the functions place. Mrs. F.lla R, Watson Bashford
of wifehood and motherhood, and the who was editor-in-chief of The Echo
management
ami
supervision of in 1'JIO, is now editor of the Alumni
homes" is the purpose of the Merrill- Quarterly,
Publications previous to the Fcho
Palmer school in Detroit, according
to Mildred Babcock, ex-'26, who will had a varied and cursory existence,
complete a course in home economics according to Dean Anna Iv. Pierce. "The
.irst year book was called the Won,"
there Ibis semester.
Miss Pierce explained. "Il was printed
"The Merrill-Palmer School came ill 1900, This did not receive the fiiiauinto being through funds left by the .•ial backing it needed arid died a painwill of Mrs, Lizzie Merrill Palmer. less death, The.next revival of an anThe purpose of its organization was, nual was Our Book published in l°ll,
to use her wording, 'the training of when il, too, ceased publ'cation,
women in the functions of wifehood
In 1914, students felt there was a
and motherhood, and the. management need for a song book. Pamphlets of
and stipervis'ou of homes, the quality songs were issued for a few years.
of which determines the welfare of
any community,.' she writes.
"In planning a curriculum fur Ibis BENNINGTON OCCURED
school, il was decided lo offer courses
in child
development- acceptable
IN THIS STATE - RISLEY
toward the degree requirement, and so
The battle of Bennington in the
organized that college students could
avail themselves of the special training. ^'evolutionary war was fought on Now
"Under the direction of two cspe- Vork Mil, [Jr. Adna W. Risley, head
c'ally trained I'.nglish women, Ibis if the history department pointed out
nursery forms a most interesting lab- yesterday, refuting th popular mis
oratory in which to study the forma- conception that the engagement w.v
tion and development of personality. fought in Vermont.
Along with Ihe mental growth, the
"fHistorians have long emphasized
physical development is studied, and I hat Ihe battle actually occurred on
correlated with the social elements the Wallonisac river, while the British
affecting the child. Graduate work- troops were on their way to Bcnuiui;
giving traiirug in the specialized fields ion for supplies." Dr. Risley declared.
nf psychology, nutrition, education,
The battle was a complete and
and sociology, as related to Ihe child brilliant victory for the Americans
is offered lo qualified students.
Old diil much to revive their spirits.
"Besides the work given to under"The people of Vermont havi
graduate and graduate students, Mer- reeled a monument at Fast Hubrill-Palmer reaches out in many other 'lardli'tt to commemorate the only
fields such as nutritional research and battle HI ihe war fought in their
investigations, courses in home-mak- •dale " Dr. Rislev said.
ing and child care for elementary ami
secondary schools and health and nutrition classes for foreign-born.
Women's Footwear
"One of the greatest advantages in
studying at the Merrill- Palmer School
reduced to
is the association one has with both
staff members, some of whom are
nationally known in their field of
work, and with students from leading
universities throughout the country.
"The school itself is able to provide
the best possible facilities for work
and its situation in the city of Detroit,
which offers much in the way of eduat
cation, is an advantage.
MerrillPalmer is a most fascinating place in
which to study, and T am very glad
that State College is joining with the
affiliating colleges in giving some students the benefit of a semester's work
44 No. Pearl
here.
$6.85, $5.65,
$4.85 and $3.85
FEAREY'S
Dr, F.nicst l{. Graves, professor of
social science at Boston university,
will speak on "Social Conditions fnllucncing Home Life" tomorrow night,
al 8:15 o'clock in Chancellor's hall.
The lecture will be Ihe first of a
series on child development and parent education under the auspices of
:he Association of t'niversily Women",
the Women's club, the Junior! League,
the Council of Jewish Women the
City club of Albany and the eastern
district of the New Vork Stale Home
Keonomies association.
Student tickets for the first lecture
arc available for twenty-live cents.
MI'.TZI.KI;
DKA.V VYIi.I.I.AM
DEAN REVEALS DUTIES
TO CURIOUS STUDENTS
conference with freshmen instructors is
•ailed in order to discuss the freshmen
hose work is below the standard. Correspondence relating to entrance requirements and curriculum must be taken ear?
of and kept up to date. Various business callers representing other colleges
visit me from lime to time. Tims, there
is enough variation in the work to give
it interest,
"And," he concludes, "my office is open
lo all students and I shall be glad to rffc.any advice (hat will he of assistance."
Bv R'OBR DKANSKV
"That's the dean," whispers a frosh
is Dean William II. Metzler hurries by,
iccompanied by another of those impor.ani visitors who always disappear behind
[lie dean's office door,
"What does the dean have lo do?'
tvuinjers the absent-minded senior whose
dreams dare lo reach the dean's chair.
"What dees the (lea i have lo do?'
echoes llic assignment editor, and thereupon sends a' reporter on the trail.
"WniiT you please sohe the mystery,"
Dean Metzler is asked, "aval enlighten the
freshmen as t> y.air height of iinpin.'tnce? ' Willi a smile, he answers: 'My
'height' of importance can easily he conceived, since illy office is located on the
first floor, while the majority of student
rlasses are on ihe llonr above,"
"My dutie.i are- varied," he conliniies,
"However, within ihe past two weoks, I
have been continuously oc.upied with in
len iewing the students.
"Al the he'-'hmi'ig of each year, eac'
•iicle-i schedule must he inspected liiv
• i..-red. Occasionally during the year, ;
EXCLUSIVE
"Dependable Flowers"
We Trlmjnvph Flowers to nil Parts
Of the World
I
FLOWER SHOP
STEUBEN STREET
Corner James
Ph ne M in 3775
BALLAGHS
Exclusive Haberdasher
849 Madison Ave.
PRINTING
Albany, N. Y.
\Yc are h a n d l i n g advertised
m e r c h a n d i s e in a big variety.
W h e n yntt arc in this vicinity
the next time drop in this shop
336 C E N T R A L A V E .
Phone W e s t 2037
(Era Stuiui anil Jfftwu 8>lnimtr
21S LARK STREET
Luncheon 12 M. to 2 P. M.
Dinner 5 P. M. to 7 P.M.
CATERING
that caters to men only.
A
call will convince you of this
fact.
Specials
Shoes
Slippers
Shirts
Neckwear
Slickers
Sweaters
CRAIG P. BALLAGH
HATS
HONEY FOR SALE
New White Clover Honey
In The Comb
$1.75 per 10 pounds
Extracted honey, $1.50 per 10 pound
of every description cleaned and renovated
also
High Grade Dry Cleaning and Dyeing of Ladies' and Gents' Garments
Superior Quality and Better Service
SUPERIOR CLEANERS & DYERS
851 MadniSOn A v e n u e
The Busy Bee Apiary
Roslyn, New York
B3 STATE STREET
Albany, N. Y.
BAKERS
pail
We pay postage or express
charges and guarantee satisfaction
or money refunded. Five per cent
discount on hundred pound lots,
Produced exclusively from clovers
Phone West5975
Work Called For and Delivered
SAVARD & COLBURN
A. HAGAMAN & GO.
877 to 885 Madison Ave., Albany, N. Y.
Branch Stores:
206 Lark St., Albany
SOA Steuben St„ Albany
173 Central Ave. Albany
1 South Allen St,, Albany
£04 Madison Ave,, Albany
130 Quail St,, Albany
32 Fourth St., Troy
BUY BONNIE BREAD
RELIABLE CLOTHING - Hats and Furnishings
For men and
Young men
We rent Tuxedos and dress
suits for any occasion
STATE COLLEGE NI2VVS, FEBRUARY 4, 1927
VAN KLEECK WRITES ROLL LISTS SUPPLY
FOR SCHOOL PRESS MENU FOR MINERVA
JUNIOR MEMBERS OF DRAMATIC COUNCIL
WILL LECTURE ON MEAT
Miss Inez S. Wilson, director of home
economics of (lie luilinnai live slock and
meat hoard, Chicago, Illinois, will speak
Monday morning, February 7, in the
cafeteria. Miss Wilson will give a
meal dcmonslraticti and talk on Ihe use
of ihe cheaper cuts of meat and the
wise buying of meat. Site will give reports on research work which has been
done at dilTere-tl universities and al the
bureau of home economics at WashingIon, Fvcryonc is invited to attend this
lecture.
"Don't Be Afraid To Speak Out Celebrities In All Fields Are
Opinions Editorially,"
Represented By Names
He Warns
Of State Students
Minerva lives in State College 365
days a year, and all that time what
"Reporters Must Keep Opinions does the poor dear get to eat? Hasn't
anyone ever wondered? She can, of
Out Of Newspapers,"
course, look about a hit in the classSays Editor
DISTINCTIVE
rooms and start her breakfast quite
A student newspaper must liavc "back- nicely with Mellon, but if she doesn't
bone" if it is to he of any service to its care for that sort of fruit, the best
Programs, Menus, Dance Orders,
college, Edwin Van Kleeek, '27, edilor- she can have is a single Berry,
Aft Novelties, for
•M - — - —
in-chief of the
Bacon makes a very nice breakfasl
&&xfm
Sororities
STATIC G O I. I. B a K dish, but it's not much good without
Courtesy Albany ISvonlng No\Vt
Fraternities
' NRWS, declares in bread ami Minnie liuds that all the
(Continued)
Ihe January num- four Bakers (lie College possesses
CANTERBURY TO MEET
Societies
Bryant, Holmes, and Browning add
ber of the School have lefi her is a single B1111 IT, and
A special meeting of Canlcrlmry will
Clubs
Press Review, na- one Crumb besides. Of course, she -i literary air to most of Minnie's so
Thursday, at eight o'clock, at Si,
tional magazine de- has a whole I'eck of Pease, and smiie eial function's, Dempsev. who only be
For Particulars See
got on her visiting list this year, Andrew's. Plans for ;i bridge parly and
voted to the inter- kind Fisher gave her a Salmon but makes a lot of trouble because be membership campaign will he made.
Dorothy Warshaw, '30, S. C. T.
ests of st lid en t she usually prefers them for dinners, always wants to g 0 lo Baruuni and
publications, The when she invites her Friends.
Bailey's when the resl would much
If you see ONE
-alber attend Faust.
second instalment
And by the way, Minnie's favorite
You'll Know It's a
of an article byMiss Morgan always has lo Bragg
way
of
entertainingis
by
inviting
all
ot her D'amond, a famous lewell
Van Kleeek on
Sweaters
"Putting Pep in the Powers that be lo 11 mil with her. which makes everyone Green' with
envy.
Webster and N'ewlon have
Though
there
is
but
one
Gitnn,
each
, the Teachers ColHiking Breeches
learned discussions, ami never bother
at 18 Steuben St,
guest
is
a
zealous
Hunter,
eager
to
Jjlege Paper" apY4M /'•ie/fC'
anyone else. Several well known
Whether it's a Shingle Bob
Riding Habits
/pears in the issue, return lo the Mansion with a Wolfe Scoils from the banks of Tweed are
A Swirl Bob or
"Write on sub a Fox, a Hare, or even a brace of always present, including Duncan Towers college slickers
A Peacock Bob
jecls that arc alive," he said, commentiu.e Hawks. Of course, they always leave Wallace and Douglas,
We Specialize in Hot Oil Scalp and
Since Minnie is very Rich, having
further on editorial policies for student Ihr K'obbins for the Katz, which also
Hair Treatment
newspapers, "Don't be afraid to have feed on the Marlins with which Col two Fortunes, she is able lo keep a
large staff of servants and have a
Two (2) Expert Marcdlers Always in
Opinions and to speak- them out cdilori- lege abounds.
will equipped House. Her n v n Cooks
Next to Post Office
itllly, The paper must have backbone.
Attendance
Being a fatuous personage herself wison things ,-, |,-| |oo much w'lh
It will not always hi- right in its po.ii Minnie never lias any trouble m • 11 i 11 L;^age but all meals are nicely served
For Appointment, Call Main 7034
ARMY-NAVY-CAMP
lion, hut at least il will not be 'wishy- famous people to accept Iter invita- m tin- b si Chippendale bv a Bulletwashy.' Don'I be afraid n\ unpopular tions, and, goddess that sin- is, she i Lackey, and a couple of Pages.
Bui here's one tiling we wonder
causes. Votl may lose popularity for mingles today and yesterday witii a
•ibfiul.
When the Mcrehanl who
the paper but you will gain respect for
uiake^.
Sayles lo Minnie's household
line disregard of whether they are lie
it. Make the paper an inlltienee as well
presents
his
Rills in ihe Falle fir Win
331 C E N T R A L A V E N U E
lug or dead. This year, for instance,
as a convenience.''
ier be is always told io Wail a few
Special Attention To
"After all routine news is covered," besides a King and a Nobl she has Weeks. And since it is always Day in Choice Meata, Poultry
anil Vegetables
School Oryanimtion*
Van Kleeek said of news-gathering two fonir.T presidents, (Irani and Slate College (for there is no' Knight),
we
want
to
know
if
he
ever
gels
paid.
methods, "The important thing is In die; Wilson. Grain has a great time chatfor the under-thc-surface news. The tine, with his old friend Sherman and
best stories are usually those which are with Lee, while all three of llietn
worked up by the paper itself." The enjoj giving Cromwell and Nelson
copy desk, be said, "is not understood some pointers on how America con
and is often neglected oil student papers. ducts warfare. Root, Hoover, Hughes
Ready-made
Usually it functions as a sort of comma- and VVadsvvortll join in tin- discusAnd Cut to Order
catcher, putting in punctuation, correct- sions from lime lo time, and though
ing spelling and letting almost anything I hey have all studied Law. they gel
ESTABLISHED ENGLISH UNIVERSITY
get by so long as il is not libelous, so excited sonietintcs thai their hcS T Y L E S , T A I L O R E D OVER YOUTHFUL
The. desk's job is not this but to make hii\ ior i- almosl Lawless,
C H A R T S S O L E L Y FOR D I S T I N G U I S H E D
liVd news out of what may be poorly
MAIN 444
SERVICE IN T H E U N I T E D STATES.
written copy,"
SILVER
STAR
ASCENDS
lie emphasized that reporters tuttsl
For prompt service
The Milne High school basketball
keep their opinions out of the news
j
i ! ! ! • I i
stories. "The paper should have no learn lost lo the Silver Star athletic
opinions in its news columns," he de- Itili Friday night by a score of 19-18.
clared.
Helen Zimmerman, '11, business man Francis !•'.. Griffin, '28, of the College
lies the U-am.
ager of the i\ri-:ws, was quoted as saying [ varsih
that "It's the work of the editorial staff
to get the news to the student body while
it is still news, and it's the business
Suits and Overcoats
staff's job to get il to them as cheaply
as possible." Several unusual methods
*40, »45, *50
of the NKWS' business staff in increasing
advertising revenue are explained.
"We do not sell advertising on the
3 So. Pearl St.
plea that we need money,'' the article
38 State St.
says. "We do not sell advertising on
the plea that our students already trade
32 So. Pear! St.
with merchants and that the merchants
therefore owe us something. We sell it
Business Lunches 40c-50c
on the basis that the merchant can also
I linncrs 50c-65c
use more profits and that we can bring
EVERY TEACHER
Sunday
Chicken Dinner $1.00
him trade through our paper. If many
of orr students trade with him,_ we tell
farnianus Bleeckcr Hall Building
Should
Visit the Home of
li'm bat more will if he advertises."
"PUT
PEP
IN
PAPER'
Society Printing
WINTER SPORT GOODS
LEONE
C. H. GILLEN'S
Kleirv Market
CLOTHES
Call
A
YELLOW CAB
BRANCH DRUG CO., Inc.
;(JUwte? louse
t
"PERSONALITY BOBS"
W e cut original bob for every type
At
PALLADINO
12 Master Barbers
6 Beauty Culturists
Phone Main 6280
133 North Pearl Street
Geurtze and Weaver
Special Sale of Evening Gowns $15 up
IRENE LINGERIE SHOP
Main 3629
SO No, Pearl St.
Boulevard
Albany, N. Y.
COLLEGE CANDY SHOP
203 Central A v e n u e (near Robin)
TRY OUR TOASTED SANDWICHES
r
I
BV SPECIAL APPOINTMENT =S
OUR STORE IS THE
J
Charter louse
OF ALBANY,
The character of the suits and
overcoats tailored by Charter House
will earn your most sincere liking.
'litis company extends an especially
cordial invitation to those engaged
in educational work; Our plant is
one of lite most modern and complete in the country—a truly mode
dairy of unique interest to you per
sonally as well as professionally
Boulevard Dairy Co,, Inc.
231 Third St., Albany
Telephone West 1314
"The Sunlight Dairy"
Steefel Brothers
INC.
Wb
j
STATE COLLEGE NEWS,
An Autumn Ideal
DR,
UEOHOK S. 1'AINTKR
O, come with me licncnth the skies,
These glorious mitiimn dnysl Heboid
How Nnturc keeps IIIRII festival I
A golden h:ize fills idl the wlilc
Expanse, and hangs o'er hill nml vulc
Uke Inilos of the snlnts. How sweet
The cool, fresh nlr. with fragrance rich
From Earth's o'crllowing ehnlice home I
The seasons have their inmost wrought,
That Ceres might iter harvest hoard
With every treasure deck. The corn
And ripened fruits drop fatness o'er
The laud, and designate the times
Of goodly cheer when Providence
Makes glad the hearts of men, All leaves
And grass of living green, from out
The Sim, have drawn bright amber threads,
And woven, silently, a robe
Of crimson flame. The flowers, that yet
Abound, resplendent are in their
Most gorgeous hue. The trees and vines
And humble shrubs have clothed themselves
With iridescent light, while all
The forests glow, like armies Rirt
With panoplies of burnished gold
Beset with sapphire, amethyst,
Jasper, and every precious stone,
More radiant than ever shone
From breastplate of high-priest, or from
The coronet of kings.
Hut seel
Tlic setting Sun has lighted up
The world, as with a llame of tire,
Which, like a jeweled diadem,
Rests on fair Nature's brow. Its rays
Fill all the world, while fleeting clouds
Stand sentinel to signal back
The mellow gleam and roseate tint
In ever new, dissolving seems,
Tilt Eartli and sky would seem to vie
In carnival of light. And thus
The day is crowned in robes of gold
And purple set with emeralds.
Abide yet while the eventide
Enfolds the world In darkening shades.
And lulls it gently on to sleep.
Sublime, enchanting ir. the scene!
The waving outline of the hills
Trembles on the far horizon;
The cattle calmly rest upon
The glade; the tratisclcnt birds have cc;i
Their chirp and snug, save here ami tiler
The nightingale's Inst note echoes
Among the dells; the brook ripples
Merrily thru the stilly hours,
And, (ike a silver threat) among
The gold, wends to the crystal sea.
And now the solemn pomp of night
Comes on in somber majesty
The moon and stars shed thei pale light
And glitter like Ciolcomln's gems
From out the azure depths.
lie still
With me, and let our souls now
How good and rich a thing is lif
How wonderful I How beautiful!
ENTERTAIN MRS. PREAR
Mrs. Florence D. Frear, instructor in
home economics, who sails for Europe on
her sabbatical leave of absence, Saturday morning, February 12, has been entertained by Miss Laura F. Thompson,
Miss Anna R. Keirri, Miss J. Cnrinnc
Troy, "and Miss A. May Fillingham, all
of the home economics department.
VARSITY WILL PLAY
ALUMNAE SATURDAY
Tomorrow night at 8 o'clock the Slate
College men's varsity basketball team
will meet the men's alumni team in their
annual game on the College court. At
7:30 the girls varsity team will meet (he
girls alumni. Doth these games are
looked forward to yearly and much interest is aroused as to how they will
turn out.
Tomorrow's game will be the first the
men's varsity nave played since their
brilliant win front Clarkson Tech two
weeks ago. Although the team plays no
games during exam week the entire
squad has been reporting to practice as
usual. Unable to hold practice on lite
College court while it is being used for
exams, Coach Rutherford llaker sent
his men through a stiff workout lasl
week on the court at School 19.
Wednesday of this week the squad
practiced with the Albany Kiuh school
leant on their court and Thursday afternoon they held their final practice on. the
College court in preparation for tomorrow's game.
Captain Nephew and his men have hit
their stride and are playing the besl
basketball of any leant to represent Stale
in several years. Coach llaker ha:; developed a fast passing game and a well
balanced team. The entire sfpiatl is
confident of a victory over the .Alumni.
The Alumni expect to put a fast five
on the floor but as with Alumni teams
they have not practiced together this
year. Two former captains will appeal'
in their lineup, fforuung, leader of last
year's team and Ciaiuor, captain in '2-1,
will start at forward and center respectively. Sage, Graham. Castcllarro, ('as
savant and Moose will all see action tomorrow night.
Coach llaker will start his regular
combination with the possibility thai
Cioff will be back at guard. fiolT has
been tint of the last two games due in
illness hut has rapidly been column
around into shape. Captain Nephew al
center, Cart- and Kttczynski, forwards
and llerney at left guard with eilher
Klein or Coff at right will start bill lite
entire squad will probably be used dnrng the game.
Dancing will follow (he game and sinlent lax cards will be honored as usual.
The eastern branch of the Alumni
association will hold a dinner Saturday,
February 5, in the cafeteria. Bel ween
courses of the dinner, which is served
from 5:,!() to 7 o'clock, members of the
Girls' Athletic association will entertain.
Helen Klady, '28, Ethel Van Embttrgh,
'2S, and Ruth Lane, '28, will present a
stunt, and Marcella Street will play the
piano. Dr. Harold W. Thompson, of the
English department, will speak. Aflcr
dinner there will be a basketball game
in the gymnasium between the senior
•'iris' leant and an alumnae team.
Anion' the alumnae players will be:
Mildred Melrose, '26; Elizabeth Milmine,
26; Alice Terry, '25; Margaret Hutchins '26; IJnrolhy Hovl, '25; Kinily
lU-IlinJ, '2-1; and leanelia Wright, '26.
JT
s
The science of graphology is character analysis through handwriting - yours registers just what you are iind can do. It can tell
if you are majoring in the right subject.
Write me a natural letter on unruled paper including a self addressed stamped envelope and one dollar.
MRS. E. MIXON
255 West Lawrence St.
(Continued)
Albany; Hilda Weiden feller, Albany,
George Taylor, '.10; Mary Merchant, '27,
John Vogel, Albany; Mary Bell Scott,
'27, Roscoe Sawyer, Oneonta; Helen
Rex, '27, C. Hunter, New York; Kalherinc Blcnis, '27, Donald Mcllum, Union;
Helen Ripley, '27, Charles Simmers;
Anna Kaufman, '27, Samuel KofTsky,
Albany; Elizabeth Benway, '27, Karl
McBridc, Troy; Lucy Hagar, '.30, William Clarke, '27; Helen Viets, '27, James
Doncs, Nebraska; Sarah Law, '27, Kenneth Batcheller, Albion; Charlotte Cole,
'27, Hi. J. McDonald, Oswego; Zuella
Butler, '27, C. Blomc, Schenectady; Constance Bauman, S. Bretzfeldcr, New
Haven.
aUALITY
SHOE
84 Robin
Street
REPAIRING
One block
from the College
J. COSTANZO
PROPRIETOR
Shoe Shining andRepairing
ALUMNI WILL HOLD
DINNER FEBRUARY 5
Dr. Thompson Will Talk; G.A A.
To Entertain; '27 Will
Play Alumni
What would the capital I's above mean to you?
W. 2623
'28's Soph President
Girls' Vanity Meets Alumnae
In Preliminary Game At
Seven-thirty
:
a
FEBRUARY 4, 1927
VARSITY TO BEGIN T R I P
Wednesday mornin'g the men's varsity
basketball leant begins their trip to New
York, Three games appear on llic
schedule for (he live days.
The first game is with New Pall/.
Normal at New I'altz, This is the big
game of the season fur Ihe. Normal leant
and if Ihey heat State they count the
season a success. Last year Slale won
and is OIK |o repeat again this year.
Thursday the team lays over in New
York and Friday Ihey incct Brooklyn
Polylcch in Brooklyn.
Saturday night the leant returns lo
Allendale where it meets Si. Stephen's.
This is Ihe hardest game on trip and one
of hardest of the season.
PLAN VALENTINE FROLIC
G. A. A. is planning a gym frolic, lo
be. held February 12. The frolic will
take, the form of a Valentine parly, according to Kathcrine II. Walkins. '30,
general chairman, The committee heads
for the frolic are; Eleaivar Slevensou,
'30, refreshments; Grace M. Brady, '3d,
decorations; Mary F. Nelson, '30, music;
Lucille Norgord. '30, entei'lainhtenl;
Marie f-favko, '30, arrangements,
CLINTON
SQUARE
LELAND
IfOMF OF FILM CLASSIC'S
EXCLUSIVE
piC'iunm
C. H. B U C K L E Y , O w n e r
A41 Next Week
"THE
All Next Week
RED MILL"
with
Marion On vies
NOW
As State was the only college to enter
a relay leant in ihe ice carnival lasl
Saturday at Lincoln park the event was
called off. Kuc/.ynski claims tin- race by
a default.
The freshman men's basketball team
will not meet ihe Albany Boys academy
five tonight. Fred Crumb, manager says
lite game was cancelled because Ihe
players are going to attend the Prom.
Nights 25c
Albany, N. Y.
PLAYING
'BELLE OF BROADWAY"
and
UNKNOWN CAVALILK"
Gretta Garbo
Matinees 15e-20c
Matinees 15c
Ntahts 25c
NEW YORK STATE NATIONAL BANK
«!» STATIC S T R E E T
A L I J A N Y . N. Y.
Understand Eyes "
A R T I S T I C PLEATING
& STITCHING CO.
58 Columbia St.
Cor. No. Pearl St.
Albany, N. Y,
NOW
THE DEVIL
with
ohn Gilbert
"We
Wc Do
Hemstitching, All Kinds of Pleating, Buttonholes, Rhinestones,
Hand Embroidery
and
"OBEY THE L A W "
PLAYING
'FLESH AND
" S W E E T ROSIE
O'GRADY"
EYEGLASSES
OPTOMETRIST
50 N. Pearl St.
Albany, N.Y.
Willard W. Andrews, Prcs.
OPTICIAN
F. Wayland Bailey, Seey
ALBANY TEACHERS' AGENCY, I n c .
Wo receive calls fur toaoliora rrnm every stun- In lliu union "ml ci
tiilnly lie of service in those
who wish to trach and WHO AUK QUA 1,1 I'M Kit 'I'll IK) GOOD WOHK. Burlyregistrationtleslrilue
74 CHAPXL STBEET,
ALBANY. N. Y.
Correspondence and Interviews Invited
Telephone SMain
1(09
J O H N W. E M E R Y , I n c .
James H.Murray
C O NFEC
Shoes and Hosiery
Albany, N. Y,
TIONERY
We Supply Candy to
The Co-Op, Fresh Daily
96 Madison Ave.
Cor. Franklyn St.
Phone Main 1571-J
L. A. BOOKHIEM
RELIABLE MEATS
and FRESH KILLED
POULTRY
Special A Mention Given
to Sorority House*
West 18J7
POPULAR PRICED SHOES
54 No. Pearl St,
846 Madison Avi.
Cor. Ontario St.
THE COLLEGE
PHARMACY
Prescriptons Our Business
PRINTING OF ALL KINDS
model College Skop
C.latku that are Distinctive tut not Bxfmivt
Normanskill Farm Dairy
X/fillc
A r t
Prp>cc
394-396 Broadway Main 2287
J.V1U13
n . U
L 1C&&
Printers of State College N e w s
Junior Prom - an opportunity which comes
once a year.
Bottled Milk and C r e a m
Velvet
ICE
CREAM
CANDY • Wi an atnh hr Anllo, Park and Tllftrd. Wkitman'i, Durand'z, l.omo'i Chcalat
Telephone West 1959 and 3951
Prompt attention given to phone and mail orders. Delivery everywhere
Cor. Western and N. Lake Aves.
Albany, N. Y.
Students and Groups at the State College for Teachers
will be given special attention
Wholesale Price to Parties
State College New Ads - opportunities
which come every week.
Don't neglect them for that reason.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
Business Department
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