State College I DE PORTE TO Closes Season With Sixth Victory;

advertisement
State College I
NEW YORK S T A T E C O L L E G E F O R T E A C H E R S
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
VOL. IX
ALBANY, N. Y. MARCH 6, 1925
No. 19
^ $3 Wjjta y^r
State
DE PORTE TO
Closes Season With Sixth Victory; CRITIC OF *
Q U I T S T A T E Wins Over Rochester College of Optometry DRAMA HERE
y^'
A field basket by Nephew in the I inintile later.
last live minutes or its season gave
State's points were well split a m o n g
Will Head Dept.
I he varsity basketball team a victory Nephew,
Gainor,
and
KuczyliSki; Woolcott To Speak
S
a
t
u
r
d
a
y
night
over
Rochester
ColKoesc
was best for the visitors. Till
of Health
March
1
.,
,, ,, , ,
,,
n„„„ : l e g e of O p t o m e t r y in a g a m e played biggest crowd of the season saw the
Tonight At Hall
gainc.
D o c t o r De P o r t e leaves the college | . . ^ ^
; ^
, ^
^
gymna3 ln
T|R
(||T
{?
faculty March 1, to become Director
to 15.
T h e score:
ol Vital Statistics in the State Depart
T h e g a m e was the tightest which
STATE
m e n t of Hea th. Me s appointed to .,
,
.
, ,. .
. .
FH
FP
'IT
,
.,
,
,• , . . , , ' \
i,-;„i,,,i the team has p a v e d this year, and in
I forming, rf
0
I
take the p a c e o Dr. I). A. I'.ichel
.
.
. , , ' • , , .? ,,' .
Griffm,
rf
1
I
,
,. .'
,,
•
the first ha f reso ved itsc
into a
c , ,-,.,„,.|.,,,,i
Kuczynski, If
0
I
who died recently m Switzerland , their. .schedule
. , . with
,
.
six . .win
bc
n
m
iKamsl
(iainor, c ..
"™
'
«
two
teams
where he was serving under the As- *™"»«
"
'
livi
I h c
,ncn
b
0
j
ticket!,
rg
s e m l d y of the League of N a t i o n s .
victory
linished
T h e first ?halftheir
started
slow and
bad
lant
of itsofkind
in the
world.
T
h e position
Department
Vital
Health
in j g o n e three minutes before Gailior,
Nephew, Ig
Dr.
repu- \
New Eiehel
York had
Stalean isinternational
the most imporPurple and Cold center, scored a foul
17
tation, and it is a very unusual compoint.
Neither side scored from lb. 1
Totals
pliment to Dr. De Porte to he seROCHESTER
floor until the half was well under
T
P
lected for this important position.
way.
Then Koesc. Rochester forD o c t o r De Porte was horn in
H o w a r d , rf
ward, came through, (iainor followed
Russia.
l i e received the degree of
Koese, If . . .
with a basket for State.
T h e half
Siinonsen, C
Bachelor of Arts at the University of
closed with the varsity leading II to (>. llildnett, r g
O k l a h o m a , the Master of Arts degree
Rochester spurted in the second Hardwell, Ig
at Princeton and the degree of Doctor
period, and worked up its score until Wcstpall, Ig
of Philosophy at Cornell.
All of .
,
.
,
was
teacher !
° " l ' V1 '" l n ' m s State missed
Doctor De Porte's wor
several
easy
shots
from
the
door
and
has been done while he was a m e m b e r
15
almost as many from the penally line.
of the Stale College faculty.
Summary
Miss Arleue W o r t h , '22, is to be A basket by Howard, of Rochester,
Score at
half
time—Slate, 1
substitute teacher d u r i n g the spring sent the score to 1-1 to 1.1. With two
Fouls committed—i
and one-half minutes to play, Kuczyn- Rochester, 6,
months.
—
ski scored a foul and Roe.se came Slate, 9; by Rochester, 8.
Referee
with one for the Oculists, I H u m p h r i e s .
Timekeeper— Feniier
Everyone's idea of why young men | Nephew scored the deciding basket a | T i m e of periods—Twenty minutes.
and women go to college and of what I
.
,
.
life there is like is w r o n g , President •_. ,
« . .
_
!
f e r r y of Hamilton College declared P r e s i d e n t A d d r e S S C S
S O I R E E IN O N E W E E K ' S T I M E
La g r a u d e Soiree! T h e hour is set
in weekly assembly Friday. T h e genfor the debut of the
sophomore
eral public, parents, alumni, and even
class, Friday, March 13. T h e sophou n d e r g r a d u a t e s themselves often do
T
h
e
General
Conference
of
the
not realize why students are at colmores take it as a good omen thai
Residence Hall Campaign was held at
lege, he said.
tin' great event comes off on a sot h e H a m p t o n Hotel Monday evening,
'•American
education,
generally," March 2. About thirty college lead- called unlucky day.
Dr. Ferry declared, " i s misunderstood ers, trustees, and division chairmen
'fhe
committees,
appointed
by
by the public. T h e place of athletics were present.
Ralph H a r r i s , president of the sophois ovcrstrcssed and the amount of
more
class,
are
headed
by
the
general
'fhe presiding officer was Mr. John
publicity given atnletic stars is all oni
McNtitt;
refreshBlackburn, chairman of the campaign. chairman, , Ruth
of p r o p o r t i o n to that allotted successT h e speakers, with their topics, were: m e n t s , Dewitt Zeh; music, Melanie
ful students.
College officials have
President Rrubarhcr, " T h e Need o, G r a n t ; door, Page Mattice; decoras o m e t i m e s wondered where any time
a Residence Hall at Slate C o l l e g e " ; t o n . Ruth Coc; invitations and taxis,
for study is to be found with foolMiss Pierce, " O u r Present H o u s i n g Efther Milnes; favors and orders,
ball in the fall, baseball in the spring,
Problem "; Professor Sayles, " W h a t j Mildrel Pawel.
and basketball in the winter.
T h e m e m b e r s of the faculty to be
has been done and what is going to
"recent are Dean Pierce, Dr. and Mrs.
" T h e purposes of college, as a gen- be done."
eral thing, are grossly misunderstood.
Brubacher, Dean Metzler and Mrs.
Mr. Frank L. Graves, Commissioner
M a n y persons think that it offers a *
Metzler; the h o n o r a r y m e m b e r s , Miss
of Education, Miss Edith L Wali'hance for students to rest their
lace, chairman of the faculty and Catherine Peltz, Mi'ss Elizabeth H.
weary backs for four happy years
u n d e r g r a d u a t e committee, and
Mr. Morris, Dr. Marion Collins, Miss
a m s t sunny walls. Education, alter C I i a r U ? s Gibson, vice-el
•man of the Marion Fleming, and Miss Queenc
all. is the real purpose of colli
c a m p a i g n , were present. A m o n g the j H o m a h .
The gymnasium will be transformed
this d e m a n d s more than mediocre division chairmen present were Mrs.
scholarship.
Figures show that the Delieer, '12, chairman of Division I; into a veritable garden, with the help
student who does poorly in big 1, Mrs. Mary R. Richardson, '1-1, chair- of Danker's ilorist shop, and the acschool will be very unlikely to do we'l man
of
Division 2; William
A. c o m p a n i m e n t to d a n c i n g feet will he
Alin college; thai the student who gels Mackey, '90, chairman of Division 4: supplied by Zita's orchestra.
C and D grades in college will do W i h i a m S. Twichcll, '89, chairman of though the favors have not been anpoorly in g r a d u a t e w o r k ; that the Division 6, and Mrs. J. W . Scudder, nounced, there is much buzzing over
the form which the treasures will
g r a d u a t e who has just slipped through '88, chairman of Division 7.
take.
college has much less chance of sucFresh and unscarred from any mark
cess in life than the man at the top
M O R E BY DR. F E R R Y
j of battle the s o p h o m o r e banner will
of bis class.
" P a r e n t s who send their sons to col- h a n g in the g y m n a s i u m as a challenge
" W h e n Wisconsin University compiled a list of its most eminent, suc- lege to get what is popularly known ' " a11 l i u | e g r e e n freshies. T h e inimcessful and distinguished graduates as ' college life ' have a mistaken idea her of the enemy, the sophomores,
for fifty years, half the valedictorians of its value. College graduates seem i will be greater, but strategy, in the
and saltitatoriaus of those classes to indicate, from their reminiscences, | history of class rivalry, has fouled
were listed. O n e - t h i r d were Phi Beta that colleiic is a place for engaging in I many a well laid plan.
Kappa men and only one in ten fell various g a m e s either of hoodwinking
below the Phi Beta Kappa scholarship j professors or stealing apples from parties, society, and sports. Ts it any
standard. Character, too, is as neees- s o m e b o d y ' s orchard.
Many college wonder that the outside public gets
<ary as scholarship lo success in life." ' s t u d e n t s tall; of little else than house a wrong impression?
Dr. Ferry; Sage, Jester hack'
Gathering at Hampton
T o n i g h t at 8:30 in Chancellor's
Hall, the D r a m a t i c s and A r t Association will present America's foremost
d r a m a t i c critic, Alexander Woollcott,
Mr. W o o l l c o t t will give " E n c h a n t e d
Aisles," his famous lecture review of
the modern theater. T h i s review, in
book form, has been described by
G. P. Putnam and Sons, the publishes, as a " book about the stage and its
varied associations, its gossip, and its
ureal figures. A love for the theater
and a love of good living and lively
'rieuds colors every page." A l e x a n d e r
Woollcott is also a u t h o r of m a n y
ither notable books on the drama,
iinoug them " Shouts and M u r m u r s , "
'Mrs.
Fiske," and " M r .
Dickens
(iocs to the F l a y . "
His articles on
famous actresses and .actors and leading plays and playwrights are featured
in leading m a g a z i n e s . Mr. W o o l l c o t t
is c h a r m i n g as a speaker, however, as
well as a literary personality. He Has
made the a c q u a i n t a n c e of many leading men and women of the stage in
this country, England, and France,
and has m a n y friends a m o n g the principal d r a m a t i c a u t h o r s and
playwrights of today.
Upon his verdict
the fate of m a n y a new play depends.
In bis lectures, Mr. Woollcott presents to his audience the foremost
stage personalities in a colorful and
a m u s i n g parade.
Let your d r a m a t i c instinct lead you
to Chancellor's Hall tonight where
you will hear the mysteries of life
behind the footlights and of N e w
York stage life from an eminent
dramatic critic's point of view. Students will be a d m i t t e d on presentation
of lax tickets, and the balcony at the
hall will be reserved as usual. Tickets
will be on sale at Cluett's on March
5 and 6 and admission for outsiders
will be seventy-live cents or one dollar
for reserved scats.
Girls' Varsity Plays
Russell Sage Saturday
T h e Girls' Varsity team of State
College will play Russell Sage College
t o m o r r o w afternoon. Saturday, March
7, in the g y m of the T r o y Y. W . A
chartered car will leave the corner of
Robin Street and Central Avenue at
2 o'clock, and the g a m e will begin at
3 o'clock.
A large crowd is anticipated to help the g a m e go " over the
top." Upper classmen will r e m e m b e r
that last year's g a m e between S t a t e
and Russell Sage was a great victory
for State.
This year's team has great prospects. T h e probable lineup is as follows:
T o m p k i n s , Moore, Craddock,
Ifoyt, E m p i e , H u t e h i n s , Maar, Dietz,
S w e e l m a n , Neville, Falle, and Daley.
.fage Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH (i, 1025
£>tuU (&M?#t 5fatii0
Vol. IX
March 6, 192S
No, 19
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars
ftr year. Advertising rates may be had
on application to the business manager.
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
ft* the hands of the editors before Mouuw» of «fl»n r*«i«!lc of publication.)
Editor-in-Chief
KATHLEEN E. FUKMAN, '28
*t*naging Editor
HARRY S. GODFREY, '26
Business Manager
RUTH BARTON, '25
Subscription Manager
GWENDOLYN JONES, '25
Assistant Business Managers
Lors MOORE, '25
ELISE BOWER, '25
Assistant Subscription Manager
HELEN BARCLAY, '26
Associate Editors
FLORENCE PLATNER, '25
HELEN ELLIOTT, '26
JOYCE PERSONS, '26
MARGARET BENJAMIN, '26
Reporters
SARA BARKLEY, '27
JULIA FAY, '27
KATHRYN BLENIS, '27
ANNA KOFF, '26
EDWIN VAN KLF.ECK, '27
LOUISE GUNN, '27
ATHLETICS AT STATE
Dr. Ferry's interesting lecture, deliverer! in Assembly last week, made
it apparent to those who were in
doubt that scholarship, and not
athletics or social events, should hold
the lirst place in college life. The lecture, seasoned with jests and personal
anecdotes, contained many philosophical generalizations drawn by a man
whose actual life-experiences had furnished data, Albany High School,
State College, and Milne High School
were all fort una ta enough to bear Dr.
Ferry, and many attended both lectures delivered in the auditorium.
Hitherto State College has had a
tendency to imder-estimate athletics,
rather than over-estimate them, as Dr.
Ferry implied was the case in many
colleges. Possibly this under-estimate
was due to a realization of our own
inferiority along the athletic line.
However, this year, under Coach
Baker's skillful management, the basketball team has won numerous home
victories, with its last game, played
Saturday night, as no exception. The
team has been rewarded by a dinner
given by the coach, as a result of Saturday night's victory Such loyalty and
labor on the part of the coach and the
team should certainly be appreciated
by the college at large. A baseball
season will open in the spring. It
should be our pleasure, and it certainly
is our duty, to lie on band at every
baseball game to cheer the team. In
this way at least we cm show our
appreciation of the successful winter
athletic season.
CANTERBURY CLUB NEWS
The candy sale held recently by
Canterbury Club netted them a profit
of about seven dollars.
The Canterbury Club will hold
communion at St. Andrew's next
Sunday.
Miss Martha Billiard of New
Jersey, will address the club March
26. She was to have spoken before,
hut on account of illness was unable
to come.
LENTEN SEASON
Ash Wednesday, February 25, began the Lenten season, the period of
forty days before Easter which commemorates the trial, conviction, and
crucifixion of Christ. Observance of
the period is practiced to a greater or
lesser degree throughout all Christian
countries, and at no previous lime has
it been more universal than it is now.
Each individual directs for himself his
form of devotion and praise, It may
be a more frequent and regular church
attendance, or abstinence from customary indulgence. What are the
effects of such observance? Earnest
thought of the meaning of the Lenten
season makes more evident real unify
of all denominations of the Christian
religion. Among the tangible results
—a higher standard of citizenship
may be listed. Citizenship, like all
moral and spiritual qualities, begins
with the individual. The moral status
of a city depends upon those qualities, moral and spiritual, of ils citizens; thus the influence of the individual is effective to a far greater
scope, state, nation, and the world.
A united people aroused by the direction of ils hearts eradicates existing wrong when sponsored by serious
thought. This period of increased religious activity cannot but have a
beneficial Influence on the siudehl
body of any college.
J. P., '26.
EARTHQUAKES AND EXAMS
Earthquakes produce a peculiar reaction hi all who experience them.
A feeling of fear, uncertain expectancy, and dread floods the heart. A
bewildering surge of emotion is experienced. Did you ever think how
much an earthquake is like an examination? We have passed through
both of these experiences recently.
To those who were not prepared', each
seemed a calamity. These fears and
forebodings are mere shadowy forms
which have now sunk to oblivion.
We should always be prepared for
earthquakes and—examinations. Let
us not wait until the opportunity for
study is passed and our examinations
are upon us. Each morning let us
arise with the thought that we are to
pass through a skirmish. Let us arm
ourselves with a shield of determination through which no dart of discouragement can enter, and let our
keen swords of application and study
pierce every lesson, so that when the
day is done we may rest in the assurance of a victory won, and a large
step taken in the direction of winning the battle of Education. With
this altitude in our daily li.'e we need
no longer fear examinations.
We
will be prepared.
V. H„ '28
ALUMNI DINNER
The New York Alumni Association
held a dinner last Saturday night at
the Hotel Majestic. President Brubacher addressed the gathering on
"State College from Day to Day."
Miss Pierce presented the dormitory
fund campaign, and Professor Gilbert
Raynor, class of 1890, State College,
president of a Brooklyn commercial
high school, spoke upon modern
trends of education. The music was
led by Dr. Thompson.
Samuel F.llner, '13, succeeds William C. Wide as president of the
organization. The new vice-president
is John McNeil, '17.
'.
Newman Club Will
Hold Sale Mar. 17;
Communion Mar. 29
The Newman Club calendar for the
month of March includes two important events, as announced at the regular meeting held Wednesday, March 4,
at four o'clock in Room 211. The
annual cake and candy sale is scheduled for March 17, A table in I he
lower hail of the Administration
Building will be laden with some delicious confectionery surprises designed to tempt the "sweet tooth" of
State. Decorations will be arranged
in the St. Patrick's Day colors, green
and white. The date for the third
Quarterly Communion of Newman
Club was announced as set for Sunday, March 29, at the 9:10 mass at
St. Vincent de Paul's Church, A
breakfast at the Academy of the Holy
Names will follow. Tentative plans
were also announced for the conference of the Albany Province of Newman Clubs to be held under the
auspices of the local did) on May
8-10, in this city. Newmanites are requested to watch the club bulletin
board for reports of Treasury Drive
results and, Incidentally, to consult
Ihc list still posted there and to sign
up for the Quarterly Communion
Breakfast.
Residence Hall Committee
sent out an emergency call for help
last week-end. The rcspoiise u;iimmediate, and centered in Page Hall
and Newman Hall. Other similar
calls will be sent out in the future.
It is hoped that the whole college
will help. Sign up on the bulletin
board, do your bit by folding and
addressing letters, and help brine
State's Residence Hall a little nearer
At the senior class meeting held
last Friday the following Class Daj
officers were elected: poet, Ruth
Moore; historian, Edith Higgins. A
revole will be taken today for class
prophet, testator, and councillor. The
names to be voted upon are: prophet,
Gertrude Olds, Mary Driscoll, Mary
Vcdder;
testator,
Margaret
MrGeency, Kathleen Furman; councillor.
Mary Bull, Dorothea Dietz, Gertrude
Olds.
Evelyn Bacllc, '28, of Page Hall,
spent Hie week-end at her borne in
White Plains.
Consuelo Van Orsdell, '28, of Page
Hall, spent the week-end at her home
in Hudson,
Esther Sherman, '26, of Page Mall,
About fifty State College students spent the week-end at her home in
took their initial trip to the peniten- Schuvlerville.
tiary last Sunday morning.
Dr.
Margaret Provost, '27, of Page Hall,
Van dor Wort, the chaplain there, con- spent the week-end at her home in
ducted the visitors through the build- Haines Cave.
ing, Later a very interesting sermon,
Margaret Calhoun, '28, of Russell
delivered by the chaplain, was enjoyed Sage College spent the week-end al
by those in attendance, Iva ITInujnn, Page Hall. She was the guest of
'25, and Dorothea Dietz, '25, read the Alva Pietschker, '28.
scripture for the service, and Bertha
Miss Johnston's Citizen Scouts held
Xajan, '27, played a violin solo.
a meeting at college Wednesday,
The snowstorm last Sunday de- March 4.
creased the numbers but not the
There was a meeting of Scout
spirit of V. W. Vespers. Iva I Hu- Leaders at Miss Johnston's borne
man, in charge of the service, an- Thursday evening, March 5.
nounced as speaker Dea'n Metzler,
State College is inviting all high
who had chosen a subject appropriate school teachers and principals of (be
to the Lenten season. Violet Pierce, nineteen districts in the Albany area
a member of '28, by a solo introduced to a round table conference to be held
herself as another gifted singer in at the college March 21.
college.
The conference will begin at ten
At (be tea following (he service, o'clock in the auditorium with a
Miss Wallace and Miss Thompson round (able talk on administrative
poured.
problems, At twelve o'clock a lunchMiss Eunice Rice will speak a I eon conference, to lake place in the
V. VV. next Tuesday. She is thinking college cafeteria, will consider rural
of taking as her subject the life of problems.
The sections of the area are to be
Alice Freeman Palmer. No further
inducement for attendance beside presided over by members of the college
faculty who will arrange the promention of the speaker and subject
grams for their separate sections.
• bould be necessary.
P-ippa Delta welcomes Betty Trowbridge, Sallic Goldsmith, lanel Gow.
VARSITY TEAM IsANQUETS
Evelyn
McGee, and Abbie Crawford
The varsity basketball team which
brought its season's scoring out on as pledge members.
Marjorie
Ferris, '21, spent the weekthe credit side of (he balance slice!
Saturday night by defeating Rochester | end at Psi Gamma house.
Psi
Gamma
welcomes Mary CampCollege of Optometry will be given a
turkey dinner Monday by R. R. 1j bell, '27, as a pledge member.
Maker, coach. The team "won six
straight games and polled die best I
record the Purple and Gold has made! Freshmen, freshmen, don't feel
blue,
for years.
The duel between Kuczvnski, for- The sophomores have their trials
ward, and Nephew, guard, both fresh- ;
too,
men, for first place in scoring honors i Hut if you'll both just buy a " ped ",
was settled in Nephew's favor when
You'll find your troubles all have
each pulled 5 points in the final game, j
fled.
Third place honors went to Captain
Gainor, center.
Found: A sum of money on WestState broke into the winning ranks
ern Avenue, below the College Dining
defeating St. Michael's.
The team has trimmed Jamaica Hall. Will loser please tell when and
Teachers, January 17, and since then where lost, and amount of money
has taken the measures of the Alumni. missed? Anyone having lost same
Oswego and Cortland Normals, and please give above particulars to Jessie
Wavnian.
Rochester.
Y. W. Events
Vw
«s
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 0, 11)25
^ ^
hige Three
College Cullings
I S C O N S I N U, long in (he forefront of slate educational iuslilutions and now in search of a new president, is being slowly starved to death by
the state authorities who control its
purse strings, according to charges of
some of its faculty. Meanwhile the
Wisconsin legislature is appropriating
millions for disposing of tubercular cows
and for other purposes which the
scholastics see as far less important than
maintenance of the big state Institution
for the education of its youth. Something like a parallel to this may he found
in New York State. As I'resident I'.ru
bacher showed in his annual report, the
state spends five and one-half times a..
much money to educate a student of vet
erinary medicine as a school teacher,
and three and one-half times as nui.h
to train a forestry student as a student
of education.
Preceding
legislatures
have been niggardly in their appropriations and near-sighted in their conception of the college's actual needs. To
the present legislature the question is
squarely this:
W
Does the stale think more of
horse doctors 'who will cure fur
the bodies of its cattle, ami tree
surgeons who will look after the
limbs of its trees than of school
teachers
who will train the
minds of its yontl\J_
A M I L T O N college students tell this
one on President berry, who spoke
in assembly Friday, Dr. berry presides
over chapel at Hamilton, and in hi^ absence the senior member of the faculty
present takes bis place. A few weeks
ago President berry did not appear at
the assembly and, since no professor was
at hand, chapel exercises were disperse;!
by everybody's consent. The Hamilton
men hint that oversleeping caused Mr
Stage directions for this scene from William Vaughn Moody's play, " T h e G r e a t
D i v i d e , " call for a w o m a n ' s muffled scream, a pistol shot, and t h e crash of breaking furniture. T h e microphone on the right sends them all t o your home.
H
An Exciting Evening
Ferry to " cut."
The following remark by the
Hamilton president, made in his
speech last week, is considered
"We. NciV York
significant.
state educators, have "watched
with greale.il interest the development of Stale College under able leadership into one of
the jive real colleges of the
E V E R Y B O D Y ' S suspicions that sopbo*-' mores are a wilder lot than the rest
of the college are confirmed by results
of an investigation on the average bedtime hour of State College students
Ten students of each class chosen at
random confidentially imparted the in
formation.
The general retiring hours
shown were: Seniors. II p. in.; juniors,
11:30 p. in.; sophomores, midnight;
freshmen, 11 p. in. The student investigator concluded that the advised l():.i()
o'clock retiring hour is not strictly adhered to and reported her fiiidiu.es to a
college class.
77ii? ten seniors nave as their
reasons that they cannot get
their work done by 10:30 o'clock
if they remain at home and thai
they are unable to return from
a place of amusement
by that
time if they go out.
ROM other Temples of Learning this
week come these tidings:
Alexander
Woollcott, a
Hamilton
graduate and a classmate of Dr. Thompson, who speaks here tonight, gave his
fraternity chapter a baby grand piano
for the new house which it opened
Sunday.
Canaries are barred from the new
dormitories for women at Columbia university.
Pratt Institute basketball team which
trimmed State by two points this year
took the measure of Rensselaer Polytechnic institute's varsity by four points.
Hamilton College lost to Union College on the basketball court for the second time last week. Union's winning
margin in each game was greater than
that"which it had over State.
F
Here are four of the W G Y
Players (the world's first
radio dramatic company)
at a thrilling climax that
almost turns sound into
sight.
WGY, at Schenectady, KOAj
at D e n v e r , and K G O , a t
Oakland, a r e t h e b r o a d c a s t i n g
stations of t h e General Electric
C o m p a n y . E a c h , a t times, is a
concert hall, a lecture room, a
n e w s b u r e a u , o r a p l a c e of
worship.
Tune in, some evening,
on one of their productions.
You will be surprised to
find how readily your
imagination will supply
stage and setting.
If y o u are i n t e r e s t e d t o learn
more a b o u t w h a t electricity is
doing, w r i t e for R e p r i n t N o .
A R 3 9 1 c o n t a i n i n g a complete
s e t of these a d v e r t i s e m e n t s .
55-13 DH
GENERAL ELECTRIC
N E R A l
SCHENlJCTAD
COMPANY,
E L E C T R I C
Stale
College's
birthplace,
now known as Van
I'echten
hall, on the north side of State
Street,
near Eagle, has been
bought by the Albany
Masons
nutl will be lorn down In make
~way for the new Masonic Temple. The century old building
that housed the colleges
first
classes eighty years ago has, in
ils career, been railroad station.
chonl house, dance hall, office
build ii, and what not.
MILLS ART PRESS
394-396 Broadway, Albany, N. Y.
f
Printers of State College
Ne
PRINTING
Special Attention Given
Society Work
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 0, J926
Pag^ Eour
Keonoiuies
Remember the
ivenieinuei
tnu Home
IHIIIIL. iwiuuuiK.n
Club
Club party tonight, March 6, in the
Home Economics corridor. Special
plans are being made for decorations.
entertainment,
and
refreshments.
Don't miss Ibis opportunity to meel
(he other members of the department.
Miss Bertha Duersehner, Stale College '23, who is now teaching in Millbrook, New York, visited the college
on Monday.
On Thursday evening, February 26,
the seniors of the Home Economics
Department entertained the sophomores of that department at the Home
Management House, The entertainment and decorations were appropriate
for Valentine's Day and WashingThe Biology Club held its second
bike Friday afternoon, February 27, ton's Birthday.
at ,3:20 o'clock, In spite of the rather
The Chamber of Commerce Club
disagreeable cold wind a number of began ils social program last Wednesthe members started from the end of day evening, February 25, wilh a dinthe Delaware Avenue car line with ner in the college cafeteria. Although
Dr. Douglas. They went through it is almost (he youngest club in colGracehiud (o the woods above the lege, its progress was shown by an
Nonnanskill. As they expressed it, attendance of seventy members.
" The wind wasn't a bit cold there,"
Mr, Roy S. Smith, executive secrcand they really enjoyed themselves lary of the Albany Chamber of Comwhile learning how to identify new merce, was the principal speaker, and
(rees and shrubs, and observing other a Irio of girls cntcrlaincd with songs
tilings of interest, The hike con- and ukeleles. Mr. Smith spoke on
tinued through the woods and ended, the relation of a Chamber of Comall (oo soon, nl Simthcrn Boulevard. merce to its community, and the atliiude of I he teacher toward his home
Sailor Jose Guerrero, of Costa Rica, town. Dancing followed the speeches.
conducted an imaginary journey to
Floyd E. Laudon, '25, was in charge.
his native laud when he addressed
Spanish Club, Wednesday, February
"University Life in Toulouse" was
25, at four o'clock in Room 209, the topic upon vvhich Miss Fay reSenor Guerrero illust'rated his lecture lated personal experiences at the meetby reference to maps showing the lo- ing of the French Club on Tuesday
cation of Costa Rica, its topography, afternoon, March 3. Miss Fay deitiicl economic importance.
Senor voted a year (o study at the UniGuerrero lectured entirely in Spanish, versity of Toulouse last year,
Clubs Are Active
Political Science Club held its
meeting Tuesday, February 24, in
Room 101. Miss Marion Bessette,
'26, gave a most entertaining tallc on
the work _ of the Albany Guild, Miss
Bessette is employed its a night clerk
at the Guild,
The next speaker whom Political
Science Club will introduce to State
College, is Miss Hulli Minor, prominent woman lawyer of Albany. Miss
Minor will talk on "The Poor Man's
Share of Justice," oil Wednesday
evening, March II, at 8 P, M.
IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE
Art students will be glad lo know
that Ihe Co-op now has a full selection
of Kstcrbrook lettering pens, Buy
your poster paper al the Co-op and
(bus save a trip down town as well
as money.
Following a suggestion given by
many students, and backed by both
Dr. Croasdalc and Miss Johnston,
spring waler will be sold for one eon!
per cup.
Help yourself and the
"Co-op" by drinking pari! water,
More suggestions are in order,
To suit the tastes of those giving
up candy there will be crackers on
sab' during the Lenten period. Al
limes when the cafeteria has sandwiches left over, these, also, will be
sold afternoons. If Cornell "Co-op"
can have a local and mail order business for Whitman's chocolates Stale's
Co-op does not appear altogether like
a country grocery.
I
BARN DANCE PROVED LARK
CALENDAR
Friday, March 6
8:00-11:00 P. M, Home Economic
Club Initiation—Room 161.
8:15 I'. M, Dramatic and Art Association Lecture—Chancellor's Hall.
Saturday, March 7
Russell Sage Basketball Game—
Troy,
Tusday, March 10
3:00 P. M. Y. W. C. A.—Auditorium.
•1:00 I'. M. Political Science Club.
•I:(K) P. M. Home Economics Club
Room 160.
Wednesday, March ll
•1:110- P. M, Spanish Club.—Room
103.
t-.j
Shoe Repairing
We Use Best Oak Leather
Good Year Rubber Heels
and O'Sullivan Rubber Heels
Twilight and moonlight featured in 250 Central Ave. 2 doors from Lake Ave
the "square dances" of Si and
Mirandy at the Barn Dance last FriC. P. LOWRY
day night, The costumes were original beyond the point of being rustic,
Watchmaker and Jeweler
especially those of " Si " Temple and
171 Central cA'venue
" Sally" Sarr, who were awarded
thoroughbreds as an increase to their
crftbany, &t. Y.
barnyard fowl. '28 has learned, early
Phone Wist
3756-J
in its career, the trick of putting on a
good stunt, for the entertainment they
provided was " choice." Then, to finish, fried cakes and refreshing drink
completed the "airy" atmosphere of
the evening,
T r y Me Out
±9
a^
WRKLEXS
ECONOMY STORE 215 CENTRAL AY.
Dress Goods Trimmings
Hemstitching and Pleating
OPEN EVENINGS
Compliments
"after every meal"
RESTAURANT
H. R. KIMBALL, Prop.
SPECIAL DINNERS 40 and 50cents
A LA CARTE SERVICE
MEAL TICKETS SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER 60c
206 Washington Ave.
Telephone
4 doors above Lark St.
West 3464
Take care of your teeth!
Use Wrigley's regularly.
It removes food particles
from the crevices. Strengthens the gums. Combats
acid mouth.
Refreshing and beneficial!
F57
&EAZED
TIGHT
KEPT
RIGHT
of
College Candy Shop
West Lawrence
Shoe Repairing Shop
SHOE SHINE
MATTEO LAVENIA
Cor. West Lawrence & Western Ave.
SPORTING
ATTENTION
Radio Supplies
SENIORS AND FACULTY WRITE ME—I HAVE A MESSAGE
FOR YOU
H O W ART) A .
467 Broadway
ALBANY AUTO SUPPLY, INC,
SHEARER
Albany
West 1616
145 Central Avenue
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
N e w Silks
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
W O O L E N S & COT T O N S
Drop in between Classes T|'or Quality Merchandise and Cour-
®hp iKraft ^hnn
Hi CENTRAL AVENUE
82 ROBIN STREET
D I S T I N C T I V E GIFTS FOR A L L O C C A S I O N S
WE ARE SHOWING OUR SPRTNG LINE OE SILK HOSIERY
H. E. STAHLER'S RESTAURANT
"THE BEST IS NONE TO GOOD"
Candies, Ice Cream, Soda, Cigars
307 CENTRAL cAVE. <Albany, &(, Y.
GOODS
Open Evenings
State College
Cafeteria
, Luncheon or dinner 11:15—1:30
Compliments of
Chapman *tameo
<Phone West 6448
(6U103 &titftt0
teous Treatment Visit
OverKre»qe« 5.10c
Store
Hewett's Silk Shop
15-17 NORTH PEARL
LAST <BUT 3<OT LEAS1
The Gateway Press
QUALITY -PRINTERS
AT YOWR ELBOW—WEST 2037
336 Central Avenue
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