S t a t e College N e w... SEASON ENDS TO-MORROW Dramatics Class To

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S t a t e College News
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE F O R TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
VOL. IX
NO. 8
SEASON ENDS
TO-MORROW
Basketball Practice
To Begin on Monday
ALBANY, N. Y., NOVEMBER 14, 1924
Dramatics Class To
Give Three Plays;
Cast To Be Chosen
FROSH PLAY
RENSSELAER
High School Wins;
Nephew Captain of '28
''Overtones,"
"The
Boy
Comes
H o m e , " and "Aria da Capo" arc the
three one-act plays to be presented in
J a n u a r y at the Vineeiitian Institute
The 1924-25 football season closes as (he. annual public work of the elem e n t a r y dramatics class under the
to-morrow. Before what is expected to
direction of Miss Agnes E. Futterer,
he the largest grid crowd of the year, it has been virtually decided.
Stale College's football men will go into
"Aria da C a p o " has been successbattle with Springfield Y. M. C. A. col- fully given before by the advanced
lege at Rlclgcfiekl park. Today cheer dramatics class. It is a tragedy played
and song practice were scheduled for by an all-woman cast and is in fantasy form.
Edna St. Vincent Milay
chapel and Ibis afternoon the eleven will is the author. Miss Milay will lecture
have a light signal workout with Coach here this season under Dramatic and
Art Association auspices, T h e proBaker in charge.
Every day this week strenuous scrim- duction of this piece has been definitely
decided
upon.
Books have been
mage has been going on at Bcvcrwyck | ordered and tryouts may begin next
park.
First work was begun Monday week.
" O v e r t o n e s " is by Susan Glaspcll,
afternoon.
It followed a week's layoff
due In the cancellation of the Manhattan • a u t h o r of "Trifles" and co-author of
'
T
i
c k l e s s T i m e . " It is a comedy and
game. Tuesday and Wednesday afterI is played by a cast of four women.
noon workouts with the scrubs and other ! " T h e Boy Conies H o m e " is an E n g men took place.
Yesterday the final j lisb comedy, touching on after-war
I situations. It is by A. A, Milne, author
scrimmage of the week came.
| of " W u r z o l F l u m m e r y , " given by the
Coach Baker said last night the men I class last year. T h e r e arc two men
are ready for the game. Reports from and two women characters.
T r y o u t s for these two plays will be
the Springfield camp indicate the phyThanksgiving.
Other
pieces
sical directors arc as strong as usual after
this year and Hearing the peak of a ! under consideration have been "The
Stepmother," " M r s . I 'at ami ihc Law,"
good season.
and " W i l l o' the Wis])."
Varsity basketball practice will he beClarence L. N e p h e w
gun Monday, it was announced yester- C H O R U S S I N G S I N
(Courtesy Allinny KvmilnirNowsl
day by Coach Baker. Three weeks of
ASSEMBLY FRIDAY
Stale Collci'C for Teachers' freshman
strenuous practice are scheduled for the
Those
who attended
the student
court men before the opening tilt with assembly last Friday, enjoyed a most basketball team went down, glorious in
Union College varsity in Albany, Sat- pleasing program. The seniors, in caps defeat, at the bauds of Rensselaer High
and gowns, occupied seats on the plat- School, last year's major league cbamurday evening, December 6.
form—a very awing and inspiring sight
On account of football, there was no to the freshmen.
Mere and there nions, Saturday night at School 1 gym.
practice this week. Workouts last week among these "greenlings" could be Rensselaer, in the closing two minutes
resulted in the selection of no line-up. heard whispers of hope, such as, "Some of play. The score was 20 to 18.
day, I'll he a senior, and then——I"
\ sensational shut by Captain Bruso,
Captain Gainor has about fifteen or The Women's Chorus, under the supertwenty men signed up for the sport. The vision of Professor Candlyn, gave a of Rensselaer, from the center of the
varsity, it is expected, will practice very pleasing musical program consist- Hour, tallied the deciding two points just
ing of such numbers a s : "Listen Gia- before the final whistle.
Rensselaer
against the freshman five.
n e t t a " an Italian folk song. "Wake. started the scoring early in the first
Miss Lindy," and "The Volga Boat
Song."
The student body joined in period, when Bruso sunk another long
Kuczynski evened the
"Noah Was a Grand Old Man" with distance shot.
unusual vim and enthusiasm.
tally for State. From then on it was
A piano duet, "Capriciouso Espag- nip and tuck, the East side boys mainnal," played by Miss Thyra lie Vier
The Interclass Basketball schedule as and Mr. Willard Retallick, merited and taining a lead throughout the first half
which closed 11 to 8, in their favor.
planned by G. A. A., allows for the oc- produced a hearty applause.
State held the Rensselaer men from
Professor Candlyn announced the concupancy of the spring sport season by
scoring in the third, and in the last pervolley and baseball contests as all cert to be given by Ossip Gabrilowilcb iod Kuczynski and Dobris each dropped
at Chancellor's Hall. December 12.
games will be played off by Christmas
The chapel exercises were closed by one through the netting, tying the score.
Captain Nephew was high man for
recess.
Beginning this week,
the the singing of "Don't You Remember."
the freshmen, with eight points, 3 fields
matches will be played at the announced
and a foul. Bruso, the high school star,
intervals:
T h e French Club will hold its meet- tallied 11 of his team's points and held
November 17, Junior—Sophomore
ing on W e d n e s d a y , November 19, Goff scoreless.
instead of T u e s d a y , November 18, in
November 18, Junior—Freshman
About eicrhty students backed the
order that the m e m b e r s of the club yearlings. Three freshmen cheerleaders
November 24, Junior—Senior
may have the privilege of listening ' drew a creditable volume of noise from
November 25, Senior—Freshman
to a talk by Professor Simonin, on the college's cheering section.
December
1, Sophomore—Junior
France and the W o r l d W a r .
This week the freshmen have been
T h e committee is trying to make hard at work rubbing out the weak spots
December
2, Sophomore—Freshman
this one of the best meetings of the and working for closer team play. They
December
8, Sophomore—Senior
year. Besides the talk by Professor are scheduling other games for the
December
'J, Freshman—Junior
Simonin, a big surprise is being winter and expect to play Milne High
December IS, Freshman—Sophomore
planned, and every m e m b e r is assured School, and possibly Cobleskill High.
December 16, Freshman—Senior
of a good time.
The line-up is as follows:
Interclass Basketball
Schedule Announced
$3.00 per year
Y.W. Holds Memorial
For Miss Martinez
Music, flowers, and simple, quiet
words honored the memory of Miss
I'ra it'sca Martinez, at the Y. \V. vesper
service last Sunday.
I be prelude, Handel's "Largo," was
played by Miss Beulah Eckcrson, '25.
Miss Nettie Gilbert, '27, gave a violin
solo, "Adoration," by Browaski, and
Miss Thyra BcVier, '26, sang "Lead
Kindly Light,"
From "Revelations," Dr. Richardson
chose readings, and followed them by a
majestic old Episcopal mayor, A more
intimate personal remembrance, written
by Miss Eunice Rice, was beautifully
interpreted by Miss Futterer:
"That Beauty might enter there,
The door of her life she kept aja<\
It was sometimes the color of llower or
star,
And sometimes the glint of a comb in
her hair.
Her heart was as young as a frail new
moon,
And a wonder dwelt in her playful eyes.
H e r life was as vivid as sunset skies,
And,—Oh—it was gone as soon,"
T h i s was followed by the singing of
the favorite; hymn of Miss Martinez.
T h e (lowers were given by the Spanish Club, French Club, and
the
Y. \V. C. A,
The service closed with the benediction of Dr. Richardson, and a choral
response.
ART
DEPARTMENT
TO SELL PICTURES
The Dramatic and Art Association
has a surprise in store. In about a week,
the walls of the main hall will he hidden
under some of (he finest etchings in the
country. As the American Federation of
Art is putting them forth, these etchings
promise to be of great interest and
value. Many American artists will be
represented.
Miss Olga Hampel happened to meet and converse with several
of these celebrities when she went to
Washington last year as representative
of the Dramatics and Art Association
at State CollegQ.
These works of art will be on sale at
reasonable prices. However, the vital
function of the exhibition is to inspire
a keen appreciation of the fascinating
style of the possibilities for varied
treatment of subject displayed in these
etchings.
Miss Ferine will have a reproduction
of the etchings in Room 208. The artist's name is Munden.
BASKETBALL
LINE-UP
Rensselaer
Williams, R. F. ...
Bonackcr, L. F. ...
Kceler, C
Bruso, L. G
Spntli. R. Ci
Sutton, R. F
G.
0
2
0
Total
Stale Freshmen
Gott, R. F
Kuczynski, L. F. . . .
Nephew, C
Dobris, R. G
Bryant, L. G
8
G.
0
3
3
1
0
,T
0
0
F.
0
0
0
I
2
1
4
F.
0
1
1>
0
F.
0
4
0
11
4
1
?n
p.
0
7
8
3
0
Total
7
4
l:
Time of quarters, 8 minutes; referee
Jumphries.
Page Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 14, 1924
&UU QtalUgt £fow* College Spirit And
What It Can Do
No. 8
Nov. 14, 1924
Vol. IX
GREET YOUR FRIENDS WITH
A SMILE WHEN YOU MEET
WELCOME THE FRESHMEN
"Oh don't you remember"—the
"Hello" campaign staged last year at
State? Why not put its good results
into practice this year? The friendliness recipe calls for a smile, a cheery
greeting, and a spirit of cooperation,
especially among the upperclassnien.
Don't wait for the freshmen to speak!
Perhaps they are trying to remember
when Mark Antony defeated the Saxons
or Mali Jong repulsed the Saracens at
Tours. They may he awed at your dignity or they may he going to History
quiz, hut they want to know you, and
they want, to be friends. Set them a
good example, juniors and seniors, by
calling out "Hello" to them and to your
own classmates wherever you see them,
livery little bit helps, and the friendly
bit most of all, in making State a
friendly college, a college where "Alma
Mater" means all that our own song
promises.
An agreement was signed last week
Published weekly during the college in which several students pledged themyear by the Student Body of the New selves not to shave until State won a
York State College for Teachers at game, If an outsider were to attend one
Albany, New York.
of State's home games there would be
The subscription rate is three dollars little cause for doubt in his mind, as to
per year. Advertising rates may be had
Gamma Kappa Phi held its annual fall
on application to the business manager. why State docs not. win. The reason
dance in the gymnasium Friday even
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must he is this; VVc as a college are not bcing, November 7. The dance committees
in the hands of the editors before Mon- j hind our teams. We arc not boosting
were: Music, Katherine Woodward;
day of the week of publication.)
J our teams on to victory. We take a
refreshments, Mary Cornell; decora| languid interest in all athletic affairs,
Editor-in-Chief
tions, Marjorie Livingstone. Miss Hazel
| which expresses its self in this sentence.
KATHLEEN E. FURMAN, '25
Rowley, Miss Elizabeth Anderson, and
j "I hope we will win.''
Managing Edi'or
Miss Agar, the house mother, were
Last week the freshmen organized a
HARRY S. GODFREY, '26
ehapcroncs. The alumnae back for the
basketball team on Monday afternoon,
Business Manager
dance were: Mildred Mescrve, Vera
which played its first game on FH'luy
RUTH BARTON, '25
Comstock, Mildred Cornell, Edna Class,
night. They were defeated it is true,
Subscription Manager
and Mrs. Lynn Barnes, formerly I lot
by a score of 20-18, but in my cstimaGWENDOLYN JONES, '25
Banner.
I lion it was a moral victory, ff the
Assistant Business Managers
Lois MOORE, '25
j freshmen can organize a team, and make
Gertrude Pothcrhridge, of Utica. spent
ELISE BOWER, '25
I the showing they did at their first game,
the week-end at dammit Kappa Phi. as
Assistant Subscription Manager
I not only to playing ability, but also to
the guest of her sister, Sarah Peltier
HELEN BARCLAY, '26
bridge.
> the support, which they received from MUSIC CLUB ENTERTAINS
Associate Editors
The under classes furnished Music
their own class, why cannot our varsity Club
FLORENCE PLATNER, '25
with able talent for its program
Marie Nixon, of Gamma Kappa Phi
basketball team win more games, when of November 9. Margaret Taylor, 27, bouse, spent the week-end at her home
HELEN ELLIOTT, '26
JOYCE PERSONS, '26
the season opens, than it did last? The gave a delightful rendition of ''Danny in Gloversvillc.
MARGARET BENJAMIN, '26
answer to this is spirit—school spirit. Boy," an old Irish folk song and of
"Sing Me To Sleep." Ruth
Margery Baylcss, '24, spent the week
It is the big factor in winning every Greene's
Reporters
l.emnile's technique in her excellent in- end at the Kappa Delta house.
Time, It is the support given to the team 'erprctatlon of Jones' "C'onzan," and
SARA BARKLEY, '27
JULIA FAY, '27
! by the student body. I f wc back the Koelling's "Hungary," was masterly and
I.lewellyna Gill, '25, spent the week
KATIIRYN BLENIS, '27
varsity basketball team, as the freshmen commanding, The selection, "Where end in Syracuse.
ANNA KOFF, '26
: My Caravan Idas Rested," with violin
class supported its team last Friday obligatto by Margaret Martin, '28, conEDWIN VAN KLKECK, '27
Miss Hclcnc Borsick, '24, and Misnight those young men, who signed that tributed a charming bit to the perform- Constance Reiley of Schnectady, spent
LOUISE GUNN, '27
agreement, will not go unshaven very- ance.
the week-end at the Chi Sigma Theta
house, at .102 Quail St.
long. Wake up Stale! Ask '28 how
THE VALUE OK UIHJCATION it gets that way.
AROUND THE COLLEGE
Beta Zeta welcomes Marion Vedder,
Ruth Baldwin, of Amityville, Long
The worth of a college education
Island, visited .Adelaide Gouescbaiu '27, Phoebe Skidmore, '27, and Doris
should be a subject of vital importW H A T S T A T E HAS
Youngs,
'26, as pledge members. Miss
>ver the week-end.
ance to those who are planning to
Amanda \iev<\, of Amsterdam, visited
Before f came to college, I had despend four of the best years of their
Cora
Reed,
'25, at the Beta Zeta house
Helen Jewett spent the week-end at
lives in an institution of higher learn- lightful visions of hundreds of girls
Saturday.
ing. When a man as intelligent and as waiting to be friends and chums; I had her home in Schenectady.
capable as Edison disclaims the value secret thrills at the thought of that
Alpha Epsilon Phi welcomes Mildred
The Schenectady Alumnae of Psi
reaped from such an education, college companionship, and at the thoughts of
Gamma, held a meeting in Schenec- I'awel, '26, as a pledge member
students feel puzzled and non-plused,
An education cannot be separated all other delightful things, of which I tady recently, and are planning a
Delta Omega Alumnae will hold their
from the individual who is pursuing it, had read concerning college life. Col- series of social events for the benefit annual
fall meeting November 15, al
and on that individual rests the worth of lege students 1 had known, came home of the active chapter.
the
house. Mrs. George Conwell, the
the education. Nor is the gain secured brimming with tales of "our college."
president,
preside. The festivities
The fifty students and teachers who will begin will
by the individual to be alone considered I would be able to do this, too.
at five o'clock.
bought pictures during the recent
but one must also take into account the
effect on his contemporaries and his offWhen I came to State, I found com- V. W. C. A. exhibition, may save
Beta chapter of Omicron Nu held
spring
If four years of college docs panionable girls, I did not find snobs, about one-third the cost of framing by their regular meeting Monday evening.
not take one a few steps nearer to per- prigs, or fashion plates. I found a joy consulting the maker of the pictures. •'' the home of .Vl-s. Earle Sutherland
fection in manners, morals, tastes, in being able to take part in the things
609 Myrtle Ave. The chapter will offer
religious faith, and in ability to be of
Esther Jansen, '26, reported that the a cash prize to the Home Economics
service to the world then we might say that went on, and I found play and work Y. W. rummage sale held last Saturday, freshman with the highest standing ai
in
the
right
proportion.
In
all
these
brought returns amounting to approxi- the end of the year.
with Gray, "where ignorance is bliss 'tis
folly to be wise." Some people even things, State College came up to my ex- mately forty-five dollars. Y. W. thanks
assert that a college education tends to pectations. But—there was and is, one Mrs. Jansen, who supervised the sale, ^ Beta Alumnae met at Russell Sage
lower one's ideals and standards, but thing lacking. They say the American and assisted in many other ways, as College, Thursday, after the Home
this argument can easily he counterbal- likes big things, with a name and repu- oHecting, marking. As a hundred Economics sectional meeting. Dorotln
anced, for contact with life would prob- tation. The American student chooses dollars is the goal, another sale will be Bachcller, editor, presided and plans for
held in the spring to raise the remainder. the year's work were made.
ably present the same problems. If an
Kindly save your old clothes! Leave
individual is pulled down by the unfor- a big college, one with a name known
everywhere.
That
is
why
the
small
colthem together with old newspapers and
tunate conditions of his environment the
Rosaline Grecnberg has not aeceptei
magazines, at 15 South Lake Avenue.
moral weakness of the individual is lege suffers.
the offer as "understudy" in "Silence.'
I found that State College has a
Miss Tallmadgc was a week-end
partially to blame. A college education
and college environment is not entirely higher standard than most colleges its guest at the home of Mrs. Elizabeth
Dr. Brubacher will give an addresideal, for nothing in this life can be requirements arc most strict, and it is Stafford Green, '06, Schenectady. She for Education Week, at the city oi
perfect. Nor does a college education worthy of being known as a great col- attended a meeting of Schenectady Psi Hudson, on November 17, at a public
always pay financially, but the material lege among great colleges, but, it is not. Gamma alumnae, at which Mrs, Mar- dinner under the auspices of the ]\u<\
side is usually over-emphasized by the Even the few who have heard of it have jorie Vedder Dempster, '12, was the son Rotary Club.
present generation. And so, little fresh- the idea that it is a Normal School, hostess. The guests were: Elizabeth
men, don't worry when some one declares which turns out a crew of (hose unap- MacMillan, '07, Edith Blades Ackerman,
Ethel Persk, '26, and Olla Goewcy, '26.
that a college education means four preciated creatures—teachers. Students '06, Grace Skinner Travis, '03, Mabel spent the week-end in New York, and
years of worthless effort. Remember from Albany, say. "State doesn't mean Meeker Roe, '04, Eunice Rice, '22,! were entertained by friends from Columto us, as it does to you, who Catherine Ostrander Glcason, '07, Genethat its value depends to a vast extent as much
from away, because we've lived vieve Brooke, '10, Florence Brown Hel- bia and New York Universities.
on yourself and the use you make of it. come
ri"ht by it all our lives " This is wrong ton, '10, and Eunice Myers, '21.
Violet Pierce directed a very enjoy
—it should mean more.
able musical program consisting of
When the American wants to impress
Y. W. C. A. was addressed by Pro- French songs, at the meeting of the
'.very day in every way
anyone,
he
talks
and
then
demonstrates.
fessor Sayles, Tuesday, November 4, as
The Pedagogue grows better
Let our subject of conversation be State Dr. Moldenhawcr was unable to be pres- French Club, Tuesday afternoon, No
ie sure to place your order now
College, here and at home, and then, let ent. Professor Sayles told intimate facts vemher 5. The club" is making plans
If not by word, by letter
us demonstrate what it has taught us, about the life of Dr. T-farry Emerson for the dansant to he given under its
auspices on November 22, from two—Ramona Downer with all our might.
Fosdick, with whom he was in college. thirty to five-thirty.
STATfi COLLEGE NKtVS, WOyKMBKR 14, 1924
•WgG fBr&r
ATTENDANCE C O ^ M I T T i ^
A student who is absent, liit any
Lyle Roberts, football captain, and
CLUB BEST ON MARKET
| DRISCOLL REPORTS CONFER- cause whatever, from nidre ttiaii 25 per
well known senior, was charged with
To freeze or not to freeze—that was j
ENCE
cent of the exercises in any course in
,
'
, NA,e w m a n one semester, shall be debarred from the
breach of promise by Miss Bcrnicc the question! Ncwmanites settled it by j ,,M
rcg,llar
nlcctmg
of
Final examination or semester examinaQuinn, '26, in a civil action begun this building a snapping, crackling pine wood ! V
fire out near the. Country Club where Club, held Wednesday, November 5, at tion in the course. In exceptional cases',*
week before Judge Hutchison in gov- the annual fall hike was held on Sattir- four o'clock, in Room 211, was well at- however, the students may be again made,
ernment class court. Adrian Johnson day, November 8. The start was made | t e n d c t |, M ; i r y briscoll, '25, the president eligible to take the examination by favorhas been retained by Miss«Qtiinn as her from College al about one-thirty,
able action of the Attendance Committee
happy, peppy crowd, brisk walking, and of the club, gave a report of the Cornell
attorney and Roberts is defended by a liberal dose of zero weather, soon com- Conference, and presented matters of Upon recommendation of the department
Harry S, Godfrey,.
Roberts was bined to develop appetites thai needed hut special interest with regard to organiza- in which the course is given.
charged with the crime and brought into one invitation to seek out the bread liUc, tion and activities among the Newman
For 3 hour courses, 25 per cent Of tile
Regardless of the tradition, Newman clubs of the stale. The conference in- exercises is 2. For 2 hoiir courses;
court Monday. Sensation-seeking crowds Club's
refreshment committee arrived cluded representatives from the Ithaca meeting on Monday and Wednesday, it
have been following the starling devel- vation
in the nick
time, and
immediateonstar
was of
averted
by bringing
the j Conservatory of _Music, Cornell Uniycr- is 8 and for all other 2 hour courses, it
opments of the case this week. The "cals." "Black and tan" refreshments,
is 7.
prosecution has produced very interest- alias, hot dogs a la carbon, doughnuts, ity, Columbia University, and the City
All statements covering absences must,
C'liege of New York. After the busiing letters purporting to have been and superb coffee with a general llavor- ness part of the regular meeting, Rev. in the future, be made on special blatikj?
written by Roberts to Miss Quinn. The i' u oi sand, suit, and nine bark received' Fr. Joseph E. Duniiey, spiritual director provided for the purpose. The purpose
the unanimous approval of the hungriest
this rule is to facilitate filing of trie
case is rivaling in interest the famous gang on the globe. After a jolly time of Newman, gave the first of the series of
statements, which are preserved for
criminal action against Miles Pollock, spent around the camp fire, the Ncwman- of lectures on religion, which are to be future reference.
included in this year's program of ac- j
senior charged with chicken stealing ites started for home, singing college tivities. Father Duniiey also spoke very
Attendance Committee
which held front page attention last songs and "telling the world that a forcefully on (hat topic which is now of
SENIOR-SOPH GAME
Newman Club hike is Ihe best thing on 'supreme interest to Christianity, "The
year.
The basketball season opened with
i he market.
I (Ircal Chalice of Aulioch."
a battle royal between sister classes,
TAG RESULTS LARGE
in the senior-sophomore game, MonPAY YOUR STUDENT TAX
day, November 10. ft'rorh start to
Nineteen State College girls sold lags KAPPA DELTA RHO INITIATES
It is ihe earnest request of ihe Finance finish it was a fast, hard-fought game,
The fin
for the Salvation Army Saturday, Noi two weeks initiation perin spile of (he small amount of pracvember 1. They collected $154.10, which, iod fur Kappa Delta Rho freshmen Hoard tha! each individual pay his stu- tice which each leani has had. The
dcnl
lax
as
soon
as
possible,
There
arc
with $50.10, raised in college the day
liue-up was:
es closed this week, with the col'ositions Sophomores
before, makes a tolal of $204.20 secured lege looking forward to a few more days still quite a number of students who Seniors
Craddock
R. F.
Neville
have
failed
to
do
so.
Ii
is
to
everyone's
for the Salvation Army, through the of free eiilerlainmenl by Ihe eleven
L. F.
Swettniann
advantage if Ibis mailer is cleared tip | lloyt
efforts of Stale. The tag sellers Satur- silcnl men.
.Mo,,re
C.
1. oni p kins
day were: Dorothy Dietz, '25, GcorgiFather Knickerbocker's town crier, immediately, otherwise, the amounts 1 tutchins
R. G.
Empic
auua Maar, '27, Ruth Maynard, '27, announcing the time of day, ceremonious which have been appropriated for carry- \ 1 lamiucrsley
L. G,
Couch
Substitutes:
Taylor for Hoyt,
Carolyn Coleman, '26, Marilla Webster, attendants who announced the entrance ing on the activities of certain depart'26, Margaret Ilulchins, '25, Agnes and departure of Ihe fraleruily's mem- ments in college must necessarily be cur-; Daly for 1 lainmersley, Du Boise for
Martm in for T< inpkins.
Webster, '26, Hazel Benjamin, '26, bers and strangely dressed creatures tailed, ll is by means of the student Neville,
Score, 13-12 Seniors 13, SophoEthel Duliois, '27, Ella Chase, '25, were all served up ibis week for ihe lax thai these departments are financed,; mores, 12.
Florence Craddock, '25, Louise Ward, amusement of the college, and their own Cp to dale, 86 seniors, 102 juniors, 191 . Referee, Miss Johnston,
lopln in ires 281 freshmen, have payed.
'26, Mary Kent, '28, Gertrude Swett- • discipline.
j SENIORS DEFEAT JUNIORS 12-9
maun, '2i, Iva Hinman, '25, Margaret. As is usual, ihe pledges were forbidden There has also been one faculty ticket
and
two special tickets sold.
The junior-senior game of NovemBenjamin, '26, Josephine Kent, '25, to talk to each other or to women. They
ber 11, beginning slowly, the first half
1
Marietta flauna, '25, and Frances addressed the upperclassnieu of the fracharacterized by fumbling, gathered
Johnson, '25.
ternity as "mister," doffed their Erosli
speed and swept into a climatic finish,
HIDLEY TO ADDRESS CLUB
with a tolal score of 12-9, in favor of
lids politely on the streets and saluted
What do you know of the history Ihe '25 team. The second half furSILVER BAY CLUB MEETS
within doors, They were punctilious in
of your native state? We are all lo nished excitement, since at its beginThe Silver Hay Club held its first the observance of every rule.
ning the score stood juniors 9, seniors
They remembered the motto impressed be teachers in the Empire State, and 8.
meeting last week at the Delta Omega
Both teams played a more or less
no mailer whether we be Spanish,
house. Miss Gertrude Olds gave an in- mi them "every violation means a blister."
erratic
game, sacrificing team work
Math., or History teachers we should and accuracy
to the urgent desire to
formal dissertation on the Art of Teachbe informed of the part New York have the sphere caged. The seniors,
LOCAL
CLUBS
SUGGESTED
ing in Milne High, to an appreciative
State
has
in
History.
playing
a
steadier
game, gained steadEveryone is aware of the tremendaudience, among whom were Miss Edith
Professor Hidley will talk on the ily in the last guarter. The work of
O. Wallace and Miss Minnie B. Scot- ous benefit and enjoyment derived
Koen,
'26,
a
new
recruit
to the sport,
from the versatile college clubs. Has
land. Before, during, and after a short anyone ever thought about the forma- History of the Niagara Frontier, on was creditable.
Tuesday,
November
25,
under
the
ausbusiness meeting, which consisted of the tion of District Clubs, Country Clubs,
Senior
Positions
Juniors
election of a president, Marjoric Living- or City Clubs; the banding together of pices of the Political Science Club. Craddock
R. E.
Koen
students
from
the
different
districts,
This
most
interesting
subject
relates
Hoyt
L. F.
Tucll
ston, '25, a secretary, Hazel Benjamin,
counties, or cities? There are a great
Moore
C.
Raynor
'26, and a reporter, Margaret benjamin, many students from Long Island, and lo the history of New York State.
Hutchins
R.
G.
Lecming
Everybody come! Remember you
'26, snapshots were passed around, fol- many from Greater New York.
1 lainmersley
L. G,
Wright
lowed by refreshments, Silver Bay
City Clubs afford some considera- have an important date for Tuesday.
Substitutes Daly for Hammcrslcy,
Milmitie for Raynor.
memories, and college "talk." Willi the tion as Schenectady, Troy, Rensselaer, November 25.
singing of the Prize "Honorably Men-; Kingston, Watervlict, Poughkeepsie,
GRAVEYARD
HOLDS NOVELTY
1'lica, Cohoes, Johnstown, Saratoga,
tionccl," Silver Bay song, and "Follow all have a dozen or more students at
CHEM. CLUB EXCURSION
A graveyard may not be the most enthe Gleam," the members exchanged State College.
Chemistry I, under the leadership of; ticing place imaginable to eat, but at
gooduights and went their individual or^ Home papers could be looked over
Professor Kennedy and Miss Betz j least it has the spice of novelty. This is
collective ways; all except the dwellers a I meetings of these clubs, and a visited the Albany water supply system, I t h e , °P«}'°n of G. A. A, members who
of the Pine Hills who "hesitated" at speaker from one's "home town" would c_,,,„,!.
v
',
-n
,,
took advantage of Saturdays hike to
0
be welcome. Here is a connection, Satin lay, November
hey all re- t r y out the idea. About ten miles were
Jig Maar's request.
Ihe "missing link" between home and tuned telling wild tales8. ol Ischmutzdeke,
j
covered
during the afternoon's activities,
college.
bacterial content filtration, alum, and ! Mildred Fellows, '28, suffered the only
WEEBER AND W H I T E ENTERchlorine, and with a high resolve never casualty of the event, a sprained foot.
. .
,
.,,
. She is reported to be rapidly recovering,
TAIN
Christmas Photographs to complain
about Albany water again 0 n the whole, the event was the invigorA meeting of the Math. Club was held
DOZEN AT HALF DOZEN
—until next time.
\ ating activity a fall hike should be.
Thursday afternoon, November 6. Mur-1
PRICES
iel Weber, '25, and Esther White, '25, j To Students Who Wish to Arrange
told very interesting bits concerning: lo Have Them Taken Before December, at
great mathematicians, among which the
fact was revealed that Euclid was not I THE OBENAUS STUDIOS
394-396 Broadway, Albany, N. Y.
original in all his works. The subject
57 No. Pearl St., Albany
PRINTING
Special Attention Given
matter in these talks was particularly! (Official Photographs for the Year Printers of State College
News
Society Work
novel and well presented.
Book)
Quinn vs. Roberts
Hike Successfel; Newiiian Club Active
MILLS ART PRESS
Page-Poor
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 14, 1024
Y. W. C. A. Enjoy
Risley Interviews
Lectnre
Monsieur Lausaune
Professor Risley spoke of a remarkable; coincidence which he had had on
November 11, 1918. Professor Risley
was on the entertainment committee of
the University Club, which had procured
Monsieur Stcphan Lausaune, then head
of the Committee on Information, as a
speaker. The date set was November
11. Monsieur Lausaune, editor of one
of the most influential French newspapers, the "Paris Matin," arrived at
the club; garbed in his beautiful, blue
uniform, lie seemed'to typify the French
victory, as he stood up to speak. A
murmur began to be heard around the
room until it finally burst into a roar
every man was on his feet yelling at
the top of his voice. It was a spectacular performance! It was November
11, 19181
Professor Risley had the opportunity
to have two interviews with Monsieur
Lausaune while he was in Paris.
Last November 11, while in Paris,
Professor Risley watched the colonial
troops march, through the Arc cle
Triomphc. ;i"fl I Wit the Eternal Fire at
the grave of the Unknown Soldier. The
French Ambassador, embodying in bis
dignity American feeling placed a
wreath upon the grave. The most spectacular part was the shrill, nervous, peculiar music of the flutes of the
Moroccan troops.
NEWS URGES CO-OPERATION
It is only through the cooperation
of an entire student body that a college paper can be representative of the
ideas and aims of that body. What the
paper really is depends almost as
much on the students themselves, as on
the board running the paper. Here at
State, the college paper is run by a
board of editors, reporters and cubs.
Each week assignments arc given to
the reporters and cubs. If they arc
alive and wide awake, without doubt,
they will bring back something in
shape of news, but often even the best
of them fail. Often they have done
their part, and then where does the
fault lie? ft most often lies with the
student or organization to whom they
are sent for news.
The editors arc trying to make the
"News" as representative of the student body as possible, and the way in
which the students and organizations
respond to their appeal for cooperation,
will decide, to a large extent, the success or failure of the "News" as such
a paper.
The "News" wishes to hake an appeal to all the students and organizations to give their help in making
State's "News" a big, alive, paper. A
paper of which State can be justly
proud.
It would be greatly appreciated if an
Rachel L. Bcnfcr, instructor in a
Kentucky mountain mission, addressed
the V. W. C. A., at its regular meeting, Tuesday, November II. Miss
Boil for, with her low Southern drawl,
immediately won the interest of all.
Ilcr speech opened with a few personal
references, treating her experiences
when she, as a young college graduate from Washington, became an instructor of the "po'r white trash."
"The novelty," she stated, "was what
first attracted me, but soon, I learned
to love my work because of the help
1 was giving others."
The girls whom Miss Benfer teaches
she divided into two classes; those
who come from the poorest country
mountain sections and those from the
mining towns. The former are of the
lowest of the white trash, unkempt
and utterly illiterate; the latter, although better clothed arc far from
ordinarily well-versed.
"It is our
task," Miss Benfer stated, "to teach
them the first rudiments of education,
for few can either read or write—nor
do they know anything of the fundamental laws of life. Our range of instruction includes religion, morals,
manners, and the laws of health."
In closing, Miss Benfer congratulated State students for their choice
of the most worthwhile of vocations.
"And I know where-of 1 speak, for
I have had experience," she added with
convincing emphasis.
SENIOR-JUNIOR DEBATE
The senior-junior debate is to be
fought out ill student assembly in the
near future. Representatives from both
classes have been chosen and they are
engaged 111 gathering together their
material.
Muriel VVeber, Jerome
Walker, and Edwin Juckctt will speak
for the red and white, while Margaret
Leishman, Niles Haight, and Isabel
['hide will probably represent '26.
Mr. Walker and Mr. Juckctt will be remembered for their political campaign
speeches, while Miss Weber, debated
last year for '25. Mr. Haight and
Miss Pludc played In "The Robbery"
recently staged by the Advanced Dramatics Class. Florence Greenblath is
to be the senior alternate.
effort were made to get all news into
the office by 9:00 o'clock Monday
morning. News which comes in late
means extra work. Don't leave your
bit of news until Tuesday night or
Wednesday morning, in the hopes that
it will still go in. •
A great deal of interest has been
evidenced on the part of the majority
of the students, and the "News"
wishes to express its appreciation, and
at the same time urge all the students
to make State's paper a real college
paper.
CALENDAR
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14
4:00 P. M. Chemistry Club—Room
2S0.
7:30 P. M. Math. Club Initiation
Party—Gym.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18
3:00 P. M. Y. W. C. A.—Auditorium.
4:00 P. M. French Club.
NOTICES
The Advanced Dramatics Class play,
which was to have been presented Wednesday, November 19, has been postponed until Tuesday evening, November
25.
Attention is called to the fact that
all pictures of classes, organizations,
clubs, and individuals must be in the
hands of the pedagogue board members
before Thanksgiving vacation.
CARDS DUE TODAY
Cards for second semester subjects,
are to be returned today at the latest.
Sections are to remain the same as
the first semester.
M. and M. Maistelmon
Successors to
H. E. STAHLER
Central Avenue's Leading Confectionery and Ice Cream Parlor
BEST SODAS and SUNDAES
IN THE CITY 10 cents
Try Me Out
ECONOMY STORE 215 CENTRAL AV,
Dress Goods Trimmings
Hemstitching and Pleating
OPEN EVENINGS
OSHER'S SHOE REPAIR
SHOP
It stimulates
a p p e t i t e and
aids digestion.
It makes your
food do yon more
good. Note how
28 Central Avenue
Albany, N. Y.
Phone West 2344
Call and Delivery Service
Compliments
I I relieves that slotfy feeling
alter hearty eating.
'hlteaa teeth.
• w c c l c a i
b r e a t h and
lt*s the goody
of
College Candy Shop
COTRELL & LEONARD
Albany, N. Y.
Caps—Gowns—Hoods
FOR
ALL DEGREES
SPORTING GOODS
COLLEGE BARBER SHOP
CONRAD HEYES, Prop.
Drop in between Glasses
Radio Supplies
Open Evenings
ALRANY AUTO SUPPLY, INC.
W e s t 1616
145 Central Avenue
82 ROBIN STREET
KIMBALL'S
RESTAURANT
H. R. KIMBALL, Prop.
SPECIAL DINNERS 40and 50cents
A LA CARTE SERVICE
MEAL TICKETS SUNDAY CHICKEN DINNER 60c
Telephone
206 Washington Ave.
4 doors above Lark St.
West 3464
QUALITY SILKS
State College
Cafeteria
Luncheon or dinner 11:15— 1:30
Quality Store
219 C E N T R A L AVENUE
Ladies' and Children's
Ready-to-Wear
Clothing
! WEARWELL CREPE SATINS in
I all the new Pall colors. 40 inch 269 yd
WEARWELL FLAT CREPES in all
the new Fall colors. 40 inch 225 yd
These two fabiics are umnatchahle in value
for the price. 'The wanted colors in new Fall
Over Kresges 6- 10c
Store
Hewett's
Silk Shop
15-17 NORTH PE4RLST.
LAST <BUT &COT LEAST
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