State College News FIRST CAME at SCHENECTADY GYM FROLIC OF SEASON

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State College News
NEW
YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
VOL. VII
NO. 4
FIRST GYM FROLIC OF
SEASON
'26 Guests of Honor
The Women's Athletic Association
will hold the iirst gym frolic of the year
on Friday evening, Octoher 20, at eight
o'clock. There will he stunts, games,
refreshments and dancing. Every member and every prospective member is invited to attend. It is customary to wear
bloomers and middies with class colors,
if possible. Freshmen girls are expected
to wear their hair down.
ALBANY, N. Y., OCTOBER 12, 1922
Class Officers
FIRST CAME at SCHENECTADY Nominationforof1926
TRYOUT GAME FOR CANDIDATES
Our football team starts off this season's schedule Saturday when it plays
the Union College freshmen. We expect to have a real team this year from
the way that all things point. There
certainly is a husky bunch of fellows
who are trying out for the team. All
candidates for the varsity team will be
tried out in this first game. The line-up
will be;
Point System
Line
For the benefit of those students who
Center—Smith and Crane.
either have never heard of or do not
Guard—Howard, Howe and Roberts.
understand the " point system" of our
Athletic Association, this is written.
Of course, every girl wants to win
class numerals, or college letters, or
both ; so we must get to work right away
to earn them. For every hour of active
exercise, such as soccer, tennis, basketball, baseball, hockey, horseback riding,
swimming, organized hikes, and in the Blue and White the Color Scheme
winter, skating, skiing and snow-shoefor Facial Decoration
ing, we get one point. In order to obtain credit for your hour it is necessary
On Friday night, October 6, the
to band in your name and the number sophomore class gave its " Get-Wise"
of hours you are claiming credit for to party to the great-in-numhers and unthe captains of the different sports. The initiated class of 1926. This class has
names of the captains will be posted on been smiling about the halls, confident
the G. A. A. bulletin board soon. Watch in the knowledge that many of them had
for them!
not been identified yet as mere " frosh."
In order to obtain class numerals one After the party, those who live to tell
must have fifty points; for college let- the tale will still smile, but there will be
ters, seventy. If one obtains the college wisdom in the smile.
letters for three years, one gets as reThe sophs started off the evening's
ward a heavy, white slip-on sweater, a entertainment with a bang. Instead of
gift from the G. A. A. Besides all the leaving it to the frosh's honor as to
above-mentioned rewards, there is one whether they should enter the front
more—the girl who wins the highest door or not, soph guards kindly but
number of points of all gets a beautiful firmly directed them to the back one.
silver loving cup. Last year the cup Then, several frosh had to have their
was given to Lela Cackncr, of the Class hairpins removed by force, which proved
of '22, who attained the large number of to be a highly interesting incident.
one hundred and eighty points.
Now the initiation started in force.
After being led about the building by
many devious routes, the now inmates
of S. C. T. were brought to the gym.
Here those who were not too frightened
to remember gave their names to the
recording officer and received in exchange a button of blue and white,
bearing
the insignia '26. Next, a gallant
Musical Program Rendered
sophomore caused them to swear fealty
An informal reception for the mem- to the class of '25. The water was wet
bers of the faculty and the student body and seemed to be an entirely new liquid
was held at Newman Hall, 741 Madison to some of the newcomers. After being
<\venue, on Monday afternoon from dried off, they were handed to the sign
three to five. Although this was the painters. Some struggled, and the reHall's initial social activity, she con- sult was disastrous. In rapid succesducted herself with all the "sang- sion came the features of the evening
froid" of an acknowledged leader. for each member of '26. They tried out
Autumn leaves and other " woodsy" the chute the chutes, the roller-coaster
folia»e were everywhere apparent.
the whirling chairs, twisting swings,
During the afternoon a pleasing mu- scissor grinders, the eating of pickled
sical program was given. Piano solos bones, and, last but not least, the ghost
were given bv Misses Martha Doocly, chamber.
Gertrude Lynch, Esther St. Denis and
Of course, there is no question of the
Peg Flannigan. Another feature was courage of '26, but many things, humorthe charming rendition of several song ous to contemplate, occurred during the
groups by Miss Thclma Valentine.
evening. Several refused to cat bones,
The guests were shown over the house and many came from the ghost chamber
bv the club members, and all marvelled with the fixed grimace of one who is
at the splendid progress which lias been
made since the opening.
(Continued on page 3)
Election on October 20
Tackle—Hayes,
Beaver,
Kershaw,
Putnam and Landon.
A
meeting
of the freshmen class was
Finds—Wagner, Crane, Cassaretta and
called by Myskania last Friday, October
Juckctt.
6, for the purpose of nominating their
officers for this year. Elections from the
Backficld
following list will take place, Friday,
Kenton, Sage, Breslaw, Hornung, October 20.
Christie and flecker.
President
The team alone cannot win. It must
Joseph Howard,
have the support of the students back of
it, to cheer, and to encourage it along.
Martha Lomax.
Everyone be out to back our boys. Get
Katherine Hurminghain.
in line and help push things along.
John Tabor.
Janet McFarlanc.
Frosh Seize Soph Banner
Freshman Initiated at
After repeated efforts at the "get
Noisy Party wise"
meeting of last Friday night to
Newmanites Receive Faculty
and Students
$3.00 per year
get the soph's banner, the frosh finally
succeeded in gaining possession of it.
When the party broke up shortly after
eleven, the frosh gathered together their
forces outside the college to consider
matters. They did not know whether
tlic sophs would attempt to remove their
banner that night or leave it in a safe
place until an opportunity presented it
self to remove it from the danger of
recapture,
At any rate, they determined to get
that banner that night. After several
false alarms, when '26 thought that the
sophs were trying to smuggle out the
banner, the sophomores left the college
at about twelve o'clock, leaving the ban
nor in the bands of Charles, who was to
put it in a safe place. In some myste
rious manner the frosh learned thi location of this hiding place, anci, after
Charles had departed, they started to
work.
They removed the screen from the
window of the typewriting room and
raised the window, which was unfastened. Inside, they forced open the door
of the closet in which the banner was
bidden and seized the banner.
Where the banner lies hidden, and
whether the banner will be recovered or
not, remain a mystery which only time
can unravel.
Citizenship School Opens
Today
Gov. Miller Will Make Chief Address
Thursday, October 12, a citizenship
school will be opened at State College
under the joint direction of the New
York State League of Women Voters
and State College. T V opening meeting
will be held in the auditorium at 2
o'clock Thursday afternoon. Dr. Brubacher will make a few introductory remarks before the meeting is given over
(Continued on page4)
Vice-President
Miriam Snow.
Helen Kerr.
Benson Home.
Katherine O'Leary.
Marion Anderson.
Ellnah Kreig.
Helen Rising,
Muriel Wenzel.
Secretary
Sylvia Fstabrook.
Elizabeth Falk.
Burton Sage.
Esther Miller.
Treasurer
Rita Corvan.
Bebe Bluestcin.
Elizabeth Doyle.
Sophia uertskin.
Herbert Campbell.
Esther Jansen.
Anna Hughes.
Aldrich NCUIKT.
Beatrice Seligsnn.
Janet Manvillc.
Reporter
Helen Elliot.
Blanche Hayes.
Mary Swart.
Zelma Gorman.
Marion Landon.
Alice Gooding.
QUARTERLY NOTICE
Material for the first issue of the
"Quarterly" must be in by October 16.
Manuscripts must be written in ink on
one side of the paper, signed, and either
put in the mail box under Q or handed
to some member of the "Quarterly"
board.
Freshmen arc urged to contribute and upperclassmen arc asked to
continue giving the " Quarterly" their
support.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS. OCTOBER 12. 1922
Page Two
Slafe fflfllkg* Jfotua
Voi.vir
October 12.
No. 4
Published weekly during the college
year by the Student Body of the New
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars per year. Advertising rates may
be liacl on application to the business
manager.
(Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the editors before Monday of the week of publication.)
tfo«*
"t« t h e
Editor-in-Chief
ROBERT MACFAKLANE, '23
Managing Editor
VERA NOI.AN, '23
Business Manager
GRACE FOX, '23
Subscription Manager '
Eik'A WILLIAMS, '23
Assistant Subscription Manager
RUTH TEFIT, '23
Assistant Business Managers
EDITH SAUNDERS, '23
Annie Olson, '24
Associate Editors
DOROTHY DANGKEMOND, '23
DORIS BUTLER, 'li
Dorothy V. Bcnnlt, '24
Reporters
MARGERY BAYLESS, '24
MILDRED KUHN, '24
AGNES NOLAN, '24
I IELEN ORR, '24
MURIEL WEIIER, '25
as they gave their reports to see just
COLLEGE TRADITIONS
CLIFF HAVEN NOTES
which clubs had made the most marked
1. Sophomore class officers will arprogress. In this respect, N. Y. S. C. T.
For
those
college
freshmen
who
are
Newman Club had the good fortune to
range with the freshmen for a "getjust beginning to be associated with
BILLETS-DOUX
wise" meeting soon after college opens, Newman clubs, for upperclassmen and be able to renort a big step forward—
the acquisition of a magnificent new dorThe fateful day fast approaches, the and may call for other meetings during alumnae who not only wish to keep in mitory, which now accommodates 25
touch with progress made, but also to girls.
day when the mail box will be sur- the year.
rounded by a fearful, anxious throng, 2. Any uppcrelassman may deprive become more animated with true " NewLife at Cliff Haven did not consist of
searching for those sweet little notes any freshman of any seat in any corri- man spirit," there is no better place to all serious things—for once business
called " billets-doux." Will the frosh dor at the request of said upperclass- go than to the Federation convention, meetings were over, we were free to inwhich is held at Cliff Haven each year.. dulge in swimming, golf, tennis, horseleave with tearful eyes, to approach re- matii
luctantly the office on the first floor? 3. All freshmen must greet upperclass- So many helnful suggestions are gained back riding or hiking. Speaking of
Will the sophs laugh and guiltily push inen .and sophomore officers and mem- from the exchange of ideas that every amusements—wdiat did we enjoy .more
an envelope into their pockets? Will the bers of Myskania respectfully at all delegate upon leaving the convention than the various dances at which we
confidently looks forward to the most were' guests? Especially enjoyable was
juniors sheepishly avoid their freshmen times.
sisters? And will the seniors?—.sell, 4. All freshmen must remain sealed successful year yet in the history of his the formal one given us at the Chamwe won't even hint at such ,a thing! A in student assembly until all other stu- respective: club.
otsiin Club. Another big event was a
" billet-doux," you are told, is not a dents have passed out.
One big factor which made this year's hay ride and " CIOT roast," which was
flunk, By all means it is not, but it's 5. Freshmen must hold doors open convention such a lur'c success was tha,t held one ni'dit.
the first mile post on the road toward for all seniors to pass.
all formality was dispensed with. At
Cliff Haven is situated near some
a Hunk. That road can so easily be 6. The mark of identification for the " get together meeting," which was
avoided, too, if we but keep our eye freshmen will be a button one inch in held on the night of our arrival at Cliff beauty spots, as we discovered on our
trips
to Ausable Chasm, Montreal and
open ami don't turn off from the main diameter, containing the class numerals Haven, announcement was made thqt
road that leads toward the land of A's, and colors and are to be worn in sight everyone would be expected to comply Lake Placid. On our return trip from
thei
latter
place, we. visited John Brown's
Tests arc coming upon us, slowly now, at all times until after Moving-Up day. with the morning custom at Cliff llavep
but soon they'll come with full force, 7. Freshman men will he obliged to —" Smile and say good-morning." What old homestead and grave—a place of
;reat
historical
interest.
like a true avalanche. Arc we going to wear regulation class caps at all times better way could have been devised tp
The Prevailing question at the end of
be prepared to meet them?
except Sundays until after Moving-Up create at once a friendly atmosphere? , the week was—" Did you ever see a
"A's are impossible," say some of da". These are not to be worn in the The convention was formally opened week go so outckly?" The end of an
our fellow-students, " unless one is a college buildings, but are to be carried on Monday, Julv 3, with a high mass. cii'oyablc
week came all too soon, and
grind." Nothing is impossible, and no on the person, and are to be shown at Father MacMillan, the pastor of tl\e| what person
who was there will soon
church, urged the delegates to avail
one need be a grind. One can be a stu- any time on demand,
forget
the
made, the good,
dent, one can recite perfectly, can pass 8. Only State College insignia may be themselves of the many opportunities iolly times acquaintances
but above all, the realitests, and still enjoy oneself fully. Why worn by freshmen. (This includes all both for spiritual and social recreation zation of thehad,
high
ideals
for which New!
do we consider all students who think sorority and fraternity pins, class nu- and enjoyment.
man Club stands and conveys to us
of college as a serious matter grinds? merals and college letters, pins of col- On Monday, also, occurred the open through
her
motto,
"
Cor ad cor
It is only we who can't make ourselves lege organizations and clubs.)
ing exercises of the Catholic Summer
do as we ought that consider people in 9. Freshmen must be segregated from School, which attracts people from all lonuitur."
INITIATED
AT
this light. If such is grinding, let's all upperclassmen and sophomores at bas- parts of the country to hear lectures of FRESHMEN
be grinds. Let's keep on as we've be- ketbsi'1 games.
NOISY PARTY
the highest quality on interesting and
gun, for we all begin well. Let's take
(Continued from page 1)
10. No freshman may use the main up-to-date topics. Especially fine were
our exams with a smile, and when billet- entrance facing on- Western avenue at the lectures given by Father Briihl, ,a mentally overcome. At last the lights
doux come out we can feel at peace. any time. No cutting across campus is noted lecturer and wri'cr, and by Father were put on and dancing began.
Then there will be no panic-stricken allowed.
Spanieling, who has written several
Many of the frosh'were seen to leave
frosh, weeping, with a great fear in
It must be remembered that not only hooks on sociology, in which he ably in- the gym in a hurried fashion, and- it
their hearts. All of us will simply, the sophomores but every student in terprets sociological problems, from the was found that they were worried about
quietly go on as before, What a com- college is expected to help enforce these Catholic viewpoint.
their complexions. Such arc the tribufortable feeling we will have! "Billets- traditions. They belong to us all, and it Business meetings were conducted each lations of extreme youth. The lavatory
doux!" Afraid of them? Oh, no! is our duty to defend them. The sopho- day after the morning lectures aiid overflowed
when the grand rush hit it,
Well, we won't be this year. Now, will mores have the additional duty of en- again after lunch. There was much
The city's water seemed to have become
forcing their own rules, if they can.
rivalry among the club representatives
(Continued nn page 4)
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 12, 1922
FOOTBALL
PROSPECTS
PSI
GOOD
Coach Snavely A s k s for More Supp o r t from Student Body
State College is blessed wilti better
material tin's year than for several years
past.
This is particularly true as regards baseball and football. Last year
vvc didn't have enough men for a team.
This year we have enough, none to
spare, but enough. Our prospects would
be much better if we had an even more
thorough response. There are still two
or three men around college who aren't
out for the learn, but who should be.
This week Landon and Crawford made
their appearance and lightened
the
coach's task considerably. The regularity of practice is still below wdiat it
should be, but is improving.
T h e schedule is practically complete.
It includes two home games and three
away. The prospect of winning is dubious. All of Slate's opponents have the
benefit of years of experience and adeI hit the real drawquate scrimmage.
back is the absence (if support by the
Student Body. We haven't seen any of
the students walchiug a single practice.
Financial support you give, but the real
need is loyally to the team. Call it enthusiasm, being a sport, college spirit,
if you like. It is thai intangible something thai makes college worth while.
T h a t makes the runner light desperately
for the last inch or the learn throw back
their opponents with its last ounce of
strength when their goal line is threatened. When we get it, we'll have winning teams, better students, an enthusiastic faculty, belter times when we
dance, excursion or sit in the bleachers.
When we get it State will be more U: us
than line buildings. It means putting the
college first and yourself second.
ft
means a little sacrifice many tunes. It
means being present at the games, cneouragin"' strict training, sending that
athlete home at 10 I'. M.
It means
Getting Behind your team, nut in front
of it.
Helen Goldsmith, '21, and Sophia
Rosensweig, '19, are on the faculty of
the Albany High School.
Eta of Alpha Epsilon Phi welcomes
Edyth Sherman, '20, back at State.
Nellie
Fieldman, ex-'23, was the
guest of Alpha Epsilon Phi over the
week-end.
f ?nM
Miss Mabel Talmadgc, '11, was a dinner guest at Psi Gamma Monday evening.
Psi Gamma welcomes Ruth Ellis, '24,
Gamma Chapter, Kappa Delta Rho, into full membership.
welcomes Elmer Stahlman, '25, as a
pledge member.
Katherine Drury, '22, spent Wednesday night at the Delta Omega house.
Gertrude Bussy, '20, was a guest of
the Delta Omega bouse Friday night.
Luncheon or dinner 12:00—1:00
GI L n E r r s
State College
Cafeteria
DE
W A O AT M T E
"WORD M O N G E R S ' W
"CHATTERING BARBERS"
"Word mongers" and "chattering barbers," Gilbert called
those of hts predecessors who asserted that a wound made
bv a magnetized needle was painless, that a magnet will
attract silver, that the diamond will draw iron, that the
magnet thirsts and dies in the absence of iron, that a magnet,
pulverized and taken with pweetened water, will cure
headaches and prevent fat.
Before Gilbert died in 1603, he had done much to explain
magnetism and electricity through experiment. He found
that by hammering iron held in a magnetic meridian it can
be magnetized. He discovered that the compass needle is
controlled by the earth's magnetism and that one magnet
can remagnetize another that has lost its power. He noted
the common electrical attraction of rubbed bodies, among
them diamonds, as well as glass, crystals, and stones, and
was the first to study electricity as a distinct force.
"Not in books, but in things themselves, look for knowledge," he shouted. This man helped to revolutionize methods
of thinking—helped to make electricity what it has become.
His fellow men were little concerned with him and his experiments. ''Will Queen Elizabeth marry—and whom?" they
were asking.
Elizabeth's flirtations mean little td us. Gilbert's method
rr.cans much It is the method that has made modern
electricity what it has become, the method which enabled
the Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company to dis^xwer new electrical principles now applied in
transmitting power for hundreds of miles, in lighting homes
electrically, m aiding physicians with the X-rays, in freeing
civilization from drudgery.
CLUB
-'fbe first meeting of the Chemistry
Club was held Friday. October 6, in
Room
250.
After
discussing
some
business propositions, we were entertained with current topics.
Emily Belding told about a new chemical formula for dentifrice, which, if
used properly, promises to save us many
painful
visits to the dentist.
Billie
I leinemanu considered it her duty to
tell us how to lake care of the rest of
our anatomy.
Rather humorously, but
nevertheless assuredly, she prescribed
the use of colloidal substances fur all
ills.
Mildred Smith explained one of
Fins'c'n's newest theories, which predicts the end of the world much sooner
than we expect.
The first of a series' of Saturday hikes
was conducted by &)r. Douglas Saturday
afternoon, when she. took a party of
biologv students through the wood's in
back of the Country Club. The first part
of the trip was spent examining wayside
plant life, and the last part in a good
swinging walk, which gave even the rain
a pleasurable aspect. Similar walks are
going to he taken every other Saturdayall year fur the benefit of biology majors
and minors and those taking advanced
work in the department.
GAMMA
'ROUND THE COLLEGE [
Meeker and Smith, WHO suffered
minor bruises in scrimmage last week,
are again ready to play.
CHEMISTRY
Page Three
GeneralifElecftric
(j en era I
ly-fo./ H D
Office
C o m p a n y •sthftcmy,if.7.
—
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 12, 1922
Page Foui
BUDGET FOR 1922-1923
Twelve Dollar Tax
In assembly on Friday, October 6, the
following budget was presented and explained by the Finance Board, through
its secretary, Evelyn Dutcher:
Music Association
$650 00
News
1,725 00
Quarterly
800 00
Dramatics
800 00
Myskania
165 00
Handbook
339 54
Treasurer's Bond
25 00
Secretarial Hire
200 00
Infirmary
1,500 00
G. A. A
250 00
Basketball
1,400 00
Baseball
650 00
Football
• 450 00
Minor Sports
50 00
Contingent Fund
75 00
Total
Balance on hand
$9,079 54
142 59
$8,836 95
It was decided by a vote of the student body that the balance on hand
from last year should be applied to the
present budget, thereby decreasing the
grand total.
T h e budget as a whole
was then accented. The tax per student
computed from the final total was $11.78,
btlt, acting upon a suggestion that, as
the $11.78 was an incollectablc amount,
the individual tax be raised to an even
$12, the student body legalized its levy.
Thus the student tax for the year 192223 is $12 per student.
During the remainder of assembly
period we all enjoyed a jolly good sing,
conducted by our college song leader,
Iidna Shafer.
Then we adjourned to
our various meetings.
Seniors are required to sign up for
pictures with Lorey next week.
Class
Presidents, Myskania, Amicron
Nu,
members of the Student Council and
Finance Board must also sign.
Thursday night Dr. Brubacher is
going to give a radio address which will
he broadcasted throughout the Capitol
District.
Hereafter the second-hand book department of the Co-op will be open for
business during the following hours
only:
Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10:0010:50 and 11:45-1:00.
Tuesday, Thursday, 11:00-1:00.
CITIZENSHIP SCHOOL OPENS
TO-DAY
'"Continued from pa:,rc 1)
to the speakers for the afternoon. Governor Miller will open the school with
an address. Professor Risley will talk
upon " The Historical Background of
Citizenship," and M. Synd Hossau, of
India, will cive a " Moslem View of
Western Civilization."
Thursdav night at 8:15 there will he
a second meeting, to which every college
student is ur^ed to come. At this meeting Mrs. Maud Wood Park, the national chairman of the League of
Women Voters, will talk. Mrs. P a r k is
reputed to he the best woman speaker
of the day, and as such will be well
worth going to hear. The New York
State chairman, Mrs. Casper Whitney,
will also speak at this meeting.
Friday morning the school group will
report at the Capitol, to study the various
State departments in operation. Friday
afternoon
Professor
Hutchison
will
speak on the " Recent Changes in Citizenship Laws," and Professor Humphrey
Conserve your vision
INTERCLASS RIVALRY BEGINS
The signal has been given for the
freshman-sophomore contests.
Judging
from past years and from present indications those contests are going to he
rather peppy and cxcilinj.
Everything
can happen on these explosive occasions.
Hair can he nulled till nothing but bobbing can save it. Paint can he artistically or otherwise applied to human
anatomy in a way warranted not to
come off by mere washing. Wearing apparel can lie rent into proverbial shreds
to defy all repair. And dispositions can
be reduced to most undesirable human
attributes. Friends can suddenly develop
into unendurable enemies.
Ciiaos can
be made to rule supreme in '25-'26 combats unless said '25 and '26 cultivate
-;ood sportsmanship to the nth clejree.
Of course, we like to see you disagree
in vocal and physical battles, providing
they arc good-natured. We all want to
see you have " s c r a p s " and penalty days
full of fun—but we want to see them
full of fun, K i v W iolly after-thoughts
and no regrets. Pull, push, paint, scrap
to your heart's content! But keep your
sense of humor and sportsmanship
working overtime all the while!
'24.
Freshman Initiated—Con. from page3
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NEWS
FRANK H. EVORY & CO.
General Printers
36-38 Be«er Street
ALBANY, N. Y.
91 Steps East of Pearl Street
SHIfioai?SfrwHiteB
of Trinity College will discuss " Modcn
Democracy." Friday evening Professo:
Walker will speak on the " Immigratioi
Policy " and M. Mamhcod, of" India
and an Oxford professor, will speal
about " America and the League of Nations."
Saturday noon the school will close
with a luncheon at the Ten Eyck bote'
in honor of Ambassador Henry Morgentb.au, former ambassador to Turkey
Mr. Mbrerentraii will speak on tin
" Eastern Question, America's Responsibility."
This School of Citizenship is an even'
to be taken seriously, especially by all
college students.
It is an unusual opportunity which should he grasped and
annreciatcd.
Have your eyes examined
BERBERICK
OCCASIONS
blue and handkerchiefs were colored beyond recognition. Powder and. hairpins
were produced. After the use of tins
essential luxuries, the frosli class war
ready to enter t i e gym once mere
Dancing continued until eleven, whe
the rival classes were persuaded to separ
ate for a short time.
THE UPTOWN OPTOMETRIST
171 Central Avenue
Phone Weat 37S6-J
Eygla.se.
OSHER'S
ORGANIZATION MEETINGS
Mondays:
First and T h i r d :
Music Association, Room 13, 4:45.
Second and F o u r t h :
French Club, Room 100, 4:00.
Second:
•Mathematics Club, Room 201, 4:20.
'IMisdays:
Each week:
Y. W. C. A., Room B, 3:00.
First and T h i r d :
Joseph Henry Club, Room 150, 7:30.
Wednesdays;
First:
Newman Club, Room 211, 4:00.
Weekly:
Student Association Executive Committee, Room 101, 11:45.
Second and Fourth :
Political Science Club, Room 101,
4:00.
Fridays:
Second and F o u r t h :
Chemistry Club, Chem. Dept, 4:00.
Spanish Club, Room B, 4:00.
Sorority meetings arc held on the second and third Monday evenings of each
month.
Expert Hemstitching, Buttonholes,
Buttons, all kinds of Pleating, Trimmings and Embroidery
2 6 0 Lark Street, Albany, N. Y.
PHONE MAIN 5875
STAHLER
Central Avenue's Leading
Confectionery and Ice
Cream Parlor
A large line of fancy box
chocolates, booklets favors,
etc.
::
::
::
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The
Flavor
Lasts
LAST WT
NOT LEAST
The Gateway Press
QUALITY WINTERS
AT YOUR ELBOW—WEST
336 Central Avenue
2037
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